Report Overview:
Total Clips (13)
American Association University Professors (AAUP); Faculty Senate; Office of the President (1)
Athletics; Students (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Health Sciences (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (1)
KSU Museum; Theatre and Dance (1)
Mathematics (1)
Political Science (1)
Research (3)


Headline Date Outlet

American Association University Professors (AAUP); Faculty Senate; Office of the President (1)
Petition for KSU faculty vote on Lefton on hold (Altobelli) 05/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Athletics; Students (1)
Kent State football recruit enters guilty plea to dorm room burglary 05/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
KSU Fashion School hosts 12th annual show 05/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Health Sciences (2)
My Town: KSU Professor Receives Grant for Parkinson's Research (Ridgel) 05/09/2012 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- A Kent State University professor received a grant to continue groundbreaking Parkinson's research and seeks participants for a clinical study. Parkinson's...

KENT STATE PROFESSOR RECEIVES $390,090 GRANT TO CONTINUE GROUNDBREAKING PARKINSON'S RESEARCH (Ridgel) 05/09/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

...leads to decreased independence and increased reliance on caregivers and the healthcare system for individuals living with it.But research conducted by Kent State University's Angela Ridgel, Ph.D., shows reduced symptoms of the disease with the use of exercise using motorized bicycles. Ridgel,...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
'Dark Shadows': The Birth Of The Modern TV Vampire (Dawidziak) 05/10/2012 NPR - Online Text Attachment Email

...not be eternal, but they have been appearing on the small screen for decades. Mark Dawidziak, who's written books about vampires and teaches a class at Kent State University on their appearances in film and TV, says that part of the way vampires have remained a force in popular culture is through...


KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (1)
Darrow, Creekside improvements on hold as city officials mull fall Kent State traffic (with map) 05/09/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

Twinsburg — City officials had hoped that a road widening at Darrow Road and Creekside Drive would be complete in late August before Kent State University's Geauga campus moves into its new home and creates more traffic at the interesection. But because no contractors have stepped...


KSU Museum; Theatre and Dance (1)
Kent letters document Civil War from Portage 05/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Mathematics (1)
Web Seminar Shaping the Future of Math Curriculum through Adaptive Technology 05/09/2012 University Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...that students who are placed in core math courses above or below their abilities have high failure and drop rates. Join this web seminar to find out how Kent State University is addressing this challenge by incorporating adaptive technology in its math curriculum, leading to improvements in placement...


Political Science (1)
Cleveland won't renew Occupy group's permit (Banks) 05/09/2012 Lake Wylie Pilot - Online Text Attachment Email

...signs on banks as a protest against corporate America but said they didn't want to be seen as terrorists. Christopher Banks, an associate professor at Kent State University who has written on terrorism, said Wednesday that anarchists have targeted research and development centers, car dealerships,...


Research (3)
Casino Week: Problem gambling 05/09/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...pockets of serious problems persist. Now, the Lottery, the casinos and the State Racing Commission, the Ohio Department of Drug and Alcohol Services and Kent State University are doing a study to see where more resources need to go. If you are borrowing money to gamble, if gambling consumes your...

Senators remove card-room language 05/09/2012 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...yesterday to allow the Ohio Lottery Commission to earmark up to 1 percent of video slot-machine revenue for gambling addiction. The state has contracted with Kent State University to complete a study by June on the gambling addiction problem in Ohio. A new change also would prohibit horse track "racinos"...

Gambling law nixes card rooms 05/09/2012 Dayton Daily News - Online Text Attachment Email

...Commission discretion on how much video slot machine revenue to earmark for gambling addiction services. The total can go up to 1 percent. The state has hired Kent State University to do a study on the gambling addiction problem in Ohio so that officials have a baseline going forward to help determine how...


News Headline: Petition for KSU faculty vote on Lefton on hold (Altobelli) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A petition that could lead Kent State University's faculty to take a vote on their confidence in KSU President Lester Lefton is on hold indefinitely.

Joe Altobelli, associate professor of math at KSU's Trumbull campus, wrote in an e-mail that the school's faculty wants push forward with negotiations with the administration before deciding if the vote is necessary.

Altobelli has been leading an effort to collect 100 faculty signatures that, if brought to KSU Faculty Senate, would lead to a vote on Lefton.

"The faculty want time to make every effort to resolve things without a no confidence vote so the petition has not been formally presented to senate," Altobelli said. "Hopefully, it never will."

KSU's chapter of the American Association of University Professors has been in contract negotiations for nearly a year.

Altobelli said he started circulating the petition that could lead to a "no confidence vote" on Lefton's performance because of what he called the administration's "flagrant disregard" for the AAUP's current contract with the school.

He said Lefton's administration often ignored the union's contract when making decisions regarding personnel actions, and appealed arbitration decisions between the school and the union in civil court.

Altobelli, who will be away from his office for several weeks, said he has left the petitions in the care of other faculty members, who will decide when and if they need to call for a vote on Lefton's record.

Only KSU's Board of Trustees can fire Lefton, and a vote of "no confidence" by the Faculty Senate would be mainly symbolic. According to a press release from the Board of Trustees last week, the board is "proud to support" Lefton and looks forward to working with him in the future.

Lefton has been KSU president since 2006.

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News Headline: Kent State football recruit enters guilty plea to dorm room burglary | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Georgia high school quarterback recruited to the Kent State Golden Flashes football team in 2011 in coach Darrell Hazell's first recruiting class has pleaded guilty in Portage County Common Pleas Court to burglarizing a fellow recruit's dorm room and stealing his wallet.

Jordan M. Tarver, 19, of Stone Mountain, Ga., faces a possible sentence of one to three years in prison after pleading guilty to one count of burglary, a third-degree felony. He also could receive probation, as third-degree felonies do not carry a presumption of prison time under Ohio law.

Sentencing by Judge Laurie Pittman is pending a pre-sentence investigation.

Portage County Prosecutor Victor Vigluicci said Tarver, a freshman, "misrepresented himself to KSU residence hall staff" on Sept. 2, 2011. By pretending he had lost his keycard, Tarver obtained a temporary keycard he used to enter a room in Korb Hall.

Tarver stole a wallet containing $120 and credit cards belonging to fellow football recruit Tristin D. Boykin. Tarver later made $230 in charges on Boykin's credit cards at several Atlanta area stores, Vigluicci said.

Boykin reported the theft on Sept. 3. Kent State police identified Tarver as a suspect. He was indicted on one count of burglary, a second-degree felony, by a Portage County grand jury in December 2011.

Following his initial arraignment, Tarver was released on bond, ordered to have no contact with Boykin and suspended indefinitely from the football team. He no longer is listed on the football team's roster

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News Headline: KSU Fashion School hosts 12th annual show | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Shannon Rodgers and Jerry
Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising
(The Fashion School) recently presented its 12th
annual Fashion Show, entitled “Möbius: A Twisting of
Evolution.”

Senior fashion design students spent nearly a year
preparing for the fashion show. Students presented initial
ideas to a panel of three industry professionals, spent
countless hours on creating their garments, and then
defended those garments at another critique in hopes of
being featured in “Möbius.”

The designer critics attending the show were John
Patrick Fleming, owner/designer of John Patrick
Organics; Sara Van Aken, designer/owner of SaVA; and
Jeff Bergus, fashion industry product development
consultant and owner of the Lockhart Smokehouse
Restaurant. They awarded Best in Show, a $1,000 prize
plus a dress form, to Liz Miller, who also won the Kohl's
$1,000 scholarship prize.

The three Critic's Choice Awards of $500 each were
presented to Stacie Moss, Deanna Turcotte and Jasmine
Kornel.

Sarah Ines won for Best Formal/Evening Wear Design
($500), and Rita Yoder won the SuedeSays Award ($500).

In addition, Shannon Miller won for Best Children's
Wear ($250), Ray Marsh won for Best Sportswear/
Casual Wear ($250), Deanna Turcotte and Allison Beck
each won the TechStyleLAB Award ($250), Lauren
Patterson and Veselena Marcheva were named the Top
Two Underclassmen Designers (Simplicity Bias tape
makers, valued at $100), Lauren Fryan won for Best Flat-
Patternmaking (professional dress form), Cate Rinto won
for Best Draping (professional dress form), and Caitlin
Craig won for the Most Creative Show Production Talent.

Plans are already under way for next year's fashion
show, scheduled for April 27, 2013.

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News Headline: My Town: KSU Professor Receives Grant for Parkinson's Research (Ridgel) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Jennifer Winot
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- A Kent State University professor received a grant to continue groundbreaking Parkinson's research and seeks participants for a clinical study. Parkinson's disease affects about 1.5 million Americans and often leads to decreased independence and increased reliance on caregivers and the healthcare system for individuals living with it. However, research conducted by Kent State University's Angela Ridgel, Ph.D., shows reduced symptoms of the disease with the use of exercise using motorized bicycles. Ridgel, Ph.D., an assistant professor in exercise science/physiology at Kent State, recently received a two-year, $390,900 grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue her work to design and test “smart” motorized bicycles, which could access individual effort, performance, skill level and therapeutic value in order to maximize the benefit. Ridgel and her research collaborators, Kenneth Loparo at Case Western Reserve University and Fred Discenzo at Rockwell Automation, are seeking people, ages 50 to 79 years old, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease to partake in a clinical trial that will be held over a one-week period at Kent State. There is no cost for participants. “After we complete this study, we anticipate that participants will be able to move better for a period of time after the exercise,” Ridgel said. “Furthermore, the information gathered from this research will allow for future exercise recommendations for individuals with Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders.” For more information or to see if you are a candidate to participate in the clinical study, contact Ridgel at (330)672-7495.

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News Headline: KENT STATE PROFESSOR RECEIVES $390,090 GRANT TO CONTINUE GROUNDBREAKING PARKINSON'S RESEARCH (Ridgel) | Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Parkinson's disease affects about 1.5 million Americans, and it often leads to decreased independence and increased reliance on caregivers and the healthcare system for individuals living with it.But research conducted by Kent State University's Angela Ridgel, Ph.D., shows reduced symptoms of the disease with the use of exercise using motorized bicycles.

Ridgel, an assistant professor in exercise science/physiology at Kent State, recently received a two-year, $390,900 grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue her work to design and test "smart" motorized bicycles, which could access individual effort, performance, skill level and therapeutic value in order to maximize the benefit.

Ridgel and her research collaborators, Kenneth Loparo at Case Western Reserve University and Fred Discenzo at Rockwell Automation, are seeking people, ages 50-79 years old, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease to partake in a clinical trial that will be held over a one-week period at Kent State.There is no cost for participants.

"After we complete this study, we anticipate that participants will be able to move better for a period of time after the exercise," Ridgel said."Furthermore, the information gathered from this research will allow for future exercise recommendations for individuals with Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders."

For more information or to see if you are a candidate to participate in the clinical study, contact Ridgel at aridgel@kent.edu or 330-672-7495.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

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News Headline: 'Dark Shadows': The Birth Of The Modern TV Vampire (Dawidziak) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: NPR - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In the influential Dark Shadows, a 1960s ABC soap opera with a gothic and supernatural bent, Jonathan Frid played Barnabas Collins, a vampire who returned to claim his coastal Maine manor.

When it comes to monsters on television, vampires have the market more or less cornered. Think about it: Buffy the Vampire Slayer, True Blood, The Vampire Diaries ...

Vampires' enduring popularity on TV may not be eternal, but they have been appearing on the small screen for decades. Mark Dawidziak, who's written books about vampires and teaches a class at Kent State University on their appearances in film and TV, says that part of the way vampires have remained a force in popular culture is through their evolution on TV.

"The great innovations, as far as vampire characters go," Dawidziak says, "always have come from either the printed page or television. Television has contributed as much if not more than movies ever have."

Let's do a little TV vampire-hunting through the decades. They've been in comedies like The Munsters, on Sesame Street, and of course sexy nighttime dramas like True Blood. But before any of those, there was Dark Shadows.

Warner Brothers Pictures

In the new film adaptation of Dark Shadows, Johnny Depp plays Barnabas. Seth Grahame-Smith, author of Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, wrote the screenplay for the movie and says the idea of living forever as a vampire continues to fascinate.

Eerie theremin music, the dulcet tones of Victoria Winters, along with crashing waves on a rocky coastline, marked the beginning of Dark Shadows, the gothic soap opera that ran every weekday afternoon on ABC from 1966 to 1971, for a grand total of 1,225 episodes. But if you watch any of the first 200 installments, you won't see vampires.

The show was set at Collinwood, a creepy old mansion on the Maine coast that was home to the wealthy Collins family. While the show had supernatural elements from the start, they were mostly suggested, not seen.

"And the show was going down the tubes," according to Dan Curtis, the late creator of the series. In a commentary on a special-edition DVD, Curtis says that ABC was ready to cancel the series. Curtis' kids told him, "At least make it scary."

So he — and the special-effects shop — introduced a ghost you could see.

"From that moment, the ratings started to climb," Curtis said. "And they got higher and higher the crazier we got."

So Curtis added more ghosts — and then a vampire.

Wearing a cape, and stiff as a board, Barnabas Collins arrived on the scene to claim his former ancestral home as his own. He was played by the late Jonathan Frid, who wasn't really a pretty boy like today's TV vampires.

"But housewives, college girls, everybody just fell in love with him," says Kathryn Leigh Scott, who played Maggie Evans on the show. "You can't imagine the mail he got — some of it pretty erotic."

Jonathan Frid's Barnabas was so popular, in fact, that the show's producers couldn't drive a stake through his heart at the end of his 90-day contract as originally planned. Instead, he became the star of Dark Shadows.

"The genius of the Barnabas Collins character," Dawidziak says, "was that Barnabas is the first vampire who questions his own nature. Barnabas said, 'Do I have to be like this?' "

Quantrell D.Colbert / The CW

Ian Somerhalder plays the charming and dangerous Damon Salvatore on The Vampire Diaries, a gothic soap opera that shares some similarities with Dark Shadows.

By giving Barnabas a conscience — and relationships — Dark Shadows opened up all kinds of possibilities for vampies, says Dawidziak.

"And this," Dawidziak says, "is where the vampire is going to become increasingly humanized, sexualized, sensualized. They're going to become younger. They're going to become more vital."

More than four decades later, just about every vampire on TV still owes a debt to Dark Shadows, right down to The Vampire Diaries on The CW. The show is also a gothic soap opera — but with two big differences: significantly better production values; and its vampires are mostly teenagers.

The show's co-creator Julie Plec says the coming-of-age idea is something they got from another TV show, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, created by Joss Whedon.

"Joss Whedon sort of gets the super gold star for the high-school-is-hell allegory," Plec says. "And that was the beauty of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ... This idea that the worst thing that happens is you finally give up your virginity to your one true love, and the next day he turns into an evil, murderous vampire."

But all of these contemporary vampires wouldn't exist without Frid's Barnabas Collins, says Kathryn Leigh Scott.

"I think they all emanate from him. He's the granddaddy of all of them," she says.

Frid died in April, but he and Scott and other actors from the Dark Shadows TV show have cameos in the new movie. Johnny Depp — who was a fan of the original — plays Barnabas Collins. And like the original, his Barnabas apologizes before sucking people's blood.

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News Headline: Darrow, Creekside improvements on hold as city officials mull fall Kent State traffic (with map) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name: Reporter Emily Canning
News OCR Text: Twinsburg — City officials had hoped that a road widening at Darrow Road and Creekside Drive would be complete in late August before Kent State University's Geauga campus moves into its new home and creates more traffic at the interesection.

But because no contractors have stepped up to do the work, the $1 million project will be put on hold for possibly another year.

City Engineer Amy Mohr said she advertised for bids at the beginning of the month but did not receive a single offer from area contractors.

View Road widening at Darrow and Creekside in a larger map

Mohr suggested that the city re-bid the project next month and begin construction in late July, but this would mean that work would likely continue through September after KSU's fall semester has begun. The city could also wait to re-bid the project in the fall and construction would begin next summer.

“Right now I'm waiting to hear back from KSU to get their opinion on how to proceed,” Mohr said to Council May 8. “I think we will have a better chance with bids in the fall because a lot of contractors are trying to line up projects for the next year at that time.”

“The summer might be the slowest traffic time for Kent State as far as planning construction,” Mayor Katherine Procop said.

“I'm fine to wait and see what Kent State's opinion is,” Councilor Ted Yates said.

The proposed project would widen a 1,000-foot stretch of Darrow Road to make room for both a northbound and southbound left turn late. Sanitary sewer improvements would also be made.

Mohr said that a traffic study completed late last year indicated that the turning lanes would help prevent accidents at the intersection. She said that the turning lanes were warranted even before considering the additional traffic that the new Kent State campus will bring.

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News Headline: Kent letters document Civil War from Portage | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HISTORICAL SOCIETY PLANS READING ON MAY 17

The Kent
Historical
Society will
commemorate
the
150th anniversary
of
the American
Civil War
next week
with a theatrical
reading of the emotional
and detailed letters between
Franklin Mills natives Charlotte
Morton and her future
husband, Adam Weaver, who
fought for the Union Army.
“Charlotte and Adam:
Franklin Mills and the Civil
War,” an installment of the
historical society's “All About
Kent” series, takes place at
7 p.m. May 17 in Kent State
University's Rockwell Auditorium
at 515 Hilltop Drive.
There is no charge for parking
at the Rockwell Hall
parking lot.
Sandra Halem, author of
the production and KHS
president, said the letters
delve deep into what life was
like both at home in Portage
County and on the
battlefield. Adam Weaver
and Charlotte Morton
eventually married after
the war.
“It's a lovely story about
two people who are quite
innocent and managed
to save some history for
us that would have been
lost and that's extremely
local and very human,”
said Halem, who has been
a playwright for over 30
years, writing as Sandra
Perlman, her family name.
“I thought it would be a
nice gift to my community
if I could take all these
great letters and share
them.”
Charlotte Morton, 15 at
the time, was a historian,
even at a young age, and
instructed Adam Weaver,
who enlisted at 17 to be
with his brother, John, to
write to her and record his
time at war. Later in life,
Charlotte became a noted
historian and first-hand
source of Kent history. She
died in 1939 at 92.
In his letters to Charlotte,
while fighting for
Ohio's 104th volunteer
regiment, Adam Weaver
writes of the horrors of the
war including the bloody
Battle of Franklin in Tennessee,
fought in the fall of
1864 and known as “The
Gettysburg of the West.”
“These rebel boys were
ordered to advance and
were led upon a death as
certain and sure to be met
with, as there was a God
in Heaven. Right into the
fury of a foe mostly concealed
from their view
and worthy of their valor,”
Adam Weaver wrote.
“The shells from our rifled
cannons located north of
town, tore dreadful gaps,
in the ranks of the rebels,
with only the visible effects
of causing them to
close up the openings and
press ever forward.”
The letters were transcribed
and published
through the Portage County
Historical Society in the
1960s by Dudley Weaver,
Charlotte and Adam Weaver's
grandson, to commemorate
the war's 100th anniversary,
but have not been
presented in a theatrical
form.
KSU theater students
also lend their part to tell
the story, with senior theater
studies major Sarah
Coon directing the production,
and four other
theater students reading
the letters and narrating.
The audience will not
only have the opportunity
to enjoy a play about
Kent's history, but also will
be able to visit the KSU
Museum's current exhibit,
“On the Home Front:
Civil War Fashions and Domestic
Life” at no charge
that night.
“On the Home Front” focuses
on the daily life and
experiences of the American
civilian population
during the Civil War and in
the years immediately following.
The pieces on exhibit,
including women's
and children's costumes,
supplemented with related
photographs, decorative
arts and women's magazines
are organized thematically.

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News Headline: Web Seminar Shaping the Future of Math Curriculum through Adaptive Technology | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: University Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Shaping the Future of Math Curriculum through Adaptive Technology

Many colleges face challenges in properly placing and preparing incoming students for core math courses that are required for many majors. Research has shown that students who are placed in core math courses above or below their abilities have high failure and drop rates. Join this web seminar to find out how Kent State University is addressing this challenge by incorporating adaptive technology in its math curriculum, leading to improvements in placement and instruction.

Topics will include:

• How and why Kent State redesigned its placement and math curriculum

• The correlation between success in core math courses and retention at Kent State

• How the math department is using a web-based, artificial intelligence assessment and learning system called ALEKS to provide students with individualized tutoring help

Scheduled speaker:

Andrew Tonge, Department Chair of Mathematics, Kent State University

Who will benefit:

Academic deans, math department chairs and others involved with curricular technology. Anyone may attend.

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News Headline: Cleveland won't renew Occupy group's permit (Banks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Lake Wylie Pilot - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Occupy protesters must ask serious questions about their open-arms policy in light of charges brought against five members accused of trying to blow up an Ohio bridge, a top Cleveland official said Wednesday.

The city declined to renew the group's downtown encampment permit on Wednesday, a denial planned before the bridge plot arrests were announced Monday, said Ken Silliman, chief of staff to Mayor Frank Jackson. The group, which remained by its encampment tent Wednesday night despite a 5 p.m. deadline to leave, can still gather at a spot across the street day or night. Police are monitoring, but no arrests have been made.

The decision was made with the allegations as a backdrop, Silliman added.

"I think a fair question to ask of Occupy Cleveland, is, if you have portrayed your organization up till now as welcome to all-comers - the tent will accommodate anyone and everyone - how does that change when something like the events of yesterday happen?" Silliman said.

"How does that change when some of the people you've welcomed into your decision-making are now accused of such serious felonies?"

That question must be asked even if the city accepts the organization's statements that it is nonviolent and was distancing itself from those charged in the plot, Silliman said.

Occupy members, who received an encampment permit in October, planned to sit in protest of the tent's dismantling by police, but don't plan to be arrested, Occupy Cleveland spokesman Joseph Zitt said. The group has said the men didn't represent Occupy Cleveland and were not acting on its behalf.

Silliman's statements are something the group must discuss, he said.

"When things like this happen, we discover there might be factors that we had not necessarily thought of before," Zitt said. "Questions arise, they get discussed in assembly, we come to consensus on it. We're learning."

The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio questioned the timing of the permit revocation, saying it was concerned Jackson's announcement was an attempt to connect the entire Occupy movement to the bomb plot.

"Individuals are responsible for their own actions, not the groups they affiliate with," ACLU of Ohio Legal Director James Hardiman said in a statement. "City officials should not be in the business of condemning an entire group of people based on the actions of others."

Bill Dobbs, a spokesman for Occupy in New York, also said the arrests have nothing to do with the Occupy movement that began last fall.

"This incident has nothing to do with Occupy Wall Street, which explicitly stands for non-violence," he said. "Before there's a rush to judgment, facts need to come out. Those charged are entitled to a fair trial and due process."

The five were charged Tuesday with plotting to bomb a bridge linking two wealthy Cleveland suburbs by placing what they thought were real explosives at the site and repeatedly trying to detonate them using text messages from cellphones, according to the FBI affidavit.

On Wednesday, an attorney representing one of the defendants questioned the role of an undercover informant, saying the ex-con hired by the FBI appeared to have played an active role in the plot.

Cleveland defense lawyer John Pyle said his client, Brandon Baxter, will plead not guilty in the case, which is set for a preliminary hearing next week.

An attorney for a second defendant, Douglas Wright, said his client also will plead not guilty. The attorney for a third defendant, Anthony Hayne, said his only information came from the 22-page affidavit.

"I have no idea who it is at this point," Michael O'Shea said Wednesday of the informant. "I imagine they will work pretty hard to keep that from us as long as they can."

Federal authorities described the men as anarchists who are angry with corporate America and the government and unknowingly worked with an FBI informant for months as they crafted and carried out their plan.

The FBI said the suspects bought the explosives - actually fake - from an undercover employee and put them at the base of a highway bridge over the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, about 15 miles south of downtown Cleveland, on Monday. After leaving the park, they tried to initiate the explosives using a text-message detonation code, and they called the person who provided the bombs to check the code when it failed, according to the FBI affidavit.

The affidavit also discussed the suspects' desire to destroy signs on banks as a protest against corporate America but said they didn't want to be seen as terrorists.

Christopher Banks, an associate professor at Kent State University who has written on terrorism, said Wednesday that anarchists have targeted research and development centers, car dealerships, timber resources and storefronts over issues including corporate policies and the environment.

"I think the so-called anarchists are getting a lot more notoriety because of economic summits and things like that, which tie into the Occupy Now movement a little bit," he said. "I think that's why it's part of the discussion today."

Court documents detail conversations the FBI secretly recorded in which its informant discussed bomb plans with some of the suspects. In one, Baxter, 20, of Lakewood, allegedly said, "Taking out a bridge in the business district would cost the ... corporate big wigs a lot of money" because it would cause structural damage and prevent people from going to work.

The alleged conversations depict Wright, 26, of Indianapolis, as a sort of group leader who recruited others, scouted out the bridge site and participated in buying the fake explosives.

The other suspects were identified as Joshua S. Stafford, 23, and Hayne, 35, both of Cleveland, and Connor Stevens, 20, of suburban Berea.

All five are charged with conspiracy and trying to bomb property used in interstate commerce. They appeared Tuesday in U.S. District Court and were ordered jailed without bond pending a hearing Monday.

The charges carry possible penalties of more than 20 years in prison.

Welsh-Huggins reported from Columbus, Ohio. Associated Press writers Kantele Franko and Barbara Rodriguez in Columbus and Verena Dobnik in New York contributed to this report.

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News Headline: Casino Week: Problem gambling | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Amanda Barren
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND -- There is a lot of excitement surrounding the opening of the Horseshoe Casino.

But as the excitement grows so does the need to talk about problem gambling. Psychiatrist Ray Isackila and Ohio Lottery Community Outreach Coordinator Karen Russo both say that the population of people who actually have a problem with gambling is small.

Dr. Isackila says it's only about 1 to 2 percent.

Most people are able to set a limit and keep their expectations about gambling in perspective.

"They go home, it's no big thing. They go to work tomorrow. Somebody with a disorder is going to chase their losses perhaps and think about the money they lost," said Dr. Isackila.

Someone with a gambling disorder finds a tolerance grows. Just like someone with a drug or alcohol addiction.

"Where gambling $30 was fun for a while. Then as people grow more accustomed to that fun, if they cross a line, well now, it takes $100 to have that fun, and then eventually $200."

The Ohio Lottery has been providing help to problem gamblers since before it was mandated by the Ohio Revised Code. This fiscal year the call line has seen a major jump in calls.

One reason why could be because of a marketing campaign throughout the month of March. In July of 2011 there were 118 calls for help, in March of 2012 that number was up to 409 calls.

"These people are calling with financial strains, they don't have food on the table, they've lost their houses they may be in foreclosure," Russo explained, "so there is a multitiude of issues going on with the individuals who finally do call the Helpline."

It is clear the number of people with a problem is small but there are no specific numbers in the state as to the kind of gambling problem across the state, or where the pockets of serious problems persist.

Now, the Lottery, the casinos and the State Racing Commission, the Ohio Department of Drug and Alcohol Services and Kent State University are doing a study to see where more resources need to go.

If you are borrowing money to gamble, if gambling consumes your thoughts, or if you are gambling to escape an emotional problem you should look into getting help.

You can call the Problem Gambler's Helpline at 1-866-589-9966 or click on this link to take you to the Ohio Lottery's website.

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News Headline: Senators remove card-room language | Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Siegel, Jim
News OCR Text: Senate Republicans reversed course, at least for now, yanking a provision from a gambling-law rewrite that would have allowed one charity card room with paid dealers to operate in each county.

House Bill 389, which authorizes slot machines at Ohio's seven horse tracks, unanimously passed a Senate committee yesterday and is likely headed for a full Senate vote this afternoon.

Yesterday morning, the plan was to further address card rooms in the gambling bill. But with opposition from Gov. John Kasich and concerns raised by House Republicans, by the time the committee reconvened in the afternoon for a vote, Senate GOP leaders decided to pull it.

"After discussion among members, we came to the conclusion we're going to save all of the charitable card-room revisions for a separate bill on charitable gaming," said Sen. Bill Coley, R-Middletown. He said that bill will be worked on over the summer.

Supporters of the card-room language said it would restrict a currently unregulated area of law that allows unlimited numbers of charity card games to operate in the state. Nautica Charity Poker Festivals, operating in Cuyahoga County since 2005, allow charities to pick days to benefit from the proceeds.

Coley said the Cleveland suburb of Garfield Heights recently started a charity card room, and he thinks there are others in Ohio.

Asked if he agreed with Senate Republicans that card rooms are legal and could open up all over, House Speaker William G. Batchelder, R-Medina, said: "That's fairly dubious."

The House-passed version of the bill would have allowed only for the Nautica card room in Cuyahoga County, and some argued that allowing more could cut into casino tax revenue.

The bill was changed yesterday to allow the Ohio Lottery Commission to earmark up to 1 percent of video slot-machine revenue for gambling addiction. The state has contracted with Kent State University to complete a study by June on the gambling addiction problem in Ohio.

A new change also would prohibit horse track "racinos" from calling themselves casinos, except for Northfield Park, which has advertised itself as a casino for years.

The bill also requires the attorney general to submit a report by Dec. 31, 2013, on how to share law-enforcement training funds from casinos with local law-enforcement agencies. Until then, Republicans are centralizing that money with the attorney general.

The bill includes a moratorium on new sweepstakes parlors, also known as Internet cafes, as lawmakers work on ways to regulate or outlaw the gambling businesses. The bill allows parlors operating before the moratorium that were shut down by local authorities to reopen and file an affidavit with the attorney general, if the legal action is dropped.

Sen. Joe Schiavoni, D-Canfield, testified yesterday on a separate bill that would give the Ohio Casino Control Commission the ability to license sweepstakes parlors. It also gives local governments the authority to opt in to having the establishments and gives them the ability to levy fees on them.

"We have all these forms of gambling, and this is the only form that is not currently being regulated," Schiavoni told the committee.

Calling it the "wild, wild west" of Ohio gambling, some questioned if it's better to just shut them down. Coley called it a "very thorny area of law."

"If we're going to do gaming, it's used for charity or for education in this state," said Sen. Keith Faber, R-Celina. "Why are we allowing gaming solely for profit?"

Schiavoni said other states have not been successful with an all-out ban.

"Once we have sufficient regulations, it will weed out the fly-by-night folks who are opening up these places," he said. "There is a legitimate, fair way to do this."

A number of retailers use sweepstakes games to lure customers -- McDonald's Monopoly game often is cited as an example -- and lawmakers are trying to find a law that distinguishes those types of entities from obvious gambling establishments.

"There are some huge consumer-protection issues that we want addressed," Coley said. "There are no reporting requirements and a lot of money moving around. That's a prescription for disaster."

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News Headline: Gambling law nixes card rooms | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Dayton Daily News - Online
Contact Name: Joanne Huist Smith
News OCR Text: A rewrite of the state's gambling law authorizing slot machines at Ohio's seven horse racing tracks will not include a provision allowing county commissions to contract with a private company to run a “charity card room.” The version does include a statewide moratorium on new sweepstakes parlors and Internet cafes until 2013.

The card room provision was yanked from the substitute version of House Bill 386 Tuesday, just before the Senate Government Oversight and Reform Committee unanimously passed the bill.

State Sen. Bill Coley, R-Middletown, chairman of the committee, said the charity card room language will be considered in a separate bill.

“Our members wanted more time to investigate,” Coley said. “We wanted to narrow or reign in proliferation of charity card rooms, but we were unwilling to give one county a monopoly as the House version did.”

Although it was opposed by Gov. John Kasich, supporters of the card-room language said it would limit a currently unregulated area of law that allows unlimited numbers of charity card games to operate in the state.

One card room in Cuyahoga County has been operating for years, where charities can pick days to have the proceeds go to them, and it appears others also are starting to create them.

• The version of HB 386, likely headed to a full Senate vote today, would set a statewide moratorium until 2013 on new sweepstakes parlors and Internet cafes as lawmakers work on ways to better regulate or outlaw the gambling businesses. Under a change made Tuesday, the bill would allow parlors that were operating before the moratorium to reopen and file an affidavit with the attorney general. They had been shut down by local authorities who later dropped their legal action.

• The bill also gives the Ohio Lottery Commission discretion on how much video slot machine revenue to earmark for gambling addiction services. The total can go up to 1 percent. The state has hired Kent State University to do a study on the gambling addiction problem in Ohio so that officials have a baseline going forward to help determine how much money is needed.

• The Senate bill requires the attorney general to submit a report by Dec. 31, 2013, on how to share law enforcement training funds from casinos with local law enforcement agencies. Until then, the training money will be centralized with the attorney general.

• A change also would prohibit new horse track racinos from calling themselves casinos, except for Northfield Park, which officials say has advertised itself as a “casino” for years.

Robert Tenenbaum, spokesman for Penn National Gaming Inc., called passage of the bill out of committee “progress.” He said the card room provision would have represented a “major expansion of the gaming industry in Ohio without a vote of the people.”

“In our view (pulling the language) was an appropriate way to handle it,” Tenenbaum said.

Penn National is building casinos in Columbus and Toledo and has proposed relocating a harness racing track, Raceway Park, from Toledo to Dayton.

“I sense there is a real commitment on part of both the House and the Senate to get the bills done,” Tenenbaum said. “I see nothing in the bill that's going to cause us to back away from our commitment to relocate a racetrack to Dayton.”

The Columbus Dispatch contributed to this report.

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