Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Athletics (1)
Athletics; Office of the President (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Economics (1)
Geography (1)
Global Education (1)
Health Sciences (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (3)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Physics (1)
Political Science (1)
Recreational Services (1)
Upward Bound (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (1)
Kent State coach Darrell Hazell pleased with team GPA (Hazell) 05/15/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Athletics; Office of the President (1)
Mid-American Conference 'a good, cohesive league' -- Q and A with Kent State University president Lester Lefton (Lefton) 05/15/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Downtown storage facility, city's cyclist-friendly rules boost bike backers 05/15/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Ohio Seeks Public Comment on State's Autism Needs 05/15/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Autism and Low Incidence (OCALI) invites the public to provide comment at an open forum on state autism recommendations. The Akron Children's Hospital and Kent State University Regional Forum is one of five to be held across the state this spring to gather practical input from parents, professionals,...


College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Pet therapy: Dogs help college kids cope with exam stress (Adamle) 05/14/2012 Digital Journal Text Attachment Email

...are high-achieving students who place a premium on performance. They just run themselves ragged sometimes.” Kathleen Adamle, a nursing professor at Kent State is hoping to get a grant to study how pet therapy helps to control stress. Adamle has about 11 therapy dogs in her team that visit dorms...

2 KENT STATE PROFESSORS TO BIKE 3 HOURS TO WORK TO MARK NATIONAL BIKE TO WORK DAY (Doheny, Jacobson, Julian) 05/14/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

Kent State University College of Nursing professors Peggy Doheny, Ph.D., and Ann Jacobson, Ph.D., will ride their bicycles to work on Friday, May...


Economics (1)
Families used housing windfalls to send their kids to pricier colleges (Reynolds) 05/15/2012 Inside Higher Ed Text Attachment Email

...18 used their newfound assets to enroll them in more selective (and more expensive) colleges than they would have otherwise, researchers at Cornell and Kent State Universities have found. Their study, published Monday by the National Bureau of Economic Research, examines data from the (uneven)...


Geography (1)
If you're stuck in traffic, you have no good choices (Schmidlin) 05/15/2012 Minnesota Public Radio - Online Text Attachment Email

...safest move if a tornado was imminent. Tom Schmidlin didn't buy that advice. RETHINKING 'HIT THE DITCH' A geography professor and meteorologist at Kent State University who studied killer tornadoes in the South in the 1990s, Schmidlin said he was struck by scenes he witnessed where mobile homes...


Global Education (1)
Undergraduate Chinese students enrolling in Ohio colleges in record numbers 05/15/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


Health Sciences (1)
Bright Spots: May 10, 2012 (Ridgel) 05/15/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (3)
Pilots in statewide tour land in Port Clinton (Murray) 05/14/2012 News-Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...Piper Cubs a little before 5 in the afternoon as part of an ambitious plan to fly the planes to all 88 Ohio counties over the next few days. Murray, a Kent State University professor, said the duo left Kent State around 8:30 a.m. Sunday morning and stopped in 12 county airports on their first...

Record-seekers fly through Van Wert, region (Murray) 05/15/2012 Lima News Text Attachment Email

Pilots hitting every Ohio county during trip (VIDEO) (Murray) 05/15/2012 timesbulletin.com Text Attachment Email


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Kent State University Summer concert tickets now on sale 05/14/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Tickets for three upcoming summer concerts at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas are now on sale. The concerts include the Broadway musical "Mamma Mia!" at 7:30 p.m. June 14, "LeAnn Rimes Acoustic" at 7:30...

Kent State University Summer concert tickets now on sale 05/14/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

Tickets for three upcoming summer concerts at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas are now on sale. The concerts include the Broadway musical "Mamma Mia!" at 7:30 p.m. June 14, "LeAnn Rimes Acoustic" at 7:30...


Physics (1)
Antimatter Propulsion Engine Redesigned Using CERN's Particle Physics Simulation Toolkit (Zhang) 05/14/2012 Technology Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...little fun working out how good antimatter rocket engines can be. Today it's the turn of Ronan Keane at Western Reserve Academy and Wei-Ming Zhang at Kent State University, both in Ohio, who take a new approach to the problem with some interesting results. First, some basic rocket science. The...


Political Science (1)
Ohio Officer Encourages Autism Training for Responders 05/14/2012 JEMS (Journal of Emerngecy Medical Services) - Online Text Attachment Email

...enforcement, 'This is coming to a call near you.' " One of Farrar's gripping stories was about Gertrude Steuernagel, a political-science professor at Kent State University who was stomped to death in 2009 by her autistic son, Sky Walker, then 18. When police arrived at the house, he said, "Mama...


Recreational Services (1)
RiverDay to celebrate Cuyahoga 05/15/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Upward Bound (2)
KSU Upward Bound sets event Sunday 05/15/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

KENT STATE'S UPWARD BOUND PROGRAMS TO CELEBRATE GRADUATING HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS, MAY 19 (Lawless-Andric) 05/14/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

The Kent State University Upward Bound Programs will host the Senior Scholarship Banquet on Saturday, May 19, from 11:30 a.m.to 1:30 p.m.at the Kent Student...


News Headline: Kent State coach Darrell Hazell pleased with team GPA (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When Kent State announced 49 of its football players had achieved grade-point averages of 3.0 or better last week at the end of the spring semester, it was a proud moment for Golden Flashes head coach Darrell Hazell.

The total was also one shy of the goal of 50 players Hazell had set at the start of the semester, but he wasn't about to let that detail spoil the excitement of what KSU believes is the program's best academic semester ever. The school started keeping academic records of individual teams in 1982, and since then the Flashes' football program had never boasted 49 players at 3.0 or better in the same term.

On Monday, Hazell and his staff learned the team's semester was even better than last week's original announcement when one late grade was reported, bringing the total to that magic number of 50.

The news was music to the ears of a coach who has been preaching the importance of studying the game to winning championships.

“We've been preaching all spring about how we have to become a smarter football team as football players,” said Hazell. “All of a sudden, you see the GPA soar the way it did and you see that guys are starting to get it. Not all of the time but most of the time, there is a correlation between intelligence on the field and off the field.

“Here's where I see it (translate) to football. When I walk into a room, even if it is unoccupied by a coach, there are still two or three guys sitting around watching film, talking about football and assignments and correcting each other. I didn't see that this year. It's a real difference.”

Getting to 50 means Hazell can also point to a goal already achieved as he sets goals for his players heading into the upcoming college football season. That's a bigger deal than you might think for a program where successes in any area have been rare for so many decades. The 2012 season marks the 40th anniversary of the last Kent State team to win a Mid-American Conference football championship.

“This just goes to show that when you put your mind to something, you can achieve it,” said Hazell. “It allows us to refer one goal to another goal.

“I'm sure when I said in January that we have 31 players with 3.0's and we need to get to 50, at first guys were rolling their eyes and saying, ‘yeah right.' ”

MORE ACADEMIC NOTES

Kent State's overall team grade-point average was 2.91 for the spring semester. For the year, it was 2.732. Of the 50 players to hit 3.0 GPA's or better, 22 made the Dean's List.

While Hazell wants to build on his team's academic goals, it will be hard for the Flashes to improve on a 2.91 in the fall when football season is in full swing.

“It's harder during the season. That's the reality of it,” said Hazell. “There is so much more going on and the anxiety level is so much greater, days are shorter. You are talking about all of those hours with football where their head is so consumed by what is coming up on Saturday. You want the focus (on academics) to be as great and you want to keep pushing that home. But if we can stay above 40 (at 3.0 or better) it would be huge.”

Hazell was so proud of “the 50,” he sent out handwritten letters to the parents of all players who achieved a 3.0 GPA.

ARCHER MAKES THE LIST

The Flashes lost the fastest player on their entire roster when running back Dri Archer was ruled academically ineligible prior to the 2011 season.

Not only has Archer worked his way back into good academic standing, the speedster was one of the 50 players to achieve a GPA above 3.0. He was at 3.33 for the spring.

CURTIS BY THE NUMBERS

The headline on Monday's front page of the PGA Tour's website referring to Matt Kuchar's win at the Players Championship read “Nice Guys Finish First.”

The four-week Tour run of Kent State alumnus Ben Curtis proves nice guys can also finish second, fifth and 13th in addition to first.

After winning at the Valero Texas Open on April 22 to end a six-year victory drought, Curtis posted a 13th at the Zurich Classic of New Orleans, a fifth place at the Wells Fargo Championship and then tied for second on Sunday at the Players Championship all in consecutive weeks. His four-week total earnings of $2,096,730 is almost five times what he made in 23 starts during all of last season.

When Curtis drilled a 10-foot putt on the 18th hole on Sunday and his playing partner Rickie Fowler followed by missing a shorter putt on the exact same line, it was more than a $200,000 swing that meant the difference of Curtis finishing in a second-place tie or solo fifth.

Curtis run has obviously meant a climb in the rankings. He is up to 72nd in the Official World Golf Rankings just four weeks after he sat at 285th. He is also 12th in the Ryder Cup Standings and 10th on the PGA Tour's money list. That very spot on money list used to be the target number for qualifying for the U.S. Open, but a change in how the USGA puts together its field for the national championship has dropped all categories referencing earnings for 2012. To avoid having to play his way in through a qualifier, Curtis would need to make it into the top 60 in the World Golf Rankings by June 11.

Only four tournaments remain before that date. Curtis is taking this week off at the HP Byron Nelson Championship. He is sure to play at the Memorial Tournament May 31-June 3. The event hosted by Jack Nicklaus is played just 10 miles from Curtis' childhood home in Ostrander. Curtis has also played well at the Memorial, making 7-of-9 cuts, including the last six. He finished 11th there last season and 8th in 2004.

