Report Overview:
Total Clips (9)
Athletics (2)
Community Service, Learning and Volunteerism (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Stark (1)
May 4 (1)
Physics (1)
WKSU (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (2)
New data show only eight college athletics programs self-sufficient 05/16/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Hughes enjoys watching KSU golf team grow into postseason contenders 05/16/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Community Service, Learning and Volunteerism (1)
Haymaker Market Opens Outdoors May 26 05/15/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...Credit/debit card users may buy $5 increment tokens that can be used on any item at the market. Not sure what to do with kale? Visit The Campus Kitchen at Kent State University's booth to sample fresh dishes made with seasonal market ingredients, and take the free recipe card and grab the ingredients...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Amateur pilots visit Van Wert on record-setting quest (Murray) 05/15/2012 Van Wert Independent Text Attachment Email

...talk to reporters in front of their yellow Piper Cub airplanes on Monday afternoon. (Dave Mosier/Van Wert independent) In a moment of winter boredom, Kent State University journalism professor Joe Murray, an amateur pilot, came up with an idea: why not fly to all the airports used by Orville and...

Vintage Plane Tour of Ohio Stops in Mahoning (Video) (Murray) 05/16/2012 WYTV-TV Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (1)
Kent Stark to Host Information Night for the Professional MBA Program 05/15/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark will host a Professional MBA Info Night on Wednesday, June 6 at 6:30 p.m. in room 232 of The University Center, 6000...


May 4 (1)
College of DuPage Dedicates New Kent State Memorial 05/15/2012 TribLocal.com Text Attachment Email

In commemoration of the 42nd anniversary of the Kent State University shootings, College of DuPage officials May 3 unveiled a memorial created by Chicago artist Richard Rezac. Crafted from wood...


Physics (1)
Revving Up the Antimatter Engine 05/16/2012 Discovery News Text Attachment Email

...of enterprising (get it?) physicists should fan the flames of that fantasy even further. Ronan Keane (Western Reserve Academy) and Wei-Ming Zhang (Kent State University) report that the latest results from their computer simulations indicate that at least one key component of realizing a working...


WKSU (1)
Fracking will be topic for panel discussion 05/16/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: New data show only eight college athletics programs self-sufficient | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Each year, USA Today makes public records requests of all public universities in the NCAA's Division I classification, asking for athletic department revenues and expenses for a closer look at how much money college athletics costs taxpayers.

The ensuing storable database is fascinating stuff, and shows that Mid-American Conference schools, Akron and Kent State included, on average have 72% of their athletic department budgets subsidized by student fees, state money and other institutional support.

That will give critics of college athletics' largesse plenty of ammo; only eight schools, including Ohio State, use $0 in subsidies to fund their athletic programs. Heck, even major programs such as Michigan, Oregon, Florida and Georgia use at least minimal subsidies, though they are smaller amounts.

Twenty-two schools, the newspaper found, operate in the black, while spending overall — inclusive of 227 schools — rose by $267 million from a year earlier.

Meanwhile, to illustrate the ongoing gulf in college sports, Texas, the top earner and spender on the list, spent over $133 million in 2010-11 on its intercollegiate sports teams. Kent State, meanwhile, spent $109 million the last six years combined. Akron, over the same time period, spent $122 million.

Cleveland State, meanwhile, has 84.5% of its expenditures subsidized, according to the newspaper's study.

Return to Top



News Headline: Hughes enjoys watching KSU golf team grow into postseason contenders | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: The Kent State golf team has been there and done that over the years, a proud program boasting a record-stuffing resume under 34-year coach Herb Page.

Page counts among his successes 17 Mid-American Conference titles and 22 trips to NCAA postseason play, including three regional titles and two Top 10 national finishes.

Yet, Page might have pulled off one of the best coaching performances this season in mentoring a Golden Flashes team that features only one senior, Mackenzie Hughes, and two juniors Isaac Charette (Hudson) and Kevin Miller (Dover).

How did the inexperienced but talented squad perform recently in the MAC Tournament? Try winning the championship by 40 strokes, claiming the team's fourth consecutive and 20th overall league title.

“With as well as the program's done over the years, we're always expected to perform at a pretty high level,” said Hughes, a 6-foot, 165-pounder from Ontario, Canada. “And despite how young we are overall this season, we still think we're that kind of a team. Guys have been getting so much better as we've gone on and that's been fun to see.”

As the 18th-ranked Flashes continue to mature, the team begins regional play Thursday at the University of Michigan, seeded third behind top seed Southern California and No. 2 seed Oregon.

After three days covering 54 holes, the top five teams of each of the six regional sites advance to the NCAA Championship at Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Calif., May 29-June 3.

