Report Overview:
Total Clips (62)
Alumni (5)
Alumni; May 4 (2)
Alumni; Theatre and Dance (2)
Athletics (4)
Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
Child Development Center; Educational Technology (Research Center for) (RCET (1)
Computer Science (1)
Geology (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU Museum (1)
LaunchPad (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
May 4 (24)
May 4; Students (3)
Music; Theatre and Dance (2)
Political Science (3)
Students (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Third Frontier (1)
University Press (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (5)
Local artist captures energy of water, spring in paintings 05/06/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...Drumm's. "There's a feeling of spring in the paintings." Seibert said she has known Don and his wife Lisa Drumm for about 50 years. All of them attended Kent State University, where they earned their masters in Fine Arts. "We are glad to have Nancy here," said Lisa Drumm. "We were enjoying the emotion...

Kent State Hosts Second Annual Alumni College 05/07/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is hosting its second annual Alumni College on May 18-19. This fun, educational event provides opportunities to renew friendships...

Local artist captures energy of water, spring in paintings 05/06/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...Drumm's. "There's a feeling of spring in the paintings." Seibert said she has known Don and his wife Lisa Drumm for about 50 years. All of them attended Kent State University, where they earned their masters in Fine Arts. "We are glad to have Nancy here," said Lisa Drumm. "We were enjoying the emotion...

Local artist captures energy of water, spring in paintings 05/06/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...Drumm's. "There's a feeling of spring in the paintings." Seibert said she has known Don and his wife Lisa Drumm for about 50 years. All of them attended Kent State University, where they earned their masters in Fine Arts. "We are glad to have Nancy here," said Lisa Drumm. "We were enjoying the emotion...

Local artist captures energy of water, spring in paintings 05/06/2012 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

...Drumm's. "There's a feeling of spring in the paintings." Seibert said she has known Don and his wife Lisa Drumm for about 50 years. All of them attended Kent State University, where they earned their masters in Fine Arts. "We are glad to have Nancy here," said Lisa Drumm. "We were enjoying the emotion...


Alumni; May 4 (2)
Responses to shootings at KSU collected in book "I will never forget or forgive the first weekend in May. . " 05/04/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

Those words were written by a Kent State University student shortly after May 4, 1970, reacting to the killing of four fellow students when the Ohio National Guard fired on antiwar...

Victim Reflects on 1970 KSU Shootings at Ceremony 05/04/2012 WKBN-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

May 4 is a day of significance for anyone who has ever been a part of Kent State University. It was 42 years ago on May 4 that 13 students were shot by the Ohio National Guard during a riot on the university's campus....


Alumni; Theatre and Dance (2)
What Does a Film Director Do? Profile on Brandon Landers 05/06/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...vocusinstance="0"> Silver Lake res-ident Brandon Landers said he got his start in filmmaking while in college. "I took filmmaking classes while I attended Kent State University," he said. "After getting my B.F.A.in Political Science & Criminal Studies I had private lessons from Rohn Thomas teaching me...

What Does a Film Director Do? Profile on Brandon Landers 05/06/2012 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

...vocusinstance="0"> Silver Lake res-ident Brandon Landers said he got his start in filmmaking while in college. "I took filmmaking classes while I attended Kent State University," he said. "After getting my B.F.A.in Political Science & Criminal Studies I had private lessons from Rohn Thomas teaching me...


Athletics (4)
Marla Ridenour: Determination shines through for former KSU softball walk-on (Linder) 05/07/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

On the Record: May 6 05/07/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball tops Ohio, wins MAC East title (Stricklin) 05/07/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State men's golf wins 4th straight MAC Championship (Page) 05/07/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Ohio 05/04/2012 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

*** Kent State University, Texas A&M University System Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., May 4 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, and Texas A&M...


Child Development Center; Educational Technology (Research Center for) (RCET (1)
Elementary Students Learn STEM with LEGO (Kratcoski) 05/07/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Computer Science (1)
Anita Borg Institute Announces Famous Women in Computer Science List 05/05/2012 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...(Professor, Computer Science Department, University of California at Santa Barbara), Dr. Bob Walker (Professor and Chair, Computer Science Department, Kent State University). "Today and every day, we celebrate the impact that women have on the creation of technology and the positive impact that...


Geology (1)
Can wearing a helmet help you survive a tornado? (Schmidlin) 05/05/2012 WRCB-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

... "It is puzzling because one or two people in a place will be killed while others live, and it often seems to be luck," acknowledges Tom Schmidlin, a Kent State University professor who has studied tornado injuries. Luck does seem to have a lot to do with it, in that one or more factors have...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
OSU president Gee's travel bill tops $800K (Smith) 05/07/2012 Dayton Daily News - Online Text Attachment Email


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSUA holds spring 2012 commencement ceremony 05/05/2012 Star-Beacon Text Email

May 05--ASHTABULA -- A historically significant anniversary for Kent State University was both somber and joyful as students from the Ashtabula campus became the first college graduates in their families. Pulitzer...


KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
Graham to give KSU commencement speech 05/05/2012 Steubenville Herald-Star - Online Text Attachment Email

From staff reports , The Herald-Star SALEM - Jefferson County Commissioner Thomas Graham will give the commencement speech at 7:30 p.m. today at Kent State University East Liverpool Campus. Graham is being welcomed back to his alma mater. He attended KSU East Liverpool in the early 1980s...

Graham to give KSU commencement speech 05/04/2012 Weirton Daily Times - Online, The Text Attachment Email

SALEM - Jefferson County Commissioner Thomas Graham will give the commencement speech at 7:30 p.m. today at Kent State University East Liverpool Campus. Graham is being welcomed back to his alma mater. He attended KSU East Liverpool in the early 1980s...


KSU at Geauga (1)
Kent State University students prepare for future in medical industry 05/04/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

SENIOR NURSING STUDENTS AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S GEAUGA CAMPUS HAVE BEEN WORKING DILIGENTLY OVER THE LAST FEW YEARS TO PREPARE FOR A CAREER IN PROFESSIONAL NURSING. AS THEY...


KSU Museum (1)
Community Guide information due May 21 05/07/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Museum explores the impact of the Civil War on the home front (WITH VIDEOS) The Kent State University Museum explores...


LaunchPad (1)
LCCC doles out degrees to 1,245 students, touts new program for creating businesses 05/06/2012 Chronicle-Telegram - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...developed by the University of Miami. LCCC's regional partners for Blackstone LaunchPad are Baldwin-Wallace College, Case Western Reserve University and Kent State University. “Lorain County Community College is one of the most inventive and active community colleges when it comes to equipping innovators...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
6th annual Ohioana Book Festival set May 12 05/07/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


May 4 (24)
Crowd gathers at KSU to reflect on shootings that killed 4, injured 9 05/07/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

PHOTOS: May 4 Candlelight Vigil 05/07/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

VIDEOS: 42nd Commemoration of May 4, 1970 Shootings 05/07/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

7 wounded at Kent St. want questions answered 05/04/2012 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio (AP) -- Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was...

42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers 05/04/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT -- Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given. ...

7 hurt in Kent State shootings want answers 05/04/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was given....

VIDEO: KSU Shooting Survivor: We Need Other Side of the Story (Lewis) 05/07/2012 Fox 8 News at 10 PM - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

COLUMBUS MILEPOSTS: May 6, 1970 Riots force closure of Ohio State's campus 05/06/2012 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...since mid-April. In early May, riots raged on more than 100 U.S. campuses, as students protested the escalation of the Vietnam War into Cambodia. At Kent State University, an ROTC building was torched. On May 3, Rhodes called the demonstrators "the worst type of people we harbor in America" and...

Activism urged as shooting recalled 05/05/2012 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — At 12:24 p.m. yesterday, the Victory Bell on the Kent State University Commons pealed 15 times. Once each for Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, William Schroeder and Sandra Scheuer, who died not...

42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers 05/04/2012 RoadRunner Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio (AP) — Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given. ...

Kent State survivors want tape re-analyzed 05/05/2012 USA Today - Online Text Attachment Email

Four people wounded in the 1970 National Guard shootings at Kent State University have asked for a federal investigation centered on a digitally enhanced audio recording of the confrontation. Four students...

42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers 05/07/2012 Google News Text Attachment Email

7 Hurt at Kent St. in 1970 Shooting Want Answers 05/04/2012 ABC News - Online Text Attachment Email

Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was...

42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers 05/04/2012 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

(05-04) 14:47 PDT Kent, Ohio (AP) -- Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given. ...

7 hurt at Kent St. in 1970 shooting want answers 05/04/2012 Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was...

42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers 05/04/2012 Associated Press (AP) - Online (United States) Text Email

KENT, Ohio_Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given. ...

Kent State 42 years later 05/06/2012 Bangor Daily News Text Attachment Email

By The Times Leader, Martins Ferry, Ohio Posted May 06, 2012, at 8:11 p.m. The United States Justice Department has opted not to reopen the 1970 Kent State shooting investigation. Four-plus decades have come and gone, so we agree with that decision. The Justice Department based its decision...

It's good Kent State shooting investigation isn't being reopened 05/04/2012 Newark Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

The U.S. Justice Department has opted not to reopen the 1970 Kent State shooting investigation. Four-plus decades have come and gone, so we agree with that decision. The Justice Department based its decision...

42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers 05/05/2012 U.S. News & World Report Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio (AP) — Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given. ...

7 hurt at Kent St. in 1970 shooting want answers 05/04/2012 Miami Herald - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was...

It's good Kent State shooting investigation isn't being reopened 05/04/2012 Times Recorder - Online Text Attachment Email

The U.S. Justice Department has opted not to reopen the 1970 Kent State shooting investigation. Four-plus decades have come and gone, so we agree with that decision. The Justice Department based its decision...

It's good Kent State shooting investigation isn't being reopened 05/04/2012 Chillicothe Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

The U.S. Justice Department has opted not to reopen the 1970 Kent State shooting investigation. Four-plus decades have come and gone, so we agree with that decision. The Justice Department based its decision...

May 4th commemoration at Kent State (Vincent) 05/04/2012 WHLO-AM - Online Text Attachment Email

...commemoration events are an opportunity for students and the community to gather and reflect on the tragedy and adapt the lessons learned to current events. Kent State University markes its 42nd annual May 4, 1970, commemoration today. KSU spokesperson Emily Vincent says the commemoration events are...

7 hurt at Kent St. in 1970 shooting want answers 05/04/2012 Associated Press (AP) Text Email

KENT, Ohio_Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was...


May 4; Students (3)
Kent State remembers victims on 42nd anniversary of May 4 shootings 05/05/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

May 05--KENT -- At 12 --24 p.m. Friday, the Victory Bell on the Kent State University Commons pealed 15 times. Once each for Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, William Schroeder, Sandra Scheuer, who died not far...

Kent State remembers victims on 42nd anniversary of shootings 05/04/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

KENT, Ohio _ At 12:24 p.m. Friday, the Victory Bell on the Kent State University Commons pealed 15 times. Once each for Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, William Schroeder, Sandra Scheuer, who died not far...

42 years later, 7 hurt at Kent State in 1970 National Guard shooting want answers 05/04/2012 New York Daily News - Online Text Attachment Email

Survivors call for hearings to examine new evidence AP FILE--Ohio National Guardsmen patrol the empty Kent State University, Ohio campus after a three-day riot with students in this May 6, 1970 file photo. On May 4, 1970, Ohio National Guardsmen fired...


Music; Theatre and Dance (2)
'See How They Run' dashes onto Weathervane Playhouse stage 05/05/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts,...

'See How They Run' dashes onto Weathervane Playhouse stage 05/05/2012 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts,...


Political Science (3)
7 police departments discuss intelligence-gathering 05/04/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

...office five years ago. It began then to combat gun crimes. The new wrinkle is an intelligence-led policing program, which the University of Akron and Kent State University are helping to facilitate. The departments are from Akron, Canton, Cleveland, Elyria, Lorain, Mansfield, Toledo and Youngstown,...

FBI: Men unknowingly put fake bombs at Ohio bridge (Banks) 05/07/2012 Daily News Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...their clients. Authorities have defended the practice, saying it’s prevented countless terrorist attacks. Christopher Banks, an associate professor at Kent State University who has written on terrorism, defended the tactic as one of many the federal government uses in fighting terrorism. He said...

Cleveland won't renew Occupy group's permit (Banks) 05/04/2012 DVD Text Attachment Email

...signs on banks as a protest against corporate America but said they didn't want to be seen as terrorists. Christopher Banks, an associate professor at Kent State University who has written on terrorism, said Wednesday that anarchists have targeted research and development centers, car dealerships,...


Students (1)
College Grads: Will They Find Jobs? 05/07/2012 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Written by Amani Abraham Rate this item Several thousand degrees were conferred over the weekend at The University of Akron and Kent State University. The next step: Finding a job. The job hunt after college graduation can be tough, but there are signs that graduates are...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Joys host Porthouse 'Adoption Party' (Kent) 05/07/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Third Frontier (1)
Ohio Third Frontier Approves $200,000 in Commercialization Grants to Kent State Researchers (McGimpsey, Hughes) 05/07/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


University Press (2)
ENTERTAINMENT ON THE TENS 05/04/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

...creator of "Funky Winkerbean," talks about the character, his comic strip and the multivolume series, "The Complete Funky Winkerbean," planned through Kent State University Press. The first volume, covering 1972-1974, is available. Noon Saturday, Ground Zero Comics, 13349 Pearl Road, Strongsville....

Do That This Weekend, May 5 and 6 05/05/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Courtesy of Kent State University Tom Batiuk will speak at Ground Zero Comics in Strongsville Saturday. FAMILIES FISHING DAYS No fishing equipment? No problem!...


News Headline: Local artist captures energy of water, spring in paintings | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Artist Nancy Seibert said she knew from a young age that she wanted to be an artist.

"At 6 years old, I decided I wanted to be a painter," said Seibert.

Seibert's abstract work can be seen at the Annual Spring Show at Don Drumm Studios & Gallery through May 26.

Although she lives in Florida part time now, Seibert said she has "deep roots in Northeast Ohio." She attended Cuyahoga Falls High School, lived in Hudson for 15 years and currently lives in Stow.

"It was really fun putting the paintings together," Seibert said of the art on display at Don Drumm's. "There's a feeling of spring in the paintings."

Seibert said she has known Don and his wife Lisa Drumm for about 50 years. All of them attended Kent State University, where they earned their masters in Fine Arts.

"We are glad to have Nancy here," said Lisa Drumm. "We were enjoying the emotion and mystery in [her paintings]."

Seibert said her direction into abstract painting was not something she foresaw in college.

"When I went through undergrad school, I never dreamed I would be an abstract expressionist," she said. "I thought I would be a portrait painter, because I love portraiture."

Her works reflect her experiences both in school and her years out of school, including when she and her husband Darel lived in California and Japan. Seibert said she taught art classes in Japan and studied Japanese calligraphy.

"I love the feeling of landscape water," she said of her work. "I like the powerful wind and waves. It's almost like I took the energy and power of water. Someone told me my works are peaceful, and they are, they are peaceful in a way. But there's power in the work."

Seibert said the pieces at Don Drumm are smaller than most of her works due to space constraints, and that with some of her larger pieces she might use 20 to 30 different kinds of brush.

"There's a physicality to my work," she said. "I usually don't sit down when I paint, I stand and I move around. It's exciting, and it never gets boring that way."

Seibert said her husband Darel, whom she has been married to for 52 years, studied architecture but has created his own art pieces, including wood carving and sculpture.

SHOW INFORMATION

Don Drumm Studios & Gallery is at 437 Crouse Street near the University of Akron campus. Hours are Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Spring Show also features ceramics by Utah artist Johnny Hughes, free-standing glass sculpture by Illinois artist Charlotte Behrens and seasonal jewelry by Michigan's Robin Satterthwaite and Minnesota's Deborah Bushinski.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

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News Headline: Kent State Hosts Second Annual Alumni College | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is hosting its second annual Alumni College on May 18-19. This fun, educational event provides opportunities to renew friendships with fellow alumni, attend stimulating classes on contemporary topics from renowned faculty and experience campus. Register to attend by May 10. Visit www.ksualumni.org/alumnicollege2012 for more information and to RSVP.

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News Headline: Local artist captures energy of water, spring in paintings | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Artist Nancy Seibert said she knew from a young age that she wanted to be an artist.

"At 6 years old, I decided I wanted to be a painter," said Seibert.

Seibert's abstract work can be seen at the Annual Spring Show at Don Drumm Studios & Gallery through May 26.

Although she lives in Florida part time now, Seibert said she has "deep roots in Northeast Ohio." She attended Cuyahoga Falls High School, lived in Hudson for 15 years and currently lives in Stow.

"It was really fun putting the paintings together," Seibert said of the art on display at Don Drumm's. "There's a feeling of spring in the paintings."

Seibert said she has known Don and his wife Lisa Drumm for about 50 years. All of them attended Kent State University, where they earned their masters in Fine Arts.

"We are glad to have Nancy here," said Lisa Drumm. "We were enjoying the emotion and mystery in [her paintings]."

Seibert said her direction into abstract painting was not something she foresaw in college.

"When I went through undergrad school, I never dreamed I would be an abstract expressionist," she said. "I thought I would be a portrait painter, because I love portraiture."

Her works reflect her experiences both in school and her years out of school, including when she and her husband Darel lived in California and Japan. Seibert said she taught art classes in Japan and studied Japanese calligraphy.

"I love the feeling of landscape water," she said of her work. "I like the powerful wind and waves. It's almost like I took the energy and power of water. Someone told me my works are peaceful, and they are, they are peaceful in a way. But there's power in the work."

Seibert said the pieces at Don Drumm are smaller than most of her works due to space constraints, and that with some of her larger pieces she might use 20 to 30 different kinds of brush.

"There's a physicality to my work," she said. "I usually don't sit down when I paint, I stand and I move around. It's exciting, and it never gets boring that way."

Seibert said her husband Darel, whom she has been married to for 52 years, studied architecture but has created his own art pieces, including wood carving and sculpture.

SHOW INFORMATION

Don Drumm Studios & Gallery is at 437 Crouse Street near the University of Akron campus. Hours are Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Spring Show also features ceramics by Utah artist Johnny Hughes, free-standing glass sculpture by Illinois artist Charlotte Behrens and seasonal jewelry by Michigan's Robin Satterthwaite and Minnesota's Deborah Bushinski.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

Return to Top



News Headline: Local artist captures energy of water, spring in paintings | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Artist Nancy Seibert said she knew from a young age that she wanted to be an artist.

"At 6 years old, I decided I wanted to be a painter," said Seibert.

Seibert's abstract work can be seen at the Annual Spring Show at Don Drumm Studios & Gallery through May 26.

Although she lives in Florida part time now, Seibert said she has "deep roots in Northeast Ohio." She attended Cuyahoga Falls High School, lived in Hudson for 15 years and currently lives in Stow.

"It was really fun putting the paintings together," Seibert said of the art on display at Don Drumm's. "There's a feeling of spring in the paintings."

Seibert said she has known Don and his wife Lisa Drumm for about 50 years. All of them attended Kent State University, where they earned their masters in Fine Arts.

"We are glad to have Nancy here," said Lisa Drumm. "We were enjoying the emotion and mystery in [her paintings]."

Seibert said her direction into abstract painting was not something she foresaw in college.

"When I went through undergrad school, I never dreamed I would be an abstract expressionist," she said. "I thought I would be a portrait painter, because I love portraiture."

Her works reflect her experiences both in school and her years out of school, including when she and her husband Darel lived in California and Japan. Seibert said she taught art classes in Japan and studied Japanese calligraphy.

"I love the feeling of landscape water," she said of her work. "I like the powerful wind and waves. It's almost like I took the energy and power of water. Someone told me my works are peaceful, and they are, they are peaceful in a way. But there's power in the work."

Seibert said the pieces at Don Drumm are smaller than most of her works due to space constraints, and that with some of her larger pieces she might use 20 to 30 different kinds of brush.

"There's a physicality to my work," she said. "I usually don't sit down when I paint, I stand and I move around. It's exciting, and it never gets boring that way."

Seibert said her husband Darel, whom she has been married to for 52 years, studied architecture but has created his own art pieces, including wood carving and sculpture.

SHOW INFORMATION

Don Drumm Studios & Gallery is at 437 Crouse Street near the University of Akron campus. Hours are Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Spring Show also features ceramics by Utah artist Johnny Hughes, free-standing glass sculpture by Illinois artist Charlotte Behrens and seasonal jewelry by Michigan's Robin Satterthwaite and Minnesota's Deborah Bushinski.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

Return to Top



News Headline: Local artist captures energy of water, spring in paintings | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Artist Nancy Seibert said she knew from a young age that she wanted to be an artist.

"At 6 years old, I decided I wanted to be a painter," said Seibert.

Seibert's abstract work can be seen at the Annual Spring Show at Don Drumm Studios & Gallery through May 26.

Although she lives in Florida part time now, Seibert said she has "deep roots in Northeast Ohio." She attended Cuyahoga Falls High School, lived in Hudson for 15 years and currently lives in Stow.

"It was really fun putting the paintings together," Seibert said of the art on display at Don Drumm's. "There's a feeling of spring in the paintings."

Seibert said she has known Don and his wife Lisa Drumm for about 50 years. All of them attended Kent State University, where they earned their masters in Fine Arts.

"We are glad to have Nancy here," said Lisa Drumm. "We were enjoying the emotion and mystery in [her paintings]."

Seibert said her direction into abstract painting was not something she foresaw in college.

"When I went through undergrad school, I never dreamed I would be an abstract expressionist," she said. "I thought I would be a portrait painter, because I love portraiture."

Her works reflect her experiences both in school and her years out of school, including when she and her husband Darel lived in California and Japan. Seibert said she taught art classes in Japan and studied Japanese calligraphy.

"I love the feeling of landscape water," she said of her work. "I like the powerful wind and waves. It's almost like I took the energy and power of water. Someone told me my works are peaceful, and they are, they are peaceful in a way. But there's power in the work."

Seibert said the pieces at Don Drumm are smaller than most of her works due to space constraints, and that with some of her larger pieces she might use 20 to 30 different kinds of brush.

"There's a physicality to my work," she said. "I usually don't sit down when I paint, I stand and I move around. It's exciting, and it never gets boring that way."

Seibert said her husband Darel, whom she has been married to for 52 years, studied architecture but has created his own art pieces, including wood carving and sculpture.

SHOW INFORMATION

Don Drumm Studios & Gallery is at 437 Crouse Street near the University of Akron campus. Hours are Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Spring Show also features ceramics by Utah artist Johnny Hughes, free-standing glass sculpture by Illinois artist Charlotte Behrens and seasonal jewelry by Michigan's Robin Satterthwaite and Minnesota's Deborah Bushinski.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

Return to Top



News Headline: Responses to shootings at KSU collected in book "I will never forget or forgive the first weekend in May. . " | Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Farkas, Karen
News OCR Text: Those words were written by a Kent State University student shortly after May 4, 1970, reacting to the killing of four fellow students when the Ohio National Guard fired on antiwar protesters.

Responses to shootings at KSU collected in book "I will never forget or forgive the first weekend in May. . . . I remember thinking that the shots sounded like toy guns. . . . I kept thinking they had to be blanks . . . but as I turned to run, the face of the boy in back of me exploded into flesh and blood."

Equally raw are the feelings expressed in other letters to Barbara Becker Agte following the tragedy. Agte, who was teaching at the university in 1970, has published "Kent Letters, Students' Responses to May 1970 Massacre," a collection of writings from members of her two freshman English classes.

As the university commemorates the 42nd anniversary of the shootings today and prepares to open the May 4 Visitors Center later this year, Agte felt it was time to share what her students felt as the events transpired.

Many of them were classmates of Allison Krause, one of the four students shot and killed. Also killed were William Schroeder, Jeffrey Miller and Sandra Scheuer. Nine others were wounded.

Several of Agte's students were on Blanket Hill shortly after noon when members of the Ohio National Guard opened fire.

Identified in her book only by their initials, students wrote about seeing people die and caring for the injured. They wrote about their disbelief and anger when Guardsmen wheeled and began shooting. Some students blamed their peers for protesting. Some sent poems.

. . . In the night I cry, in the day I laugh

I live so far away it cannot affect me now.

"The letters made me aware of how differently the students thought," Agte, 72, said in a telephone interview from her home in New Mexico. "I was truly saddened by some of the letters. The kids had returned home and had no one to sympathize with them."

She arrived at Kent in 1968 as a doctoral teaching fellow in English. She and her husband, Lloyd, also a teaching fellow, were deeply involved in the antiwar effort in 1970, she said.

On May 4, she had just left a building after a meeting when a student ran by her and said, "They have killed students," she recalled. Students told her that Krause, who was in one of her classes, had been shot.

In the wake of the shootings, the university closed for the year and administrators told faculty to write to their students and tell them what they should do to complete individual classes for a final grade.

Agte told her students that all would receive A's but asked them to send her their thoughts about the May 4 tragedy.

As the 32 responses arrived over the next several months, Agte put them in a large manila envelope and set them aside.

She and her husband left Kent in 1972, returning in 1980 for about a year so he could finish his doctorate.

After they divorced in 1992, she moved to New Mexico. She worked for 14 years with special-education students at the Deming Public Schools, resigning in September of last year..

She said that despite her distance from Ohio, she never forgot May 4 and still breaks down in tears when she talks about the shootings.

She said she maintains contact with Barry Levine, Krause's boyfriend, and Krause's sister, Laurel, as well as with several students who were in her classes at the time.

Agte spoke at the May 4 commemoration at Kent State on behalf of Krause in 1995, at the invitation of the organizers.

But the envelope with the student essays remained unopened in the back of a file drawer until about five years ago, when she got a letter from Kent State's honors college asking for ideas for the May 4 commemoration.

"I thought I'd make up a readers' theater and people could sit in a big circle and read the letters and poems," she said. But officials did not take her up on the offer.

"Since then I have wanted to do something with the letters," she said. "A year ago I had heavy-duty heart repair and while in the hospital I decided that when I got well I would get these out there so other people can see them."

Since she was unable to contact students, she used only their initials in the book, which includes photocopies of the letters. It was recently published by a friend who owns a publishing company, Bluwaters Press.

She has sent a book to those organizing the new May 4 Visitors Center and hopes to attend the opening in the fall.

She said a friend asked her if publishing the letters provided some sort of closure.

Her voice breaking, Agte said, "I told her, 'It never goes away.' "

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: kfarkas@plaind.com, 216-999-5079

Copyright © 2012 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Victim Reflects on 1970 KSU Shootings at Ceremony | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKBN-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: May 4 is a day of significance for anyone who has ever been a part of Kent State University.

It was 42 years ago on May 4 that 13 students were shot by the Ohio National Guard during a riot on the university's campus.

Every year, the May 4th Task Force, a student organization, organizes a special commemorative ceremony to honor the victims.

Those victims include Howard Ives of Pittsburgh, who attended the school from 1967 through 1973.

"I was here, I saw everything," said Ives. "I stood there looking at the guardsmen as they were kneeling and aiming their rifles at us, not believing that they would possibly ever shoot. When the dust cleared and everybody started getting up, we saw that not everybody was getting up, and people were still lying there."

Ives said he will never forget that day, no matter how bad the memories are.

"I try to come back if I can every year because if people like me don't come back, who is going to be here," said Ives. "Probably without knowing what post traumatic stress disorder was back then, I probably had that for a period of time."

Forty-two years later, the Kent State community is still looking for answers as to why the National Guard did open fire that day, killing four students and wounding four more. It's especially meaningful to those that were there that day and witnessed what happened.

"I'm not interested in someone going to jail or getting in trouble for what happened 42 years ago," said Ives. "I just want to know why it happened."

Four students, including one from Boardman, were killed when the Ohio National Guard opened fire during a Vietnam War protest.

"We want to correlate with the National Guard members that were here and just figure out what happened, why things went wrong, and not put blame on anyone, but just get an understanding," said Ashton Potter, vice president of the May 4th Task Force.

Friday's commemorative ceremony featured speakers on behalf of the students killed, reminding those in attendance that their deaths should not be in vain.

"It's important for reflection and for true appreciation for the sacrifice that was made here 42 years ago," said speaker Elizabeth Vild.

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News Headline: What Does a Film Director Do? Profile on Brandon Landers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name: Brandon Landers
News OCR Text: " onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0">

Silver Lake res-ident Brandon Landers said he got his start in filmmaking while in college.

"I took filmmaking classes while I attended Kent State University," he said. "After getting my B.F.A.in Political Science & Criminal Studies I had private lessons from Rohn Thomas teaching me filmmaking for the motion picture. I attended multiple interactive classroom style filmmaking sessions. I've studied from over 135 books on filmmaking and film producing in the process that was highly recommended."

Landers said he has been in filmmaking for five years, and has directed, produced and acted in several films, as well as being a screenwriter.

"I am a Public Talent Representation Executive at International Management Group (IMG)," he said of his day job. "However I consider filmmaking to be a job and a half, ha ha ha."

How would you define your job?

I am involved in any writing, financing and editing of a film, as well as the responsibility for working closely with the cast and crew to shape the film. I handle business and legal issues. One of my biggest responsibilities I have is overseeing creative aspects of a film. I take part in hiring the cast and key crew members.

What is one aspect about your job that many people might not know?

I think that one aspect of this industry that many people don't know is how much work actually goes into making a film.

What is your most impressive career moment so far?

My most impressive moment so far was when, at the premier for my film, The Ridges, The National Film Council presented me with the 2011 award for Best Director. Being that this was the first film that I directed, I was so surprised and honored.

What kind of training do you need to do this job?

I would suggest formal education such as film school. It allows for a more rounded understanding of techniques, artistic approaches, and offers the opportunity to gain from the knowledge and experience of professional instructors who work in, or who have worked in, the industry. A great benefit of film school is the opportunities available to students to work as an intern for filmmakers or in related businesses, such as post-production editing.

What do you find most rewarding?

The thing I find the most rewarding by far is when I see people truly enjoying the film that I made. I put so much hard work into my film. By the time it is finished, my blood, sweat, and tears have gone into making this film absolutely perfect. I feel like it is a part of me. So when I see and hear about people loving the film that I lived and breathed, that is the best feeling.

What would your dream come true be, in regards to this job?

My dream come true would be to be the first African-American to win an Academy Award for Best Director and Best Picture.

What are some projects you are working on currently?

Currently I am Executive producing the films Benaniah and City of Lost souls with Randy Clark& REEL ONE Films. I'm doing Pre-Production with Leonard Brown of PBS/TLC Channel for the 1876 Ashtabula Train accident project. I just finished work on SuperHero 101 with Bryan Pixler of Pixler Perfect Productions. I am also getting the best help and advice from my mentor Robert Banks of New Bridge Center for Art and Technology in Cleveland about putting the final touches on my follow-up scripts with Amazon Studios.

Critically hailed as an instant classic, The Ridges is the one psychological thriller DVD to own that plays on your most primal fears, and guarantees you'll need to sleep with the lights on.

The Ridges: Special Edition is available exclusively at Amazon.com.

Other details

Landers said one of the most challenging aspects of his career "was dealing with people when it came to locations."

"I would think we had a location locked in and at the last minute, I would have to find a new one because the person in charge of the location backed out," he said. "Then I had to work twice as hard and twice as fast to find a new one. A second challenge was working around the schedules of the cast and crew. To deal with this, we would film very late nights and on the weekends."

The biggest challenge?

"Losing over six hours of footage, some of which I thought were the best scenes," he said. "I ended up working with the footage I had and moving the story around to fit in with it."

Landers said he "learned a lot about myself during my years in college and afterward."

"I faced challenges that I never thought I would come across and in turn, I have become more confident," he said. "I am sure that my passion and talent in filmmaking in combination with my confidence as an artist will enable me to be successful in the film world.

Landers said one thing that changed for him was his lack of belief in the supernatural while working on "The Ridges."

"I wanted everything to be authentic for The Ridges, so I filmed the asylum scenes in places that are rumored to actually be haunted," he said. "Before this, I was a non-believer of ghosts. I was shocked when I realized that we had real evidence of the paranormal on our film! There are two very clear voices we found in the footage as well as numerous other eerie noises."

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News Headline: What Does a Film Director Do? Profile on Brandon Landers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name: Brandon Landers
News OCR Text: " onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0">

Silver Lake res-ident Brandon Landers said he got his start in filmmaking while in college.

"I took filmmaking classes while I attended Kent State University," he said. "After getting my B.F.A.in Political Science & Criminal Studies I had private lessons from Rohn Thomas teaching me filmmaking for the motion picture. I attended multiple interactive classroom style filmmaking sessions. I've studied from over 135 books on filmmaking and film producing in the process that was highly recommended."

Landers said he has been in filmmaking for five years, and has directed, produced and acted in several films, as well as being a screenwriter.

"I am a Public Talent Representation Executive at International Management Group (IMG)," he said of his day job. "However I consider filmmaking to be a job and a half, ha ha ha."

How would you define your job?

I am involved in any writing, financing and editing of a film, as well as the responsibility for working closely with the cast and crew to shape the film. I handle business and legal issues. One of my biggest responsibilities I have is overseeing creative aspects of a film. I take part in hiring the cast and key crew members.

What is one aspect about your job that many people might not know?

I think that one aspect of this industry that many people don't know is how much work actually goes into making a film.

What is your most impressive career moment so far?

My most impressive moment so far was when, at the premier for my film, The Ridges, The National Film Council presented me with the 2011 award for Best Director. Being that this was the first film that I directed, I was so surprised and honored.

What kind of training do you need to do this job?

I would suggest formal education such as film school. It allows for a more rounded understanding of techniques, artistic approaches, and offers the opportunity to gain from the knowledge and experience of professional instructors who work in, or who have worked in, the industry. A great benefit of film school is the opportunities available to students to work as an intern for filmmakers or in related businesses, such as post-production editing.

What do you find most rewarding?

The thing I find the most rewarding by far is when I see people truly enjoying the film that I made. I put so much hard work into my film. By the time it is finished, my blood, sweat, and tears have gone into making this film absolutely perfect. I feel like it is a part of me. So when I see and hear about people loving the film that I lived and breathed, that is the best feeling.

What would your dream come true be, in regards to this job?

My dream come true would be to be the first African-American to win an Academy Award for Best Director and Best Picture.

What are some projects you are working on currently?

Currently I am Executive producing the films Benaniah and City of Lost souls with Randy Clark& REEL ONE Films. I'm doing Pre-Production with Leonard Brown of PBS/TLC Channel for the 1876 Ashtabula Train accident project. I just finished work on SuperHero 101 with Bryan Pixler of Pixler Perfect Productions. I am also getting the best help and advice from my mentor Robert Banks of New Bridge Center for Art and Technology in Cleveland about putting the final touches on my follow-up scripts with Amazon Studios.

Critically hailed as an instant classic, The Ridges is the one psychological thriller DVD to own that plays on your most primal fears, and guarantees you'll need to sleep with the lights on.

The Ridges: Special Edition is available exclusively at Amazon.com.

Other details

Landers said one of the most challenging aspects of his career "was dealing with people when it came to locations."

"I would think we had a location locked in and at the last minute, I would have to find a new one because the person in charge of the location backed out," he said. "Then I had to work twice as hard and twice as fast to find a new one. A second challenge was working around the schedules of the cast and crew. To deal with this, we would film very late nights and on the weekends."

The biggest challenge?

"Losing over six hours of footage, some of which I thought were the best scenes," he said. "I ended up working with the footage I had and moving the story around to fit in with it."

Landers said he "learned a lot about myself during my years in college and afterward."

"I faced challenges that I never thought I would come across and in turn, I have become more confident," he said. "I am sure that my passion and talent in filmmaking in combination with my confidence as an artist will enable me to be successful in the film world.

Landers said one thing that changed for him was his lack of belief in the supernatural while working on "The Ridges."

"I wanted everything to be authentic for The Ridges, so I filmed the asylum scenes in places that are rumored to actually be haunted," he said. "Before this, I was a non-believer of ghosts. I was shocked when I realized that we had real evidence of the paranormal on our film! There are two very clear voices we found in the footage as well as numerous other eerie noises."

