Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Town-Gown (1)
English; Town-Gown (1)
Fashion Design (2)
Higher Education (1)
Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum (4)
KSU Airport (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
Physics (1)
Political Science (1)
Quality Initiatives and Curriculum, Office of; Wick Poetry Center (2)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Sustainability; University Facilities Management (1)
Town-Gown (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
KSU workout event to honor fallen soldiers 05/23/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...will host "The Hammy," a unique workout honoring fallen U.S. Army Spc. Adam S. Hamilton and other slain area soldiers, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday at Kent State University's Dix Stadium. The event is open to all ages for a $25 donation per person. All proceeds go to benefit the Adam S. Hamilton...


Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Town-Gown (1)
PARTA seeks artisans for Kent vets memorial 05/24/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


English; Town-Gown (1)
University Oaks Buying Land on Horning for Parking (Howard) 05/24/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...700 feet away. That variance was based on the distance between the apartment complex and the Music and Speech Building parking lot on the campus of Kent State University, which officials there had indicated could be used for parking at the complex. Anderson Neighbors, chief operating officer...


Fashion Design (2)
Ohio jeweler collects movie star fashions as hobby 05/23/2012 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...Jewelry, in Stow. A couple of times a year he'll assemble an exhibit for a charitable event, as he did Saturday for a fashion group's annual luncheon at Kent State University. While the private collection doesn't see the light of day often, it's a collection that is still growing. Auction houses...

A very special collection 05/23/2012 Hamilton Spectator, The Text Email

...Jewelry, in Stow. A couple of times a year he'll assemble an exhibit for a charitable event, as he did Saturday for a fashion group's annual luncheon at Kent State University. While the private collection doesn't see the light of day often, it's a collection that is still growing. Auction houses...


Higher Education (1)
OSU tuition about to go up, but so is financial aid 05/24/2012 Columbus Dispatch Text Attachment Email


Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum (4)
KSU Museum gets $1.1 million gift 05/24/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

Kent State University Museum gets $1.1 million donation (Crawford, Sokany) 05/24/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Museum gets Largest Cash Gift Ever (Crawford, Sokany, Finn) 05/24/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Akron Man Tops Million With KSU Gift (Finn, Sokany; Crawford) 05/23/2012 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

An Akron man's desire to see to it that a friend's legacy stay strong is making the largest gift ever to Kent State University's Fashion Museum. More than $1.1 million dollars worth. Longtime supporter Gerald Schweigert says he was inspired by friend...


KSU Airport (1)
Along the Way: From Stow, Ohio, to the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum 05/24/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

...that has led to something others can enjoy for generations to come. Al Beckwith can. Beckwith, owner and founder of Commercial Aviation Corp. at Kent State University's Andrew Paton Airport in Stow, and a flying buddy, the late Peter Graichen, built in the late 1970s an airplane that is part...


KSU at Stark (1)
Andrea Adolph named director of academic affairs 05/23/2012 Penn State Live Text Attachment Email

Andrea Adolph named director of academic affairs Wednesday, May 23, 2012 Andrea Adolph has accepted the position of director of academic affairs at Penn State New Kensington, replacing Arlene Hall, who retires this summer. Adolph is currently associate professor of English and coordinator of...


Physics (1)
Space Harvesting of Antimatter Might Fuel Starships (Zhang) 05/24/2012 Discovery News Text Attachment Email

...obstacle of low energy efficiency when an accelerator is used to produce antimatter," writes Ronan Keane (Western Reserve Academy) and Wei-Ming Zhang (Kent State University) in a recently published paper on antimatter engine design. As far-fetched as all of this may sound, imagine trying to explain...


Political Science (1)
Elections in Egypt | Essential Public Radio 05/24/2012 WESA-FM (Essential Public Radio) Text Attachment Email

Elections in Egypt With historic elections still going on in Egypt, we talk to Joshua Stacher, an experiment in Middle East politics at Kent State University. We'll ask him about the political situation in Egypt since Mubarak was forced from office, and what the present election could...