“We mixed up who we played a little bit with rotating guys in the five-spot a little bit, but for the last four or five tournaments the lineup's been set and we've settled in and developed great chemistry,” Hughes said. “This team is very explosive. We've shown that we can post some really low numbers and win against some great fields. It's fun to be a part of a team like this, always capable of having a great team round on any day that can lead us to a great finish.”

Hughes takes pride in being the team's only senior, the lone mentor of a squad of “younger brothers” whose talent he has helped coax to bloom.

“Early on, our first tournament wasn't great,” Hughes said. “But the second tournament of the year, even though it was rain-shortened, our team won. Right away I kind of got a sense that this team had potential to be very good, even if I didn't know at that point how good.”

But when the Flashes pulled off a first-place finish at a tournament in Tennessee in mid-October, Hughes remembers thinking, “we're contenders.”

“We had some in-between results in there, too,” he said. “So I was optimistic, but I knew we still had a ways to go. But every week we kept getting better and went on a pretty good roll heading into the MAC Championship.”

Since the NCAA adopted a regional format in 1989, the Flashes have qualified for postseason play 21 times in the past 24 years, advancing to the championship 15 times, including each of the past two seasons.

Last season, Kent State tied for 19th place (good for fifth-best in school history) to put the Flashes among an elite group of only 10 schools to have finished in the Top 20 at the NCAA Championship each of the past two seasons.

“Being my last year, I'd love for the whole team to play extremely well and for us to go as far as we can go,” Hughes said. “I'd love nothing more than for us to give a national championship a run.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Haymaker Market Opens Outdoors May 26 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 20 musicians lined up for 'Music at the Market' this year

http://kent.patch.com/articles/haymaker-market-opens-outdoors-may-26/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1336989820

The Haymaker Farmers' Market in Kent launches the celebration of its 20th year with the grand opening on Saturday, May 26, 2012 at its outdoor market.

Located on Franklin Avenue beneath the Haymaker overpass between College Street and Summit Street, the market runs rain or shine from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays until October 27, 2012.

More than 40 vendors weekly will offer locally grown fruits, vegetables and herbs (with 4 OEFFA Certified Organic growers). Fresh baked goods include gluten-free and vegan. Also available are artisan goat and cow cheeses, pastured eggs and meats, certified organic specialty grains, flours, and dry beans, handmade fresh pasta and sauces, pierogies, and vegan veggie burgers, chips and salsa, guacamole, hummus, grain salads, preserves, maple syrup, honey, dried herbs, rubs, dips, vinegars, soaps, lotions, candles, cut flowers or bouquets, as well as seedlings, potted perennials and shrubs. Enjoy ready to eat foods, coffees and teas at the market or take them home for later.

Light on cash? Visit the market information table to buy tokens to use within the market. The SNAP program lets customers swipe their Ohio Direction card in exchange for $1 increment tokens that may be used to purchase any SNAP-eligible food item from any vendor. Credit/debit card users may buy $5 increment tokens that can be used on any item at the market.

Not sure what to do with kale? Visit The Campus Kitchen at Kent State University's booth to sample fresh dishes made with seasonal market ingredients, and take the free recipe card and grab the ingredients while you're at the market to make it yourself at home (May-August).

The Children @ the Market series offers educational activities for kids (TBA), and the Music @ the Market series continues with free live performances each Saturday from 10 a.m. until noon. This series features local musicians and is made possible in part through a “Celebrate Kent!” grant. Join the market's email list by writing to: haymakermarket@gmail.com or visiting its website at www.haymakermarket.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: Amateur pilots visit Van Wert on record-setting quest (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Van Wert Independent
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Pilots Ron Siwik and Joe Murray talk to reporters in front of their yellow Piper Cub airplanes on Monday afternoon. (Dave Mosier/Van Wert independent)

In a moment of winter boredom, Kent State University journalism professor Joe Murray, an amateur pilot, came up with an idea: why not fly to all the airports used by Orville and Wilbur Wright more than 100 years ago?

The problem, Murray found, was that some of those old airports no longer existed. That led to Plan B, which was to fly his vintage two-seater Piper Cub on a record-setting quest to airports in all of Ohio's 88 counties within 26 hours of flying time. The trip is being made to honor the 75th anniversary of the Piper Cub.

Murray took some time off from his teaching position and also convinced a buddy, retired physician and fellow Piper Cub owner Ron Siwik, to tag along. The men started their journey on Mother's Day and Murray said it was a sign that, with storms all around, the route he and Siwik had chosen was clear all the way.