As for Curtis' Ryder Cup ranking, he is the only player in the top 25 to play fewer than 10 events this season. He has eight starts in 2012.

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News Headline: Mid-American Conference 'a good, cohesive league' -- Q and A with Kent State University president Lester Lefton (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In anticipation of this week's Mid-American Conference meetings in Cleveland, Kent State University president Lester Lefton sat down recently for a Q and A with Plain Dealer reporter Elton Alexander.

Their discussion covered topics ranging from the NCAA proposal to pay small stipends to athletes, to athlete graduation rates to the future of college sports:

PD: What about the new NCAA rule on paying athletes? You have never been in favor of this.

LL: "I think there will be something passed, effective in a couple of years. Not immediately. Maybe 2013, 2014 or 2015. There is likely to be some flexibility. The real issue is that nobody can afford it. It's not like there is money just sitting around, where you can all of a sudden just lay out more. This is part of the pathway towards breaking up athletics into the haves and the have-nots. I don't know that they are doing this purposely for that reason, but that is what it will functionally wind up doing.

"Because, unless you are one of the top 60 schools, in the BCS, you just can't afford it."

PD: That seems to be a common theme around that issue.

LL: "That is a common theme amongst a lot of issues: the paying of coaches multiyear, multimillion-dollar contracts. Extravagant facilities. The paying of athletes. It's about all this conference realignment, to bring in even more money. It's all part of a pattern."

PD: Does this disturb you?

LL: Very much. I think intercollegiate athletics is on a collision course with itself, in the same way the housing bubble was on a collision course with itself. It is an unsustainable model as it is currently designed. It is likely to lead to some kind of super conference, or conferences, or maybe even Division I, part A, part B, part C. It is not going to stay the way it is, in the direction that it is going."

PD: Academic Performance Ratings is another issue. The NCAA system penalizes schools that have athletes underperform in school by taking away scholarships and enforcing other penalties.

LL: "They are doing better because there is so much money put into academic tutoring, and monitoring of individual athletes' (academic) performance. These big teams at the big schools are investing millions and millions of dollars into insuring that (athletes) actually graduate. APR is a good thing, I'm glad they have it.

"But it is harder to have a consistent APR when you have a small squad, like in basketball, than when you have a large squad, like football. When you have 87 guys, if one or two of them aren't doing well, it doesn't hit you APR very hard. But when you have 15 guys in basketball, two or three can make a very big difference in the APR. When you get some of these places, with a lot of "one and done" you wonder what's going on there. The whole system is whack. It is not sustainable."

PD: Coming closer to home, in general, six years in as president, what are your 1-2-3 priorities?

LL: "My number one priority is overall student graduation rates. We're in the business of graduating students. We are the most successful public university in Northeastern Ohio in graduation rates. But it is still not good enough."

"(No. 2) It's very important we develop a culture of philanthropy, because the state keeps taking away more and more money. There was a day when nearly 80 percent of our budget came from the state. Today, only 18 percent of our budget comes from the state. So increasingly, we have to rely upon philanthropy in the same way that private universities do.

"We raised $42 million dollars last year. A record. We just completed a $250-million capital campaign.

"(No. 3) Another big challenge, the next couple of years that has been continuing, is our physical infrastructure. Sixty of our buildings were built in the 1960s, and haven't been touched pretty much since then. They were built by the state, and the state pretty much doesn't give much money any more for buildings. Sixty building went up in a 10-year period paid for by the state. Today, we couldn't get one building paid for by the state. So we're going to embark on a major remodeling effort."

PD: Where does athletics fit into that picture, and what are your plans to lift Kent athletics?

LL: "Academically, we want to compete with Ohio State, be No. 2 to them, the same way the Cincinnati does. Cincinnati, Kent State, maybe Ohio University -- we're all pretty good schools with national reputations. Athletically, we're in the MAC. We're a midmajor. On any given Sunday, or Thursday night, we're gonna win, or we're not gonna win.

"We've had our good years, we've had our not so good years. But we haven't come out at the bottom. We're not a bad team. The conference is a pretty evenly matched conference. Really, on any given Sunday, whether we're going to beat Miami, or Bowling Green, you never know what is going to happen."

PD: Is this to say, there is a different measure there for athletics?

LL: "Oh, definitely, within athletics. We're matched for the kind of students that come to our schools. We're matched economically. I think we're well matched. We play well in the MAC. The MAC has good values, in terms of putting students first. We're going to continue at Kent State to try to improve our facilities, improve our coaching staffs. We tend not to build new, we tend to renovate. The cost of building new facilities is just extraordinary. We just don't have the fan base or the alumni base to support it.

"We have a $43 million-dollar master plan for athletic facilities that we are fund raising for now.

PD: Is there a target date for any shovel turning?

LL: "Well, I think it is a 10-year plan, based upon our fund-raising ability. The more (AD) Joel (Nielsen) and I can raise money for athletics, the more quickly we will proceed with the plan. There are certain things we want to do right away. I think you are likely to see a new basketball practice facility as one of the first things. We're likely to develop some new women's locker rooms, some office space for basketball and football needs to be spiffed up."

PD: All of this circles back to what you just mentioned, in regards to buildings. With graduation coming up -- not to mention athletic events, concerts and such -- Kent is the only school of this size in the state without an updated arena, auditorium or multi-purpose facility capable of holding graduations, and other big events?

LL: "We could never do it."

PD: So any kind of timeline for a facility along those lines?

LL: "No. A practice facility is the first thing. To be competitive with other teams in the MAC, or even nationally, we really need that. It's something we should have been done years and years ago. We're going to get that done in the next couple of years."

PD: But a multi-purpose facility, or auditorium, for a school of this size, it's amazing not to have one.

LL: "We have an auditorium. It holds 800 to 2,000. But we would never fill it (arena/multi-purpose facility) for basketball games. That's not on the agenda. Very expensive to build. Very little use. We need to get the biggest bang for our bucks."

PD: Last time we spoke, you were pretty strong against paying coaches "the big bucks" as you said. Kent remains at the low end regarding coaching salaries. How can you remain competitive with this philosophy, considering contracts around the country continue to rise?

LL: "They do. The performance of coaches does not seem to be correlated with how much you pay them, except for very high-end coaches and very high-end teams. If we pay our basketball coach, football coach, women's men's, an extra $200,000, that does not make them a better coach. And, other coaches in the MAC, who get paid much, much more, don't have necessarily better records."

PD: You are hiring coaches with three- and four-year contracts, which again is under the norm. The trickle down of that is, opposing coaches and schools use that to recruit against you. It puts coaches at a big disadvantage.

LL: "The other side of that is Geno Ford, who had a five-year contract and walked away from that, two weeks after telling everybody, 'Oh no, this is my home, I'm here to stay.' We gave him a five-year contract and he walks. The length of the contract, I don't think, keeps somebody or doesn't keep somebody. If Notre Dame wants our basketball coach, or Ohio State wants to steal back our football coach, there is nothing I can do.

"The other piece of this is, the coaches have their own ideas about this. It's not like we say, 'We'll only give you a three-year contract.' And they say, 'Please give me five.' It's a conversation. . . . Men's basketball coach (Rob) Senderoff, a good guy, he felt very comfortable with a three-year contract.

"He had a 21-11 season, which is good, but he didn't get to the dance (NCAA Tournament). So it wasn't the best year ever. Had he got us to the dance, I'm sure he would have been in Joel's office saying I'd like an extension of my contract and a bump in my salary. And we probably would have said yes. He'll have another shot at it this year.

"We want to keep good talent. When (Jim) Christian left, there was no way we could have kept him. And he didn't do so well after he left. Geno, don't get me started on Mr. Geno."

PD: From Kent's standpoint, looking at the recent basketball success at Ohio University, in regards to the MAC's presidents initiative with basketball, considering this can reap a big financial reward, that seems to fall right in your wheelhouse. How do you see that going forward?

LL: "Basketball has always been a stronghold for Kent State. The last couple of years have not been that great. If you look at the last 30 years we have always been a good basketball school, and we will be again. Senderoff needs a couple of years to build his team, to build his coaching staff. And we really need this basketball practice facility, it's one of the ways we can commit to basketball in a serious way, and not just throw the money at Rob, who is well compensated, by the way."

PD: MAC football bowl affiliations have not been what you liked in the past. Your football team could be in one of those bowl games this year. Has your opinion changed?

LL: "It's kind of like having twins. Nobody wants to have twins. But if you have them, you might as well appreciate them.

"If we get to a bowl game, and we do well, we will appreciate it. We will make it a big success. We'll bear whatever financial costs that will be. But the league, the MAC, is trying to subsidize some of that, whoever goes to these bowl games. We shouldn't be punished for being successful.

"And I have been critical of this. I just think bowl games that are too far away just cost too much. Planes, trains, automobiles, it's too much of a burden on the kids, the students, the coaches and the fans. I'd rather that we be closer."

PD: It seems like conference realignments have had a big impact recently, but at the same time, the MAC appears to be stronger, because of it.?

LL: "We do. I mean, I could see one or two teams trying to bolt. But you can't speculate. You never know what anyone is going to do. But we're in a good, cohesive league. A good conference, that has been pretty stable for a long time, too. I think (the MAC) is tighter.

"People are like, 'Let's hang on to each other. We're brothers in this together.' Over the years we keep looking at Navy and Army. We talked about some teams in Virginia, but at the end of the day, we're pretty stable as a conference. Adding UMass, was nice. Although I don't think they're happy now that Temple is out. But I think they will stay."

PD: Anything you would like to address that we did not touch on, in terms of athletics?