Quality Initiatives and Curriculum, Office of; Wick Poetry Center (2)
Mild winter and warm spring should make for a fabulous farmers market season 05/23/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...Haymaker overpass will be unveiled. Ferry said the market raised $8,500 of the $11,000 needed to complete the mural project. The Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University donated a large portion of the money for the project and worked with children from Kent's Holden Elementary School (the school...

Mild winter and warm spring should make for a fabulous farmers market season - Top Stories - Ohio 05/23/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Haymaker overpass will be unveiled. Ferry said the market raised $8,500 of the $11,000 needed to complete the mural project. The Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University donated a large portion of the money for the project and worked with children from Kent's Holden Elementary School (the school...


Renovation at KSU (1)
Kent State planning $170 million campus overhaul (Vincent) 05/24/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Sustainability; University Facilities Management (1)
School Notes: KSU installing panels to capture power from sun 05/23/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is installing 1,716 solar panels on its fieldhouse near Dix Stadium. The panels will cover almost one acre of roof area or...


Town-Gown (2)
Projects creating 1,728 new beds for students 05/24/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Ruller: Kent State University, Kent need consultant on housing 05/24/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: KSU workout event to honor fallen soldiers | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SPC CrossFit, a local gym and fitness community, will host "The Hammy," a unique workout honoring fallen U.S. Army Spc. Adam S. Hamilton and other slain area soldiers, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday at Kent State University's Dix Stadium.

The event is open to all ages for a $25 donation per person. All proceeds go to benefit the Adam S. Hamilton scholarship fund.

Born and raised in Kent, Hamilton was killed in action in Afghanistan in 2011.

"The Hammy" is a workout program composed of rowing, squatting, calisthenics and running. While it sounds intense, this is an event a 7-year-old and his grandmother can work through, said Toby Jurging, event organizer and owner of SPC CrossFit.

"The event was created to bring an entire community together, not just athletes and younger generations," he said. "Everything is scalable so, regardless of age or athletic ability, anyone is capable of performing the movements and completing the workout."

Jurging, a certified trainer, will guide participants on correct form of the varied movements. Several other certified trainers will be on site as well.

Participants can enter a raffle to win a three-month car lease courtesy of J.D. Byrider. Other sponsors include: Dr Pepper/Snapple Group, Giant Eagle, Acme Fresh Market and Vertical Runner.

Following the event, The Rusty Nail, located at 7291 S.R. 43, will host a BBQ dinner for participants. Cost is $12 a plate with the CrossFit band providing free entertainment

For more information visit spccrossfit.com or email toby@spccrossfit.com .

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News Headline: PARTA seeks artisans for Kent vets memorial | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Portage Area Regional
Transportation Authority
is making a call for
qualified artists, architects,
landscape architects, city
planners and others interested
in designing a veterans'
memorial at the Kent
Gateway transit center.
PARTA is asking those
interested to submit images
of past work and their
resumes as evidence of
their qualifications to be
chosen as the “designer of
record' for the memorial.
Bryan Smith, project
director for PARTA, said
the only requirement for
the memorial is that include
an American flag
and markers for each of
the service branches. The
memorial is to honor past,
present, fallen and POWMIA
veterans from all service
branches of the U.S.
military.
The memorial is a joint
project of PARTA, the City
of Kent and Kent State
University. A budget of
$100,000 has been set to
fund the design, fabrication
and installation of the
memorial.
The project is to be located
on city property
along Haymaker Parkway
(S.R. 59), adjacent to
the PARTA Kent Central
Gateway Multimodal facility.
For more information,
visit the Kent Central
Gateway website at www.
kentcentralgateway.com
and click on the Veterans
Memorial link for details.
More information is
available on the Ohio Arts
Council website at http://
www.oac.state.oh.us/
search/IndividualArtistOpportunities/
SearchArtistOpportunities.
asp.