“I keep telling everyone it was my mom up there looking out for us,” Murray told reporters and others gathered Monday at the Van Wert County Regional Airport to greet their yellow airplanes after they landed on a grass runway at the airport.

While the men are working to set a world record for flying around the state in their Piper Cubs, they aren't in a huge hurry to do so, with Murray noting that a secondary reason for the trip is just to meet and talk to people around the state.

“People have been wonderful … it's just so much fun,” Murray noted.

In addition to visiting with people along the way, eating some tasty strawberry pie at a Defiance County restaurant also wasn't a bad idea, but that stop alone put the travelers two hours behind on their itinerary. That delay, coupled with early-morning fog that grounded them for awhile, wreaked havoc with the fliers' schedule on Monday.

Joe Murray brings his Piper Cub to a stop on the taxiway at Van Wert County Regional Airport. (Dave Mosier/Van Wert independent)

That doesn't bother Siwik, though. Murray's partner on the trip is no stranger to long flights, as Siwik noted he flew around the world not too long ago. That trip was strictly by the flight plan, though, the retired physician said, largely because he had to obtain permits in each country he planned to fly over and the permits were only good for 48 hours.

He likened that trip to a game of croquet, where he had to jump through each hoop in the proper timeframe.

Siwik's wanderlust could also be Murray's biggest challenge. “My biggest fear with him is that he's going to wander off and try to circumnavigate something,” the Kent State professor said with a smile.

Both men have lots of flying experience, with Siwik's piloting going back to 1967, while Murray has flown for more than three decades.

Murray has some secondary goals on his trip and one of those was to obtain a signature from someone in each county. Van Wert County Commissioner Clair Dudgeon, a member of the local airport authority, obliged after greeting the two fliers.

The Kent State professor, who also plans to write a book about the trip, is also trying to raise $500 in each county to use as scholarship seed money for Kent State students.

Meanwhile, Murray and Siwik's plan to finish their quest by Sunday could be in jeopardy, especially with Monday's turgid pace. It didn't seem to bother either of them, though. Murray was more interested in talking about how flat the local topography was.

That also may be because it's Murray's brother, Mike, who is ground coordinator for the trip. Siwik joked that Mike Murray is getting more and more frustrated as the fliers get further and further behind the original schedule.

But with great weather for flying, Murray and Siwik were on Cloud 9 when they stopped in Van Wert County. Now if Siwik's brother can only figure out where that is on their flight plan

Return to Top



News Headline: Vintage Plane Tour of Ohio Stops in Mahoning (Video) (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: WYTV-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two northeast Ohio natives are on a quest to fly to all 88 counties in the Buckeye State and on Tuesday, their travels landed them back in Mahoning County.

The wheels touched down at Youngstown Elser Regional Airport in North Lima Tuesday afternoon.

"Every landing we made I think, except for one, was a cross-wind, so the wind's trying to blow you off the runway and you're trying to keep it on, but it's great fun. I've never had more fun in all my life," said pilot and Kent State University professor Joe Murray.

Murray and retired radiologist Ron Siwik of Chargin Falls have logged many miles and hours flying airplanes. But on this trip, they wanted to honor the 75th anniversary of the Piper Cub.

"It's a pleasure to fly because of its history, and the heritage is just on your mind all the time when you're flying it," Siwik said.

Mahoning County was their last stop on Tuesday. The pair took off Sunday from Kent State Airport, and will touch down for the final time at Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport in about nine days, stopping in all of Ohio's 88 counties along the way.

Tuesday's landing was special for Murray, who grew up in Girard.

"It's coming home. I had a sack of muffins here, my sister gave us some oatmeal cookies which I would kill for, so we ate those for two or three days," Murray said.

Their journey also has touched complete strangers. Peppy Laakso, 87, flew the very same J-3 Cubs as a teenager in Trumbull County.

"I was thrilled to death that they would do something like this. It was just great," Laakso said.

Laakso got a chance to sit in Murray's pilot seat on Tuesday.

"I told him give me the keys, I'm going," she said.

After a good night's sleep, it's back to the friendly skies bright and early Wednesday morning for the pair.

To track their flight and follow their blog, click here.

Please click on link to view video:
http://www.wytv.com/content/news/local/story/Vintage-Plane-Tour-of-Ohio-Stops-in-Mahoning/DXddESrntka1RZ1dJMknnA.cspx

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent Stark to Host Information Night for the Professional MBA Program | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark will host a Professional MBA Info Night on Wednesday, June 6 at 6:30 p.m. in room 232 of The University Center, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township. The presentation is free and open to the public. To RSVP, or for more information, visit www.stark.kent.edu/PMBA.