LL: "My last thought is I'm concerned about the future of intercollegiate athletics. The purity of sport. The commercialization of the student-athlete. If they want to have minor leagues they should start minor leagues. I don't think we should be paying athletes. They're getting a terrific education.

"The TV networks are what is driving all of this. Billions of dollars are at stake. It's becoming about the money.

"America has grown increasingly supportive of sports. Money is driving so many of these decisions with the top 60 teams. . . . It is no longer about locations, or natural rivalries. But when your rivalry starts to be with somebody from California, it's not a natural rivalry. There is so much money at stake, the NCAA is really controlled by about a dozen universities.

PD: I'll end it there. Thank you.

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News Headline: Downtown storage facility, city's cyclist-friendly rules boost bike backers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jim Dixon, an attorney at Frantz Ward, regularly trades in his Bostonian wingtips for a pair of Chuck Taylor sneakers.

Mr. Dixon, who works in Key Tower, commutes daily to downtown Cleveland from Shaker Heights by bike — a 35-minute endeavor that gives him both exercise and extra cash in his pocket.

Mr. Dixon is one of roughly 1,200 Cleveland workers, or 0.8% of the work force, who opt for a two-wheeled ride to and from their jobs over a four-wheeled drive, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 American Community Survey.

Of the 70 largest metros in the country, Cleveland had the largest increase in cycling commuters — 280% — in the past decade, according to the League of American Bicyclists.

Local riders attribute the rise in cyclists to efforts made by the city and cycling advocates to encourage cycling.

Those efforts include the Cleveland

Bike Rack, a joint creation of the city and the Cleveland Clinic that opened last August. The 1,400-square-foot facility, which is located in the Gateway North Parking Garage at East Fourth and High streets, provides secure rack space for 50 bikes and shower and locker areas for riders.

“The impediments to people who would like to commute but don't are lack of secure parking and a lack of shower facility,” said John Sirignano, manager of the Bike Rack. “We've met two of the biggest impediments of why people don't commute to work.”

Mr. Dixon typically doesn't ride in winter, but since the Bike Rack opened, he decided to make the commute two to three times per week by bike from November through February.

“The Bike Rack makes it so easy to be a bike commuter,” Mr. Dixon said. “This year I decided to push it.”

New law paves the way

The Bike Rack is not the only cyclist-friendly move the city of Cleveland has taken.

The city last September passed the Complete and Green Streets Ordinance — a law requiring that 20% of the money spent on new infrastructure projects be devoted to green infrastructure features such as bike lanes, energy-efficient lighting and crosswalks.

“The biggest drawback right now with cycling in Cleveland is the access; the roads and the bridges around here are still not the greatest for encouraging cycling,” Mr. Sirignano said. “As the city continues to implement Complete and Green Streets, you're going to see a lot more people attempting to bike.”

Jenita McGowan, Cleveland's chief of sustainability, said the new ordinance, which went into effect Jan. 1, was designed to create a network of biking, walking and public transportation resources for residents.

“It's a sustainable approach to transportation,” Ms. McGowan said.

By improving bicycle access, the city also hopes to boost the local economy, Ms. McGowan said. People who cycle are more apt to stop at local businesses because they won't be constrained by parking and they have more discretionary income because they don't use their cars.

“Complete streets are attractive. They're fun. They allow people to use them for transportation and for recreation,” Ms. McGowan said. “I think more people will come out and use them. You'll get more people on the ground.”

Plus, a growing cycling population brings new businesses such as bike shops and repair shops to town, she said.

One man's journey

In a recent study, students at Case Western Reserve University's Weatherhead School of Management found that a $20 million investment in street improvements and a 3% shift of University Circle workers from cars to bikes could provide a $100 million boost to the local economy. The study also predicted a $1.6 million savings in health care costs and the creation of 500 jobs.

The city last month worked with Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative on a week-long test of Complete and Green Streets known as Pop Up Rockwell. The effort transformed five blocks of Rockwell Avenue into an example of the type of streets possible under the new ordinance. During the test, Rockwell featured a cycle track (a two-way bike lane), public art and benches that filter water runoff.

Sagree Sharma, project manager and urban designer at the Urban Design Collaborative, said there was a positive response to Pop Up Rockwell, and that a number of people used the cycle track, particularly casual bike riders and families with children. Ms. McGowan said the cycle track allowed the city to understand how to best implement traffic signalization in a safe and beneficial manner.

Five years ago, a perfect storm of factors drove David Pauer, director of the employee health plan for the wellness program at Cleveland Clinic, to his bicycle.

Gas prices were high, the Euclid Avenue bike lanes had just been installed and his three children were ages eight and younger. Without time to go to the gym and care for his kids, Mr. Pauer turned to cycling for exercise.

For an extra 15 minutes added to his commute, Mr. Pauer simultaneously can exercise and ride to work from Lakewood.

“Really, if I had to define myself, I'd be a walker or a runner. I don't consider myself a cyclist. I just do it to get to work,” Mr. Pauer said.

Mr. Pauer is one of an estimated 400 to 600 employees at Cleveland Clinic's main campus who commute via bicycle. A number of garages on site provide bike storage, and employees can use showers in the Walker Fitness Center for free.

Uphill climb

Despite continuing efforts to increase the ease of cycling in the city, problems still exist.

Rob Smitherman in Cleveland's Ohio City neighborhood has had a few close calls on the city's streets.

“I've almost been run over a few times. It's because people aren't used to cyclists. I think it will get better and better,” said Mr. Smitherman, who moved to Cleveland from Chicago in February to take a job as the sports director for the 2014 Gay Games, which will be held in Cleveland and Akron. He usually bikes to work five days a week.

However, while Cleveland has fewer bike lanes than the Windy City, its Bike Rack is an amenity that wasn't available in Chicago to Mr. Smitherman, who used to pay for a gym membership in order to have a place to shower when he lived there.

Scott Godwin, an audio engineer for Colortone Staging and Rentals in Solon, said Cleveland offers little roadway assistance to cyclists. He said the city's lack of existing bike lanes discourages some potential cyclists from riding the roads.

“I believe we should all just share the road, but I know a lot of people are more comfortable if they have their own space to ride,” said Mr. Godwin, who sold his car last year.

In his travels for work, Mr. Godwin has noted the advancements other cities have made in terms of promoting cycling.

“We seem behind, and not necessarily to larger cities,” Mr. Godwin said.

Pittsburgh, for example, has miles of bike lanes and 1.6% of its workers commute to work on their bicycles, according to the American Community Survey.

In Ohio, Dayton has the greatest share of cycling commuters —1.4%, according to the survey.

The road ahead

Jacob VanSickle is excited about the future of cycling in Cleveland.

Mr. VanSickle last September was selected as the first executive director of BikeCleveland, a new nonprofit. In his role, Mr. VanSickle serves as an advocate for the local cycling community and works to promote safe conditions for riders.

He said Cleveland is lucky to have the Complete and Green Streets law, which will pave the way for future cycling-friendly development.

“Getting people comfortable is really what we want to do to really grow that critical mass,” Mr. VanSickle said.

To promote cycling, BikeCleveland is participating in the National Bike Challenge — a new, four-month competition that pits cities against other cities. Cyclists log miles to compete locally and as part of the Cleveland-area team.

“The biggest challenge is getting the general public behind biking. There's about a million benefits to biking,” Mr. VanSickle said. “Biking really puts people on a human scale. You really experience the neighborhood at a different level than when you're driving a car. That really brings a vibrancy back.”

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News Headline: Ohio Seeks Public Comment on State's Autism Needs | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Columbus, OH _ Ohio's Center for Autism and Low Incidence (OCALI) invites the public to provide comment at an open forum on state autism recommendations. The Akron Children's Hospital and Kent State University Regional Forum is one of five to be held across the state this spring to gather practical input from parents, professionals, and other stakeholders with first-hand knowledge of what supports and services are needed most. Details on the local forum are as follows:

Akron Children's Hospital and Kent State University Regional Forum William H. Considine Professional Building (CPB) Auditorium

215 W. Bowery St. | Akron, OH 44308

May 15, 2012 | 6:00 _ 8:30 p.m.

Hosted by the OCALI Advisory Board, the forum will provide a brief overview of the proposed recommendations followed by opportunity for feedback and comments. Responses and suggestions will be used in developing final recommendations, which will be presented in June to the governor's office and Interagency Work Group on Autism (IWGA) for implementation.

"These recommendations provide a blueprint for the state to improve its response to autism," said Jon Peterson, chair of the Autism Recommendation Committee. "The OCALI Advisory Board sincerely hopes the public will participate in setting the future for autism in Ohio by providing their thoughts and comments on the recommendations."

The autism recommendations focus on early identification and diagnosis, skill development and support, and sustained services for future success. Revised from previous recommendations first prepared in 2004, they will be used to inform state policy decision makers and improve support services for all Ohioans diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.

"The final recommendations that are brought forward after public input will assist in developing an interagency plan that streamlines support and improves services for individuals with autism across Ohio," said John Martin, director of the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. "It is imperative that those recommendations truly reflect the needs and hopes of the public, a viewpoint that I know Governor Kasich shares."

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News Headline: Pet therapy: Dogs help college kids cope with exam stress (Adamle) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Digital Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Pet therapy for college students taking their final exams is growing in popularity on university and college campuses across the U.S. Trained therapy dogs are helping students relax and keep away stress.

The dogs are kept in counseling centers for students to visit as often as they wish. According to AP, pet friendly dormitories where students can bring their own pets are also springing up.

Both Harvard Medical School and Yale Law School have resident therapy dogs in their libraries. Students are allowed to borrow the dogs through the library's card catalog just like they borrow books!

AP reports that Richelle Reid, law librarian who started Emory University's pet therapy program after hearing about the success of the program at the University of California, San Francisco, said: “We had a student who came in and a staff person commented they had never seen that student smile. It has had positive effects, helping them to just have a moment to clear their minds and not have to think about studies, not have to think about books.”

According to AP, some of the dogs like Harvard Medical School's resident dog Cooper, hold regular office hours. Loise Francisco-Anderson, a researcher who owns Cooper said she got the permission of school authorities to bring the dog to the campus after her husband read that the Yale Law School had a resident therapy dog named Monty.

Franciso-Anderson comments on advantages of pet therapy: "You can release some of the emotions to a pet that you can't to a human. A pet keeps it confidential. You don't have to worry about someone else saying, ‘Oh, I think she's having a nervous breakdown over the science exam.'"

According to AP, Cooper is so popular on Harvard campus that undergraduate students petition for him to spend time with them and many students come to visit the dog on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Universities partner with organizations that train companion dogs while others prefer that faculty members bring their dogs certified as therapy dogs to campus at certain hours during the week. According to AP, pet therapy services are mostly provided free.

Advocates of pet therapy claim that research shows that interaction with pets decreases levels of the stress hormone cortisol and increases "happiness" hormones known as endorphins. Fox 5 reports that Jerry Phelps, acting director of Student Wellness Initiatives at the University of California, San Diego, said: "A number of studies have demonstrated that petting an animal lowers feelings of stress and improve mood." According to UT San Diego, Phelps pointed to an article in the May/June 2009 issue of the American Journal of College Health and explained that “a pet therapy program could temporarily fill the absence of previous support systems and be a catalyst for establishing new social relationships.” Phelps added : “Stress is the number one impediment to academic performance. We do a lot to reduce stress. These are high-achieving students who place a premium on performance. They just run themselves ragged sometimes.”

Kathleen Adamle, a nursing professor at Kent State is hoping to get a grant to study how pet therapy helps to control stress. Adamle has about 11 therapy dogs in her team that visit dorms regularly. She started her "Dogs on Campus" program in 2006. All her dogs belong to her and other campus community members and are certified therapy dogs.

According to Adamle, there is a high demand for her dogs after a tragedy on campus, such as a death by accident. She says: “I don't care if it's 10 at night, we go to that dorm and sit on the floor. The kids are crying, and they grab the dog and put their face in the fur and just let it go."

The enthusiasm for pet therapy on campuses is remarkable. AP reports that Indiana University students cheerfully patronized a "Rent-a-Puppy" program in which students pay $5 to book time with one of 20 puppies from the local animal shelter with the option to adopt them.

According to First-year Emory law student Anna Idelevich, 22, who was visiting Stanley and Hooch, two retrievers school authorities brought to help students cope with the stress of exams, “I've literally been here every day. This is the best thing that's ever happened to me. They couldn't have thought of a better way to relieve stress. If they don't do it next year, I'll be upset.”

UT San Diego reports Harpalpreet Sekhon, spent time between examination papers, gently stroking Maly, a 9-year-old German shepherd. About 18 trained therapy dogs were brought to UCSD for the 2010 session as part of the university's week long “De-Stress Fest.” Sekhon said: “I just left my o-chem final. Yeah, it was stressful. This is calming me down.”

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News Headline: 2 KENT STATE PROFESSORS TO BIKE 3 HOURS TO WORK TO MARK NATIONAL BIKE TO WORK DAY (Doheny, Jacobson, Julian) | Email

News Date: 05/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University College of Nursing professors Peggy Doheny, Ph.D., and Ann Jacobson, Ph.D., will ride their bicycles to work on Friday, May 18, to mark National Bike to Work Day.Doheny and Jacobson, both in their 60s, will ride about 30 miles to work in Kent, Ohio, from Jacobson's home in South Russell, Ohio.

National Bike to Work Day, a yearly event since 1956, was established by the League of American Bicyclists to promote bicycling to work as a healthy and safe alternative to driving.The event also promotes bicycle safety.In conjunction with National Bike to Work Day, Kent State is joining in an effort to be "fuel-less" by encouraging its employees to participate in Fuel-Less Friday on May 18 by walking, riding a bike, riding public transit or carpooling to work or campus.

Doheny and Jacobson will ride about three hours to get to work at Kent State - a distance they can easily cover in 45 minutes by car.The ride will take them along several bike trails, including the Head Water Trail in Mantua and the Portage Hike and Bike Trail in Portage County.

During their ride to work on May 18, both professors will reminisce about past rides, as well as take in the sights along the bike route.This year, Jacobson is trying out an iPhone app that records her distances and times using GPS technology.Because riding a bike is much like operating a vehicle, they plan to stay focused on the road and avoid distractions.

Doheny, who rides about 2,000 miles a year, considers biking to be a great way to be in touch with nature and see the countryside; something she says cannot be experienced in a car.

"I like to bike and it is always fun to have a destination," Doheny said."Biking to work day on May 18 is one way to exercise, and is a great way to avoid the commuter traffic and stay in shape."

"Biking is my favorite way to relax and enjoy life," Jacobson said."It is a healthy stress reliever, and I would definitely encourage others to bike to work, particularly if there are showers and places to secure the bike available at the destination."

Kent State has several bike racks across the campus, and Gretchen Julian, director of the Student Recreation and Wellness Center at Kent State, is offering the center on May 18 to anyone wanting to shower after riding their bike to work.

"We are happy to let the bike-to-work participants use the recreational center for showers," Julian said."It is just one small way we can show our support for the biking initiative."

In warm weather, Jacobson bikes four to five days a week.Although she has biked several times to Kent, she had always wanted to do it on National Bike to Work Day, but it never worked out well with her schedule before now.

"I took those trips before Google Bike Maps came into being and had to do a segment on State Route 43 South, which is a nightmare," Jacobson said."But now, thanks to Google Bike Maps, we will have a route that circumvents 43 and will actually have us on a bike path."

Doheny, who has worked at Kent State for 35 years, will be retiring this summer, and biking, she said, will be part of her retirement plans.She has ridden in the MS 150 Pedal to the Point, the annual ride in support of Multiple Sclerosis, for the last 17 years and plans to continue to participate to support the cause.Doheny said she has had wonderful support for her rides over the years from her colleagues at Kent State's College of Nursing.

"I am planning to go to South Africa with my son and husband in June, and I also have several local bike rides planned over the summer," Doheny said."One ride my husband designed is what he calls the 'Tour de Cleveland,' which is a great tour to appreciate the history of Cleveland."

Doheny and Jacobson will continue to share their love for biking even after Doheny retires.Both plan to participate in bike rides together with their families.

"She will leave a huge void," Jacobson said."I am sorry to see her go and wish her much happiness in this next chapter of her life.I will see her during our annual Great Ohio Bicycle Adventure ride in June, an event that Peggy introduced my family and me to 10 years ago.This will be the 10th anniversary ride for my husband and me.I have Peggy and her husband to thank for planning trips involving many happy miles on the bike in downtown Cleveland, the towpath, the Vermont countryside, and more."

For more information about National Bike to Work Day, visit the League of American Bicyclists website at www.bikeleague.org.

For more information about Kent State's College of Nursing, visit www.kent.edu/nursing.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

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News Headline: Families used housing windfalls to send their kids to pricier colleges (Reynolds) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Inside Higher Ed
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Home prices soared in San Francisco in the late 1990s, boomed in Miami in the early 2000s, and rose throughout that period for many New York City residents. And many of the low- and middle-income home owners who saw the value of their houses climb in the several years before their children turned 18 used their newfound assets to enroll them in more selective (and more expensive) colleges than they would have otherwise, researchers at Cornell and Kent State Universities have found.

Their study, published Monday by the National Bureau of Economic Research, examines data from the (uneven) housing boom of the late 1990s and early 2000s to explore how those families who were fortunate enough to reap a windfall from living in the right place at the right time altered the choices they made in sending their kids to college. The answer, in short: They grew significantly more likely to enroll their children in flagship public universities (rather than regional publics) and less likely to send them to community colleges.

While the study does not extend into the housing bust that affected much of the United States in the last five years, the researchers say the flipside of their findings is likely to be occurring now: Lower- and middle-income families whose home values have declined since 2008 are probably looking at lower-priced colleges than they might have before their housing assets dipped. And it is also possible, they say, that the choices some families made during the housing boom may be coming back to cost them now, in two ways: their own home-based assets may have shriveled, as has access to home equity financing generally.

The researchers, Michael Lovenheim, an assistant professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell, and C. Lockwood Reynolds, an assistant professor of economics at Kent State, say they believe the role of housing wealth is underexamined in discussions of college access, especially given that home values make up a greater portion of the overall assets for lower- and middle-income families than they do for wealthier Americans.

Studying the effects of increases in housing prices on economic behavior is often difficult, Lovenheim said in an interview. Because increases and decreases in housing values are often closely linked to ups and downs in the labor market or other financial indicators, parsing the impact of housing shifts is hard. What was distinctive about the boom (which turned out to be a bubble) of the late 1990s and early 2000s, Lovenheim noted, is that it was driven (as we've all come to learn, somewhat painfully) by what he called "financial innovations" and other factors unrelated to the general labor market.

For those homeowners who were fortunate enough to live in the right metropolitan areas at the right times, "it was almost like winning the lottery," Lovenheim said,as they found themselves with significantly greater assets.

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, Lovenheim and Reynolds looked at how changes in short-run home prices affected families with college-age students. They found that for every $10,000 in additional assets a family gained in the four years leading up to a child's enrollment in college, the child was 2 percent likelier to attend a flagship public university rather than a regional public institution, and 1.6 percent less likely to enroll in a community college. The lower the family's overall income, the bigger the impact of the increase in housing values; those with annual incomes of under $75,000 were 8.3 percent likelier to attend a flagship university for every $10,000 gain in home value, while the impact was statistically insignificant for those with incomes above $125,000.

(There was no greater likelihood to attend a private institution; the authors speculate that that's because private colleges are likelier than public institutions to consider a family's home assets when calculating how much a family should pay out of pocket, and because private institutions are on average enough more expensive than public colleges that a small bump in home values isn't enough to put them in range for a student.)

Did the students' and parents' choices to use their "lottery" winnings to change where they went to college mean they got more for their money? The authors acknowledge that they are constrained in answering that question by higher ed's broader inability to gauge value. But the paper notes that every $10,000 increase in a family's home values resulted in their child attending a college with somewhat higher SAT averages, expenditures per student, instructional expenditures per student, and graduation rates.

And each $10,000 increase in a family's home values resulted in a 1.8 percent increase in the student's likelihood of earning a bachelor's degree, the authors note.

What's Happening Now?

While their data can't show it, the authors acknowledge that the positive benefits that lower- and middle-income families appeared to derive when their housing values increased may be reversing themselves now that the housing market in so many places has crashed.

With housing prices having fallen about 35 percent from 2006 to 2010, said Lovenheim, "that price drop can have a huge equity effect, wiping out all the equity you have." Additionally, he noted, the market for home equity loans has "totally dried up." So to the extent that some of those families used their newfound resources to enroll their children into more expensive flagship universities, they may now be struggling to find the funds to cover the increased costs.

The authors say their study offers evidence that it might not be wise for federal policy to generally ignore housing wealth in the calculation of financial aid. "It's great for families when housing prices are rising," Lovenheim said. "But when people have basically all of their wealth tied up in their house, and their home values drop, the financial aid system doesn't see it, because they're not paying attention to it."

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News Headline: If you're stuck in traffic, you have no good choices (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Minnesota Public Radio - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: You're stuck in Minneapolis rush hour traffic on Interstate 94, near the Lowry Hill Tunnel. A thunderstorm spins out a tornado nearby. What can you do?

Not much. You're now among the most vulnerable people in a tornado. There are no good options.

Traffic's gridlocked, so you can't drive away. Hide under an overpass? It's a trap of swirling wind and debris. Hit the ditch immediately? That's what you were taught, but many experts believe that advice is more likely to get you hurt or killed.

In this situation, your best chance is to stop, stay in your car, duck below the dash -- and hope.

"When you have a big, vicious tornado moving across an area and traffic is just bumper to bumper -- that's probably one of the big scenarios that we really worry about," said Todd Krause, warning coordination meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Chanhassen.

"I don't know that there's really a safe way to be out there on the highway."

UNDER AN OVERPASS -- BAD IDEA

Unlike home, where you can run to the basement, or out shopping, where merchants probably have a plan to keep you safe, you're pretty much on your own in your car on the highway.

You might be lucky enough to be in front of an electronic highway sign that can send an immediate warning, or receive an alert on your smart phone that a tornado is near. But without a way to pinpoint the location, the information could lead to a fatal mistake.

"We have documented cases, especially in stronger tornadoes, of people trying to drive out of a tornado and being hit by tornadoes," said John Ferree, the National Weather Service official who oversees NWS weather warnings across the country. "Even if we put out a warning you would hear because you have the radio on ... sometimes the warning won't tell you enough to know if you're in it or not."

Some might go with their gut and hide beneath the nearest highway overpass -- a dangerously bad move since the wind can accelerate and concentrate the debris. In 1999 a huge tornado caught drivers exposed on I-35 in Moore, Okla. Drivers jammed the highway to park beneath an overpass, leaving their cars to take shelter underneath.

Of the dozen or so who tried to hide there, one was killed and others suffered horrific injuries -- "shattered bones, missing fingers, missing ears, missing noses, and being impaled by pieces of shingles," weather service researchers found.

The weather service had long warned of those dangers, but for decades also accepted that leaving the car immediately and heading to a ditch lower than the road was the safest move if a tornado was imminent.

Tom Schmidlin didn't buy that advice.

RETHINKING 'HIT THE DITCH'

A geography professor and meteorologist at Kent State University who studied killer tornadoes in the South in the 1990s, Schmidlin said he was struck by scenes he witnessed where mobile homes had been destroyed while cars and pickups sitting outside those homes sat upright.

"It became obvious to us pretty quickly that those people would have survived in their vehicle while they were killed in the mobile home," he said. "The mobile homes were flipped over and disintegrated, and the vehicles were still sitting upright."

In wind tunnel experiments, Schmidlin's researchers found vehicles more stable than had generally been presumed and "undoubtedly a safer place to be in a high wind than a mobile home."

That threw into question the long standing hit-the-ditch advice for mobile home owners -- and for people stuck on the highway.

A deep ditch might work, Schmidlin said. "But deep ditches are still out in the open. You're prone to lightning. The wind can still get you in a deep ditch. There's flying debris. You need to put as many layers between you and the wind as possible," he said. "Being in a car is at least one layer."

Schmidlin's work caught the attention of Richard Bissell, director of the Center for Emergency Education and Disaster Research at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, who was leading a review of Red Cross emergency response guidelines.

"The advice about abandoning your car and go lie in a low-lying area or ditch ... it didn't make any sense to us intrinsically," Bissell recalled. "Modern cars have a pretty good safety cage," and that's better than nothing if a tornado is on you.

NEW ADVICE: CONSIDER THE OPTIONS

Schmidlin's research led the weather service and Red Cross to overhaul the guidelines in 2009. Instead of hit-the-ditch, the advice is:

If you can't get to a shelter, you're in your car and flying debris hits, pull over, park and weigh these "last resort" options:

�Stay in the car with the seat belt on. Put your head down below the windows, covering with your hands and a blanket if possible.

�If you can safely get noticeably lower than the level of the roadway, exit your car and lie in that area, covering your head with your hands.

The advice also notes that your choice should be "driven by your specific circumstances," which begs the question: Are the signals on this still too mixed?

Despite the three-year-old guidelines, there is no "consistent message right now coming from either the meteorological community or the emergency preparedness community about exactly what you're supposed to do in every situation," said Kenneth Blumenfeld, a Twin Cities tornado researcher.

"We have not resolved the what-to-do-in-your-car argument yet. That is not a done deal," he said.

The old advice to get out of the car immediately can still be found on some weather service pages. Up until a month or two ago, the Federal Emergency Management Agency had the outdated advice posted on its site, Bissell said.

Though the weather service shifted its stance, Ferree cautions the updated advice isn't absolute.

"The problem is we have tornadoes every year that do kill people in vehicles," Ferree said.

He recalled a case last year where a tornado lifted a car off the ground and slammed it into a water tower a quarter mile away. It landed in a crushed ball.

"We don't want to tell everybody necessarily to get out of the car and get in a ditch, and we also don't want to tell everybody you should stay in your car and park your car and use the car," he said.

"Once you are in a car and in a situation where a tornado is bearing down, you don't have a lot of good choices," he said. "The choice between staying in the vehicle or getting out of the vehicle and into a ditch -- those are both bad choices. It's really tough to tell you what's the best way to go."

SHOULD HIGHWAYS BE CLOSED DURING TORNADOES?

Should emergency officials close highways and get people off the roads in tornado weather, the same way they shut down interstates during blizzards?

"It's perfectly feasible if time allows for the state patrol or local police to close the highways," said Schmidlin.

Officials could close the highways for 20 or 30 minutes as a dangerous storm approached and then passed.

"Logistically, that could be difficult," he said, but "if that saved two or three lives every year it might be worth the inconvenience if it was possible ... Nobody likes a traffic jam, but then nobody likes to drive into a tornado either."

Privately, public safety officials say that in a metro area with more highway lane miles per capita than Los Angeles, closing Twin Cities interstates during rush hour for fear of a tornado is impractical.

So, on a highway packed with cars beneath a thunderstorm that spawns a tornado, what's a driver to do?

"If you're in a car and there's no way to find a structure and it's imminent you're gonna be hit, I would stop the car," said Bissell.

"Leave the engine on -- because the air bags work while the engine's on -- and hunker down so that your head is below the level of the windowsill on the car because sometimes stuff blows through the windows. Leave your seat belts on. If the car does get picked up and blown around, you've received some protection by all that metal and the safety cage that's built around you."

It's not perfect, he added, but "better than being out in your sneakers and blue jeans ... which is about all you've got lying outside on your own."

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News Headline: Undergraduate Chinese students enrolling in Ohio colleges in record numbers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Li Chen arrived in Cleveland in August 2009 with two large suitcases and a Case Western Reserve University admissions packet that had been mailed to her home in Chengdu, China.

Chen was one of 56 freshmen from China who enrolled that fall at CWRU, following the university's first effort to actively recruit international students. Only 12 Chinese students had enrolled the previous year.

Last fall, CWRU had 188 undergraduates from China.

The university, like others in Ohio and across the country, has realized the benefits of recruiting Chinese students -- who usually pay full price and can handle the academic challenges.

The number of Chinese students in undergraduate programs at U.S. colleges increased 43 percent, to 57,000 students, from 2009 to 2010, according to the most recent statistics from the Institute of International Education.

Some colleges are sending their own staff abroad to recruit and some contract with agents in the country to find students. Others rely on word-of-mouth by strengthening their existing ties -- through alumni, for example -- in a particular area.

Chen, 22, a finance major who is president of the International Club at CWRU, found the university by chance when researching schools. She has never regretted her choice.

"There are a limited number of colleges for students in China, and the competition is huge," she said. "United States colleges are personality-oriented. In China they do not see you as an individual but as a score."

Until recently, most international students came to the United States to attend graduate school, but now there are only 5,000 fewer undergraduates from other countries (291,439) than graduates, according to the institute. Ohio ranks eighth in total enrollment of international students.

Countries that send the most students to the United States are, in order: China, India, South Korea, Canada, Taiwan and Saudi Arabia. The top three account for 46 percent of all foreign enrollment.

The primary source of funds for 61.5 percent of students was personal and family money, according to the institute.

William Brustein, vice provost for global strategies and international affairs at Ohio State University, has worked in international education for 30 years. He said the sudden increase in undergraduate Chinese students has been a surprise.

"The phenomenon is due to the growth of the professional middle class in China and the emphasis they place on higher education," he said. "The United States is that magnet. The growth wasn't a surprise, but I don't think people expected it to surge so quickly and rapidly."

OSU, in an effort to establish a large global presence, targeted China as its first "global gateway" -- a prime location for faculty research, international student recruitment and opportunities for study abroad.

The university has opened offices in Shanghai, China, and Mumbai, India, and plans others in Brazil and Turkey.

"We want to bring the world to Ohio," said President E. Gordon Gee. "We think of the offices as embassies. We tell people it is as much about Ohio as Ohio State."

Gee said Ohio's universities should work together to recruit international students.

"We don't all need to be trolling over there," he said.

Cleveland State University President Ronald Berkman, who traveled to China and India in March, agreed. He and Gee were in the same hotel at the same time in India, where Gee was opening OSU's global office and Berkman was visiting high schools and other institutions.

Berkman said CSU has to determine what resources, including money, it wants to devote to attracting international students.

The university has a large number of graduate students from India and in 2008 established its Confucius Institute, which prepares teachers of Chinese. The institute is co-sponsored by CSU and Hanban, also known as the Office of Chinese Language Council International in China. CSU's partner university is Capital University of Economics and Business in Beijing.

Berkman said he would like to expand the relationship with Capital University to other programs at CSU, such as urban studies. And the university may target undergraduate students from India, which does not have enough space in its universities.

But many other schools are also seeking ties with those countries.

Berkman said the day he visited the Hanban he was told that eight other U.S. college presidents had stopped by.

"There is a really incredibly strong demand for American higher education in both countries," he said.

Schools vary on committing staff

The extent to which Ohio's public and private universities recruit international students varies.

Many send admission staffers overseas to student recruitment fairs and high schools. Others use agents in targeted countries, who connect students to institutions and help them apply.

The use of agents in China has recently come under fire as some have been accused of filling out applications for students who are not qualified academically or do not have English language skills to succeed at U.S. colleges.

Kent State University uses agents, but officials said they vet agencies and rely on accrediting bodies, other Ohio universities and alumni to ensure the quality of the recruiters and the students who come to campus.

The University of Cincinnati, which also uses agents, helped form the American International Recruitment Council to develop standards for international student recruiting agencies, Ron Cushing, director of International Services, said in an email. The university has added country coordinators and sends its staff on tours in a number of countries.

Face-to-face meetings with students is imperative, Mark Schroeder, associate director of admissions at the University of Toledo, said in an email.

"We have found that where we show up and recruit, where we invest our time and efforts, and where we can tell the UT story, we do well and are able to recruit students," he said.

Oberlin College has had educational ties to China since 1908, when it founded Shansi, one of the oldest educational exchange institutions in the United States. But while Oberlin graduates have been sent to Asia since 1918, the college has only recently seen increasing interest from Chinese students seeking a liberal arts education.

The college joined a group of 12 selective liberal arts colleges three years ago for an annual tour to four cities in China, said Joel Presti, assistant director of admissions.

"There is a lot more interest in a liberal arts education because of the freedom it provides," he said. "You can study multiple subjects while at many international universities they stream you into one subject or one field."

The liberal arts college tour was developed by Chinese graduates from several schools. All colleges rely on alumni to recruit new students. They are also using social media and revamping their websites to include information in different languages.

The College of Wooster last year produced an in-house video featuring several Chinese students talking about their experiences at the college. It was posted on a college-search website specifically to be used in China.

At CWRU, the incoming class of 2016 from China has its own Facebook page, and students are communicating on social-media sites, said Chen.

Overcoming language barrier

Once Chinese students arrive at universities, they often have difficulty with the language even though all speak English. Chen said she spent a year at an international language school to hone her English before applying to U.S. colleges.

"The hardest thing is when I am talking with my American friends, they talk so fast," said Jenny Wang, 20, a junior at CWRU. She said that by the time she determines how to respond, they have moved on to the next topic.

Universities offer programs in English as a second language and American students who volunteer as English partners to practice conversations.

Miami University admits some international students on a conditional basis and they must complete classes focused on the English language and American culture their first semester to move into regular enrollment in the university.

While universities focus on China and India, they are also looking to other countries because as China and India expand their university systems, fewer students will look to the United States, Brustein said.

"There are emerging markets," he said. "Brazil will be one and Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia as well. We have to have plans for that more diverse flow."

A year ago, representatives from 56 universities, including the University of Cincinnati, Miami University, Shawnee State University and the University of Findlay, visited Vietnam and Indonesia to explore opportunities for student recruitment there. They were invited by the U.S. Department of Commerce.

OSU's Brustein said a degree from an American university is viewed as an important credential around the world.

"This is a great time to be doing this," he said of expanding international partnerships. "It is so important for our state and for higher education. There is the international mobility of our students in going abroad and students from around the world are coming here. Faculty are working on collaborative projects. These are just very exciting times."

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News Headline: Bright Spots: May 10, 2012 (Ridgel) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University professor has received a $390,900 grant to continue advanced research on Parkinson's disease.

Angela Ridgel, Ph.D., was awarded the two-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue her work to design and test “smart” motorized bicycles, which could access individual effort, performance, skill level and therapeutic value in order to maximize the benefit to Parkinson's patients.

The disease affects about 1.5 million Americans and often leads to decreased independence and increased reliance on caregivers. The research to date by Dr. Ridgel, an assistant professor in exercise science/physiology, shows reduced symptoms of the disease with the use of exercise using motorized bicycles.

Dr. Ridgel and her research collaborators — Kenneth Loparo at Case Western Reserve University and Fred Discenzo at Rockwell Automation — are seeking people, ages 50-79, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease to take part in a clinical trial that will be held over a one-week period at Kent State. There is no cost for participants.

“After we complete this study, we anticipate that participants will be able to move better for a period of time after the exercise,” Dr. Ridgel said. “Furthermore, the information gathered from this research will allow for future exercise recommendations for individuals with Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders.”

To see if you are a candidate to participate in the clinical study, contact Dr. Ridgel at aridgel@kent.edu or 330-672-7495.

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News Headline: Pilots in statewide tour land in Port Clinton (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PORT CLINTON -- Visitors to the Erie-Ottawa Regional Airport got to see a piece of aviation history Sunday, as a pair of pilots in 1946 Piper J3 Cubs ended their first day of a planned statewide tour in Port Clinton.

Joe Murray and Ron Siwik touched down in the bright yellow Piper Cubs a little before 5 in the afternoon as part of an ambitious plan to fly the planes to all 88 Ohio counties over the next few days.

Murray, a Kent State University professor, said the duo left Kent State around 8:30 a.m. Sunday morning and stopped in 12 county airports on their first day of the trip.

"It was terrific. We were a little worried about the weather this morning," Murray said shortly after he and Siwik exited their planes, adding, "This was just the perfect start to the trip."

The idea for the flights came from Murray. He came up with the idea as a book and documentary project with his students.

He and his students also wanted to create an annual scholarship fund from flight-related donations to help families send a child to college for the first time. Murray and Siwik hope to raise $500 in each of Ohio's 88 counties, with the proceeds going toward the fund.

The flights will end in Dayton, Murray said.

The Piper Cubs were originally designed for military observation flights and pilot training service during World War II, according to a website established for the Ohio tour.

Siwik, a Chagrin Falls flight instructor and former military flight surgeon, said he bought his Piper Cub in the 1980s and flies it twice a week.

He said Murray started planning the statewide flights in November.

"He was talking about it one day and I said, 'do you care if I go?'" Siwik said.

Siwik said there were about 30 people at Kent State to see the two pilots off on their trip Sunday morning.

Murray said that he didn't expect perfect weather for eight days, roughly the amount of time it will take to take off and land in all 88 counties.

But he said he thought it would be good at least for the next three or four days.

The total distance of the flights is estimated to be 1,670 miles.

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News Headline: Record-seekers fly through Van Wert, region (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Lima News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: VAN WERT — Joe Murray had a bit of cabin fever last winter. An aviation enthusiast, Murray dreamed of taking to the skies and flying into all the airports aviation pioneers Orville and Wilbur Wright used.

One minor complication — many of those airfields no longer exist. That's when Murray, a journalism professor at Kent State University, came up with the record-setting idea to do something no one has ever done before. He would fly his Piper Cub two-seater on a voyage to every county in Ohio this year in honor of the aircraft's 75th anniversary.

Every good sojourn needs a companion. Murray's friend, Ron Siwik, a retired doctor, joined the pursuit, and on Sunday the pair took off from the Portage County airport to begin their six-day journey crisscrossing the state.

“My biggest fear with him is he's going to wander off and try to circumnavigate something,” Murray said of Siwik, who piloted a solo flight around the world in 2008. “People have been wonderful. Good weather, good people. It's just so much fun.”

Weather threatened to scrub the plan before the two Piper Cubs ever made it airborne. Storms were prevalent all around on Sunday — Mother's Day — except for straight across their planned route across northern Ohio, Murray said.

“We left on my mom's birthday,” Murray said. “I keep telling people it was my mom up there looking out for us.”

Siwik said he was up for the challenge, especially after his 24,000-mile journey a couple of years ago.

“The trouble with an Earth-rounding is you need permits in each country that are good for 48 hours,” Siwik said. “It's almost like a game of croquet where you have those little hoops. You know they're up there and you've got to go through those hoops.”

Murray said the record attempt is being overseen by RecordSetter. It's not the first time someone's attempted a record visiting all 88 counties, he said.

“A guy did this in a car back in 2006. He did it in 23 hours,” Murray said. “We planned 26 hours in the airplane. He's got us beat by three hours.”

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News Headline: Pilots hitting every Ohio county during trip (VIDEO) (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: timesbulletin.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: VAN WERT - For two guys trying to establish a world record, Joe Murray and Ron Siwik did not seem to be in much of a hurry. Then again, the record they are working to set is a rather peculiar one.

Murray and Siwik are not exactly sure what category their new record will be, but it will be something like "Fastest time to land a Piper Cub in all 88 Ohio counties." Both men are piloting separate 1946 Piper J3C-65 8F aircraft in a route from Kent to Dayton which includes stops in each county in the state -- not the most efficient method of getting there.

But when the two bright yellow Piper Cubs landed at Van Wert County Regional Airport more than two hours behind schedule, the pilots were ready to get out and socialize.

"We just don't get anywhere fast today," quipped Murray.

"We are visiting at the stops, and we can't get away on time!" explained Siwik.

The planes were late getting to Van Wert after spending some extra time at a restaurant in Definace with some of the locals. Part of the pleasure for the men is to meet people and learn about the areas of Ohio they have never visited. Murray is writing a book about flying in Ohio. While in Van Wert, both he and Siwik expressed their amazement at how flat the land is in this area.

Murray shared that the planes made a quick change in the flight plan Monday afternoon, temporarily bypassing a stop at a private landing strip in Paulding County to get to Van Wert. The reason? The media and a few others were patiently waiting in Van Wert.

The idea of making the trip was Murray's. "It was back about six months ago," he recalled. "It started out as just a small idea. I wanted to fly this to Huffman Prairie down by Dayton, the pasture where the Wright Brothers first flew their airplane. That was it. That was the small idea. But it was right in the middle of 'cabin fever' time, November, so I kept thinking about it."

Murray went on to refine his idea to visiting all the airports where the Wrights landed, but many of those airfields are lost to time. So the next idea was to visit every county in the state via airplane. A little later, Murray recruited Siwik to join him with his own Piper Cub. Siwik has been flying since 1967 and flew a different aircraft around the world solo back in 2008. Murray has 31 years of flying experience, but his Cub is new to him, with only 100 hours of flight time in it so far.

"I didn't know about it till we were talking about it at the airport one day, and I said, 'Maybe I should go along,' Siwik added.

The duo were hoping to make it back to Seneca County by evening, but the slow schedule kept them from achieving that goal, settling for Hancock County as the end of the second day of flying. Siwik showed little concern over the slow pace.

"I'm retired," he said. "I've been retired two years, so I've got all year. Joe's got to go to work sometime."

Murray, who teaches at Kent State University, is also trying to raise $500 in each county in the state to create an annual scholarship fund for Ohio students at the school.

The long, winding flight path to Dayton was due to be completed by Sunday, but Monday's pace put that goal in jeopardy. Well-wishers and media were not the only ones to blame.

Siwik shared, "This morning we were delayed by fog, so we took off for Sandusky County from Port Clinton. They were down to a quarter-mile visibility and a 100-foot ceiling, so we got up to that fog bank and had to turn right and land at Fremont, which was right at the edge of the fog." The Fremont stop was a fortunate one since it also lies in Sandusky County. At each stop, the pilots collect the signature of someone from the county. In Van Wert, County Commissioner Clair Dudgeon did the honors.

After a refill of 12 gallons of fuel, Murray and Siwik each climbed back into their respective flying machines and took off for the next stop in Paulding County. No mechanical problems are expected since the planes just went through annual inspection, but Murray's brother Mike is serving as a ground coordinator for the excursion. But keeping up with the delays is taking its toll on him as well.

"(Murray's) brother is keeping track of us and sort of scheduling things, and he is getting more and more frustrated as we are falling further behind!" Siwik laughed.

No matter how long the trip finally takes, it will be a record since no one else has thought to attempt this flight plan in the past. It is also hard to imaging anyone else duplicating the feat and having more fun than these two friends are having this week.

Please click on link for video:

http://timesbulletin.com/main.asp?SectionID=2&SubSectionID=4&ArticleID=173509

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News Headline: Kent State University Summer concert tickets now on sale | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tickets for three upcoming summer concerts at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas are now on sale.

The concerts include the Broadway musical "Mamma Mia!" at 7:30 p.m. June 14, "LeAnn Rimes Acoustic" at 7:30 p.m. July 26 and "VeggieTales Live: God Made You Special" at 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sept. 23.

"Mamma Mia!" is a hit musical that features the songs of ABBA, and tells a love story set on a Greek island.

LeAnn Rimes, a country music singer, will perform an acoustic concert.

"VeggieTales" is a performance event based on the Christian animated television show of the same name, and is intended for young children and their families.

Tickets range from $48-70 for "Mamma Mia!," $49-69 for "LeAnn Rimes Acoustic" and $15-30 for "Veggie Tales Live: God Made You Special."

To purchase tickets or for more information, go to www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or call 330-308-6400.

The Performing Arts Center box office is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Kent State University Summer concert tickets now on sale | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Matt Alpert
News OCR Text: Tickets for three upcoming summer concerts at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas are now on sale.

The concerts include the Broadway musical "Mamma Mia!" at 7:30 p.m. June 14, "LeAnn Rimes Acoustic" at 7:30 p.m. July 26 and "VeggieTales Live: God Made You Special" at 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sept. 23.

"Mamma Mia!" is a hit musical that features the songs of ABBA, and tells a love story set on a Greek island.

LeAnn Rimes, a country music singer, will perform an acoustic concert.

"VeggieTales" is a performance event based on the Christian animated television show of the same name, and is intended for young children and their families.

Tickets range from $48-70 for "Mamma Mia!," $49-69 for "LeAnn Rimes Acoustic" and $15-30 for "Veggie Tales Live: God Made You Special."

To purchase tickets or for more information, go to www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or call 330-308-6400.

The Performing Arts Center box office is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Antimatter Propulsion Engine Redesigned Using CERN's Particle Physics Simulation Toolkit (Zhang) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Technology Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Antimatter Propulsion Engine Redesigned Using CERN's Particle Physics Simulation Toolkit

Latest simulation shows that the magnetic nozzles required for antimatter propulsion could be vastly more efficient than previously thought--and built with today's technologies

kfc 05/14/2012

Smash a lump of matter into antimatter and it will release a thousand times more energy than the same mass of fuel in a nuclear fission reactor and some 2 billion times more than burning the equivalent in hydrocarbons.

So it's no wonder that antimatter is the dream fuel for science fiction fans.

The problem, of course, is that antimatter is in rather short supply making the prospect of ever building a rocket based on this technology somewhat remote.

But from time to time physicists put aside these concerns and have a little fun working out how good antimatter rocket engines can be. Today it's the turn of Ronan Keane at Western Reserve Academy and Wei-Ming Zhang at Kent State University, both in Ohio, who take a new approach to the problem with some interesting results.

First, some basic rocket science. The maximum speed of a rocket depends on its exhaust velocity, the fraction of mass devoted to fuel and the configuration of the rocket stages. "The latter two factors depend strongly on fine details of engineering and construction, and when considering space propulsion for the distant future, it seems appropriate to defer the study of such specifics," say Keane and Zhang.

So these guys focus on the exhaust velocity--the speed of the particles produced in matter-antimatter annihilations as they leave the rocket engine.

The thrust from these annihilations comes largely from using a magnetic field to deflect charged particles created in the annihilation. These guys focus on the annihilation of protons and antiprotons to produce charged pions.

So an important factor is how efficiently the magnetic field can channel these particles out of the nozzle.

In fact, the exhaust velocity of these pions depends on two factors--their average initial velocity when they are created and the efficiency of the magnetic nozzle design.

In the past, various physicists have calculated that the pions should travel at over 90 per cent the speed of light but that the nozzle would be only 36 per cent efficient. That translates into an average exhaust velocity of only a third of lightspeed, barely relativistic and somewhat of a disappointment for antimatter propulsion fans.

All that is set to change now, however. Keane and Zhang have come up with a different set of figures with the help of software developed by CERN that simulates the interaction between particles, matter and fields of various kinds.

CERN uses this software, called GEANT4 (short for Geometry and Tracking 4), to better understand how particles behave at the Large Hadron Collider, which itself collides beams of protons and antiprotons. So it's ideally suited to Keane and Zhang's task.

The new work produces some good news and some bad news. First the bad. The new simulations indicate that pions produced in this way will be significantly slower than previously thought, travelling at only 80 per cent of light speed.

The good news is that the GEANT4 simulations indicate that a magnetic nozzle can be much more efficient than previously envisioned, reaching 85 per cent efficiency. That translates into an average exhaust velocity of about 70 per cent light speed. That's much more promising. "True relativistic speeds once more become a possibility," say Keane and Zhang.

These guys have another surprise up their sleeve. Their nozzle has a magnetic field strength of around 12 Tesla. "Such a field could be produced with today's technology, whereas prior nozzle designs anticipated and required major advances in this area," they say.

That will bring a smile to the face of many science fiction fans.

There is, of course, the small problem of gathering enough antimatter for a journey of any decent length. The number of antiatoms made at CERN is small enough to be countable. By one estimate, at this rate it will take a thousand years to make a single microgram of antimatter.

Keane and Zhang point out that all earlier estimates predate the PAMELA spacecraft's discovery last year that Earth is surrounded by a ring of antiprotons and suggest that this could mined for fuel. What they don't mention, however, is that PAMELA spotted only 28 antiprotons in two years--far less than the rate at which CERN makes them on a daily basis.

Keane and Zhang finish by noting that other fuel technologies have advanced at an exponential rate, liquid hydrogen production, for example. If antimatter manufacture turns out to follow a similar trajectory, who knows what could happen.

Interesting, entertaining and wildly ambitious--all good fun.

Ref: arxiv.org/abs/1205.2281 : Beamed Core Antimatter Propulsion: Engine Design and Optimisation

TRSF: Read the Best New Science Fiction inspired by today's emerging technologies.

Beams 'n' Bones

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News Headline: Ohio Officer Encourages Autism Training for Responders | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: JEMS (Journal of Emerngecy Medical Services) - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Akron Police Sgt. Mark Farrar knows the facts of autism in his head and the pain of autism in his heart.

With the incidence of autism rising rapidly -- 1 in 88 children (and 1 in 54 boys) are born with some form of it -- law-enforcement agencies are being affected because, Farrar says, the autistic are seven times as likely as others to come into contact with first responders such as police, fire and paramedics. They also are more likely to be crime victims.

"We talk about autism in kids as if they mysteriously disappear when they become adults," Farrar said yesterday at Attorney General Mike DeWine's "Two Days in May" crime-victims conference in the Hyatt Regency. "Those kids are growing up, becoming adults, living in our communities. We can't assume first responders know how to deal with them on their own."

Farrar, 39, who spends half his time patrolling the streets of Akron, has a son Kyle, 5, who has Asperger's syndrome, a high-functioning form of autism. Farrar became a self-taught expert on the subject after his son's autism was diagnosed, and he now trains law-enforcement and other organizations about autism, often on his own time.

Autism is a development disorder that often shows up early in childhood. It is marked by communication and behavioral issues but is not mental retardation.

An audience of 1,000 was spellbound yesterday as Farrar blended the story of his family's struggles raising Kyle and the growing trend for autistic individuals to become victims and sometimes perpetrators of crime. He showed a clip from the Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman movie Rain Man, offering a glimpse of life with autism.

"We have to convince police there's a need for this training, not because I have a son, but because of research and statistics," he said. "As I say in training law enforcement, 'This is coming to a call near you.' "

One of Farrar's gripping stories was about Gertrude Steuernagel, a political-science professor at Kent State University who was stomped to death in 2009 by her autistic son, Sky Walker, then 18. When police arrived at the house, he said, "Mama hurt. Kicking Mama," Farrar said.

Steuernagel, who dealt with her son's erratic and increasingly violent behavior for years, left a message locked in a safe in her bedroom. "This is my fault, not Sky's," she wrote. "I do not want him to be punished for something he was not responsible for."

The court decided that Walker was incompetent. He was not convicted and is in a mental-health facility.

In an interview, Farrar discussed the devastation he and his wife felt when Kyle's behavior problems were diagnosed. As a toddler, Kyle came into his parents' room early every morning, screaming loudly. He was sensitive to changes in light and sound. He had trouble communicating.

With treatment, Kyle's behavior has improved. But Farrar said autism is not something he will outgrow. It will always be with him.

On Farrar's website, www.autismawareness4firstresponders.com, he has information about autism, along with a short video about his son.

"I love Kyle now more than ever," Farrar says at the end. "Every day I am around him, he makes me a better man. ... Kyle is truly a remarkable son who I wouldn't change for the world."

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News Headline: RiverDay to celebrate Cuyahoga | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 22nd annual RiverDay along the Cuyahoga River will be celebrated with cleanups, hikes, tours and parties Saturday.

The day includes 19 events in Summit, Portage, Cuyahoga and Geauga counties.

The message is that a free-flowing Cuyahoga River is important and everyone needs to get involved to help it get cleaner.

Sponsors are the Friends of the Crooked River, the grass-roots group devoted to the Cuyahoga River, and Appalachian Outfitters, with stores in Boston and Plain townships.

A detailed list of events is available at www.cuyahoga river.net/riverday.htm.

Akron-area events include a river cleanup from 9 a.m. to noon in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park.

The cleanup is sponsored by the park and the Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park, the friends-of-the-park group.

Registration is required for volunteers willing to remove trash and invasive plants. To register, contact 330-657-2909 or volunteer@forcvnp.org. Volunteers should wear long sleeves and long pants, sturdy boots and work gloves.

The park is also sponsoring a Cuyahoga River hike at 1:30 p.m. at park headquarters at Vaughn and Riverview roads in Brecksville, a Junior Ranger program for youngsters 7 to 12 years old at 9:30 a.m. (registration at 330-657-2909, ext. 100) and a chat with a ranger on water-quality tests at 1:30 p.m. at the park's Boston Store Visitor Center off Boston Mills Road in Boston Township.

In Cuyahoga Falls, volunteers are needed from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on a community cleanup, including pulling invasive plants from Water Works Park. Trash bags, planting supplies and lunch will be provided to volunteers.

To register, contact Becky McCleary at 330-971-8201.

Friends of the Crooked River is offering a bus tour along the Cuyahoga and Little Cuyahoga rivers.

The morning tour from 9 to 11:30 a.m. includes stops at Goodyear's work on the Little Cuyahoga River in East Akron and Rack 40, an Akron project to curtail overflowing sewers in North Akron.

Lunch at noon will be at Munroe Falls, where the river was lowered.

From 1 to 4:30 p.m., the bus tour will go to Kent, where a Cuyahoga River dam was removed and so, too, was a small dam on Plum Creek. There will also be a stop at two dams on the Cuyahoga in Cuyahoga Falls that are to be removed this year.

The bus tour is free, but reservations are required. Contact Elaine Marsh at 330-666-4026 or ohgreenway@gmail.com.

There will also be stream hikes from 10 a.m. to noon starting at Akron's Mustill Store off West North Street (330-374-5625) and at 2 p.m. along Haley's Run off Landon Street in South Akron (330-592-8155).

Munroe Falls will celebrate its River Day Festival from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Brust Park off North Main Street (state Route 91). That includes a free pancake breakfast from 7 to 11 a.m. at the fire station on Munroe Falls Avenue. For information, call 330-687-2686.

Kent will dedicate its restoration of Plum Creek, a Cuyahoga River tributary, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Plum Creek Park off Cherry Street. Call 330-673-1193 for details. There will be a potluck picnic dinner from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Call 330-678-8760 for details.

Canoe and kayak trips will be available from Crooked River Adventures, if water levels are safe. There is a fee. Call 330-541-7467 for reservations and information.

In northern Portage County, the Portage Park District is offering a tour at 1 p.m. of the stream restoration work at the Morgan Preserve Wetlands in Shalersville Township. For information, go to www. portageparkdistrict.org.

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News Headline: KSU Upward Bound sets event Sunday | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Upward Bound Programs will host the Senior Scholarship Banquet from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday at the Kent Student Center Ballroom.

The event is open to KSU faculty and staff, high school administrators and community members.

The Senior Scholarship Banquet recognizes graduating high school seniors who have successfully participated and completed the Upward Bound TRIO Programs' experience. Graduating seniors will be recognized for their achievements and success as program participants. Many of these students are the first in their families to go to college, and in many instances, have obtained academic and athletic scholarships.

Upward Bound alumna and Vice President of Planning and External Affairs for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland Jacklyn Chisholm, Ph.D., will deliver the keynote address at the event.

The cost to attend the event is $10, with proceeds benefitting the Parent Advisory Council scholarship. Tables also are available for purchase for $100.

For more information, call 330-672-2920.

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News Headline: KENT STATE'S UPWARD BOUND PROGRAMS TO CELEBRATE GRADUATING HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS, MAY 19 (Lawless-Andric) | Email

News Date: 05/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Upward Bound Programs will host the Senior Scholarship Banquet on Saturday, May 19, from 11:30 a.m.to 1:30 p.m.at the Kent Student Center Ballroom.The event is open to Kent State faculty and staff, high school administrators and community members.

The Senior Scholarship Banquet recognizes graduating high school seniors who have successfully participated and completed the Upward Bound TRIO Programs' experience.Graduating seniors will be recognized for their achievements and success as program participants.Many of these students are the first in their families to go to college, and in many instances, have obtained academic and athletic scholarships.

Upward Bound alumna and Vice President of Planning and External Affairs for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland Jacklyn Chisholm, Ph.D., will deliver the keynote address at the event.Kent State Upward Bound scholarships will be awarded during the banquet, including the Parent Advisory Council awards.The event also will feature recognition of program alumni, university and community partners.

"We are extremely proud of our graduating students and very happy to have impacted their lives here at Kent State through the Upward Bound programs," said Dana Lawless-Andric, director of the pre-college and TRiO Upward Bound programs at Kent State."By successfully completing the program, these students are better prepared for the college experience, and will go on to make meaningful contributions to their communities."

Kent State hosts three federal Upward Bound TRIO grants: the Upward Bound Classic program, serving the Akron Buchtel, Barberton and Warren areas; the Upward Bound PREP Academy, serving the Ravenna and Lorain areas; and the Upward Bound Math/Science Center, serving the Canton area.

The banquet is coordinated by the Kent State Upward Bound Programs in collaboration with parents from all three programs who volunteer time and resources through the Parent Advisory Council, fundraising scholarship dollars and gifts for the graduating seniors.

The cost to attend the event is $10, with proceeds benefitting the Parent Advisory Council scholarship.Tables also are available for purchase for $100.

For more information about the Senior Scholarship Banquet or to purchase a ticket, contact the Kent State University Upward Bound Programs' offices at 330-672-2920.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

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