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News Headline: Marla Ridenour: Determination shines through for former KSU softball walk-on (Linder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: For her first three years at Kent State, Shannon Laughlin was a walk-on who made it, sort of.

If you call being a redshirt freshman bullpen catcher who couldn't go on road trips making it.

If you call spending two years on the softball team without financial assistance and playing any position that had an opening making it.

But Laughlin, a four-year starting catcher at Fairview High School, remained undaunted, even by shoulder surgery after her sophomore year at KSU. She went into the operating room thinking she needed a minor procedure for tendinitis that would keep her out four weeks. When she awoke from anesthesia, she was told she had a torn labrum and was facing nine months of rehab.

Even now, Laughlin, a 23-year-old senior from Fairview Park, doesn't know what caused the injury.

“Might have been the bullpen stuff,” she whispered.

But Laughlin's determination through that drudgery was eventually rewarded. In 2011, she earned the starting job at first base, a position she hasn't surrendered, and a scholarship. A left-handed hitter with power, she has climbed from hitting eighth in the order to batting cleanup.

On April 24, she was named Mid-American Conference East Division player of the week. Going into a regular season-ending trip to Ohio today and Sunday, she was hitting .324 (12-for-37) in her past 11 games with four doubles, one home run, nine RBI and seven runs scored.

As the Golden Flashes (26-26, 11-9) battle for the fourth seed and a first-round bye in the MAC Tournament that runs Wednesday through Saturday at Firestone Stadium, Laughlin was hitting .250 (36-for-147) with 13 doubles, four home runs and 23 RBI, .281 (18-for-64) in conference play.

And she's finishing her career in grueling fashion, becoming the first player in coach Karen Linder's 16 years at Kent State to do her student teaching in the spring. Linder said Laughlin got up at 5:30 a.m. to make it to Kent Roosevelt High School, then rushed to practice after school was out.

“To go from just showing up at a tryout and sticking with it for the last five years is just incredible,” Linder said of Laughlin Tuesday.

Laughlin knows some of her struggles were of her own doing. Her high school grades weren't very good, so she couldn't get a scholarship. She had offers to play at smaller schools, but the tuition was higher and her family's finances were limited.

“Shannon struggled in high school,” said Jo Ann Allen, the former Fairview softball coach who retired after 28 years after Laughlin's senior season. “I made a couple phone calls and they'd say, ‘What's the grade situation?' Once they'd hear that, it's ‘There's not much we can do.' I felt terrible. Talent-wise she was probably one of the most deserving kids I'd ever coached.”

Once she was accepted by Kent State, Laughlin decided to try out for softball. Linder knew nothing about her but coveted catchers and said she kept her because Laughlin had “a pretty good bat and a strong arm.” But early that spring, when the Golden Flashes were on their way to a 46-win season and MAC regular-season and tournament titles, Linder knew she wouldn't be able to play Laughlin. She asked her to be the only freshman she has redshirted without an injury issue.

In an interview before weightlifting Tuesday at the M.A.C. Center, Laughlin admitted how she felt when the pitchers she was warming up kept running onto the field and she couldn't.

“It was awful. It was rough. It wasn't easy,” she said. “There were a lot of phone calls home wondering if I was going to make it or if I wanted to make it.”

But Laughlin's parents, divorced when she was 9, and her two older brothers reassured her. Her teammates kept her spirits up.

“That made it easier. I couldn't imagine not spending every day with them once I had for six months,” she said.

She could have quit when learning she needed surgery, but Laughlin looked at it differently.

“I felt that was a new starting point,” she said. “I thought when I came back and Coach saw how hard I worked off of that, I would get a shot that way.”

When she returned, she was still an athlete without a position. Her brother Darrin kept telling her all she needed was one shot, so Laughlin asked if she could play some outfield. She got in 11 games in 2009, seven in 2010, with only one start each season.

“I always had a lot of confidence in myself,” Laughlin said. “Last year when we moved to first base, honestly that was the one I was like, ‘I'm not going to play.' I figured, ‘This is just another spot to put Shannon.' ”

Linder planned to have Laughlin split the job the first weekend of the season, but Laughlin was so productive in her at-bats she virtually said, “I'm the one, you've got to play me.”

Since then, Linder said Laughlin has also asserted herself as a vocal leader who isn't afraid to tell a teammate she's not doing her job. Laughlin said growing up with brothers Darrin, 29, and Doug, 27, helped her to develop that personality.

“There were a lot of fights, yeah,” she said of her brothers. “I used to be a hot-head, so I think I've calmed down a lot.

“I've always been brought up, sort of a put-up or shut-up type of thing. I haven't been one to sit there and whine and dwell or make excuses, so I don't really accept them, I guess.”

That personality might serve her well as a teacher. Graduated and certified for grades seven through 12, Laughlin said she wants to work at a detention center or correctional facility. She might move to North Carolina, where an aunt and a former Kent State trainer live.

“I think I do well with more challenging youth, the ones who aren't expected to do well or don't want to do well,” she said. “I like the fact after I'm finished working with those students I actually feel like I did something.

“I was one of them in a way. I didn't make the best decisions as a kid. I got in trouble more than I should have. I didn't surround myself with the best people. A lot of them come from broken homes. My parents were divorced and my dad got remarried. We haven't always gotten along and I have stepsisters I don't get along with. I think I connect with those kids more.”

She marvels at the next challenge Laughlin wants to take on, but Linder said watching Laughlin succeed is “so gratifying.”

“That's one of the reasons I enjoy coaching, to see these kinds of stories where a kid walks on and pays their dues and puts the team first and keeps at it just for the love of the game,” Linder said.

Allen shares that sentiment.

“The determination she had, this is something she did on her own and I can't tell you how proud I am of her,” Allen said. “This is a perfect example of perseverance paying off.”

Marla Ridenour can be reached at mridenour@thebeaconjournal.com. Read her blog at http://www.ohio.com/marla. Follow her on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/MRidenourABJ and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/sports.abj

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News Headline: On the Record: May 6 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 18th-ranked Kent State men's golf team won the MAC championship, taking its fourth straight and 20th overall league title by blitzing the field with a 40-shot, 54-hole victory. Storms canceled the final round of the 66th annual championship on Sunday afternoon.

“Just a remarkable performance by our guys all week,” said Herb Page, Kent State director of golf and head coach.

The Golden Flashes were 9-under 855 (283-281-291) for a 54-hole team score.

Before play was canceled for good, the University Akron climbed five spots to third place at 2- under with players on holes 12-15, the second-lowest round of the day to that point.

Akron finished with a score of 906 and tied with Bowling Green.

Charlie Bull earned first-team All-MAC honors and tied for fourth place with a score of 1-over 217.

Senior Scott Landreth was the recipient of the Earl Yestingsmeier Sportsmanship Award, concluding his Akron career in 30th place (231).

Ryan Mason finished tied for 16th place with a score of 225.

Softball

The University of Akron finished on a positive note by defeating Buffalo 5-2 on Sunday at Lee Jackson Field.

The Zips (24-29-1, 8-14) finished the season on a four-game winning streak after sweeping the Bulls and Kent State this weekend.

Alissa Birkhimer finished the game 2-for-3 with a home run and two RBI. Rachel Ratcliffe had two hits and an RBI.

Brittany Maurer (19-22) earned her third victory of the weekend, allowing two runs on six hits, striking out six and walking four in a complete game effort.

Seniors Andrea Arney, Allison Dorr, Alex Helfrich, Crystal Hernandez and Amanda Ricker played their final game in a Zip uniform.

Baseball

Kent State completed a sweep at Ohio with a 13-4 win Sunday afternoon.

Catcher David Lyon had three hits, including two doubles, walked twice and drove in four runs to lead the 20-hit Golden Flashes attack. First baseman George Roberts also drove in four runs with three hits, including a home run.

Third baseman Sawyer Polen had three hits, a run and two RBI. Center fielder Evan Campbell had three hits, scored three times and drove in a run.

The win went to Tyler Skulina (7-2), who pitched 6⅓ innings, giving up two runs, six hits and a lone walk and striking out nine, with Eric Dorsch, Dan Slavik and Casey Wilson mopping up.

Late Saturday, the Golden Flashes defeated the Bobcats 8-1 as Bick Hamilton and Alex Miklos had two hits and three RBI. Starter Ryan Bores (6-2) got the win and Josh Pierce picked up his first save.

• The University of Akron baseball team lost at Miami 4-3. Senior Sam Watkins had a pair of hits for Akron (17-30, 10-11), while senior Dan Burant and sophomore Brandon Winter both tallied an RBI.

Starter Alex Loftin (3-2) allowed four runs over 5⅔ innings in a losing effort on the hill. Senior Scott Foster tossed 2⅓ innings of scoreless relief.

More softball

Kent State's recent struggles continued Sunday in a 6-0 loss at Ohio to close the regular season.

The Golden Flashes (26-28, 11-11) will open the MAC Championships on Wednesday against Central Michigan at 1:30 p.m. at Firestone Stadium.

The winner takes on Bowling Green later that night, while the loser plays in an elimination game at 11 a.m. Thursday

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News Headline: Kent State baseball tops Ohio, wins MAC East title (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ATHENS, Ohio — Senior shortstop Jimmy Rider became the Mid-American Conference's new all-time hits king and helped the Kent State baseball team win the East Division title and complete a weekend series sweep of Ohio with a decisive 13-4 triumph Sunday at Bob Wren Stadium.

The Golden Flashes (30-17, 18-3 MAC) won their sixth MAC series of the 2012 season in seven tries and earned their fifth straight conference series sweep and second straight thanks to their three victories over the Bobcats (23-24, 12-9 MAC).

The Flashes weathered a lightning suspension that pushed their Friday series opener into Saturday to post a 4-1 win over Ohio, then followed it up with an 8-1 triumph in game two. Kent State has won 22 of its last 29 games – including 11 of their last 13 and six in a row.

The weekend series win allowed Kent State to maintain its hold on first place in the race for the conference's regular season championship and number one seed in the 2012 MAC Tournament, which will be held May 23-26 all All-Pro Freight Stadium in Avon, Ohio. Kent State could clinch the MAC's regular season title with a win over rival Miami next Friday coupled with a Toledo loss at Bowling Green. Kent State has won at least 30 games 25 times in the last 30 years — including 14 years in a row and all eight seasons under eighth-year head coach Scott Stricklin's watch.

“I don't think many people thought we'd win a championship this year and picked against us,” said Stricklin. “It says a lot about our players to take the doubts personal and work hard. To be up six games in the conference with six conference games to play is unbelievable.”

Rider collected his 319th hit with a single to right field in the top of the first inning to surpass Scott Simon (2003-04, 06-07) of Northern Illinois for the conference's career hits record. He finished the contest with a double and two singles to up his career total to 321 and helped Kent State pound out 13 runs on 20 hits, marking the second time this season the Flashes have tallied at least 20 hits.

He was one of six Golden Flashes to record a multi-hit game. Junior center fielder Evan Campbell posted a double and two singles to go along with an RBI and three runs scored for his team-leading 24th multi-hit game of the season. Senior catcher David Lyon added two doubles and a single, drove in four runs and scored another. Junior first baseman George Roberts finished a triple shy of hitting for the cycle and drove in four runs.

Freshman third baseman Sawyer Polen tallied three base hits, added two RBIs and scored a run while sophomore right fielder T.J. Sutton collected two singles and scored a run. Polen finished the three-game sat batting a team-best .571 with a team-high eight hits.

“What Jimmy Rider has been able to accomplishment is amazing,” said Stricklin. “When you think of the thousands of players who have come through the MAC, for him to stand alone at the top is special. Today, everybody stepped up. We had a lot of good at-bats, one through nine.”

Sophomore right-handed starting pitcher Tyler Skulina was dominant on the mound for a third straight weekend. He earned his team-high seventh pitching victory of the season, improving to 7-2 thanks to nine strikeouts over 61/3 innings. He surrendered two earned runs on six hits and a walk. Over his last three starts, Skulina has piled up a team-high 25 strikeouts against the

“I'm proud of Tyler and our whole pitching staff,” said Stricklin. “If we pitch and play defense like we did this weekend, we can go a long way.”

Kent State put its first run on the scoreboard in the top of the first. Campbell led off the frame with a base hit to right, and Rider followed with his record-breaking hit to right. Lyon followed by coaxing a walk to load the bases. Roberts hit into a 4-6-3 double play, but Campbell was able to scamper home to make it 1-0.

After Lyon threw out Ohio senior center fielder Ethan Newton and Skulina posted two strikeouts to get out of the home half of the first, the Golden Flashes increased their lead to 2-0 in the ensuing frame. Freshman left fielder Alex Miklos legged out a one-out base hit to short, then advanced second when Ohio junior right-handed starting pitcher Seth Streich's pickoff attempt to first base missed its mark. Polen drove Miklos home with a single down the left field line.

The Flashes tacked on three more to their lead in the top of the fifth. Polen got things rolling with a single to right, then moved up 90 feet on an infield base hit by sophomore second baseman Derek Toadvine. Campbell drove in Polen with Kent State's third straight base hit. Toadvine made it a four-run affair when he scampered home on a wild pitch. After Rider drew a walk, Lyon smacked a single to right to score Campbell and make it 5-0 in favor of the Golden Flashes.

The top of the seventh saw Kent State add four more runs. Campbell started it with a leadoff double down the right field line. Lyon received an intentional walk from Streich, setting the table for a three-run blast over the right field wall by Roberts – his team-leading sixth home run of the 2012 season. Sophomore left-handed relief pitcher Sean Kennedy entered the game to replace Streich, but fifth-year senior pinch hitter Joe Koch responded with a base hit through the left side. Polen followed with a single to center to score Koch and make it 9-0.

Kent State hosts rival Miami Friday at Olga A. Mural Field at Schoonover Stadium. First pitch is scheduled for 3 p.m.

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News Headline: Kent State men's golf wins 4th straight MAC Championship (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SUGAR GROVE, Ill. — Lighting and rain were the only things that slowed the 18th ranked Kent State men's golf team at the Mid-American Conference Championship this weekend. The Golden Flashes claimed their fourth straight and 20th overall league title by blitzing the field with a 40-shot, 54-hole victory after storms canceled the final round the 66th annual championship on Sunday afternoon.

“Just a remarkable performance by our guys all week,” said Kent State Director of Golf/Head Coach Herb Page. “Rich Harvest is a challenging golf course and our guys did a tremendous job of limiting their mistakes and staying focused to the task at hand.”

With the final round at Rich Harvest Farms flashed out, Kent State officially ends the Championship with a nine-under, 855 (283-281-291) 54-hole team score. The 2012 Golden Flashes' 40-shot margin of victory enters the MAC record book as the fourth largest in tournament history falling behind Ohio's 44 in 1960, Kent State's 41 in 1995 and Ohio's 41 in 1963.

Kent State had extend the lead to as many as 50 on Sunday, as the teams completed half the round before the cancelation wiped out all the scoring for the fourth round.

Sophomore Corey Conners was awarded individual medalist honors after topping the field with a seven-under, 209 (70-67-72) on par 72, 6978-yard.

The victory is the first collegiate win for the Kent State sophomore who also became the fourth straight and 21 individual in program history to win the MAC Championship.

Finishing runner-up to Conners was junior Kevin Miller who shot five-under 211 (70-69-72). 2011 MAC medalist, senior Mackenzie Hughes gave Kent State three of the top five finishers after ending in a tie for fourth at one-over 217 (72-71-74). Hughes becomes the first MAC player since 2001 to play for four consecutive championship teams when the Golden Flashes' Jon Mills and Danny Sahl did so from 1997-01.

Picking up his team best sixth top 10 finish of the year was sophomore Taylor Pendrith (Richmond Hill, Ontario) who tied for 8th at four-over 220 (71-74-75). Sophomore Kyle Kmiecik (Avon, Ohio) was having the Golden Flashes' best round on Sunday before the lighting came.

Already three-under on the day after a birdie chip in on No. 10, Kmiecik was putting for eagle on No. 11 when the horn sounded to clear the course.

His Sunday round had gained him 10 places on the field, but due to the cancelation he settled in a tie for 21st at 11-over, 227 (76-78-73).

Kent State's 855 was followed in the team standings by Eastern Michigan (895), Ohio (896), Ball State (899), Miami (900), Toledo (903), Northern Illinois (905) along with Akron (906) and Bowling Green (906).

2012 marks the first time since 2004 at the Medallion Club in Westerville, Ohio the MAC Championship was completed in less than 72 holes. Since the tournament went to 54 holes in 1972 its only the fourth time only 54 holes have been played.

Kent State's destination site for the 2012 NCAA Regional will be announced on Monday, May 7 at 9:00 pm EST.

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News Headline: U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: *** Kent State University, Texas A&M University System Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., May 4 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, and Texas A&M University System, College Station, Texas, have been assigned a patent (8,169,680) developed by Hanbin Mao, Kent, Ohio, Paul Luchette, Kent, Ohio, and David E. Bergbreiter, College Station, Texas, for "polymers responsive to radiation pressures." The abstract of the patent published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office states: "Polymers that undergo a reversible phase change in response to being exposed to a light from a laser having a radiation pressure greater than a threshold level. The phase changeable polymers have the ability to reduce the intensity of the laser and can advantageously scatter laser light incident on the polymers. The on-off response of such polymers is in the microsecond range and the light scattering property is independent of laser wavelength. The polymers can beneficially be incorporated into devices to protect human vision and optical instruments that are vulnerable to lasers at high intensities. Methods for making and using such devices are also disclosed." The patent application was filed on Sept. 19, 2007 (11/901,916). The full-text of the patent can be found at http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=8,169,680&OS=8,169,680&RS=8,169,680 Written by Arpi Sharma; edited by Anand Kumar.

For more information about Targeted News Service products and services, please contact: Myron Struck, editor, Targeted News Service LLC, Springfield, Va., 703/304-1897; editor@targetednews.com; http://targetednews.com.

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News Headline: Elementary Students Learn STEM with LEGO (Kratcoski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Summer camps at Kent State use childhood toy to teach students robotics

Knowing that young children are natural engineers, fascinated with how things work and with building and taking things apart, led the Research Center for Educational Technology (RCET) staff at Kent State University to adopt the LEGO® WeDo™ Robotics system to help promote elementary content standards for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning.

The project, funded by the Martha Holden Jennings Foundation in Cleveland, helps support local K-5 th grade teachers to design curriculum that utilizes the robotics system to introduce young children to the engineering design process. The WeDo™ set contains blocks, working motors and sensors, and a computer software program to run constructed models, which can range from dancing birds to a hungry alligator to a soccer goal kicker.

To date, four local schools have participated in the STEM learning project, including Kent State's Child Development Center (Kindergarten), Akron Public Schools (4th and 5th grades), Kent City Schools (1st and 3rd grades) and Stow-Munroe Falls City Schools (1st grade).

“The outcome of this project will provide much needed classroom-tested examples of how a variety of educational technologies can effectively create opportunities for deep learning of STEM content, and equally as important, how such tools can be used to build children's capacity for using critical thinking
and problem solving skills within the context of rigorous content,” said Annette Kratcoski, RCET's educational researcher.

RCET will run a LEGO® WeDo™ camp for children in 3rd, 4th and 5th grades from July 10-13. To learn more about this camp and other RCET camps for elementary students, such as digital storytelling, video production and game development, contact Mary Stith at 330-672-5995 or mstith@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Anita Borg Institute Announces Famous Women in Computer Science List | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology announced today the publication of its Famous Women in Computer Science List. The list highlights over fifty women who have positively impacted the creation of technology, many of whom have received awards and recognition for their contributions to technology. This resource was designed to highlight the importance of submitting women as well as men for awards for outstanding work. The list was created by members of the Anita Borg Institute's Advisory Board Awards Committee. The committee includes Katy Dickinson (Director, Huawei Technologies), Fran Allen (IBM Emerita and 2006 Turing Award Winner), Chandra Krintz (Professor, Computer Science Department, University of California at Santa Barbara), Dr. Bob Walker (Professor and Chair, Computer Science Department, Kent State University).

"Today and every day, we celebrate the impact that women have on the creation of technology and the positive impact that technology has on the world. The women on this list have all changed our world through their work. This list is by no means complete and we look forward to continuing to grow this list in the years to come," said Telle Whitney, President and CEO, Anita Borg Institute.

Among the many women highlighted are:

Frances E. Allen, the first female ACM A.M. Turing Award Winner and a pioneer in the optimization of compilers.

Mary Lou Jepsen, founding Chief Technology Officer of One Laptop per Child and a leader in the design of low-cost and low-power LCD screens as CEO of Pixel Qi.

Katherine Johnson, research mathematician and scientist who worked at NASA's Langley Research Center from 1953-1986, who calculated the trajectory of the early space launches.

Hedy Lamarr, the Hollywood star who also co-invented spread-spectrum broadcast communications technologies.

The Anita Borg Institute will be celebrating more leading women technologists and the winner of the Anita Borg Top Company for Technical Women Award at its Women of Vision Awards Dinner May 10, 2012 in Santa Clara CA.

About the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology (ABI)

The Anita Borg Institute provides resources and programs to help industry, academia, and government recruit, retain, and develop women leaders in high-tech fields, resulting in higher levels of technological innovation. Our programs serve high-tech women by creating a community and providing tools to help them develop their careers. ABI is a not-for-profit 501(c) 3 charitable organization. ABI Partners include: Google, HP, Microsoft, CA Technologies, Cisco, Facebook, First Republic Bank, IBM, Intel, Intuit, Lockheed Martin, Marvell, National Science Foundation, National Security Agency, NetApp, SAP, Symantec, Thomson Reuters, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, Amazon, Broadcom, Motorola Foundation, Raytheon, Salesforce.com, and Yahoo! For more information, visit www.anitaborg.org.

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News Headline: Can wearing a helmet help you survive a tornado? (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: WRCB-TV - Online
Contact Name: Miguel Llanos
News OCR Text: (MSNBC) -- Jamal Stevens, 7, is among the few who can say they survived being picked up and tossed around by a twister -- last Friday he was sucked out of his bed and flung onto a grassy strip along an interstate behind his home. But how could Jamal or anyone survive such an extreme event?

"It is puzzling because one or two people in a place will be killed while others live, and it often seems to be luck," acknowledges Tom Schmidlin, a Kent State University professor who has studied tornado injuries.

Luck does seem to have a lot to do with it, in that one or more factors have to go your way to survive. It can happen, but chances are very, very remote.

"It's a lot like flipping a coin and have it land perfectly on its edge," says Jason Persoff, a University of Colorado doctor and -- on the side -- storm chaser.

A key survival factor seems to be "an oversized object being thrown with the patient" that actually protects him or her from the other debris flying through the air like missiles, says Persoff, who doesn't know of any specific studies but has treated such victims himself and spoken to peers about it.

"A mattress, a tub, a door, or sometimes another person" can offer that protection, he notes, while emphasizing that those same objects can just as easily become debris that kills.

Other factors that might come into play include one's age, a tornado's speed and where one lands.

"The very old and very young seem to be vulnerable," notes Schmidlin. Moreover, a person flung by a twister will likely also have been hit by debris "so surviving probably depends on those elusive factors of what you were hit with and your ability to survive injuries."

Mark Baker, an emergency room doctor at Children's of Alabama hospital in Birmingham, says children might actually have an advantage compared to adults when it comes to their chests and abdomens. "Their skeletons are a little more pliant," he says.

But the danger for children is the head area. Baker's ER group saw 60 children during the city's deadly twister on April 27, 2011 -- and two thirds had serious or critical injuries, most to the head.

Jamal, who doesn't remember anything about the ordeal, felt sore afterward but otherwise checked out OK after landing on a relatively soft grassy area along that interstate in Charlotte, N.C.

Jamal Stevens and his siblings were asleep on the second floor of this home in Charlotte, N.C., when a twister ripped off the top. Jamal was flung the farthest, but two sisters also landed outside the home. All survived with just cuts and bruises.

As for increasing one's chances of surviving a twister, experts at the University of Alabama at Birmingham recently came out with some straightforward advice: Wear a helmet.

The idea was first proposed in the 1960s, researchers at the university's Injury Control Research Center wrote in an online commentary, and anecdotal evidence includes a boy who survived the deadly 2011 Joplin, Mo., tornado because he was wearing a bike helmet when airborne debris hit him in the head.

Acknowledging the idea "never gained popularity," the team said it was time to raise awareness -- and even chastised federal safety tips as "woefully inadequate."

The tornado safety page at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website, the team wrote, does encourage people to protect their head "with anything available -- even your hands" but doesn't specify wearing a helmet.

"From a practical perspective," the team added, using one's hands has "major limitations."

For one, hands can't cover all head, face and neck areas, they stated. And second, using your hands and arms for protection means you can't then use them for other emergency tasks -- "such as keeping young children close by and protected."

Dr. Russ Fine, director of the injury research center, says that since the commentary was published Jan. 12, he's "questioned, publicly and privately, why they have not changed their web-based Emergency Preparedness recommendations to include helmets."

"I'm embarrassed that the nation's prevention agency hasn't modified its recommendations," he adds.

Msnbc.com forwarded the commentary to the CDC and a spokesperson was reviewing it for a response.

Baker, the ER doctor, agrees that helmets, especially with straps, and infant carriers for the youngest should be part of preparing for a tornado.

Children's of Alabama is also informally starting to get the word out, says spokeswoman Kathy Bowers. Efforts include a public service announcement on local TV with a meteorologist who touts the value of having helmets handy.

Fine senses that the helmet idea is slowly getting some traction. He went to a sporting goods store to buy bike helmets for two grandchildren during Birmingham's last bout of bad weather and the clerk realized it was for the storm, not exercise. "She also said she didn't own a helmet but that she and every other clerk" borrowed them from the shelves when bad weather hit, he says.

Fine himself has a helmet at home, as does his wife. "We have helmets in our safe room," he says. "We have our drill, we know what we're planning to do."

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News Headline: OSU president Gee's travel bill tops $800K (Smith) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Dayton Daily News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Endowment funds paid for OSU president's trips to China, Iceland, UK.

COLUMBUS — Ohio State University has spent at least $844,000 on President E. Gordon Gee's travel since 2007, including more than $550,000 in the last two years that included two treks to China and two other international trips to Iceland, Turkey, France and the United Kingdom.

The travel costs far exceeded what Ohio's two governors during that time spent, and was about three times the amount spent by University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman, who holds a comparable position to Gee.

The Dayton Daily News received information from two other big public universities — the University of Virginia and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill — and they also appear to have spent less on presidential travel than Gee.

Ohio State officials noted that unrestricted endowment funds — and not tuition or tax money — cover the costs.

They also said Gee is expected to travel as president of a university with ties to institutions around the world. His contract with the OSU Board of Trustees calls for first-class domestic flights, business class international flights and access to corporate jet travel through NetJets.

“Ohio State is one of the largest, most comprehensive universities in the world and President Gee maintains a significant outreach schedule with donors, alumni, and key national leaders,” said OSU spokesman Jim Lynch. “In many cases, his schedule does not accommodate commercial aircraft travel.”

Gee was not made available to discuss his travel expenses.

The Dayton Daily News waited seven months for Ohio State to provide information on Gee's travel, finally receiving only a small fraction of what was requested. By comparison, the University of Michigan responded to the newspaper's request within 27 hours.

“When we received the newspaper's request, we were experiencing a record number of public record requests related to the university's NCAA investigation,” Lynch said, referring to the scandal that led to the firing of former OSU football coach Jim Tressel. “We were very grateful for the newspaper's patience as it took us until late winter to catch up on our long-standing list of requests.”

The Daily News tabulated Gee's travel costs from the limited records the university provided and financial disclosure statements he filed with the Ohio Ethics Commission. The actual costs are likely greater because not all trips are reported to the ethics commission, and the summary of costs for the one year of data the university provided omitted lodging, ground transportation and other travel-related expenses.

Gee is required to report his travel to the ethics commission, but those records do not show destinations or when those trips occurred. State ethics law also doesn't require the university to disclose travel if OSU pays dues to the organization hosting the conference or event.

OSU gave a summary of Gee's trips for 2009 only, which showed he was on the road for 37 days, visiting 11 states as well as Europe, India and Canada.

“Please know that the university intends to comply with your remaining request,” Lynch said of the additional information sought by the newspaper.

Universities like Ohio State have an obligation of transparency, even when the spending doesn't come directly from tax dollars, said Sara Kilpatrick, executive director of the Ohio Conference of American Association of University Professors.

“I would be curious to know where he has flown, the specific purposes of the trips, how much money was spent per trip, what the money was spent on,” she said. “And if I was a donor to the endowment fund, I would certainly want to know that as well.”

She added, “It's still a public university. No matter where the money comes from, the public has a right to see how the money is being spent. And at the core, Ohio State is still supposed to be a public institution of higher education where students have access and it's affordable. And vast amounts of money are being spent on private plane trips. People have a right to raise eyebrows and ask questions.”

One of Ohio's best known officials

Gee is known nationally for his extensive bow tie collection, boundless energy, occasional verbal gaffes, and fundraising magic. He can work a room like the most skilled politician — Gov. John Kasich calls Gee Ohio's best politician.

Since returning to Ohio State in November 2007, Gee has helped raise $1.46 billion, including a record $259 million last year, according to the university. A big chunk of the 2011 gift money — $100 million — came from Limited Brands founder and long-time OSU trustee Leslie H. Wexner. In February, Ohio State renamed its sprawling medical center after Wexner.

Private donations are becoming more important as state and federal funding stagnates or declines, Lynch said. OSU is now campaigning to raise $2.5 billion in gifts by June 2016.

Alex Fischer, chief executive of the Columbus Partnership, a nonprofit, nonpartisan business organization, said Gee's reputation and high-profile is helping the university achieve new heights.

“Gordon is not your average university president. Gordon is probably one of the best known figures inside the state of Ohio and one of the, I'd dare say, top two or three best known figures in America in education and that doesn't happen by sitting at Bricker Hall at Ohio State. It's Gordon's personality to be anywhere and everywhere,” Fischer said.

1 | 2 | 3 next page » Ohio State University-paid travel for President E. Gordon Gee:

2007: $57,473

2008: $74,007

2009: $194,104

2010: $284,222

2011: $269,036

Sources: Ohio State University, Ohio Ethics Commission

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News Headline: KSUA holds spring 2012 commencement ceremony | Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Star-Beacon
Contact Name: Dillaway, Warren
News OCR Text: May 05--ASHTABULA -- A historically significant anniversary for Kent State University was both somber and joyful as students from the Ashtabula campus became the first college graduates in their families.

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Connie Schultz, an Ashtabula High School graduate, asked all first-generation graduates to stand at one point in her commencement speech.

Loud applause broke out for the dozens of students who sacrificed to make the day possible.

"It means a lot to me. I'm the first one in my family to graduate from college," said Sherry Zack of Williamsfield who received her associates degree in radiology.

Susan Stocker, dean of the Ashtabula campus, led a moment of silence in remembrance of the students killed and injured during the May 4, 1970, shootings at the main campus of KSU.

Tina Bihlajama gave the student address for the graduates. She said her time at Kent State proved to be life changing as she faced a personal illness and the loss of a best friend.

"My mission now is to prove dreams do come true," she said of her life path that KSU-Ashtabula helped plot.

"My hope is each of you will find passion in your careers so none of you will have to work again," she said.

The Roger T. Beitler Distinguished Former Student Award went to Deborah Newcomb of Conneaut and Ford Behm of Geneva received the Community Service Award.

Candidates for Bachelor Degrees for Spring 2012

Ashtabula

Nicholas A. Billman, Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Management; Aaron W. Crowell, Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management, Summa Cum Laude; Janis K. Dorsten, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; David Duane Fogle, Bachelor of Science in Technology; Adam T. Franley, Bachelor of General Studies; Nicholas E. Frye, Bachelor of Science in Technology; Jason D. Hornyak, Bachelor of Science in Nursing; Charissa Lefik, Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Food; Shawn M. Lorelli, Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Rebecca Anne Mason, Bachelor of General Studies; Shelby Lynn Meola, Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Food; Amanda Rose Miller, Bachelor of Science in Public Health, Cum Laude; Meghann E. Orr (Stell), Bachelor of General Studies; Ann M. Piercy, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Kevin L. Shick, Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Management, Magna Cum Laude

Austinburg

Jeremy Robert Loveridge, Bachelor of Science in Technology and Jessica L. Tilton, Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies, Magna Cum Laude

Conneaut

Katelin M. Pabody, Bachelor of General Studies

Dorset

Elizabeth J. Beckwith, Bachelor of General Studies

Geneva

Katelyn M. Bittner, Bachelor of Science in Nursing; Kaitlyn C. Carrillo, Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Kayla N. Tersigni, Bachelor of General Studies

Grand River

Alicia Nicole Adams, Bachelor of Arts in Criminology and Justice Studies

Jefferson

Dedra M. Au, Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Management; Amy E. Douglass, Bachelor of Science in Education in Integrated Social Studies, Cum Laude; Hannah J. Falkenburg, Bachelor of Science in Education in Middle Childhood Education and Christopher Scott Gray, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, Cum Laude;

Kingsville

Melissa Lute, Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing

Madison

Rebecca F. Wilson, Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Rome

Clay M. Mader, Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Management

Stow

Jessica N. Gabor, Bachelor of Arts in English, Magna Cum Laude

Warren

Scott A. Morrison, Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Management, Magna Cum Laude

Willoughby

Michelle L. McBrayer, Bachelor of General Studies, Cum Laude

Candidates for Associate Degrees for Spring 2012

Ashtabula

Erin K. Ahlstrom, Associate of Science; Tina Marie Bihlajama, Associate of Arts; Benjamin M. Blum, Associate of Applied Business in Computer Technology, with honors; Kelly J. Cartner, Associate of Applied Business in Accounting Technology, with honors; Lisa J. Cook, Associate of Applied Science in Human Services Technology; Kristy S. Cunningham, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Janis K. Dorsten, Associate of Science; Sarah Ann Durkin, Associate of Applied Business in Computer Technology; Ryan S. Fertig, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Kyle A. Hamilton, Associate of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology; Tanya T. Helmbright, Associate of Applied Business in Accounting Technology; Ronald Joseph Kelly, Associate of Applied Science in Electrical Electronic Engineering Technology, with honors; Kevin W. Kinney, Associate of Science; Ryan P. Kinney, Associate of Applied Business in Computer Technology, with honors; Kaitlin Amanda Lambert, Associate of Science; Laura May Lang, Associate of Applied Business in Computer Technology, with honors; Kate Anne Lynch, Associate of Applied Science in Human Services Technology; Hannah E. Mahoney, Associate of Applied Business in Accounting Technology; Angela Marie Meaney, Associate of Applied Business in Accounting Technology AND Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Cali Lee Orlando, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Deepa Raghupathy, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology, with honors; Carmen E. Reyes, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Sarah Jean Salyer, Associate of Applied Business in Computer Technology, with honors; Maxwell W. Seymour, Associate of Applied Business in Computer Technology; Kayla M. Siekkinen, Associate of Science, with honors; Genero Tirado, Associate of Applied Business in Computer Technology; Michael J. Valentic, Associate of Science, with honors; Kylee C. Weger, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology, with honors; Carrie A. Wimer, Associate of Science, with honors; Sherry L. Zack, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology and Daniel Jarrod Zetlaw, Associate of Arts in Justice Studies;

Austinburg

Alison R. Davidson, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing, with honors and Arla Jean Olsen, Associate of Science, with honors

Bristolville

Jennifer R. Noga, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology

Chardon

Lisa Marie Allen-Cardina, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing and Danielle Lynn Glaser, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

Conneaut

Brittnay E. Bradnan, Associate of Science; Karen A. Dubinsky, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Alicia Nicole Duris, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Danielle Lynn Gay, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Kayla A. Glenn, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Emily R. Henson, Associate of Science; Shannon J. Lines, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Michael John Malys, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Sheila Ann Martin, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology; Jill Michaela McNutt, Associate of Applied Business in Information Technology for Administrative Professionals; Shannen Kathryn McRoberts, Associate of Applied Science in Human Services Technology, with honors; Alexandria Marie Miller, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Gabrielle T. Owens, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Jennifer L. Thomas, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology; Jonathan W. Tuttle, Associate of Applied Business in Computer Technology and Alexis C. Webster, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology

Cortland

Allison S. Backner, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Patricia Hawkins, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Patricia Lynne Nagy, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing, with honors and Jessica L. Stetson, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

Dorset

Kari M. Jacobs, Associate of Science

Farmdale

Jenna Lee Rowland, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology

Geneva

Scott E. Brenis, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Charles W. Deutsch, Associate of Applied Business in Information Technology for Administrative Professionals; Michele L. Faulkner, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Kristen J. Fortune, Associate of Arts in Justice Studies; Dara Marie Frango, Associate of Applied Science in Human Services Technology, with honors; Heather D. Hounshell, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Andrew R. King, Associate of Arts; Tim E. Koschar, Associate of Science; Amy S. Kurt, Associate of Applied Business in Business Management Technology; Heather S. Martin, Associate of Arts; Candice Pollard, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing, with honors; Julie A. Sigg, Associate of Science and Katherine Gray Stehura, Associate of Arts

Girard

Christy L. Crown, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

Jefferson

Dawn M. Allen, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing, with honors; Rebecca C. Cortright, Associate of Science; Amanda Fay DeRosa, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Everett L. Hunt, Associate of Science; Jayne L. Lynch, Associate of Science; Keith R. Morris, Associate of Science; Michael P. Roberts, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Tiffany N. Tenney, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Amy A. Wilber, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology and Lindsey J. Zaebst, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing;

Kent

Charlotte A. Kintz, Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapist Assistant Technology

Kingsville

Nicole A. Romano, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

Leavittsburg

Patti D. Anastasia, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing and Nikita L. Fortenbury, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

Madison

Marijana Benedict, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing, with honors; Jason Blake, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; April M. Fugate, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Meaghan Anne Geraghty, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Robert L. Gibb, Associate of Science; Kelly K. Hurst, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing and Daniel R. Slepsky, Associate of Applied Business in Computer Technology

Niles

Rebecca D. Cutright, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

North Kingsville

Jessica Ann Francis, Associate of Science

Orwell

Peter G. Goranitis, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

Painesville

Jennifer Lauren Sams, Associate of Science

Pierpont

Brianne A. Roebuck, Associate of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology, with honors

Roaming Shores

Renee E. Zele, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

Rock Creek

Andrew David Bissell, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing and Melissa Jean Lamar, Associate of Applied Business in Information Technology for Administrative Professionals, with honors

Rome

Unni M. Heineking, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing, with honors

Staffordsville

Bobby M. Hutchinson, Associate of Science AND Associate of Applied Business in Business Management Technology

Stow

Elizabeth A. Burke, Associate of Science

Warren

May Crain, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing, with honors

Warren

Heather L. Filkorn, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Harold Clair Haggerty, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing; Keith L. Mackey, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing, with honors; Lori Ann Mayfield, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology, with honors and Timothy Aaron Wolbert, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing;

Williamsfield

Victoria L. Blascak, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology and Jennifer R. Jordan, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

Willowick

Janine Marie Smalley, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

Youngstown

Raymond Lee McFadden, Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology, with honors

___

(c)2012 the Star Beacon (Ashtabula, Ohio)

Visit the Star Beacon (Ashtabula, Ohio) at www.starbeacon.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2012 Star Beacon, Ashtabula, Ohio

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News Headline: Graham to give KSU commencement speech | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Steubenville Herald-Star - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: From staff reports , The Herald-Star

SALEM - Jefferson County Commissioner Thomas Graham will give the commencement speech at 7:30 p.m. today at Kent State University East Liverpool Campus.

Graham is being welcomed back to his alma mater. He attended KSU East Liverpool in the early 1980s before completing his bachelor's of science in secondary education at the Kent campus. He earned a master of arts degree in sociology from KSU and a master's degree in clinical social work from the University of Pittsburgh.

In 1992, he was awarded his Ph.D. in sociology from KSU. He has conducted extensive research in the field of social work education and has written dozens of critical reviews, papers and professional articles.

Graham's career in higher education began in 1987. During his tenure he has worked for numerous universities including KSU, Youngstown State and Franciscan University of Steubenville. Currently, he is the director of the sociology department at Franciscan University of Steubenville, where he has taught since 1988.

In addition, he serves his alma mater as an adjunct faculty member within the criminology and justice studies bachelor's degree program at KSU East Liverpool.

Graham worked in industry at Weirton Steel for eight years prior to beginning his academic career.

In 1980, he began his higher education journey at KSU East Liverpool. His love for education is exemplified by service to local school districts. He has served 10 years on the board of education for Toronto City School District and two years on the Jefferson County Joint Vocational School Board.

He also served on the Jefferson County Behavioral Health Board and was safety director for the city of Toronto, where he oversaw the police and fire departments.

He has been a Jefferson County commissioner for the last 10 years and currently serves as chairman of the commissioners.

He also been involved for two years as a trustee for the state of Ohio County Commissioners Association.

Graham and his wife, Diane, live in Wintersville. They own and operate Classic Cutters, a day spa and salon in Weirton.

Their daughter, Kayla Jo, is completing her degree in accounting and finance at Mount Union University.

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News Headline: Graham to give KSU commencement speech | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Weirton Daily Times - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM - Jefferson County Commissioner Thomas Graham will give the commencement speech at 7:30 p.m. today at Kent State University East Liverpool Campus.

Graham is being welcomed back to his alma mater. He attended KSU East Liverpool in the early 1980s before completing his bachelor's of science in secondary education at the Kent campus. He earned a master of arts degree in sociology from KSU and a master's degree in clinical social work from the University of Pittsburgh.

In 1992, he was awarded his Ph.D. in sociology from KSU. He has conducted extensive research in the field of social work education and has written dozens of critical reviews, papers and professional articles.

Graham's career in higher education began in 1987. During his tenure he has worked for numerous universities including KSU, Youngstown State and Franciscan University of Steubenville. Currently, he is the director of the sociology department at Franciscan University of Steubenville, where he has taught since 1988.

In addition, he serves his alma mater as an adjunct faculty member within the criminology and justice studies bachelor's degree program at KSU East Liverpool.

Graham worked in industry at Weirton Steel for eight years prior to beginning his academic career.

In 1980, he began his higher education journey at KSU East Liverpool. His love for education is exemplified by service to local school districts. He has served 10 years on the board of education for Toronto City School District and two years on the Jefferson County Joint Vocational School Board.

He also served on the Jefferson County Behavioral Health Board and was safety director for the city of Toronto, where he oversaw the police and fire departments.

He has been a Jefferson County commissioner for the last 10 years and currently serves as chairman of the commissioners.

He also been involved for two years as a trustee for the state of Ohio County Commissioners Association.

Graham and his wife, Diane, live in Wintersville. They own and operate Classic Cutters, a day spa and salon in Weirton.

Their daughter, Kayla Jo, is completing her degree in accounting and finance at Mount Union University.

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News Headline: Kent State University students prepare for future in medical industry | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SENIOR NURSING STUDENTS AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S GEAUGA CAMPUS HAVE BEEN WORKING DILIGENTLY OVER THE LAST FEW YEARS TO PREPARE FOR A CAREER IN PROFESSIONAL NURSING. AS THEY APPROACH THEIR FINAL SEMESTER AND THE SEARCH FOR EMPLOYMENT BEGINS, THEY ARE HOPEFUL THEIR HARD WORK WILL PAY OFF.

When they began their education, the students were told to expect long hours of study and great fulfillment in their chosen career.

Recruitment for the perfect job is a 2-way street as employers and employees analyze each other to find the right employment fit.

Kent's Geauga campus has welcomed representatives from Lake Health and University Hospitals Geauga Medical Center to meet students who will soon graduate.

Students also had opportunities to hear from career nurses who illuminated the real job of a nurse.

Administrators at UH Geauga Medical Center and the university's Geauga campus met with senior nursing students April 11 to discuss the transition from school to the work environment.

Administrators provided important information to students on planning a job search and how to ask the right questions to find the most suitable employment.

Students asked questions and did some networking with both the college and hospital administrators.

Experienced nurse and author Mary Reynolds Powell also brought nursing to life March 28, when she presented her memoirs to students, staff, faculty and administrators at Kent State University at Geauga in the William and Margaret Clark Commons.

She kept the audience's rapt attention as she described her time as a nurse in Vietnam, the condition of the soldiers she tended, the political mood in that era and how nursing and women's roles have evolved. Powell's book, "A World of Hurt: Between Innocence and Arrogance in Vietnam" describes her time in the war, and a year in the lives of several other people during the same time period.

Students enjoyed speaking with Powell after the presentation and were able to learn from her life-changing events.

The Kent State University at Geauga nursing class will graduate in August from the accelerated three-year program. Following graduation, they will take the state nursing exam to qualify as registered nurses. For information about the bachelor of science in nursing degree at Kent State at Geauga, contact Kay Gurtz at 440-834-4187.

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News Headline: Community Guide information due May 21 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Museum explores the impact of the Civil War on the home front (WITH VIDEOS)

The Kent State University Museum explores the impact of the Civil War on the home front by April Helms | Special Products Editor The 1860s are known primarily in America for the Civil War, which pitted the northern states with the newly-created... Read Story.

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News Headline: LCCC doles out degrees to 1,245 students, touts new program for creating businesses | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Chronicle-Telegram - Online, The
Contact Name: Chelsea Miller
News OCR Text: LORAIN — Finding a seat at Lorain County Community College's graduation ceremony Saturday was no easy task.

Friends and family members filled LCCC's Ewing Activities Center to see more 550 graduates pick up their degrees. In all, 1,245 students graduated, one of the biggest classes in school history, according to Roy Church, LCCC president.

The graduates were awarded 1,379 degrees — 134 more degrees than graduates. One student at the ceremony received five degrees.

This year's commencement theme was “A Higher Degree of Innovation,” and attorney Kreig Brusnahan, LCCC board chairman, shared the college's newest venture — the Blackstone LaunchPad.

Click any image to view larger.

The Blackstone LaunchPad program is a partnership between LCCC and the Burton D. Morgan Foundation. LCCC will receive $3.2 million in a three-year initiative to launch the program, which will begin in the fall.

Once Blackstone is launched, it will teach students, faculty and alumni how to transform their ideas into a viable business by connecting them with experts and resources.

The program is based on one developed by the University of Miami. LCCC's regional partners for Blackstone LaunchPad are Baldwin-Wallace College, Case Western Reserve University and Kent State University.

“Lorain County Community College is one of the most inventive and active community colleges when it comes to equipping innovators with the tools, resources and know-how they need to follow through on a great idea,” Brusnahan said.

Brusnahan also spoke of the University Partnership Inspiration Award, a scholarship for those receiving a bachelor's or associate's degree who wish to continue their education in the fall.

With the scholarship, a graduate can receive a one-time $500 award to be used at any partner university or college.

Fifty-six students who graduated Saturday obtained both their high school diploma and an associate's degree. The students were part of LCCC's Early College High School program, and 94 percent of those students planned to continue their education at a four-year university or at LCCC.

Seventeen-year-olds Alicia Washington and Aaron Martinez obtained associate of arts degrees. The two received their college degrees before their high school diplomas and plan to continue their education at four-year universities.

“It's overwhelming,” Washington said of graduating college.

Washington plans to attend Potomac State College, a division of West Virginia University, for a doctorate in physical therapy. She said she is optimistic about finding a job.

Several nontraditional students were also awarded degrees on Saturday.

Tom Sexstella entered LCCC's Transformations program to help him find a job more suited to his skill set. The goal of Transformations is to help dislocated workers such as Sexstella find work again.

Ninety percent of those who completed the program found full-time work within three months of graduation, according to LCCC. Sexstella graduated with honors Saturday.

Gary Cates, senior vice chancellor of innovation and enterprise development at the Ohio Board of Regents, said programs such as Transformations are why President Barack Obama stopped at LCCC in April.

“When you get the president of the United States to come to your college, that's big,” he said.

Cates was the keynote speaker for the evening. He shared his experiences as an Eagle Scout and compared them to obtaining a college degree. Cates said an important part of college is helping classmates achieve their goals.

“Find someone you know here that has skills … and give them a hand to get them into the nest with you,” he said.

The board of directors also presented Faculty Excellence Awards to faculty members who demonstrated innovation in the classroom, in educational practices or educational development, while also providing service to the college and community.

Two selected this year received $2,500 each. Those selected were Ruby Beil, for her sustainable agriculture projects, and Maria McConnell, for leading Students in Free Enterprise programs.

Concluding the ceremony was Mary Sanata, Student Senate president.

Sanata came to LCCC through its Make Your Layoff Payoff program and received her associate's degree in 2011. She is currently enrolled in the University Partnership program and is studying to earn her bachelor's in psychology from Cleveland State University.

“The support and growth fostered here by the faculty and staff has given me the confidence and drive to follow my passions and take on challenges I never knew I could,” she said.

Sanata, who has an autistic child, helped coordinate a special-needs work study program at LCCC with Elyria High School students. With help from LCCC's staff, Sanata was able to give 11th- and 12th-grade special-needs students on-campus jobs. The students work at Michele Henes' children's sensory garden, the Dining Services kitchen and the bookstore on campus.

Sanata also helped form Project SEARCH, a 10-week internship program for special-needs students that prepares them for permanent employment within the community.

“The campus community has not only embraced my dream, but it is also celebrating the successes of the Project SEARCH interns,” she said.

For many students, graduating from LCCC was just one step in furthering their education.

Dee Arndt received an associate of arts degree Saturday. She is enrolled in the University Partnership program and plans to attend Youngstown State University for a bachelor's degree, even though she already has a job in her field.

“I'm ecstatic,” she said. “It gives me something to look forward to.”

Contact Chelsea Miller at 329-7123 or cmiller@chroniclet.com.

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News Headline: 6th annual Ohioana Book Festival set May 12 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The sixth annual Ohioana
Book Festival will take place
from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. May
12 at Fort Hayes Metropolitan
Education Center, 546
Jack Gibbs Blvd., near downtown
Columbus. The event is
free and open to the public.
The festival will include 25
panel discussions on a variety
of topics, such as authors'
literary influences, the creative
process, and children's
literature, and author roundtables
devoted to popular
genres such as mystery, romance
and science fiction.
“We are excited to have
so many nationally recognized
authors participating
in our sixth festival. They are
all Ohioans by birth or residents
with books that have
been published in the past
year,” said Ohioana Executive
Director Linda Hengst.
“They represent every major
literary field and genre —
fiction (mystery, romance,
fantasy, science fiction, and
literary fiction), nonfiction
(memoirs, history, essays,
and cook books), poetry and
books for children and young
adults.”
Additional festival activities
will include a special
children's room with programs
designed to entertain
young readers. The line-up
for youth was created and is
managed by the Kent State
University School of Library
and Information Science students
and faculty, along with
local librarians.
Featured authors include
Tom Batiuk (“Funky Winkerbean”),
Cinda Williams Chima
(“The Gray Wolf Throne”),
Casey Daniels (Pepper Martin
mysteries), Donald Ray
Pollock (“Knockemstiff”),
Les Roberts (Milan Jacovich
mysteries), among others.
Among the other authors
who will be on hand are Mark
Dawidziak, Amanda Flower,
Julie Anne Lindsey, Mike Olszewski,
Mary Ann Winkowski,
and many more.
For more information, visit
www.OhioanaBookFestival .
org.

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News Headline: Crowd gathers at KSU to reflect on shootings that killed 4, injured 9 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ■ MAY 4 VISITOR CENTER
SET TO OPEN IN THE FALL

A crowd of more than 100
gathered at Kent State University's
Blanket Hill Friday
to reflect on the shootings
that killed four students and
wounded nine others at the
site 42 years ago, and urge for a
continuing fight for civil rights
and truth of the day's events.
The commemoration began
with a reminder of the chronology
of events that led to
the shots that forever changed
the university and affected
countless people around the
world: Nation-wide student
unrest over the war in Vietnam
and surge to Cambodia,
the vandalism and confrontations
with police and
city authorities in Kent, the
arson of KSU's ROTC building,
the presence of armed
Ohio National Guardsmen
ready to use lethal force, daily
student protests on campus
and the gunfire that killed
Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller,
Sandra Scheuer and William
Schroeder, which then led
to martial law within Kent's
city limits.

■ To see video and
more photos from Friday's
commemoration,
visit www.recordpub.com

“Forty-two years ago on this
day, students took a stand
against their government,”
May 4 Task Force chairwoman
Jessica Denton said.

“In 13 seconds, this country
changed drastically,”
Denton added.
Former Task Force chairman
Jim Mueller talked
about the soon-to-open
May 4 Visitor Center in
Taylor Hall.“This fall, the
May 4 Visitor Center will
open, telling the truth of
what happened that day,”
he said.
Many speakers criticized
the U.S. Department of
Justice's recent decision
to not further investigate
the case.
“The Department of Justice
should reconsider its
decision to not investigate
further,” said Sandford
“Sandy” Rosen, the
attorney who represented
families and victims of
the shootings. “As a small
start, the Department of
Justice should authorize or
secure release to the public
the transcripts of the grand
jury proceedings that led to
the federal indictments and
unsuccessful prosecution of
several guardsmen.”
Bryan Staul, KSU College
Democrats president,
spoke on the apathy he
sees in his generation, and
urged his peers to be active
and opinionated like
past generations.
“My generation hasn't
earned it,” he said. “We
failed. We didn't pick up
the torch. They shed their
blood, all that we ask is
that you make your voice
heard.”
Beth Vild, KSU student,
founder of Women's Liberation
Collective and community
organizer, said Krause
serves as a main influence
and inspiration in her life
and political vision.
“We've always fought battles
and always will until we
build a world that sees the
value of equal and free access
to education, health
care and our basic necessities,
the value of living
harmoniously, not just with
each other, but also with
the earth,” Vild said. “We
have the knowledge and
technology to put an end
to this destructive past because
Allison was right.
Flowers are better than
bullets.”

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News Headline: PHOTOS: May 4 Candlelight Vigil | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: May 4

Walkers pick up candles during the annual walk and vigil held to commemorate the May 4, 1970 shootings at Kent State on Thursday,

About 150 people made the annual silent walk and candlelight vigil Thursday night around the Kent State University campus from the Liberty Bell to the Taylor Hall parking lot, where four students were killed on May 4, 1970.

At the parking, lot a person stood vigil at each of the four memorial locations throughout the night.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW PHOTOS: http://kent.patch.com/blog_posts/may-4-candlelight-vigil#photo-9820334

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News Headline: VIDEOS: 42nd Commemoration of May 4, 1970 Shootings | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University, community remember 4 killed, 9 wounded

Peter Jedick talks about his relationship with Sandy Scheuer, one of four students killed at Kent State on May 4, 1970, during the 42nd commemoration of the shootings Friday, May 4, 2012.Credit Matt Fredmonsky

Members of the Kent and Kent State University community gathered on campus Friday for the 42nd commemoration of the May 4, 1970 shootings that killed four and left nine wounded.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEOS: http://kent.patch.com/articles/videos-42nd-commemoration-of-may-4-1970-shootings#video-9825152

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News Headline: 7 wounded at Kent St. want questions answered | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio (AP) -- Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was given.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reports Friday ( http://bit.ly/IKS6By ) that survivors and supporters are appealing to Congress, Ohio lawmakers, Gov. John Kasich, Attorney General Mike DeWine and human-rights groups.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, says it's important to get the truth out before it's too late.

The Justice Department said last month it won't reopen its investigation.

Information from: The Plain Dealer, http://www.cleveland.com

Read more http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/O/OH_KENT_STATE_SHOOTINGS_OHOL-?SITE=WAKR&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

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News Headline: 42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: KENT -- Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given.

"Our May 4 movement for truth and justice has continued for 42 years, and we will not desist until truth about this government crime is acknowledged by our government," the group said Thursday on the eve of the anniversary of the shooting, which killed four people and helped galvanize opposition to the Vietnam War.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

"We have undeniable, verifiable, digital, forensic, recorded evidence proving a shouted military command ending with the word `FIRE!' preceded the barrage of 67 deadly gunshots fired by the Ohio National Guard on this campus," the statement by survivors said.

Backers of a renewed investigation said a 2010 analysis of a recently enhanced audio recording concluded that someone may have ordered troops to prepare to fire during the campus protest. But the federal government said its review was inconclusive in determining whether the recording provided such evidence.

Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez said last month on the issue of a command to fire that the government's analyst showed "no military-like voice commands to fire or otherwise were heard; rather, many of the words heard were probably uttered by several different individuals located closer to the microphone."

The original reel-to-reel audio recording was made by Terry Strubbe, a student who placed a microphone in a window sill of his dormitory overlooking the anti-war rally. A copy of the audio tape was found in a library archive in 2007.

The survivors asked Gov. John Kasich and Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine to clear the way for an analysis of the tape by state crime laboratory investigators.

Messages seeking comments in response were left Friday at the offices of the governor and DeWine.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, joined other survivors on campus Thursday and said it's important to get the truth out.

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News Headline: 7 hurt in Kent State shootings want answers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was given.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reports Friday that survivors and supporters are appealing to Congress, Ohio lawmakers, Gov. John Kasich, Attorney General Mike DeWine and human-rights groups.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, says it's important to get the truth out before it's too late.

The Justice Department said last month it won't reopen its investigation.

Information from: The Plain Dealer, http://www.cleveland.com

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News Headline: VIDEO: KSU Shooting Survivor: We Need Other Side of the Story (Lewis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 News at 10 PM - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — The 42nd anniversary of a shooting at Kent State that left four students dead brought calls for a new investigation into the events of May 4, 1970.

Survivors of the shooting on Friday gathered with others to remember the lives of Jeffrey Miller, Allison Krause, William Schroeder and Sandra Scheuer.

All were killed when national guardsmen opened fire on students demonstrating the Vietnam War.

Professor Jerry Lewis made his way to the parking lot at Prentice Hall, where he may have saved additional lives that day by urging students to leave after he heard the gunfire and realized guardsmen were firing real bullets.

“It's very real, and this commemoration captures the spirit of the rally that we were going to hold, but the national guard told us to leave within five minutes,” said Lewis.

Also present for Friday's ceremonies, were survivors including Alan Canfora, Dean Kahler and Joe Lewis, Jr., all of whom support the effort to closely examine an audio tape recorded during the shooting that was enhanced in 2010.

Some experts believe the recording now clearly reveals that an order to open fire was given.

The U.S. Justice Department has refused to open a new investigation arguing, in part, that voices on the recording could have been of people closer to the microphone, and not from those commanding the guardsmen that day.

Lewis, who was shot twice, says it is important to look more closely into what the recording reveals for historical purposes.

“It's not for the purposes of prosecution, but for the purpose of making the history books include the whole truth,” Lewis told Fox 8 News on Friday.

“I think the assistant attorney generals comments didn't rely really on the facts. I think if he was going to make a statement based on the facts, he would rely more strongly on the professional analysis of the audio by people who do that for a living, and he would look at their sound pictographs, and the conclusions they came to,” he added.

Lewis says he has long ago forgiven the two guardsmen who fired at him. He and others believe so much time has passed that what matters now is to get the story correct, and not who is to blame. He and other victims are urging any surviving guardsmen from that shooting to open up and tell their side of the story.

“We need to have the other half of the story. We need to have guardsmen tell us what their experience was like because everyone who was here at Kent State, whether you were shot and wounded or not, you were wounded spectators, as well as guardsmen, and I think in order to know the whole truth, we need to know their truth as well,” said Lewis.

On the 42nd anniversary of the shooting, the University is also putting the finishing touches on a May 4th Visitors Center in Taylor Hall overlooking the historic site where the events of 1970 took place.

The center, which will feature exhibits related to the shootings, is expected to be open in August.

Present day students, whose parents were college age when the shootings happened, are among those who believe the center is long overdue.

“This is a big part of what our campus stands for,” said Brittany Martony who graduates on Saturday, “and I think a lot of our students need to remember that.”

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO: http://fox8.com/2012/05/04/ksu-shooting-survivor-we-need-other-side-of-the-story/

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News Headline: COLUMBUS MILEPOSTS: May 6, 1970 Riots force closure of Ohio State's campus | Email

News Date: 05/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Tebben, Gerald
News OCR Text: Acting on a recommendation by Ohio Gov. James A Rhodes, Ohio State University closed its doors in mid-quarter on May 6, 1970. The 45,000 students on the riot-racked Columbus campus were told to leave the university by noon the next day.

Periodic disturbances over black's and women's rights and the Vietnam War had broken out at OSU since mid-April. In early May, riots raged on more than 100 U.S. campuses, as students protested the escalation of the Vietnam War into Cambodia.

At Kent State University, an ROTC building was torched. On May 3, Rhodes called the demonstrators "the worst type of people we harbor in America" and ordered the Ohio National Guard to restore order at Kent State. Guardsmen killed four people the next day.

Kent State immediately closed, but Ohio State remained open. Amid chants of "Shut it down," protesting OSU students blocked entrances to several buildings on May 5, but dispersed after Guardsmen forced them away.

On May 6, protesters mobbed Ohio State President Novice G. Fawcett's campus home and the school's administration building. Troops with rifles and bayonets drove them back to the Oval. Shortly before 3 p.m., a fire broke out at Hayes Hall, where, according to some reports, protesters threw stones at firefighters.

Fearing what he called "further disruptions and violence," Fawcett said at 5:30 p.m., "I am closing the university until further notice." More than 80 colleges across the country closed that day in the face of growing protests over the war and the Kent State killings.

Ohio State reopened on May 19. In a letter to parents and students, Fawcett wrote: "In the days ahead we will work toward improved student-faculty-administration relationships."

Suggestions for Mileposts that will run this bicentennial year can be sent to: Gerald Tebben, Box 82125, Columbus, OH 43202, or email gtebben@columbus.rr.com.

* This daily feature traces important dates in Columbus history and is archived at Dispatch.com.

Copyright © 2012 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH and may not be republished without permission.

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News Headline: Activism urged as shooting recalled | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — At 12:24 p.m. yesterday, the Victory Bell on the Kent State University Commons pealed 15 times.

Once each for Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, William Schroeder and Sandra Scheuer, who died not far from the symbol whose purpose was to ring out in triumph.

Nine more times for students who were struck by bullets but survived after National Guardsmen fired on a crowd during that now-famous anti-war demonstration on May 4, 1970.

Two more solemn metallic clangs in remembrance of two Jackson State University students killed by Mississippi police during a Vietnam War protest 10 days later.

Hundreds attended yesterday's annual commemoration. On a warm day beneath billowy clouds, an afternoon not unlike the day of the Kent State tragedy, they spread out across Blanket Hill, the slope that the students ascended before charging guardsmen.

Read more at

Ohio.com.

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News Headline: 42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: RoadRunner
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio (AP) — Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given.

"Our May 4 movement for truth and justice has continued for 42 years, and we will not desist until truth about this government crime is acknowledged by our government," the group said Thursday on the eve of the anniversary of the shooting, which killed four people and helped galvanize opposition to the Vietnam War.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

"We have undeniable, verifiable, digital, forensic, recorded evidence proving a shouted military command ending with the word 'FIRE!' preceded the barrage of 67 deadly gunshots fired by the Ohio National Guard on this campus," the statement by survivors said.

Backers of a renewed investigation said a 2010 analysis of a recently enhanced audio recording concluded that someone may have ordered troops to prepare to fire during the campus protest. But the federal government said its review was inconclusive in determining whether the recording provided such evidence.

Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez said last month on the issue of a command to fire that the government's analyst showed "no military-like voice commands to fire or otherwise were heard; rather, many of the words heard were probably uttered by several different individuals located closer to the microphone."

The original reel-to-reel audio recording was made by Terry Strubbe, a student who placed a microphone in a window sill of his dormitory overlooking the anti-war rally. A copy of the audio tape was found in a library archive in 2007.

The survivors asked Gov. John Kasich and Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine to clear the way for an analysis of the tape by state crime laboratory investigators.

Messages seeking comments in response were left Friday at the offices of the governor and DeWine.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, joined other survivors on campus Thursday and said it's important to get the truth out.

Information from: The Plain Dealer, http://www.cleveland.com

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News Headline: Kent State survivors want tape re-analyzed | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: USA Today - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Four people wounded in the 1970 National Guard shootings at Kent State University have asked for a federal investigation centered on a digitally enhanced audio recording of the confrontation. Four students were killed and nine injured in the incident, which began as a campus protest against the Vietnam War.

The survivors contend that the recording contains evidence that National Guard troops were ordered to fire on unarmed protesters. A command to fire has never been proved, and some Guard members have said they fired in self-defense.

The request for an investigation was made Thursday, a day before Friday's 42nd anniversary of the May 4, 1970, shootings; it asks Attorney General Eric Holder to examine the audio recording, Reuters reports.

The Kent State shootings enraged anti-war protesters, triggering a nationwide student strike that shut down hundreds of universities. A Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph of an anguished young woman kneeling over a dead student stands as an icon of the anti-war movement. "Ohio," a song about the shootings written by Neil Young and performed by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, became an anthem for rebellious youth of the era.

For many baby boomers now in their late 50s and 60s, the so-called Kent State Massacre was a searing and, for some, life-altering event. It came at the height of the anti-war movement and set off a renewed spasm of opposition not only to the Vietnam War but also to the Nixon administration, the Pentagon and other symbols of authority.

The shootings hold far less resonance for today's college-age Americans. For them, the 42-year-old event might best be described as a particularly demonstrative Occupy rally featuring extreme violence.

Eight Guardsmen were indicted by a grand jury in the shootings, but a judge dismissed the case in 1974. Wounded students and survivors of those killed received a settlement totaling $675,000 and a statement by the state of Ohio expressing regret for the shootings.

Two of the dead, including an ROTC student, were bystanders who did not take part in the protests. Those killed were 19 and 20 years old. The Guardsmen fired 67 shots over 13 seconds.

Alan Canfora, one of the wounded students, asked the Justice Department in 2010 to review the enhanced recording. Two private forensic audio experts had concluded that the recordings reveal an order to fire. The Justice Department closed its inquiry last month, saying the recording is inconclusive, Reuters reported.

The recording was made by a Kent State communications student who placed a microphone outside his dormitory room window about 250 feet from the Guardsmen who fired. It is the only known recording of the event.

Canfora this week asked for a new investigation, appealing for Guard members to come forward with new information. He said Guardsmen should be offered immunity from prosecution. Canfora is director of the nonprofit Kent May 4 Center.

Dean Kahler, another of the four wounded students, was paralyzed from the waist down by a Guardsman's bullet. "We want justice in a sense, to have the truth. It would be nice to know what actually happened," Kahler told Reuters.

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News Headline: 42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Google News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio (AP) — Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given.

"Our May 4 movement for truth and justice has continued for 42 years, and we will not desist until truth about this government crime is acknowledged by our government," the group said Thursday on the eve of the anniversary of the shooting, which killed four people and helped galvanize opposition to the Vietnam War.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

"We have undeniable, verifiable, digital, forensic, recorded evidence proving a shouted military command ending with the word 'FIRE!' preceded the barrage of 67 deadly gunshots fired by the Ohio National Guard on this campus," the statement by survivors said.

Backers of a renewed investigation said a 2010 analysis of a recently enhanced audio recording concluded that someone may have ordered troops to prepare to fire during the campus protest. But the federal government said its review was inconclusive in determining whether the recording provided such evidence.

Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez said last month on the issue of a command to fire that the government's analyst showed "no military-like voice commands to fire or otherwise were heard; rather, many of the words heard were probably uttered by several different individuals located closer to the microphone."

The original reel-to-reel audio recording was made by Terry Strubbe, a student who placed a microphone in a window sill of his dormitory overlooking the anti-war rally. A copy of the audio tape was found in a library archive in 2007.

The survivors asked Gov. John Kasich and Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine to clear the way for an analysis of the tape by state crime laboratory investigators.

The governor's office referred the matter to DeWine, who said Friday there was no ongoing investigation but added that he would look at any new evidence.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, joined other survivors on campus Thursday and said it's important to get the truth out.

Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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News Headline: 7 Hurt at Kent St. in 1970 Shooting Want Answers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: ABC News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was given.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reports Friday ( http://bit.ly/IKS6By ) that survivors and supporters are appealing to Congress, Ohio lawmakers, Gov. John Kasich, Attorney General Mike DeWine and human-rights groups.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, says it's important to get the truth out before it's too late.

The Justice Department said last month it won't reopen its investigation.

Information from: The Plain Dealer, http://www.cleveland.com

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News Headline: 42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: San Francisco Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (05-04) 14:47 PDT Kent, Ohio (AP) --

Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given.

"Our May 4 movement for truth and justice has continued for 42 years, and we will not desist until truth about this government crime is acknowledged by our government," the group said Thursday on the eve of the anniversary of the shooting, which killed four people and helped galvanize opposition to the Vietnam War.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

"We have undeniable, verifiable, digital, forensic, recorded evidence proving a shouted military command ending with the word `FIRE!' preceded the barrage of 67 deadly gunshots fired by the Ohio National Guard on this campus," the statement by survivors said.

Backers of a renewed investigation said a 2010 analysis of a recently enhanced audio recording concluded that someone may have ordered troops to prepare to fire during the campus protest. But the federal government said its review was inconclusive in determining whether the recording provided such evidence.

Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez said last month on the issue of a command to fire that the government's analyst showed "no military-like voice commands to fire or otherwise were heard; rather, many of the words heard were probably uttered by several different individuals located closer to the microphone."

The original reel-to-reel audio recording was made by Terry Strubbe, a student who placed a microphone in a window sill of his dormitory overlooking the anti-war rally. A copy of the audio tape was found in a library archive in 2007.

The survivors asked Gov. John Kasich and Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine to clear the way for an analysis of the tape by state crime laboratory investigators.

The governor's office referred the matter to DeWine, who said Friday there was no ongoing investigation but added that he would look at any new evidence.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, joined other survivors on campus Thursday and said it's important to get the truth out.

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News Headline: 7 hurt at Kent St. in 1970 shooting want answers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online
Contact Name: The Associated Press
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was given.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reports Friday (http://bit.ly/IKS6By ) that survivors and supporters are appealing to Congress, Ohio lawmakers, Gov. John Kasich, Attorney General Mike DeWine and human-rights groups.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, says it's important to get the truth out before it's too late.

The Justice Department said last month it won't reopen its investigation.

Information from: The Plain Dealer, http://www.cleveland.com

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News Headline: 42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers | Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Associated Press (AP) - Online (United States)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio_Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given.

"Our May 4 movement for truth and justice has continued for 42 years, and we will not desist until truth about this government crime is acknowledged by our government," the group said Thursday on the eve of the anniversary of the shooting, which killed four people and helped galvanize opposition to the Vietnam War.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

"We have undeniable, verifiable, digital, forensic, recorded evidence proving a shouted military command ending with the word `FIRE!' preceded the barrage of 67 deadly gunshots fired by the Ohio National Guard on this campus," the statement by survivors said.

Backers of a renewed investigation said a 2010 analysis of a recently enhanced audio recording concluded that someone may have ordered troops to prepare to fire during the campus protest. But the federal government said its review was inconclusive in determining whether the recording provided such evidence.

Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez said last month on the issue of a command to fire that the government's analyst showed "no military-like voice commands to fire or otherwise were heard; rather, many of the words heard were probably uttered by several different individuals located closer to the microphone."

The original reel-to-reel audio recording was made by Terry Strubbe, a student who placed a microphone in a window sill of his dormitory overlooking the anti-war rally. A copy of the audio tape was found in a library archive in 2007.

The survivors asked Gov. John Kasich and Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine to clear the way for an analysis of the tape by state crime laboratory investigators.

Messages seeking comments in response were left Friday at the offices of the governor and DeWine.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, joined other survivors on campus Thursday and said it's important to get the truth out.

___

Information from: The Plain Dealer, http://www.cleveland.com

Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: Kent State 42 years later | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bangor Daily News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By The Times Leader, Martins Ferry, Ohio

Posted May 06, 2012, at 8:11 p.m.

The United States Justice Department has opted not to reopen the 1970 Kent State shooting investigation. Four-plus decades have come and gone, so we agree with that decision.

The Justice Department based its decision on “insurmountable legal and evidentiary barriers” in regard to the fatal shooting by the Ohio National Guardsmen during a Vietnam War protest at the university.

That tragedy played out 42 years ago May 4, taking four Kent State students and wounding nine more.

The recent request to reopen the probe came from one of those wounded victims. He based his plea on an enhanced audio recording that orders may have been given for the Guardsmen to prepare to fire on students during the protest. …

Family members and loved ones of the Kent State victims have had 42 years to come to grips with a most sad and unfortunate occurrence. The pain will never cease but it does lessen.

A new investigation will only open old wounds. We see no reason to revisit the tragedy, evoking more heartache.

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News Headline: It's good Kent State shooting investigation isn't being reopened | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Newark Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The U.S. Justice Department has opted not to reopen the 1970 Kent State shooting investigation. Four-plus decades have come and gone, so we agree with that decision.

The Justice Department based its decision on "insurmountable legal and evidentiary barriers" regarding the fatal shooting by the Ohio National Guardsmen during a Vietnam War protest at the university.

That tragedy played out 42 years ago today, taking four Kent State students and wounding nine more. ...

The recent request to reopen the probe came from one of those wounded victims. He based his plea on an enhanced audio recording that orders might have been given for the Guardsmen to prepare to fire on students during the protest. ...

Family members and loved ones of the Kent State victims have had 42 years to come to grips with a most sad and unfortunate occurrence. The pain never will cease, but it does lessen.

A new investigation will only open old wounds. We see no reason to revisit the tragedy, evoking more heartache.

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News Headline: 42 years after Kent State, survivors want answers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: U.S. News & World Report
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio (AP) — Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday have renewed an appeal for answers to lingering questions, such as whether an order to fire was given.

"Our May 4 movement for truth and justice has continued for 42 years, and we will not desist until truth about this government crime is acknowledged by our government," the group said Thursday on the eve of the anniversary of the shooting, which killed four people and helped galvanize opposition to the Vietnam War.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

"We have undeniable, verifiable, digital, forensic, recorded evidence proving a shouted military command ending with the word 'FIRE!' preceded the barrage of 67 deadly gunshots fired by the Ohio National Guard on this campus," the statement by survivors said.

Backers of a renewed investigation said a 2010 analysis of a recently enhanced audio recording concluded that someone may have ordered troops to prepare to fire during the campus protest. But the federal government said its review was inconclusive in determining whether the recording provided such evidence.

Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez said last month on the issue of a command to fire that the government's analyst showed "no military-like voice commands to fire or otherwise were heard; rather, many of the words heard were probably uttered by several different individuals located closer to the microphone."

The original reel-to-reel audio recording was made by Terry Strubbe, a student who placed a microphone in a window sill of his dormitory overlooking the anti-war rally. A copy of the audio tape was found in a library archive in 2007.

The survivors asked Gov. John Kasich and Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine to clear the way for an analysis of the tape by state crime laboratory investigators.

The governor's office referred the matter to DeWine, who said Friday there was no ongoing investigation but added that he would look at any new evidence.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, joined other survivors on campus Thursday and said it's important to get the truth out.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: 7 hurt at Kent St. in 1970 shooting want answers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Miami Herald - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was given.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reports Friday ( http://bit.ly/IKS6By) that survivors and supporters are appealing to Congress, Ohio lawmakers, Gov. John Kasich, Attorney General Mike DeWine and human-rights groups.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, says it's important to get the truth out before it's too late.

The Justice Department said last month it won't reopen its investigation.

Information from: The Plain Dealer, http://www.cleveland.com

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News Headline: It's good Kent State shooting investigation isn't being reopened | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times Recorder - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The U.S. Justice Department has opted not to reopen the 1970 Kent State shooting investigation. Four-plus decades have come and gone, so we agree with that decision.

The Justice Department based its decision on "insurmountable legal and evidentiary barriers" regarding the fatal shooting by the Ohio National Guardsmen during a Vietnam War protest at the university.

That tragedy played out 42 years ago today, taking four Kent State students and wounding nine more. ...

The recent request to reopen the probe came from one of those wounded victims. He based his plea on an enhanced audio recording that orders might have been given for the Guardsmen to prepare to fire on students during the protest. ...

Family members and loved ones of the Kent State victims have had 42 years to come to grips with a most sad and unfortunate occurrence. The pain never will cease, but it does lessen.

A new investigation will only open old wounds. We see no reason to revisit the tragedy, evoking more heartache.

Return to Top



News Headline: It's good Kent State shooting investigation isn't being reopened | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Chillicothe Gazette - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The U.S. Justice Department has opted not to reopen the 1970 Kent State shooting investigation. Four-plus decades have come and gone, so we agree with that decision.

The Justice Department based its decision on "insurmountable legal and evidentiary barriers" regarding the fatal shooting by the Ohio National Guardsmen during a Vietnam War protest at the university.

That tragedy played out 42 years ago today, taking four Kent State students and wounding nine more. ...

The recent request to reopen the probe came from one of those wounded victims. He based his plea on an enhanced audio recording that orders might have been given for the Guardsmen to prepare to fire on students during the protest. ...

Family members and loved ones of the Kent State victims have had 42 years to come to grips with a most sad and unfortunate occurrence. The pain never will cease, but it does lessen.

A new investigation will only open old wounds. We see no reason to revisit the tragedy, evoking more heartache.

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News Headline: May 4th commemoration at Kent State (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: WHLO-AM - Online
Contact Name: Ken Robinson
News OCR Text: KSU spokesperson Emily Vincent says the commemoration events are an opportunity for students and the community to gather and reflect on the tragedy and adapt the lessons learned to current events.

Kent State University markes its 42nd annual May 4, 1970, commemoration today.

KSU spokesperson Emily Vincent says the commemoration events are an opportunity for students and the community to gather and reflect on the tragedy and adapt the lessons learned to current events.

On Friday, May 4, a book signing of “Democratic Narrative, History, and Memory,” edited by Carole Barbato and Laura Davis, will be held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the University Bookstore in the Kent Student Center.

Barbato, who was a Kent State student in 1970, is a communication studies professor for Kent State University at East Liverpool.

Davis, who was a freshman at Kent State when the May 4 events occurred, is an English professor and the university's faculty coordinator for May 4 initiatives.

Vincent says the commemoration event, also hosted by the May 4 Task Force, begins at noon, May 4, on the Commons.

The Kent Student Center Ballroom will serve as the rain location. This year's commemoration theme is “Don't Give Up the Fight!”

Multiple speakers will discuss the effect of May 4 on the Kent State community, as well as college campuses nationwide.

The featured speakers include Beth Vild for Allison Krause; Bryan Staul for Jeffrey Miller; Barbato for Sandra Scheuer; Jim Mueller for William Schroeder; Sandford “Sandy” Rosen, attorney for families and victims in 1977; Maia O'Meara, student representing Project Vietnam from Kent Roosevelt High School; Joe Cullum, witness to May 4; Joe Lewis, witness and victim of May 4; Davis; Jon Schluepp, Warriors Journey Home; and Howie Emmer, 1960s activist.

Friday's itinerary also will consist of the Kent State chronology followed by the ringing of the Victory Bell and tributes to the four deceased students. Melanie Safka will perform the day's music.

Vincent explains, each spring, Kent State inquires, learns and reflects on social, cultural and historical events through the annual Symposium on Democracy, held in commemoration of the events surrounding May 4, 1970.

The symposium honors the memories of the four students - Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder - who lost their lives on that day.

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News Headline: 7 hurt at Kent St. in 1970 shooting want answers | Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Associated Press (AP)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio_Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was given.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reports Friday ( http://bit.ly/IKS6By) that survivors and supporters are appealing to Congress, Ohio lawmakers, Gov. John Kasich, Attorney General Mike DeWine and human-rights groups.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, says it's important to get the truth out before it's too late.

The Justice Department said last month it won't reopen its investigation.

___

Information from: The Plain Dealer, http://www.cleveland.com

Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: Kent State remembers victims on 42nd anniversary of May 4 shootings | Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Schleis, Paula
News OCR Text: May 05--KENT --

At 12 --24 p.m. Friday, the Victory Bell on the Kent State University Commons pealed 15 times.

Once each for Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, William Schroeder, Sandra Scheuer, who died not far from the symbol whose purpose was to ring out in triumph.

Nine more times for students who were struck by bullets but survived a volley from National Guardsmen as they opened fire on a crowd during that now-famous anti-war demonstration on May 4, 1970.

Two more solemn metallic clangs in remembrance of two Jackson State University students killed by Mississippi police during their own Vietnam War protest 10 days later.

Hundreds attended Friday's annual commemoration. On a warm day beneath billowy clouds, an afternoon not unlike the day of the KSU tragedy, they spread out across Blanket Hill, the slope where students ascended before charging guardsmen.

They milled about on the other side of the hill, where the dead students fell, and a bullet hole in a Don Drumm sculpture in front of Taylor Hall remains a 42-year-old reminder of that iconic moment in American history.

As has become tradition, a historical chronicle of events was read aloud, recalling the announcement of the U.S. invasion of Cambodia, the downtown riots that followed, the burning of the ROTC barracks, and the tension that built as armed National Guardsmen were called in to dispel demonstrations.

Then four people took turns speaking on behalf of the four slain students on a stage framed by poster-sized photographs of Krause, Miller, Schroeder and Scheuer.

"Don't think of this place as anything less than where Americans shed blood for their freedom," said Bryan Staul, president of the Kent State College Democrats.

Staul said his own generation has been "lazy" when it comes to the ages-old battle to preserve liberty and fight for justice.

"We don't vote. We don't stand up. We don't protest ... We gave up, we let go," he said as he called on his peers to become more active in their world.

Representing Scheuer, classmate Peter Jedick recalled meeting Scheuer in the Tri-Towers dorm cafeteria, where she made jokes about the food. Afterward, they ate together often.

Jedick said he was in the KSU commons that day in 1970 when he heard "firecrackers" on the opposite side of Taylor Hall. It took awhile before he realized the noise was gunfire, and another day before he learned his friend had died in that moment.

Sanford Jay Rosen, who represented surviving victims and the families of the dead in a wrongful death civil suit, told the story of how the families had lost the first court round, won a new trial on appeal, and eventually made a heart-wrenching decision to settle for $600,000.

"I have only wept twice in public as an adult," Rosen said, and the first was when he saw how difficult it was for the families to accept the settlement without any authorities accepting responsibility.

Rosen said he has often dreamed that he had the chance to try the case a third time "and win total victory."

Rosen joined many other voices in continuing to ask state and federal lawmakers to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the shootings.

Last week, the Justice Department said it would not reopen the investigation, saying enhanced audio recordings that some insist include an official order for the guardsmen to open fire were inconclusive.

Copyright © 2012 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Kent State remembers victims on 42nd anniversary of shootings | Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Schleis, Paula
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio _ At 12:24 p.m. Friday, the Victory Bell on the Kent State University Commons pealed 15 times.

Once each for Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, William Schroeder, Sandra Scheuer, who died not far from the symbol whose purpose was to ring out in triumph.

Nine more times for students who were struck by bullets but survived a volley from National Guardsmen as they opened fire on a crowd during that now-famous anti-war demonstration on May 4, 1970.

Two more solemn metallic clangs in remembrance of two Jackson State University students killed by Mississippi police during their own Vietnam War protest 10 days later.

Hundreds attended Friday's annual commemoration. On a warm day beneath billowy clouds, an afternoon not unlike the day of the Kent State tragedy, they spread out across Blanket Hill, the slope where students ascended before charging guardsmen.

They milled about on the other side of the hill, where the dead students fell, and a bullet hole in a Don Drumm sculpture in front of Taylor Hall remains a 42-year-old reminder of that iconic moment in American history.

As has become tradition, a historical chronicle of events was read aloud, recalling the announcement of the U.S. invasion of Cambodia, the downtown riots that followed, the burning of the ROTC barracks, and the tension that built as armed National Guardsmen were called in to dispel demonstrations.

Then four people took turns speaking on behalf of the four slain students on a stage framed by poster-sized photographs of Krause, Miller, Schroeder and Scheuer.

"Don't think of this place as anything less than where Americans shed blood for their freedom," said Bryan Staul, president of the Kent State College Democrats.

Staul said his own generation has been "lazy" when it comes to the ages-old battle to preserve liberty and fight for justice.

"We don't vote. We don't stand up. We don't protest ... We gave up, we let go," he said as he called on his peers to become more active in their world.

Representing Scheuer, classmate Peter Jedick recalled meeting Scheuer in the Tri-Towers dorm cafeteria, where she made jokes about the food. Afterward, they ate together often.

Jedick said he was in the Kent State commons that day in 1970 when he heard "firecrackers" on the opposite side of Taylor Hall. It took awhile before he realized the noise was gunfire, and another day before he learned his friend had died in that moment.

Sanford Jay Rosen, who represented surviving victims and the families of the dead in a wrongful death civil suit, told the story of how the families had lost the first court round, won a new trial on appeal, and eventually made a heart-wrenching decision to settle for $600,000.

"I have only wept twice in public as an adult," Rosen said, and the first was when he saw how difficult it was for the families to accept the settlement without any authorities accepting responsibility.

Rosen said he has often dreamed that he had the chance to try the case a third time "and win total victory."

Rosen joined many other voices in continuing to ask state and federal lawmakers to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the shootings.

Last week, the Justice Department said it would not reopen the investigation, saying enhanced audio recordings that some insist include an official order for the guardsmen to open fire were inconclusive.

Copyright © 2012 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: 42 years later, 7 hurt at Kent State in 1970 National Guard shooting want answers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: New York Daily News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Survivors call for hearings to examine new evidence

AP

FILE--Ohio National Guardsmen patrol the empty Kent State University, Ohio campus after a three-day riot with students in this May 6, 1970 file photo. On May 4, 1970, Ohio National Guardsmen fired on a crowd of anti-Vietnam War demonstrators, killing four and wounding ten. This year marks the thirty-year anniversary of those shootings. (AP Photo, File)

KENT, Ohio — Seven people wounded by Ohio National Guard gunfire at Kent State University 42 years ago Friday are appealing for answers to lingering questions about the shooting, such as whether an order to fire was given.

Paul Tople/Akron Beacon Journal/AP

National Guardsmen open fire on students, some of whom are fleeing for cover into Taylor Hall May 4, 1970, in Kent, Ohio. Four students died and nine others were wounded during the student protest at Kent State against the Vietnam War. Clouds of dust at the far left of the photo near the sidewalk show bullets hitting the ground. The incident marked a pivotal moment in the public's perception of the Vietnam War, hastening the end of U.S. involvement. The Akron Beacon Journal's coverage of the Kent Stateshootings won the Pulitzer Prize for General Local Reporting.

The survivors are launching a campaign to persuade state and federal lawmakers and other officials to convene hearings to examine new evidence from the May 4, 1970, shootings.

The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reports Friday (http://bit.ly/IKS6By ) that survivors and supporters are appealing to Congress, Ohio lawmakers, Gov. John Kasich, Attorney General Mike DeWine and human-rights groups.

JOHN FILO/AP

Mary Ann Vecchio gestures and screams as she kneels by the body of a student lying face down on the campus of Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, on May 4, 1970. Four students died and nine others were wounded during student protests against the Vietnam War when National Guardsman opened fire.

Dean Kahler, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed from the waist down, says it's important to get the truth out before it's too late.

The Justice Department said last month it won't reopen its investigation.

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News Headline: 'See How They Run' dashes onto Weathervane Playhouse stage | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera

Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts, on April 20 at 7:30 p.m. and April 22 at 3 p.m. with a reception following each performance.

Solon Center for the Arts is at 6315 SOM Center Road.

The program features "Gallantry" by Douglas Moore and "The Medium" by Gian Carlo Menotti. Members of the Kent State University Orchestra will accompany 16 singers from the School of Music and the School of Theatre and Dance, conducted by Kent State Associate Professor Kerry Glann. Katherine Perkowski directs both productions.

The casts include graduate students Natalie Reitz as Baba and Lindsey Sandham Leonard as Monica in "The Medium" and well-known Cleveland-area performer Darryl Lewis as Dr. Gregg in "Gallantry."

"Gallantry" is a spoof of 1950s-era soap operas, complete with live commercials just like the early years of television. The soap opera is set in a hospital, in which Dr. Gregg is in love with his nurse Lola, who is engaged to another hospital worker. Commercials for the two 'sponsors' of the show, Lochinvar soap and Billy Boy Wax, are interspersed in the action, providing additional context and humor.

Menotti's dramatic masterpiece "The Medium" follows the story of a woman who supports herself as a medium, performing fake séances in her home with her daughter and a mute boy. Her world turns to chaos when she believes an unidentified presence has touched her.

Both operas will be performed as one show, with an intermission in between.

This production represents a continued and developing collaboration between Solon Center for the Arts and Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music.

Tickets are $16 for adults, $12 for seniors, and $5 for students and can be reserved by calling Solon Center for the Arts at 440-337-1400.

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News Headline: 'See How They Run' dashes onto Weathervane Playhouse stage | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera

Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts, on April 20 at 7:30 p.m. and April 22 at 3 p.m. with a reception following each performance.

Solon Center for the Arts is at 6315 SOM Center Road.

The program features "Gallantry" by Douglas Moore and "The Medium" by Gian Carlo Menotti. Members of the Kent State University Orchestra will accompany 16 singers from the School of Music and the School of Theatre and Dance, conducted by Kent State Associate Professor Kerry Glann. Katherine Perkowski directs both productions.

The casts include graduate students Natalie Reitz as Baba and Lindsey Sandham Leonard as Monica in "The Medium" and well-known Cleveland-area performer Darryl Lewis as Dr. Gregg in "Gallantry."

"Gallantry" is a spoof of 1950s-era soap operas, complete with live commercials just like the early years of television. The soap opera is set in a hospital, in which Dr. Gregg is in love with his nurse Lola, who is engaged to another hospital worker. Commercials for the two 'sponsors' of the show, Lochinvar soap and Billy Boy Wax, are interspersed in the action, providing additional context and humor.

Menotti's dramatic masterpiece "The Medium" follows the story of a woman who supports herself as a medium, performing fake séances in her home with her daughter and a mute boy. Her world turns to chaos when she believes an unidentified presence has touched her.

Both operas will be performed as one show, with an intermission in between.

This production represents a continued and developing collaboration between Solon Center for the Arts and Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music.

Tickets are $16 for adults, $12 for seniors, and $5 for students and can be reserved by calling Solon Center for the Arts at 440-337-1400.

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News Headline: 7 police departments discuss intelligence-gathering | Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Ewinger, James
News OCR Text: Seven of the largest police departments in northern Ohio caucused in Lakewood on Thursday about ways to employ better intelligence-gathering in the war on violent crime.

All belong to the Northern Ohio Violent Crime Consortium, started by the local U.S. attorney's office five years ago.

It began then to combat gun crimes. The new wrinkle is an intelligence-led policing program, which the University of Akron and Kent State University are helping to facilitate.

The departments are from Akron, Canton, Cleveland, Elyria, Lorain, Mansfield, Toledo and Youngstown, with support from the U.S. Department of Justice and various state federal agencies.

Elsie Day, a consultant for the program, said that before it began last month, some of the departments had no crime analysis abilities. Now all have some.

U.S. Attorney Steve Dettelbach said in a telephone interview that the intelligence program began because "law enforcement executives wanted to be more data-driven in how they deployed their resources so it is not just the gut feeling of the desk sergeant about what blocks need to be patrolled.

"Law enforcement has always been good at gathering information but less good at using it," he said.

Each department is supposed to identify priorities and craft an implementation program by Dec. 21.

Akron did not attend Thursday. The seven others broke out to caucus on their respective problem areas. Then they came together to outline what they had and what they needed.

Cleveland Police Capt. Tom Tube said it was striking to note the similarities of the crime problems in each city.

All spoke of gun violence, but some departments placed equal emphasis on gang activity.

Tube said Cleveland police have three crime analysts and the department has a general intelligence policy, but not everyone understands it or has bought into it.

He said the newest officers are the ones most open to using new technology and methods.

Cleveland has had great success with V-GRIP (Violence/Gun Reduction and Interdiction Program). He defined this as a directed mission.

Todd Wiles, a civilian intelligence analyst with the Cleveland Department, said there have been three V-GRIP missions with a fourth under way. They begin with analysis of a particular area, usually little more than a square mile. Some missions are investigative, and these result in more arrests. But others involve what he called saturation patrols with "knock and talk" sweeps, in which police knock on every door in a neighborhood.

Tube said residents are more likely to open up if it's clear that police are talking to everyone; that way they are less likely to appear as snitches.

Cleveland police said the state's Adult Parole Authority is a good source of intelligence because it maps the location of recently released violent offenders. Detective Kathy Cruz said the FBI and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives also are good sources.

Tube said Cleveland police log every gun seized and pass the information on to federal authorities for further analysis.

Toledo Police Lt. Mike Troendle, who leads the intelligence unit in his city, said the department has four analysts. He said Chief Derrick Diggs is the driving force behind it.

Burglaries are down in Toledo, the officers said, but gun violence is up, so their priorities are guns and gangs.

Troendle said keeping dossiers on gang members is one tactic, and getting greater access to security cameras is another. Toledo police have discussed asking firefighters and paramedics to share what they see when they have to go into homes.

Tube said the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority has 200 security cameras that might be useful to Cleveland police.

The intelligence program has three more planning sessions between now and October, with a summer training institute this summer, said the University of Akron's Professor David Licate, the project coordinator.

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: jewinger@plaind.com, 216-999-3905

Copyright © 2012 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: FBI: Men unknowingly put fake bombs at Ohio bridge (Banks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily News Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: THOMAS J. SHEERAN
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND — Five men charged with plotting to bomb a bridge linking two wealthy Cleveland suburbs placed what they thought were real explosives at the site and repeatedly tried to detonate them using text messages from cellphones, according to an FBI affidavit filed in court.

Federal authorities on Tuesday described the men as anarchists who are angry with corporate America and the government and unknowingly worked with an FBI informant for months as they crafted and carried out their plan.

The FBI said suspects bought fake explosives from an undercover employee and put them at the base of a highway bridge over the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, about 15 miles south of downtown Cleveland, on Monday. After leaving the park, they tried to initiate the explosives using a text-message detonation code, and they called the person who provided the bombs to check the code when it failed, according to the FBI affidavit.

Their arrests that night marked the latest case in which FBI agents planned fake terrorism plots alongside targeted suspects, an indication it continues to be a top strategy for the government in preventing terrorism.

“They talked about making a statement against corporate America and the government as some of the motivations for their actions,” U.S. Attorney Steven Dettelbach said Tuesday.

Court documents detail conversations the FBI secretly recorded in which its informant discussed bomb plans with some of the suspects. In one, Brandon L. Baxter, 20, of Lakewood, allegedly said, “Taking out a bridge in the business district would cost the … corporate big wigs a lot of money” because it would cause structural damage and prevent people from going to work.

The alleged conversations depict Douglas L. Wright, 26, of Indianapolis, as a sort of group leader who recruited others, scouted out the bridge site and participated in buying the fake explosives.

The other suspects were identified as Joshua S. Stafford, 23, and Anthony Hayne, 35, both of Cleveland, and Connor Stevens, 20, of suburban Berea.

All five are charged with conspiracy and trying to bomb property used in interstate commerce. They appeared Tuesday in U.S. District Court and were ordered jailed without bond pending a hearing Monday.

The charges carry possible penalties of more than 20 years in prison.

Similar arrests in the last few years — including in Massachusetts, Oregon, New York and Texas — offer a glimpse into sting operations by undercover FBI agents trying to catch possible terrorists in the act.

Defense attorneys in those cases have accused federal authorities of conducting overblown operations that entrapped their clients. Authorities have defended the practice, saying it’s prevented countless terrorist attacks.

Christopher Banks, an associate professor at Kent State University who has written on terrorism, defended the tactic as one of many the federal government uses in fighting terrorism. He said each case involving a possible terrorist threat is different, but after 9/11, caution weighs more on the side of government than the individual citizen.

“In this age that we live in, and with the heightened sense that the government should be doing something to prevent these kinds of acts, in that sense it can only protect public safety,” he said. “So it’s a fine line.”

The suspects had been associated with the anti-corporate Occupy Cleveland movement but don’t share its non-violent views and don’t represent Occupy Cleveland, organizer Debbie Kline said.

The alleged plotters were frustrated that other anti-corporate protesters opposed violence, Dettelbach said.

Federal authorities said their investigation was aided by a convicted criminal who worked as a paid confidential source, made contact with the some of the suspects in October and recorded conversations with them over the past three months.

The men had considered different plots, including trying to bring down financial institution signs in downtown Cleveland or attacking other targets, including a law enforcement center, oil wells, a cargo ship or the opening of a new downtown casino, according to the affidavit. The document also alleges that one suspect talked about being part of group planning to cause trouble during an upcoming NATO summit in Chicago.

Franko reported from Columbus, Ohio. Associated Press writers Barbara Rodriguez in Columbus and Pete Yost in Washington contributed to this report.

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News Headline: Cleveland won't renew Occupy group's permit (Banks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: DVD
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cleveland won't renew Occupy group's structure permit, 2 days after bridge bomb plot alleged

CLEVELAND (AP) ' Occupy protesters must ask serious questions about their open-arms policy in light of charges brought against five members accused of trying to blow up an Ohio bridge, a top Cleveland official said Wednesday.

The city declined to renew the group's downtown encampment permit on Wednesday, a denial planned before the bridge plot arrests were announced Monday, said Ken Silliman, chief of staff to Mayor Frank Jackson. The group, which remained by its encampment tent Wednesday night despite a 5 p.m. deadline to leave, can still gather at a spot across the street day or night. Police are monitoring but no arrests have been made.

The decision was made with the allegations as a backdrop, Silliman added.

"I think a fair question to ask of Occupy Cleveland, is, if you have portrayed your organization up till now as welcome to all-comers ' the tent will accommodate anyone and everyone ' how does that change when something like the events of yesterday happen?" Silliman said.

"How does that change when some of the people you've welcomed into your decision-making are now accused of such serious felonies?"

That question must be asked even if the city accepts the organization's statements that it is nonviolent and was distancing itself from those charged in the plot, Silliman said.

Occupy members, which received its encampment permit in October, planned to sit in protest of the tent's dismantling by police, but don't plan to be arrested, said Occupy Cleveland spokesman Joseph Zitt. The group has said the men didn't represent Occupy Cleveland and were not acting on its behalf.

Silliman's statements are something the group must discuss, he said.

"When things like this happen, we discover there might be factors that we had not necessarily thought of before," Zitt said. "Questions arise, they get discussed in assembly, we come to consensus on it. We're learning."

The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio questioned the timing of the permit revoke, saying it was concerned Jackson's announcement was an attempt to connect the entire Occupy movement to the bomb plot.

"Individuals are responsible for their own actions, not the groups they affiliate with," said ACLU of Ohio Legal Director James Hardiman in a statement. "City officials should not be in the business of condemning an entire group of people based on the actions of others."

Bill Dobbs, a spokesman for Occupy in New York, also said the arrests have nothing to do with the Occupy Movement that began last fall.

"This incident has nothing to do with Occupy Wall Street, which explicitly stands for non-violence. Before there's a rush to judgment, facts need to come out. Those charged are entitled to a fair trial and due process."

The five were charged Tuesday with plotting to bomb a bridge linking two wealthy Cleveland suburbs by placing what they thought were real explosives at the site and repeatedly trying to detonate them using text messages from cellphones, according to the FBI affidavit.

On Wednesday, an attorney representing one of the defendants questioned the role of an undercover informant, saying the ex-con hired by the FBI appeared to have played an active role in the plot.

Cleveland defense lawyer John Pyle said his client, Brandon Baxter, will plead not guilty in the case, which is set for a preliminary hearing next week.

An attorney for a second defendant, Douglas Wright, said his client also will plead not guilty. The attorney for a third defendant, Anthony Hayne, said his only information came from the 22-page affidavit.

"I have no idea who it is at this point," Michael O'Shea said Wednesday of the informant. "I imagine they will work pretty hard to keep that from us as long as they can."

Federal authorities described the men as anarchists who are angry with corporate America and the government and unknowingly worked with an FBI informant for months as they crafted and carried out their plan.

The FBI said the suspects bought the explosives ' actually fake ' from an undercover employee and put them at the base of a highway bridge over the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, about 15 miles south of downtown Cleveland, on Monday. After leaving the park, they tried to initiate the explosives using a text-message detonation code, and they called the person who provided the bombs to check the code when it failed, according to the FBI affidavit.

The affidavit also discussed the suspects' desire to destroy signs on banks as a protest against corporate America but said they didn't want to be seen as terrorists.

Christopher Banks, an associate professor at Kent State University who has written on terrorism, said Wednesday that anarchists have targeted research and development centers, car dealerships, timber resources and storefronts over issues including corporate policies and the environment.

"I think the so-called anarchists are getting a lot more notoriety because of economic summits and things like that, which tie into the Occupy Now movement a little bit," he said. "I think that's why it's part of the discussion today."

Court documents detail conversations the FBI secretly recorded in which its informant discussed bomb plans with some of the suspects. In one, Baxter, 20, of Lakewood, allegedly said, "Taking out a bridge in the business district would cost the ... corporate big wigs a lot of money" because it would cause structural damage and prevent people from going to work.

The alleged conversations depict Wright, 26, of Indianapolis, as a sort of group leader who recruited others, scouted out the bridge site and participated in buying the fake explosives.

The other suspects were identified as Joshua S. Stafford, 23, and Hayne, 35, both of Cleveland, and Connor Stevens, 20, of suburban Berea.

All five are charged with conspiracy and trying to bomb property used in interstate commerce. They appeared Tuesday in U.S. District Court and were ordered jailed without bond pending a hearing Monday.

The charges carry possible penalties[ServletException in:/common/layout/viewtemplate.jsp] null'

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News Headline: College Grads: Will They Find Jobs? | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Amani Abraham
News OCR Text: Written by Amani Abraham

Rate this item

Several thousand degrees were conferred over the weekend at The University of Akron and Kent State University. The next step: Finding a job.

The job hunt after college graduation can be tough, but there are signs that graduates are finding jobs sooner than expected.

Kim Beyer, interim director of Career Center at the University of Akron, said the proof is in the numbers.

"Our indications are showing that hiring is up about 7 percent for undergraduate students, but 4 percent overall which is the average for all college hires," said Beyer.

Hiring of new college graduates is expected to increase to 10.2 percent in 2012, according to a survey done by the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

More students are lining up interviews at career fairs, according to Beyer. She says most employers are are targeting students with various skills.

"A lot of our employers don't necessarily specify a specific major," said Beyer. "They're looking for candidates that have very specific skill sets."

Deanna Dunn, director of the cooperative education program in the UA College of Engineering, said at least half of the engineering graduates have already landed full-time jobs.

"We've gotten calls from companies that we have never heard before where we are staring new relationships. It definitely has increased," said Dunn.

On the Web: www.naceweb.org

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News Headline: Joys host Porthouse 'Adoption Party' (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In an updated take of singing
for one's supper, student
interns who will work at Porthouse
Theater this summer
performed at a fundraiser in
which the audience bid on
the interns after hearing and
watching them sing.
Called an “Adoption Party,”
the gathering was held at the
Franklin Township home of
David and Sherry Joy, major
boosters of the summer theater
program that the Kent State
University School of Theater
and Dance has operated for
more than four decades.
This was the fourth annual
party the Joys have staged at
their home in cooperation with
Terri Kent, the artistic director
of Porthouse. This year's drew
Porthouse fans who came out
to enjoy the music and then
pledged their support by identifying
a student intern they'd
like to help get through the
summer.
Adoptions were $300 per student
or $500 for two, and those
who attended could pick a student
they wished to help out after
having witnessed their talents
in musical performance.
Piano accompaniment was
provided by faculty members
Jonathan Swoboda and Jennifer
Korecki.
Some 44 adoptions took
place and, according to Terri
Kent, more are available. Supporters
who adopt can interact
with their adoptees, invite
them into their homes, or simply
offer financial support.
Because not all the student
interns were on hand, some had
to be selected based on their
photographs and resumes, supplied
by the School of Theater
and Dance.
The singing was full of gusto
and often bore lyrics adapted
to the occasion.
Artistic Director Kent announced
three musicals for the
upcoming season: “Damn Yankees,”
the Richard Adler and
Jerry Ross hit, will open the
season, playing from June 14 to
30. “The World Goes 'Round,” a
revue of the music by the team
of John Kander and Fred Ebb,
runs from July 5 to 21. The finale
will be “The Sound of Music,”
the ever-popular Richard
Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein
II hit.

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News Headline: Ohio Third Frontier Approves $200,000 in Commercialization Grants to Kent State Researchers (McGimpsey, Hughes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Grants could help move technology from the lab to the market

The Ohio Third Frontier program recently made three separate grants to Kent State University researchers through the newly established Technology Validation and Start-up Fund, which promotes the commercialization of Ohio technologies developed by the state's institutions of higher education.

“These projects demonstrate our commitment as a university to high-quality research that supports the health and livelihood of the people of Ohio,” said Grant McGimpsey, Ph.D., Kent State's vice president for research. “We would like to express our gratitude to the Third Frontier for showing confidence in our researchers and for supporting these efforts.”

Joel Hughes, Ph.D., associate professor in Kent State's Department of Psychology and director of the university's Applied Psychology Center, will lead a $50,000 effort to develop the project “iLidRX - an Interoperating Medication Container for mHealth Management of Chronic Illnesses.” This venture will complete the development of a system for managing patient compliance in both clinical trials and the treatment of chronic diseases.

“I think that this product could be completely revolutionary,” Hughes said. “At this point, we know that a major barrier to effective medical care is medication adherence. Solving this problem is a ‘holy grail' of health behavior right now, and the iLidRx will be uniquely suited to improving medication taking, reducing medication errors and ultimately improving health.”

Kent State Trustees Research Professor John L. West, Ph.D., from the university's Liquid Crystal Institute and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, is spearheading a $50,000 materials science project titled “Controlled Cracking of ITO on Plastic Substrates” which will demonstrate the commercial viability of a manufacturing method for use in flexible electronics applications.

“It's an exciting new technology, and I'm glad the state has provided this support for it,” West said. “We will move quickly to build a prototype and commercialize this new technology.”

A $100,000 Phase 2 grant was made to GraphSQL LLC, a newly established Portage County company co-funded by Kent State Associate Professor Ruoming Jin, Ph.D., from the Department of Computer Science. The grant will help develop the firm's software system supporting graph data analysis for massive business data.

“We also are very excited about this Phase 2 award for GraphSQL,” McGimpsey said. “This is an excellent example of university-private sector cooperation that reflects what we see as the university's responsibility to promote economic development in the region through research and development.”

Ohio Third Frontier, an unprecedented and bipartisan commitment to create new technology-based products, companies, industries and jobs, has attracted more than $6.6 billion in other investments to Ohio, and has a nearly 9 to 1 return on investment since its inception. The Ohio Third Frontier also has assisted in the creation and retention of more than 79,000 direct and indirect jobs for Ohioans.

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News Headline: ENTERTAINMENT ON THE TENS | Email

News Date: 05/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Free

Tom Batiuk, the creator of "Funky Winkerbean," talks about the character, his comic strip and the multivolume series, "The Complete Funky Winkerbean," planned through Kent State University Press. The first volume, covering 1972-1974, is available. Noon Saturday, Ground Zero Comics, 13349 Pearl Road, Strongsville. 440-572-9599. . . . Children's book author and artist Ashley Bryan will speak about his work and its adaptation to the "Let It Shine" children's space at the Warrensville Heights branch of the Cuyahoga County Public Library. 7 p.m. Thursday 4415 Northfield Road. Free, but registration requested at cuyahogalibrary.org or 216-464-5280.


Copyright © 2012 The Plain Dealer.

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News Headline: Do That This Weekend, May 5 and 6 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Special to The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Courtesy of Kent State University Tom Batiuk will speak at Ground Zero Comics in Strongsville Saturday. FAMILIES FISHING DAYS No fishing equipment? No problem! Staff from Cleveland Metroparks Institute of the Great Outdoors are renting fishing gear on selected weekends...

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