The professional master's of business administration (PMBA) program, which is available in its entirety at Kent State Stark, is designed for those with two to several years of work experience. The PMBA is the only AACSB-accredited MBA program in Stark County. Kent State shares this distinction with universities, such as Harvard, Yale, UCLA and MIT.

Graduates of the PMBA will be prepared for management and leadership positions in regional, national and international organizations through an emphasis on ethical leadership, teamwork, creative problem solving, global perspectives and skilled applications of information technology.

The Professional MBA program features:

· Evening classes held during the week, leaving weekends free for family, travel, work, hobbies, etc.

· On-site and online courses.

· Part-time, flexible scheduling allows most students to finish within 2.5 to 3 years.

· Open to professionals with varying baccalaureate degrees. Undergraduate business degree not required.

· Free parking, convenient location and professional setting.

· Deferred billing and streamlined employer reimbursement.

This presentation will provide detailed information for anyone considering a professional MBA from Kent State University, including curriculum, admissions requirements, application process and the importance of AACSB accreditation. All courses are taught by experienced and knowledgeable Kent State College of Business faculty. Following the presentation will be an opportunity for questions and discussion.

http://northcanton.patch.com/announcements/kent-stark-to-host-information-night-for-the-professional-mba-program/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1337129065

Return to Top



News Headline: College of DuPage Dedicates New Kent State Memorial | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: TribLocal.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In commemoration of the 42nd anniversary of the Kent State University shootings, College of DuPage officials May 3 unveiled a memorial created by Chicago artist Richard Rezac.

Crafted from wood from four memorial Silver Leaf maple trees removed during construction of the Homeland Security Education Center, the sculpture is one of the few times Rezac has worked with provided materials. The final piece incorporates four trunk portions, as well as bronzed stems in a tabletop formation that features the original memorial plaque along with a poem by Marvin Bell, commemorating the four students killed May 4, 1970, and two students killed at Jackson State University just a few days later.

Naperville resident Carol Martin, a sophomore at Kent State in 1970, said the campus had not been a hotbed of unrest in the days leading up to the shooting as some believe.

“The National Guard came to campus and declared Marshall Law. We had no fear and not one student on campus believed there were bullets in those guns,” she said. “It's still so hard today to think of the fact that people were divided so much that their children were the enemy. I think it's a cautionary tale for not letting the country divide us like that again.”

In addition to the Rezac sculpture in the Student Services Center, the College has planted four beech trees offset by a memorial marker by the Homeland Security Education Center to further remind students and visitors about the Kent State tragedy. After first recalling his memories of the 1970 shootings, College of DuPage President Dr. Robert L. Breuder praised Rezac's work and noted the significance of the newly planted trees.

“This magnificent creation is a tremendous expression of an event that struck a nation and shook the foundations of higher education,” Dr. Breuder said. “In addition, the strength and stateliness of the beech trees aptly placed near a new building that represents public safety and service will help us remember this tumultuous time in our history.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Revving Up the Antimatter Engine | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Discovery News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Discovery News Space News Revving Up the Antimatter Engine

Revving Up the Antimatter Engine

Hope springs eternal for die-hard Star Trek fans that scientists will one day build an actual, working antimatter propulsion engine similar to the one that powers the fictional starship Enterprise.

A new paper by a pair of enterprising (get it?) physicists should fan the flames of that fantasy even further.

Ronan Keane (Western Reserve Academy) and Wei-Ming Zhang (Kent State University) report that the latest results from their computer simulations indicate that at least one key component of realizing a working antimatter propulsion engine -- highly efficient magnetic nozzles -- should be far more efficient than previously thought. And such nozzles are feasible using today's technologies.

SLIDE SHOW: Introducing the Warpship

Before everyone chimes in with a resounding "Squee!", let's back up a moment.

First, its true: matter/antimatter propulsion is not just the stuff of science fiction. As he did with many technical aspects of the series, for the Enterprise propulsion system, Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry drew on science fact.

Antimatter is the mirror image of ordinary matter. So antiparticles are identical in mass to their regular counterparts, but the electrical charges of antiparticles are reversed. An anti-electron would have a positive instead of a negative charge, while an antiproton would have a negative instead of a positive charge.

When antimatter meets matter, the result is an explosion. Both particles are annihilated in the process, and their combined masses are converted into pure energy -- electromagnetic radiation that spreads outward at the speed of light.

Remember in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock: when Kirk sabotages the Enterprise after surrendering his ship to the Klingons? He programs the computer to mix matter and antimatter indiscriminately. Ka-boom! The ship is destroyed.

