Report Overview:
Total Clips (11)
Alumni (2)
Athletics (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Finance and Administration (1)
Human Resources (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Office of the University Architect; Sustainability; University Facilities Management (1)
Students (1)
Sustainability; University Facilities Management (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (2)
Arsenio Hall and Clay Aiken are this season's 'Celebrity Apprentice' finalists 05/17/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...NBC's "The Celebrity Apprentice" are 2003 "American Idol" runner-up Clay Aiken and Cleveland native Arsenio Hall, a Warrensville Heights High School and Kent State University graduate.

Ex-Kent State star Ben Curtis inducted into MAC Hall of Fame 05/18/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


Athletics (1)
Herb Page stocks Kent State golf program with Canadians (Page) 05/18/2012 CBC Sports - CBC Television Network Text Attachment Email


College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Kent State Profs Bike to Work for Bike Month 05/18/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Schools are going to the dogs, literally, to help stressed out students relax 05/18/2012 Bradenton Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...Atlanta. Emory University is part of a small but growing number of schools that are going to the dogs, literally, to help stressed out students relax. From Kent State University in Ohio to Macalester College in Minnesota, colleges are bringing dogs on campus during exams, placing pups in counseling centers...


Finance and Administration (1)
Recordpub.com - Student housing eyed for 20 acres near Dix Stadium 05/18/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...zoning changes for a 20-acre tract of land in Franklin Township in order to build a new student apartment complex across from Dix Stadium east of the Kent State University campus. Campus Crest Development of Raleigh, N.C., is seeking rezoning of six lots, located at the corner of Summit Road...


Human Resources (1)
Job fair for 'mature workers' attracts more than 700 05/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...by the nonprofit Mature Services Inc. - featured 35 area employers. Paul Magnus, vice president of work force development at Mature Services, said Kent State University and Viking Forge Corp. of Streetsboro had particularly busy booths. The university is seeking people to fill adjunct teaching...


KSU Museum (1)
National Exhibits That Aren't 'Schiaparelli And Prada' 05/17/2012 AOL Stylelist Text Attachment Email

... "A Day at the Beach" At the Kent State University Museum, 515 Hilltop Drive Kent, Ohio. From November 18, 2011 - October 7, 2012. "Worn To Be Wild"


Office of the University Architect; Sustainability; University Facilities Management (1)
Kent State installing solar panels on the Field House (Euclide, Misbrener) 05/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Students (1)
Hiram College hosts student entrepreneur competition 05/17/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

..."EvenPlayingField.com" James Basar and Amanda Mass, Baldwin-Wallace College. Third place, and $1,000: "Fresh Scent Surgical Masks," Breana Jacobs and Chad Radke, Kent State University. The competition was sponsored by the Entrepreneurship Education Consortium, a consortium of nine schools that encourages...


Sustainability; University Facilities Management (1)
My Town: Solar Power at KSU (Euclide) 05/17/2012 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- The first renewable energy project at Kent State University is underway and will ultimately power a portion of the campus' field house. Kent State University officials say 1,716...


News Headline: Arsenio Hall and Clay Aiken are this season's 'Celebrity Apprentice' finalists | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Mark Dawidziak, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: The two finalists going into Sunday night's two-hour season finale of NBC's "The Celebrity Apprentice" are 2003 "American Idol" runner-up Clay Aiken and Cleveland native Arsenio Hall, a Warrensville Heights High School and Kent State University graduate.

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News Headline: Ex-Kent State star Ben Curtis inducted into MAC Hall of Fame | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Record-Courier Staff Report

CLEVELAND — Former Kent State men's golf standout Ben Curtis was one of six new members inducted into the Mid-American Conference Hall of Fame on Thursday. The ceremony was part of the MAC Honor's Dinner at the Cleveland Renaissance Hotel.

In addition to Curtis (KSU 1997-2000), the Class of 2012 inductees include Herb Deromedi (Central Michigan, football), Wayne Embry (Miami of Ohio, men's basketball), Karen Fitzpatrick (Ball State, field hockey), Bob Nichols (Toledo, men's basketball) and Mike Schmidt (Ohio, baseball).

Long before his 2003 British Open Title and four PGA Tour wins, Ben Curtis made a name for himself at Kent State University.

A three-time All-American, Curtis earned honorable mention honors in 1998 and second-team honors in 1999 and 2000. As a senior in 2000, Curtis was named MAC Golfer of the Year, Sportsman of the Year and was the MAC Championship medalist.

Curtis led the Golden Flashes to a MAC title in each of his four years and helped Kent State to a ninth-place finish at the 2000 NCAA Championships.

He is the Golden Flashes' all-time leader in career top-10 finishes with 28 and stroke average at 72.23.

Upon reaching the PGA Tour in 2003, Curtis immediately made a name for himself by winning the British Open in just his 16th Tour start, becoming the first player in 90 years to win the first major golf championship he ever played.

Curtis has won three more times on the Tour since, with his most recent victory coming at the Valero Texas Open last month.

Curtis secured a spot on the winning United States Ryder Cup squad in 2008, following a summer in which he tied for second place at the PGA Championship, had another top 10 at the British Open and finished in ninth place in the FedEx Cup standings.

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News Headline: Herb Page stocks Kent State golf program with Canadians (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: CBC Sports - CBC Television Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Herb Page is now in his fourth decade at Kent State as one of the longest serving and well respected coaches in collegiate golf. But that long tenure in the Ohio city of the same name almost ended before it even began for the Canadian from Markham, Ont. Had the former three-sport varsity athlete been a better negotiator after he was drafted by the Edmonton Eskimos as a placekicker back in the early 1970s, Page's time at Kent State could have ended then.

"I told this story in my [Golf Association of Ontario] Hall of Fame speech -- had Jackie Parker offered me a signing bonus, I may have went [to Edmonton] instead and I think I eventually would have made it in the CFL somewhere," said Page, who played football, golf and hockey at Kent State. "

"But fifth-round draft picks didn't get signing bonuses and so I went back to Kent State and took my graduate degree."

Though it would not have seemed that way at the time, Page's decision to walk away after Parker, then Eskimos boss, refused his request was a good one. Page instead stayed on at Kent State and eventually became its golf coach. Now in his 34th season, he's built a golf program at a school not known for its athletic prowess -- Kent State no longer even has a men's hockey team -- into a powerhouse.

The Golden Flashes tee it up Thursday at their NCAA regional hosted by the University of Michigan. Three Canadians playing a central role this week are Mackenzie Hughes of Dundas, Ont., the reigning national amateur champion, and fellow Ontarians Corey Conners of Listowel and Taylor Pendrith of Richmond Hill.

"Great kids and they are interchangeable parts for us," Page said.

The top five schools advance through to the NCAA championship in two weeks. Page's squad is seeded third regionally and 18th nationally. Southern California is seeded No. 1 followed by Oregon, whose best player is Vancouver's Eugene Wong. Another school participating is North Carolina State, with three Canadians in its lineup, including 2010 Canadian amateur champion Albin Choi.

"If we play like we can, we should get through," said Page, whose team has won five tournament titles this year. "But I told my team that everyone starts [equal] this week."

Page's program is underpinned by a year-long, $2-million US practice facility that was bankrolled by private money. Virtually from the beginning of his time at Kent State, he's stocked his roster with a healthy dose of Canadian players. Currently, there are the three on the men's team and two more on the women's squad, whose season is now over after failing to qualify for the regionals a couple of weeks ago.

"I've had as many as five at one time," Page said of the Canadians he's coached.

'We like what we've built'

It would be an exaggeration to say that Page has created a collegiate golf miracle in Ohio. After all, the state is home to the greatest player to have ever played in Jack Nicklaus, who grew up in Columbus and attended Ohio State. But the weather and the glamour of playing in sunnier climes has always affected competitive golf at all levels and yet Page has managed to build a program that goes blow-for-blow against many of the big programs from the American south and Pacific coast.

He admits that it's not always easy competing against those institutions.

"When we recruit kids, we understand the appeal of playing in such places," Page said. "But we like what we've built here and we travel down south and out west to play each and every year ... we do well when we go there."

That's an understatement.

The Golden Flashes have peaked as high as sixth nationally back in 2007-08 and routinely rank in the Top 20. Now with three consecutive seasons in which Page has guided his squad to the Top 20, Kent State is one of just 10 programs to stay in that bracket during that span. When there are low patches, Page has always found a way to re-build his roster, often with the next wave of Canadians coming through the amateur ranks at home.

With so much dust having settled during his time at Kent State, Page's perspective on former players and general changes in the game are interesting. The best former player he's had was local product Ben Curtis, who won the 2003 British Open and played for the U.S. Ryder Cup team in 2008. When Curtis won the Open at at Royal St. George's in Sandwich, England, he became the first Kent State grad to win a major and fulfill a long-standing Golden Flash pledge to have their coach on the bag when the next year's Masters rolled around. Sure enough, Curtis had Page caddy for him during a practice round at Augusta Natonal in 2004.

"I had the time of my life that week," said Page, who goes to the British Open every year as a member of Curtis's support team.

Curtis, who was struggling to get PGA Tour starts before winning the Texas Open at TPC San Antonio last month, often practises as Kent State's golf facility.

'Big believer in Millsy'

Jon Mills of Belleville, Ont., is another Page favourite and Curtis's teammate when both played at Kent State about a decade ago. Mills, now 34, was once considered Canada's brightest pro prospect and Page says that Mills current situation, where he is struggling to secure even full Nationwide Tour status after two different stints on the PGA Tour, is symptomatic of the struggles almost all players go through.

"I'm a big believer in Millsy," Page said. "He'll get it back."

But Page also agrees that making it to the PGA Tour and staying there is as elusive as ever for both elite college/amateur players and pros in Mills position.

"It's just a tough road to hoe," Page said, citing Hughes as an example of a player who has the requisite tools but needs to be committed for years and even a bit lucky to eventually make it to the game's highest level.

"Everything has to fall your way and you have to be prepared for a long [journey]."

Spoken from someone who would know.

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News Headline: Kent State Profs Bike to Work for Bike Month | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University College of Nursing professors Peggy Doheny, Ph.D., and Ann Jacobson, Ph.D., will ride their bicycles to work on Friday, May 18, to mark National Bike to Work Day. Doheny and Jacobson, both in their 60s, will ride about 30 miles to work in Kent, Ohio, from Jacobson's home in South Russell, Ohio.

National Bike to Work Day, a yearly event since 1956, was established by the League of American Bicyclists to promote bicycling to work as a healthy and safe alternative to driving. The event also promotes bicycle safety. In conjunction with National Bike to Work Day, Kent State is joining in an effort to be “fuel-less” by encouraging its employees to participate in Fuel-Less Friday on May 18 by walking, riding a bike, riding public transit or carpooling to work or campus.

Doheny and Jacobson will ride about three hours to get to work at Kent State – a distance they can easily cover in 45 minutes by car. The ride will take them along several bike trails, including the Head Water Trail in Mantua and the Portage Hike and Bike Trail in Portage County.

During their ride to work on May 18, both professors will reminisce about past rides, as well as take in the sights along the bike route. This year, Jacobson is trying out an iPhone app that records her distances and times using GPS technology. Because riding a bike is much like operating a vehicle, they plan to stay focused on the road and avoid distractions.

Doheny, who rides about 2,000 miles a year, considers biking to be a great way to be in touch with nature and see the countryside; something she says cannot be experienced in a car.

“I like to bike and it is always fun to have a destination,” Doheny said. “Biking to work day on May 18 is one way to exercise, and is a great way to avoid the commuter traffic and stay in shape.”

“Biking is my favorite way to relax and enjoy life,” Jacobson said. “It is a healthy stress reliever, and I would definitely encourage others to bike to work, particularly if there are showers and places to secure the bike available at the destination.”

Kent State has several bike racks across the campus, and Gretchen Julian, director of the Student Recreation and Wellness Center at Kent State, is offering the center on May 18 to anyone wanting to shower after riding their bike to work.

“We are happy to let the bike-to-work participants use the recreational center for showers,” Julian said. “It is just one small way we can show our support for the biking initiative.”

In warm weather, Jacobson bikes four to five days a week. Although she has biked several times to Kent, she had always wanted to do it on National Bike to Work Day, but it never worked out well with her schedule before now.

“I took those trips before Google Bike Maps came into being and had to do a segment on State Route 43 South, which is a nightmare,” Jacobson said. “But now, thanks to Google Bike Maps, we will have a route that circumvents 43 and will actually have us on a bike path.”

Doheny, who has worked at Kent State for 35 years, will be retiring this summer, and biking, she said, will be part of her retirement plans. She has ridden in the MS 150 Pedal to the Point, the annual ride in support of Multiple Sclerosis, for the last 17 years and plans to continue to participate to support the cause. Doheny said she has had wonderful support for her rides over the years from her colleagues at Kent State's College of Nursing.

“I am planning to go to South Africa with my son and husband in June, and I also have several local bike rides planned over the summer,” Doheny said. “One ride my husband designed is what he calls the ‘Tour de Cleveland,' which is a great tour to appreciate the history of Cleveland.”

Doheny and Jacobson will continue to share their love for biking even after Doheny retires. Both plan to participate in bike rides together with their families.

“She will leave a huge void,” Jacobson said. “I am sorry to see her go and wish her much happiness in this next chapter of her life. I will see her during our annual Great Ohio Bicycle Adventure ride in June, an event that Peggy introduced my family and me to 10 years ago. This will be the 10th anniversary ride for my husband and me. I have Peggy and her husband to thank for planning trips involving many happy miles on the bike in downtown Cleveland, the towpath, the Vermont countryside, and more.”

For more information about National Bike to Work Day, visit the League of American Bicyclists website at www.bikeleague.org.

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News Headline: Schools are going to the dogs, literally, to help stressed out students relax | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bradenton Herald - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In this May 2, 2012 photo, law students Josh Richey, 22, right, and Lindsay Stewart, 26, play with Hooch, a 19-month-old golden retriever, right, and Stanley, a 4-month-old golden retriever, in between final exams at Emory University in Atlanta. Emory University is part of a small but growing number of schools that are going to the dogs, literally, to help stressed out students relax. From Kent State University in Ohio to Macalester College in Minnesota, colleges are bringing dogs on campus during exams, placing pups in counseling centers for students to visit regularly or allowing faculty and staff to bring their pets to campus to play with students. (AP Photo/David Goldman) DAVID GOLDMAN — AP

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News Headline: Recordpub.com - Student housing eyed for 20 acres near Dix Stadium | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Homes

Jobs

Autos

MarketplaceOhio

DiscountGuru

A North Carolina developer has applied for zoning changes for a 20-acre tract of land in Franklin Township in order to build a new student apartment complex across from Dix Stadium east of the Kent State University campus.

Campus Crest Development of Raleigh, N.C., is seeking rezoning of six lots, located at the corner of Summit Road and Cline Road, from low-density residential to multi-family residential to allow for the construction of "upscale student housing."

A drawing of the proposed complex, The Grove at Kent, shows 13 buildings on the site, which is located east of S.R. 261.

Franklin Township Administrator Ken Penix said residents will get their first chance to discuss the project at a Zoning Commission meeting 7 p.m. Thursday, May 24, in Franklin Township Hall on Gougler Avenue in Kent.

In its proposal to Franklin Township, the developer contends the re-zoning "is not a radical change," noting the property sits across the street from Dix Stadium's parking lot, and its closest neighbor on the west is the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's headquarters and garage.

"This is right where it (student housing) should be rather than creeping into the neighborhood," Campus Crest officials wrote in their proposal. The land is mostly vacant..

Of the six properties the developer is seeking to re-zone, four are owned by University Retirement Centers, Ltd. and two are owned by Kent State University.

Campus Crest Development has an option to buy the properties owned by University Retirement Centers, a partnership between Warren L. Wolfson and Charles W. Keiper II, if the zoning change is approved. Keiper is a former Portage County commissioner.

Keiper said University Retirement Centers formed in 1995 for the purpose of building a senior housing complex across from Dix Stadium, a project that never came to fruition.

He said the corporation has "an exclusive right to purchase" the 3.5 acres KSU owns on the site of the proposed apartment buildings, which they plan to transfer to Campus Crest Development if the sale goes through.

Keiper, Wolfson and Gregg Floyd, KSU vice president for finance and administration, signed off on documents stating they had no objection to the proposed zoning change.

Keiper said he did not believe University Retirement Centers will need to seek KSU's approval to transfer the right to purchase KSU's property to Campus Crest Development.

Campus Crest also stated in its proposal for the apartments, which would sit on Brimfield's northern border, that the company planned to purchase "five-plus acres" in Brimfield Township to "supplement" the project. Whether they would build a portion of the complex in Brimfield is unclear.

Brimfield Zoning Inspector Dick Messner said no one from Campus Crest Development has contacted his office.

Usually, Franklin Township Zoning Commission meets to receive the proposal from the applicant, hear public comment and a get a recommendation from the Portage County Regional Planning Commission, using that information to make a recommendation to either approve of deny the new zoning to the township's Board of Zoning Appeal.

Penix said he does not believe Portage County Regional Planning will be ready to make a recommendation by May 24, so he expects the Zoning Commission meeting to be continued, which likely will delay the final decision by the Board of Zoning Appeals.

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News Headline: Job fair for 'mature workers' attracts more than 700 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Katie Byard

Beacon Journal Publishing Co.

More than 700 candidates showed up Thursday at the 22nd Mature Workers' Job and Career Fair at the Hilton Akron/Fairlawn hotel.

The fair - aimed at job-seekers age 40 or older and sponsored by the nonprofit Mature Services Inc. - featured 35 area employers.

Paul Magnus, vice president of work force development at Mature Services, said Kent State University and Viking Forge Corp. of Streetsboro had particularly busy booths.

The university is seeking people to fill adjunct teaching jobs, as well as part-time clerical and groundskeeping positions, among other jobs.

Job seekers also kept Element14's booth busy. The distributor of electrical components is seeking inside and outside sales representatives.

Attendees also participated in free workshops on online job applications, job clubs, and using social media in a job search, among other topics.

For more information on Mature Services Inc., go online to www.matureservices.org .

Katie Byard can be reached at 330-996-3781 or kbyard@thebeaconjournal.com .

Click here to read or leave a comment on this story.

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News Headline: National Exhibits That Aren't 'Schiaparelli And Prada' | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: AOL Stylelist
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Beyond 'Schiaparelli And Prada': What's Happening In South Carolina, Colorado & More (PHOTOS)

may be the most buzzed-about fashion exhibit in America right now, New York isn't the only city hosting a seriously stylish show.

Can we credit the record-breaking success of last year's "Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty" at the Metropolitan Museum with the abundance of clothing-focused exhibits? Across the country, a multitude of designers, style icons and genres have been honored already in 2012, including "The Fashion World Of Jean Paul Gaultier," which has traveled from the .

There's a lot more style on display nationwide. Take a peek at our gallery below for the fashionable shows we'd even travel to California, Tennessee or Wisconsin to see.

"Charleston Couture"

At the Charleston Museum, 360 Meeting Street

Charleston, South Carolina. Through November 4, 2012.


"The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk"

The de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park, 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, San Francisco, California from March 24 to August 19, 2012.

"The First Ladies"

At the National Museum of American History on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.. Permanent exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution.

"A Day at the Beach"

At the Kent State University Museum, 515 Hilltop Drive

Kent, Ohio. From November 18, 2011 - October 7, 2012.


"Worn To Be Wild"

At the Harley Davidson Museum on West Canal Street, Milwaukee. From June 16 through September 3, 2012.

"Fashion Accessories from Head to Toe"

At the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation's DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum, 326 West Francis Street, Williamsburg, Virginia. From March 12 through December 30, 2012.



"Herb Ritts: L.A. Style"

At The Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles, California. From April 3 through August 26, 2012.

"Silver Threads and Golden Needles: Nudie's Rodeo Tailors"

At the Nashville's Country Music Hall of Fame, 222 Fifth Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee. Through November 2012.

"The Total Look: The Creative Collaboration Between Rudi Gernreich, Peggy Moffitt, and William Claxton"

At MOCA Pacific Design Center, 8687 Melrose Avenue, West Hollywood, California. From March 3 to May 20, 2012.

"Jeremy Kost, Of an Instance"

Presented by Hugo Boss in partnership with The Andy Warhol Museum at 150 11th Avenue, New York, NY. Through May 31, 2012.

Want more? Be sure to check out Stylelist on .

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News Headline: Kent State installing solar panels on the Field House (Euclide, Misbrener) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is in the process of installing 1,716 solar panels on the Kent State Field House located on the Kent Campus. The panels will cover almost one acre of roof area or nearly 0.5 megawatt of panel capacity. This installation is believed to be the largest roof mounted system among Ohio's public universities.

The project, scheduled to be completed in early July, is the first renewable energy project for Kent State.

The solar panels will generate about 500,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year, which is about one-third of the annual power used by both the university's Field House and Dix Stadium – enough to power about 50 average homes. The project will eliminate an average of 779,000 pounds of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per year, which is roughly equivalent to removing 70 cars from the road per year.

“We have been searching for funding opportunities to install solar panels on this roof for many years, and it is great to see the installation underway,” said Tom Euclide, Kent State's associate vice president for Facilities Planning and Operations. “The benefits of adding this renewable energy source to our campus energy portfolio will not only help keep our costs lower for decades to come, but will also provide a visual reminder of Kent State's leadership in sustainability, energy conservation and the use of renewable energy.”

The solar panels will be installed by Ohio developer Third Sun Solar and Wind Power located in Athens, and contractor Thompson Electric Inc. in Munroe Falls.

“Facilitating the installation of energy-saving technologies and now, renewable solar energy systems, is extremely satisfying,” said Robert Misbrener, project manager, sustainability, energy conservation, commissioning in the Office of the University Architect at Kent State. “The true goal is to demonstrate our stewardship of the environment and empower generations of students to carry that mission to the world.”

Kent State does not initially own the solar panel system, but will purchase all the electricity produced with the option to purchase the system after seven years. Some larger electrical system components are being included for the potential expansion of the Kent State Field House facility.

“The sun's energy can fulfill the world's power needs many times over,” Misbrener said. “Sunlight contains energy that can be turned into electrical current, which can be harnessed for power. There are no harmful emissions from the sun as an energy source; it won't run out, and best of all it's free.”

Kent State already produces most of its own energy in its combined heat and power plant that uses natural gas to power electric turbines. The heat typically wasted to the atmosphere in a power plant is saved and used to heat and cool the campus, making the university's power production substantially more energy efficient than utility power systems. The university will reduce the amount of fossil fuel used as it continues to explore renewable energy as one of its sustainability initiatives.

“The plans for Kent State's sustainability are new and exciting,” said Melanie Knowles, sustainability manager for Facilities Planning and Operations at Kent State. “The phase that follows will help us use energy wisely across campus.”

Kent State continues to work on energy conservation projects and new ideas that drive its momentum in sustainability. The Office of the University Architect is currently managing three large energy conservation projects, including a 340,000-square-foot project at Kent State University at Stark, 810,000 square feet at its Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Salem and Trumbull campuses, and a 1.8 million-square-foot project on the Kent Campus' Residence Services buildings. The university's combined reduction in greenhouse gas emissions is equivalent to removing 1,287 cars from the road each year with annual utility cost savings of about $2.4 million. The final phase of planned large energy conservation projects will be at the Kent Campus and will address about 3.6 million square feet.

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News Headline: Hiram College hosts student entrepreneur competition | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hiram College recently hosted "Entrepreneurship 101," with budding entrepreneurs from Hiram and 10 other Ohio colleges pitching their ideas for new businesses at the ideaLabs 2012 competition.

IdeaLabs encourages students from all disciplines to develop new venture ideas, apply feasibility study methodology and answer three questions: Is there a market? Do the financials make sense? What resources are necessary?

Undergraduate students or teams of students from nine Ohio colleges and universities showed off their ideas to a panel of experts in the Kennedy Center Ballroom. The winners were:

First place, and $5,000: " The Pothole Patch," Nicholas Barron, Case Western Reserve University.

Second place, and $3,000: "EvenPlayingField.com" James Basar and Amanda Mass, Baldwin-Wallace College.

Third place, and $1,000: "Fresh Scent Surgical Masks," Breana Jacobs and Chad Radke, Kent State University.

The competition was sponsored by the Entrepreneurship Education Consortium, a consortium of nine schools that encourages student exploration of new, innovative ideas in their quest to either create new enterprises or become entrepreneurs within existing organizations.

It was the first time Hiram's Center for Integrated Entrepreneurship had hosted the contest.

Judges included Dorothy Baunach, president emeritus of NorTech; Trevor Clatterbuck, founder and CEO, FreshFork Market; John Dearborn, president of JumpStart, a nonprofit supporting Northeast Ohio entrepreneurs; J. Marin Erbaugh, chairman of the Board of Advisors, CEBI, Kent State University and trustee, The Burton D. Morgan Foundation; Michael S. Moloney, director, EY Knowledge, Ernst & Young; and John Myers, executive-in-residence, UA Research Foundation.

"In my work, I see many presentations, often from entrepreneurs with more than 20 years of industry experience," said Dearborn. "The student participants and their coaches should be proud. They clearly put in a great deal of effort and their presentations were as good or better than any I have seen."

For more information on entrepreneurship at Hiram, contact Kay Molkentin, director of the Center for Integrated Entrepreneurship at 330-569-5256, molkentinkf@hiram.edu or visit www.eecneohio.com .

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News Headline: My Town: Solar Power at KSU (Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: jacquejovic
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- The first renewable energy project at Kent State University is underway and will ultimately power a portion of the campus' field house.

Kent State University officials say 1,716 solar panels are currently being installed on the Kent State Field House on the Kent Campus.

According to university officials, the panels will cover almost one acre of roof area and are scheduled to begin harvesting the suns energy in early July.

The solar panels will generate about 500,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year, which is about one-third of the annual power used by both the university's Field House and Dix Stadium.

“We have been searching for funding opportunities to install solar panels on this roof for many years, and it is great to see the installation underway,” said Tom Euclide, Kent State's associate vice president for Facilities Planning and Operations. “The benefits of adding this renewable energy source to our campus energy portfolio will not only help keep our costs lower for decades to come, but will also provide a visual reminder of Kent State's leadership in sustainability, energy conservation and the use of renewable energy.”

The solar panels will add to a sustainable energy initiative at Kent State, which already produces most of its own energy in its combined heat and power plant. The plant uses natural gas to power electric turbines. The heat typically wasted to the atmosphere in a power plant is saved and then used to heat and cool the campus.

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