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News Headline: University Oaks Buying Land on Horning for Parking (Howard) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Applicant withdraws parking variance request; will return in June with new request

Whether or not a proposed project in Kent has enough parking seems to be the key question as of late for the city's planning boards.

The Kent Board of Zoning Appeals listened to a parking variance request from the company turning the former Silver Oaks Place apartments into the "University Oaks" student apartments this week, but ultimately the firm asked the board to table their vote on the issue until next month after zoning board members expressed concerns over their parking proposal.

Capstone Real Estate Investments initially wanted a variance from the board so that off-site parking for the apartments could be 820 feet from the property line, whereas the zoning code doesn't allow off-site parking to be more than 700 feet away.

That variance was based on the distance between the apartment complex and the Music and Speech Building parking lot on the campus of Kent State University, which officials there had indicated could be used for parking at the complex.

Anderson Neighbors, chief operating officer at Capstone Real Estate Investments, said about 80 percent of the tenants who have signed leases for the fall need a parking space at the complex.

"The university has acknowledged that tenants of University Oaks would qualify for a commuter pass and can park overnight" in the music building lot, Neighbors said.

Capstone is planning for 376 on-site parking spaces by the time renovations are finished at the former retirement complex. But the Alabama developer also is asking the city to change the apartment complex's housing status from single-family to a rooming and boarding house designation. Such a change would allow the developer to rent each individual bedroom — there are 520 total — to separate, unrelated students.

Such a change also would require the developer to meet a parking ratio of 1.25 parking spaces for every one resident.

Neighbors said they've determined there's enough room for 51 extra parking spaces — for 376 total — at the Horning Road complex, but Capstone also plans to buy land adjacent to the complex and across the street from the apartments to build another 151 parking spaces.

Nancy Rice, whose family owns property caddy-corner across the street from University Oaks, confirmed Capstone is buying their land. The other seller is unknown.

"If you add those 51 spaces to the 151 spaces we feel we can put on the two parcels we intend to purchase, that brings you to 201 additional spaces, which brings the parking ratio to an excess of 1 to 1," Neighbors said. "It does not meet the 1.25 requirement, but from a practical standpoint, considering the fact that 80 percent, and that is the percentage, will have a car, there is ample parking when you consider there is additional parking to what we proposed."

Neighbors said one of the two properties they plan to buy is already under contract and the other landowner should be under contract to sell within the week.

Kent zoning board chairperson Elizabeth Howard, a professor at Kent State, said at Monday's meeting she was concerned about the firm's reliance on the university commuter lot for parking.

Howard said she talked with the university's parking manager and learned only commuter students who are juniors or seniors and have taken 60 or more credit hours can buy a permit for that lot.

"That particular parking lot is a high use parking lot by non students in the evening because it's adjacent to music and speech" where numerous performances are held throughout the year, she said.

Capstone and Kent State have no formal agreement for tenants to use the space. A letter from Gregg Floyd, a senior vice president at the university, to the zoning board simply stated "As with all commuter students attending Kent State University, the student residents at University Oaks Apartments will be able to purchase a commuter parking permit."

"Given all that information I would personally have to say no to this request because I don't think it's reasonable without an explicit agreement between Kent State University and University Oaks," Howard said.

Zoning board member Dave Mail suggested Capstone change its variance request for a variance from the total parking requirement rather than the off-site parking variance, which indicates a reliance on Kent State parking spaces.

"That's very different than this request, which basically says ‘We talked to the university and they said bring them over,'" Mail said. He added that parking for the complex was adequate when it was the retirement complex for single-family units.

"Basically you're going from family housing to student housing where the density of unrelated persons is greater," Mail said.

Neighbors asked for the board to table it's vote Monday. He plans to return to the zoning board on June 18 to ask for a modified variance request. The modified request will likely include the 201 spaces Capstone plans to build off-site.

"I think when you consider fewer than all, in fact 80 percent of our tenants for next year, will have a car, because many of them are international students that don't have a car, there is ample parking for guests and staff," Neighbors said. "We still have excess spaces."