Despite that whole annihilation thing, as recently as October 2000, NASA scientists were developing early designs for an antimatter engine for future missions to Mars.

ANALYSIS: Warp Drives: Making the 'Impossible' Possible

Antimatter is an ideal rocket fuel because all of the mass in matter/antimatter collisions is converted into energy. Matter/antimatter reactions produce 10 million times the energy produced by conventional chemical reactions such as the hydrogen and oxygen combustion used to fuel the space shuttle.

We're talking reactions that are 1,000 times more powerful than the nuclear fission produced at a nuclear power plant, or by the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. And they are 300 times more powerful than the energy released by nuclear fusion

Alas, the only way to produce antimatter is in large accelerators at places like CERN. Even the most powerful atom smashers only produce minute amounts of antiprotons each year -- as little as a trillionth of a gram, which would barely light a 100-watt bulb for three seconds.

It would take tons of antimatter to fuel a trip to distant stars. It would take CERN roughly 1,000 years to produce one microgram of antimatter.

Should an ample supply of antimatter be found, a secure means of storage must then be devised; the antimatter must be kept separate from matter until the spacecraft needs more power. Mixing can’t occur all willy-nilly, because then the two would annihilate each other uncontrollably, with no means of harnessing the energy.

ANALYSIS: Metamaterials Could Help Simulate Warp Drive

But these are trivial engineering concerns, surely. The point is, Keane and Zhang think they've solved one part of the conundrum. Any rocket's maximum speed depends on the configuration of the rocket stages, how much of the total mass is devoted to fuel, and a little something called exhaust velocity that provides the all-important thrust.

Keane and Zhang focus on the latter in their paper, i.e., how fast all those particles resulting from (hypothetical) matter-antimatter annihilation are traveling as they whip out of the rocket engine. Their premise relies on charged pions resulting from proton-antiproton collisions. A nozzle that emits a strong magnetic field could channel the emitted charged particles into a focused stream of charged pions, accelerating them to produce stronger thrust.

All this is old hat. And here's the sticking point to that plan. The exhaust velocity of those pions depends partly on how fast they're moving as they emerge from the annihilation event, and partly on the efficiency of the magnetic nozzle design.

Past calculations have shown that while the pions' initial speed would be over 90 percent the speed of light, the magnetic nozzle would only be 36 percent efficient, so the largest escape velocity that could be achieved would be a disappointing one-third of light speed.

There isn't much human beings can do to jack up the pions' initial speed, so clearly the way to tackle this problem is to focus on the design of the magnetic nozzle. That's exactly what Keane and Zhang did, relying on CERN software designed to simulate the complex interactions between particles, matters and fields so physicists can better understand the behavior of all those particles produced in collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

ANALYSIS: Interstellar Speed Menace For Warpships

The simulations showed that prior assessments of the magnetic nozzle's efficiency were much too low; it should be possible to build a nozzle with 85 percent efficiency using technology available to us today.

True, they also found that the initial speed of the pions was lower than previously estimated -- only about 80 percent of light speed. That still averages out to a far more promising final exhaust velocity of about 70 percent light speed.

There's still the little problem of acquiring sufficient antimatter to fuel an entire rocket, even if we could work out all the engineering kinks. Keane and Zhang hypothesize that rather than creating antimatter on board, as the Enterprise does, it might be more feasible to mine deposits of antimatter in space.

Last year the PAMELA mission found that Earth is ringed by antiprotons . Unfortunately, it only detected 28 protons over the course of its two-year mission. That's less than CERN produces each day.

Okay, so maybe we're not ready for antimatter powered spaceships just yet. But it's fun to play around with these kinds of ideas. Perhaps one day, one of these crazy schemes will pay off, and a future generation of astronauts will boldly go where only the fictional Enterprise has dared to venture before.

Images: (top) Proposed schematic of an antimatter propulsion engine, NASA. (bottom) The fictional U.S.S. Enterprise.

Return to Top



News Headline: Fracking will be topic for panel discussion | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A panel discussion on “Fracking:
A Burning Issue” will take place at 7
p.m. May 23 at the Hudson Library,
96 Library St., Hudson.

The panel will include Rhonda L.
Reda, executive director of the Ohio
Oil and Gas Energy Education Program
and the Ohio Oil and Gas Foundation,
and Trent Dougherty, general
counsel and chief legal analyst and
advocate for the Ohio Environmental
Council's Agriculture & Clean Water.
The program will be moderated
by Tim Rudell, a reporter for WKSU,
who has produced a series of award winning
fracking stories.

There is no registration for this free
program. For more information, call
330-653-6658, ext. 1010, or visit
www.hudsonlibrary.org.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus