Report Overview:
Total Clips (10)
American Association University Professors (AAUP); Faculty Senate; Office of the President (1)
Art, School of; Town-Gown (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
Office of the President (1)
Research (3)
Sociology (1)
Students; Technology (1)


Headline Date Outlet

American Association University Professors (AAUP); Faculty Senate; Office of the President (1)
Petition drive against KSU president on hold (Altobelli) 05/09/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

A petition drive that could trigger a vote on the performance of Kent State President Lester Lefton is on hold pending "critical" negotiations with the faculty union. Joe Altobelli, an associate professor of...


Art, School of; Town-Gown (1)
Kent to host Masterpieces on Main art, wine festival 05/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
Jobs fair draws hundreds on day one of summit 05/08/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...including the One Stop of Mahoning and Columbiana counties. Officials from Columbiana Career and Technical Center, Eastern Gateway Community College, Kent State University East Liverpool and other job training centers also spoke about the need to develop skills for skills that employers are seeking...

Jobs fair draws hundreds on day one of summit 05/09/2012 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...including the One Stop of Mahoning and Columbiana counties. Officials from Columbiana Career and Technical Center, Eastern Gateway Community College, Kent State University East Liverpool and other job training centers also spoke about the need to develop skills for skills that employers are seeking...


Office of the President (1)
OUR VIEW Leftons' gift boosts global education 05/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Research (3)
Gambling law nixes card rooms 05/09/2012 Middletown Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...Commission discretion on how much video slot machine revenue to earmark for gambling addiction services. The total can go up to 1 percent. The state has hired Kent State University to do a study on the gambling addiction problem in Ohio so that officials have a baseline going forward to help determine how...

Gambling law nixes card rooms 05/09/2012 Dayton Daily News Text Email

...Commission discretion on how much video slot machine revenue to earmark for gambling addiction services. The total can go up to 1 percent. The state has hired Kent State University to do a study on the gambling addiction problem in Ohio so that officials have a baseline going forward to help determine how...

In reversal, charity card rooms are out of gambling bill 05/08/2012 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...discretion on how much video slot machine revenue to earmark for gambling addiction. The total can go up to 1 percent. The state has contracted with Kent State University to complete a study by June on the gambling addiction problem in Ohio now, to give officials a baseline going forward and help...


Sociology (1)
Link between parental time pressure, depression examined (Roxburgh) 05/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Students; Technology (1)
Kent homes benefit from Rebuilding Day effort 05/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Petition drive against KSU president on hold (Altobelli) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A petition drive that could trigger a vote on the performance of Kent State President Lester Lefton is on hold pending "critical" negotiations with the faculty union.

Joe Altobelli, an associate professor of math at KSU's Trumbull campus, said by email that he had turned the petitions over to George Garrison, a professor of pan-African studies at the Kent campus, "who will decide, in consultation with others, if and when, the petition will go forward."

"Since, the faculty want time to make every effort to resolve things without a no confidence vote [against Lefton], the petition has not been formally presented to [the KSU Faculty] senate," Altobelli said Tuesday.

He took it upon himself two weeks ago to launch the petition drive that could trigger a no-confidence vote against Lefton. Altobelli criticized Lefton for "ignoring the contract" with the American Association of University Professors and "showing contempt for the faculty."

The AAUP and university have been negotiating a new contract since last summer. Both sides have agreed not to make public comments while the negotiations are ongoing, but about 100 faculty took out an ad in the April 9 issue of the student-run Daily Kent Stater to demonstrate their unhappiness with Lefton.

At Monday's regular Faculty Senate meeting, Garrison, who is a senator, complained that Lefton was not honoring the tenets of shared governance that he said had served the university well for decades.

"It diminishes the faculty when we are under assault," he said at the meeting. "What kind of message does that send?"

He told colleagues by email that he was boycotting a reception that Lefton was holding at his home for the Faculty Senate that night "as an act of protest."

If petitions are turned in to the Faculty Senate, President Paul Ferrell, a computer science professor, said the signatures would need to be verified before faculty at all eight KSU campuses could vote on Lefton's job performance. One hundred valid signatures would be needed to trigger the no-confidence vote.

If the faculty does vote, it may not have much direct impact.

Lefton works by contract and reports to the KSU trustees, who issued a statement through their public relations office supporting him.

"The university has an impressive strategic plan, which the board approved, and which President Lefton is implementing with excellent results," the statement read. The trustees "affirm their confidence in the President."

Meanwhile, the Kent chapter of the AAUP agreed April 24 to ask members for a strike vote "at such time deemed appropriate," possibly this summer, according to an email circulated to faculty.

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News Headline: Kent to host Masterpieces on Main art, wine festival | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: It's almost time for the
sixth annual Masterpieces
on Main Art & Wine Festival,
to be held in downtown
Kent from noon to 10 p.m.
June 2.
Main Street Kent is gearing
up for two and a half
times as many artists at the
event than last year.
Admission to the event
is free. For $10, event goers
can purchase a commemorative
wine glass and three
“taste” tickets to be used at
their choice of the five winery
tents.
North Water Street will be
closed from Main Street to
Columbus Street, and the
Hometown Bank Plaza will
be filled with live, local music
all day long. A selection of
popular, local bands will play
at noon, 2, 4, 6 and 8 p.m.
Local wineries participating
in the event include Wolf
Creek, Troutman Vineyards,
Viking Vineyards & Winery,
Maize Valley Winery and
Myrddin Winery.
New to the event this year,
Main Street Kent has added
a “bistro” within the festival,
where a selection of
foods will be available for
purchase from Taproot Catering,
an offshoot of Cajun
Dave's located in downtown
Kent. A tent with chairs and
tables will be set up for people
to sample different offerings
at their leisure throughout
the event.
The event is sponsored by
Ametek, KSU School of Art
Galleries, Wild Earth Outfitters,
and Williams, Welser,
Kratcoski & Can, LLC, all located
in Kent.
Proceeds from the event
will benefit Main Street
Kent, the non-profit organization
dedicated to the
revitalization of downtown
Kent. More information can
be found at mainstreetkent.
org and facebook.com/mainstreetkent.

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News Headline: Jobs fair draws hundreds on day one of summit | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "It was an exciting day," said Larry Kosiba, executive director of the Sustainable Opportunity Development Center, following day one of the "Teaming4Success - 2012" Columbiana County Economic Summit held Monday at the East Liverpool Motor Lodge.

The feature attraction for the majority of attendees was a jobs fair hosted by Rep. Bill Johnson, which drew more than 500 individuals from across the valley seeking employment opportunities in a variety of fields. Drawing the most attention were energy companies, such as MarkWest and Chesapeake, that have flocked to the state in recent years seeking development of the oil and gas deposits found in the Marcellus and Utica shale formations.

In all, there were representatives from more than 50 companies seeking employees present at the jobs fair, as well as 13 workforce development agencies, including the One Stop of Mahoning and Columbiana counties. Officials from Columbiana Career and Technical Center, Eastern Gateway Community College, Kent State University East Liverpool and other job training centers also spoke about the need to develop skills for skills that employers are seeking in the shale energy business.

"This could be a great employment opportunity for a lot of people, a lot of different skill sets, a lot of different management professionals in the geological, or construction engineering and other fields," Kosiba said. The training programs presented at the job fair will allow people to see where the needs are and give them the skills they'll need for the specific trades that are in demand now, he said. "I think it's a great marriage."

Kosiba said he was very happy with the turnout and encouraged by the stories he'd heard of people hired on the spot, with several more making appointments for interviews. Despite the years of economic hardship, he's also bullish on the future for the area. "The employment numbers for Ohio are looking much, much better every day," Kosiba said, a benefit of investment from the energy industry.

"If you've moved out of town, you find that you might have left too soon, and it'd be great to come home to Ohio and find jobs here," he added.

The two-day event continues today with programs dedicated to the shale energy industry in Ohio.

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News Headline: Jobs fair draws hundreds on day one of summit | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "It was an exciting day," said Larry Kosiba, executive director of the Sustainable Opportunity Development Center, following day one of the "Teaming4Success - 2012" Columbiana County Economic Summit held Monday at the East Liverpool Motor Lodge.

The feature attraction for the majority of attendees was a jobs fair hosted by Rep. Bill Johnson, which drew more than 500 individuals from across the valley seeking employment opportunities in a variety of fields. Drawing the most attention were energy companies, such as MarkWest and Chesapeake, that have flocked to the state in recent years seeking development of the oil and gas deposits found in the Marcellus and Utica shale formations.

In all, there were representatives from more than 50 companies seeking employees present at the jobs fair, as well as 13 workforce development agencies, including the One Stop of Mahoning and Columbiana counties. Officials from Columbiana Career and Technical Center, Eastern Gateway Community College, Kent State University East Liverpool and other job training centers also spoke about the need to develop skills for skills that employers are seeking in the shale energy business.

"This could be a great employment opportunity for a lot of people, a lot of different skill sets, a lot of different management professionals in the geological, or construction engineering and other fields," Kosiba said. The training programs presented at the job fair will allow people to see where the needs are and give them the skills they'll need for the specific trades that are in demand now, he said. "I think it's a great marriage."

Kosiba said he was very happy with the turnout and encouraged by the stories he'd heard of people hired on the spot, with several more making appointments for interviews. Despite the years of economic hardship, he's also bullish on the future for the area. "The employment numbers for Ohio are looking much, much better every day," Kosiba said, a benefit of investment from the energy industry.

"If you've moved out of town, you find that you might have left too soon, and it'd be great to come home to Ohio and find jobs here," he added.

The two-day event continues today with programs dedicated to the shale energy industry in Ohio.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW Leftons' gift boosts global education | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ENDOWMENT FUND AT KENT STATE
AIDS STUDENTS WHO STUDY ABROAD

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY
President Lester Lefton and his
wife, Linda, are doing their part
to enable students to incorporate time
abroad in their studies at Kent.
The Leftons have
established a $25,000
endowment to assist
students who need
financial support to
study overseas, and
they're encouraging
other potential donors to provide similar
assistance.
Kent State has a long history of encouraging
students to pursue overseas study
opportunities. The university welcomes
international students to the Kent campus
and maintains relationships with universities
around the world that welcome
Kent students as well.
Travel broadens perspective and it is
especially beneficial for young people by
promoting diversity and a better understanding
of the world in which they will
compete in their chosen professions.
We commend the Leftons for leading
by example and hope that others who
are in a position to provide similar assistance
will do so.

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News Headline: Gambling law nixes card rooms | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Middletown Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: State won't allow charity games; moratorium set on sweepstakes parlors.

A rewrite of the state's gambling law authorizing slot machines at Ohio's seven horse racing tracks will not include a provision allowing county commissions to contract with a private company to run a “charity card room.” The version does include a statewide moratorium on new sweepstakes parlors and Internet cafes until 2013.

The card room provision was yanked from the substitute version of House Bill 386 Tuesday, just before the Senate Government Oversight and Reform Committee unanimously passed the bill.

State Sen. Bill Coley, R-Middletown, chairman of the committee, said the charity card room language will be considered in a separate bill.

“Our members wanted more time to investigate,” Coley said. “We wanted to narrow or reign in proliferation of charity card rooms, but we were unwilling to give one county a monopoly as the House version did.”

Although it was opposed by Gov. John Kasich, supporters of the card-room language said it would limit a currently unregulated area of law that allows unlimited numbers of charity card games to operate in the state.

One card room in Cuyahoga County has been operating for years, where charities can pick days to have the proceeds go to them, and it appears others also are starting to create them.

• The version of HB 386, likely headed to a full Senate vote today, would set a statewide moratorium until 2013 on new sweepstakes parlors and Internet cafes as lawmakers work on ways to better regulate or outlaw the gambling businesses. Under a change made Tuesday, the bill would allow parlors that were operating before the moratorium to reopen and file an affidavit with the attorney general. They had been shut down by local authorities who later dropped their legal action.

• The bill also gives the Ohio Lottery Commission discretion on how much video slot machine revenue to earmark for gambling addiction services. The total can go up to 1 percent. The state has hired Kent State University to do a study on the gambling addiction problem in Ohio so that officials have a baseline going forward to help determine how much money is needed.

• The Senate bill requires the attorney general to submit a report by Dec. 31, 2013, on how to share law enforcement training funds from casinos with local law enforcement agencies. Until then, the training money will be centralized with the attorney general.

• A change also would prohibit new horse track racinos from calling themselves casinos, except for Northfield Park, which officials say has advertised itself as a “casino” for years.

Robert Tenenbaum, spokesman for Penn National Gaming Inc., called passage of the bill out of committee “progress.” He said the card room provision would have represented a “major expansion of the gaming industry in Ohio without a vote of the people.”

“In our view (pulling the language) was an appropriate way to handle it,” Tenenbaum said.

Penn National is building casinos in Columbus and Toledo and has proposed relocating a harness racing track, Raceway Park, from Toledo to Dayton.

“I sense there is a real commitment on part of both the House and the Senate to get the bills done,” Tenenbaum said. “I see nothing in the bill that's going to cause us to back away from our commitment to relocate a racetrack to Dayton.”

The Columbus Dispatch contributed to this report.

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News Headline: Gambling law nixes card rooms | Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Dayton Daily News
Contact Name: Smith, Joanne Huist
News OCR Text: A rewrite of the state's gambling law authorizing slot machines at Ohio's seven horse racing tracks will not include a provision allowing county commissions to contract with a private company to run a “charity card room.” The version does include a statewide moratorium on new sweepstakes parlors and Internet cafes until 2013.

The card room provision was yanked from the substitute version of House Bill 386 Tuesday, just before the Senate Government Oversight and Reform Committee unanimously passed the bill.

State Sen. Bill Coley, R-Middletown, chairman of the committee, said the charity card room language will be considered in a separate bill.

“Our members wanted more time to investigate,” Coley said. “We wanted to narrow or reign in proliferation of charity card rooms, but we were unwilling to give one county a monopoly as the House version did.”

Although it was opposed by Gov. John Kasich, supporters of the card-room language said it would limit a currently unregulated area of law that allows unlimited numbers of charity card games to operate in the state.

One card room in Cuyahoga County has been operating for years, where charities can pick days to have the proceeds go to them, and it appears others also are starting to create them.

• The version of HB 386, likely headed to a full Senate vote today, would set a statewide moratorium until 2013 on new sweepstakes parlors and Internet cafes as lawmakers work on ways to better regulate or outlaw the gambling businesses.

Under a change made Tuesday, the bill would allow parlors that were operating before the moratorium to reopen and file an affidavit with the attorney general.

They had been shut down by local authorities who later dropped their legal action.

• The bill also gives the Ohio Lottery Commission discretion on how much video slot machine revenue to earmark for gambling addiction services. The total can go up to 1 percent. The state has hired Kent State University to do a study on the gambling addiction problem in Ohio so that officials have a baseline going forward to help determine how much money is needed.

• The Senate bill requires the attorney general to submit a report by Dec. 31, 2013, on how to share law enforcement training funds from casinos with local law enforcement agencies. Until then, the training money will be centralized with the attorney general.

• A change also would prohibit new horse track racinos from calling themselves casinos, except for Northfield Park, which officials say has advertised itself as a “casino” for years.

Robert Tenenbaum, spokesman for Penn National Gaming Inc., called passage of the bill out of committee “progress.” He said the card room provision would have represented a “major expansion of the gaming industry in Ohio without a vote of the people.”

“In our view (pulling the language) was an appropriate way to handle it,” Tenenbaum said.

Penn National is building casinos in Columbus and Toledo and has proposed relocating a harness racing track, Raceway Park, from Toledo to Dayton.

“I sense there is a real commitment on part of both the House and the Senate to get the bills done,” Tenenbaum said. “I see nothing in the bill that's going to cause us to back away from our commitment to relocate a racetrack to Dayton.”

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News Headline: In reversal, charity card rooms are out of gambling bill | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Senate Republicans reversed course, at least for now, and decided this afternoon to yank a provision out of a gambling-law rewrite that would have allowed one charity card room with paid dealers to operate in each Ohio county.

House Bill 389, which authorizes slot machines at Ohio's seven racetracks, unanimously passed a Senate committee this afternoon and is likely headed for a full Senate vote on Wednesday.

The plan this morning was to add more card-room language to the bill, but by the time the committee reconvened in the afternoon, it was decided to pull all the language out.

"After discussion among members, we came to the conclusion we're going to save all of the charitable card-room revisions for a separate bill on charitable gaming," said Sen. Bill Coley, R-Middletown.

Although it was opposed by Gov. John Kasich, supporters of the card-room language said it would limit a currently unregulated area of law that allows unlimited numbers of charity card games to operate in the state. One card room in Cuyahoga County has been operating for years, where charities can pick days to have the proceeds go to them, and it appears others also are starting to create them.

Coley this morning read a letter from Garfield Heights Mayor Vic Collova, who said the city also runs a charity poker operation, approved by the City Council in December, and it has helped local charities. The mayor opposed limiting card rooms to one per county, because Cuyahoga County already has one.

Coley said he has been told that other charity card rooms are operating in Ohio, but he has not confirmed the locations.

"We are trying to narrow the focus of charity card rooms," Coley said, noting it's up to county commissioners to decide if and where to run one.

Asked earlier if he agreed with Senate Republicans that card rooms currently are legal and could open all over the state, House Speaker William G. Batchelder, R-Medina, said: "I don't believe that I do agree with that. That's fairly dubious."

The House-passed version of the bill would have allowed only for the existing card room in Cuyahoga County, and some argue that allowing more of them could cut into casino-tax revenue that would go to local governments and schools.

Among other changes, the bill also gives the Ohio Lottery Commission discretion on how much video slot machine revenue to earmark for gambling addiction. The total can go up to 1 percent.

The state has contracted with Kent State University to complete a study by June on the gambling addiction problem in Ohio now, to give officials a baseline going forward and help determine how much money is needed.

A new change also would prohibit new horse-track racinos from calling themselves casinos, except for Northfield Park, which officials say has advertised itself as a "casino" for years.

The bill also requires the attorney general to submit a report by Dec. 31, 2013, on how to share law enforcement training funds from casinos with local law enforcement agencies. Until then, Republicans are centralizing that training money with the attorney general, a move that police have opposed.

The bill includes a moratorium on new sweepstakes parlors and so-called Internet cafes as lawmakers continue to work on ways to better regulate or outlaw the gambling businesses. Under a change today, the bill would allow parlors that were operating before the moratorium, and that were shut down by local authorities who later dropped their legal action, to reopen and file an affidavit with the attorney general.

Sen. Joe Schiavoni, D-Canfield, testified yesterday on his separate bill that would give the Ohio Casino Control Commission the ability to license and regulate sweepstakes parlors. It also gives local governments the authority to allow the establishments and levy fees on them.

"We have all these forms of gambling, and this is the only form that is not currently being regulated," Schiavoni told the committee.

Some, including Sen. Larry Obhof Jr., R-Montville Township, questioned if it's better to just shut them down completely. Schiavoni, who said several sweepstakes parlors are operating in the Youngstown area, disagreed. "Once we have sufficient regulations, it will weed out the fly-by-night folks who are opening up these places," he said. "There is a legitimate, fair way to do this."

Sen. Keith Faber, R-Celina, called sweepstakes parlors the "Wild, Wild West" of gaming in Ohio, but lawmakers have struggled with how to regulate them. "That is a very thorny area of law," Coley said.

"Why do we, because we have a loophole that some people have figured out how to exploit, say: 'Good for you, you need to continue to allow that loophole to go,'" Faber said. "If we're going to do gaming, it's used for charity or for education in this state. Why are we allowing gaming solely for profit?"

Schiavoni said that in talks with the attorney general, and looking at what other states have done, those that have tried an all-out ban on sweepstakes parlors have not been successful. "We're trying to take a reasonable approach to this issue."

A number of retailers use sweepstakes games to lure customers -- McDonald's Monopoly game is often cited as an example -- and lawmakers are trying to find a law that distinguishes those types of entities from clearly gambling establishments.

Lawmakers may address sweepstakes parlors in separate legislation.

"There are some huge consumer protection issues that we want addressed," Coley said, noting that there is nothing regulating how much the parlors must pay out. "There are no reporting requirements and a lot of money moving around. That's a prescription for disaster."

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News Headline: Link between parental time pressure, depression examined (Roxburgh) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A recently published
paper by
Kent State University
Associate Professor
Susan Roxburgh
examined
the association between
depression
and parental time
pressures among
employed married parents.

Roxburgh is a sociologist who
has been with KSU since 1994.

The Journal of Family Issues
published her paper “Parental
Time Pressures and Depression
among Married Dual-Earner Parents”
in its most recent issue (November,
2011).

In a telephone survey of 250 parents,
Roxburgh found that concerns
about having enough time to
spend with children are associated
with higher depression among
both fathers and mothers.

Her research also revealed that
job experiences play a role in influencing
the link between parental
time pressure and depression.

Parents who reported high job
demands felt more parental time
pressure, which in turn increased
their depression.

“Even though other research
shows that American parents are
actually spending more time with
their children than they were 20
years ago, the results of this survey
show that parents worry about the
time they spend with their children
and that these concerns are associated
with higher depression,” Roxburgh
said.

The study also found that mothers
who reported high job control
were less likely to be depressed by
parental time pressures.

This relationship was not observed
among fathers, which suggested
that good working conditions
may be particularly important
for employed mothers' well-being.

Roxburgh reported that social
support from partners did not reduce
the association between time
pressure and depression among
parents, but household income
was a significant moderator of the
depression-parental time pressure
link.

This means that irrespective of
marital quality, parental time pressures
are associated with higher
depression, but that affluent mothers
and fathers who report high parental
time pressure experience
less depression than low-income
mothers and fathers.

Even as other studies show
that American parents, particularly
fathers, are spending more
time with their children, the results
of this study indicate that
concerns about the amount and
quality of time with children is
a significant source of stress
for working parents, especially
those in low-paying, high-demand
jobs.

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News Headline: Kent homes benefit from Rebuilding Day effort | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Homes in Kent were
among those receiving improvements
during the 17th
annual Rebuilding Day, sponsored
by Rebuilding Together
Greater Cuyahoga Valley
Serving Portage County.

More than 400 volunteers
representing dozens of organizations
joined Rebuilding
Together to provide home repairs
and modifications to 14
homes in Summit and Portage
counties on April 28.

Kent State University students
assisted in replacing
doors and windows on two
homes on Dodge Street in
Kent.

More than $7,500 in donated
volunteer labor and an
additional $7,500 in materials
were invested on behalf
of those in need.

Volunteers and donors included
the City of Kent, First
Congregational Church of
Tallmadge, the First Church
of God of Tallmadge, Metis
Construction, students from
Kent State University Construction
Technology program
and the BJ's Charitable
Foundation, the event promises
to be a huge success.

“The housing needs of our
low-income elderly and disabled
citizens are growing
exponentially every day,” said
Paul Holm, executive director
of Rebuilding Together.
“Rebuilding Day captures
the spirit of what Rebuilding
Together is all about. It
brings together donors, corporations,
civic groups, government,
and religious organizations
to better the lives
and homes of people who really
need our help.”

Local volunteers helped
to raise funds for the event
through Rebuilding Together's
Bowl to Rebuild held on
March 31 and through other
individual group events.

“We could not continue
this great tradition without
the commitment and hard
work of each of our volunteer
groups,” said Holm.

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