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News Headline: Ohio jeweler collects movie star fashions as hobby | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: [May 22, 2012]

May 22, 2012 (Akron Beacon Journal - McClatchy-Tribune News Service via COMTEX) -- Richard John has one of the most interesting closets in America.

A Barbra Streisand concert gown. Costumes from "The King and I," "Camelot" and "The Ten Commandments." Suits worn by Bob Hope on stage and Laurence Olivier on the big screen. A Lana Turner necklace. Sequined shoes from Phyllis Diller's final Vegas act. An Elizabeth Taylor ensemble from a television appearance.

After more than 20 years of collecting clothing and accessories from classic-era movie stars, John's wardrobe is bursting at more than 900 pieces.

A handful of items take turn on display at John's store, Hood & Hoover Jewelry, in Stow. A couple of times a year he'll assemble an exhibit for a charitable event, as he did Saturday for a fashion group's annual luncheon at Kent State University.

While the private collection doesn't see the light of day often, it's a collection that is still growing.

Auction houses that focus on the entertainment industry host two to three major online sales a year, and the industry knows John will be in front of his computer monitor.

"The Internet is making it a lot easier" to maintain his hobby, John said.

Maybe too easy, JoAnne Cawley said.

Cawley has worked for John for years, both in the jewelry store and at the charity events featuring his collection.

She laughs when she recalls her attempts to rein him in.

"He'll be watching the auction (online), and I'll see him 'click' and 'click' and 'click.' And then he'll say, 'Should I go higher?' And I'll say, 'No.' And then 'click.' ..." Most outfits cost more than $2,500. His most expensive pieces _ a Liberace tuxedo and a Marilyn Monroe cocktail dress _ set him back more than $5,000.

He flips through a scrapbook a friend made of a show he did at the Akron Civic Theatre. The catalog of sophisticated fashions reveal a Who's Who of golden Hollywood: Bette Davis, Katharine Hepburn, Joan Crawford, Robert Redford, Gloria Swanson, Peter Lawford, Carol Burnett, Lucille Ball, Liza Minnelli, Cher, Eva Gabor, Carol Channing, Tina Turner, Mae West, Ginger Rogers, Grace Kelly, Mitzi Gaynor, Sophia Loren, Julie Andrews, Ann Miller.

John is also partial to their jewelry _ not surprisingly, given his occupation.

He hesitates to name a favorite piece, but finally pulls out an 18-karat white gold cubic zirconium necklace, along with a photo of Lana Turner wearing it. He bought it in 1996 from a buyer who had the winning bid in a Christie's auction.

"Being a jeweler, I appreciated the work," he said.

John tries to find a photo of each of his items on the star to which it belonged. If a photo isn't provided with the winning bid, he and Cawley will scour the Internet and often find one.

"If we don't find it right away, we just search again later. New things are being added to the Internet all the time," John said.

John's self-confessed "obsession" with star memorabilia isn't because he wanted to be in their shoes. Growing up, he always thought he would stand behind the camera. He even won acknowledgement for a film he made in high school for a national Eastman Kodak contest.

The jewelry industry won the tug of war for John's heart, and he said he has no regrets. He was content to collect 16 mm feature films as a hobby.

Then, 30 years ago, he made his first fashion purchase. He shared the cost of a Dorothy Lamour cocktail dress with a relative who spotted it in an antique shop during a trip to Disney World.

Even so, "I really wasn't into it then," he said, and the dress hung alone in the back of his closet.

It would take another decade before the fashion bug bit him.

Today, the occasional charity show he presents satisfies that love for production that never completely left him. Sometimes he throws in film clips and stage demonstrations with he, Cawley and others in costume. At his last event, they donned outfits worn in MGM's "Marie Antoinette" with John dressed as Robert Morley's character.

John is never worried about whether the audience is going to have a good time.

Although the collection is rarely on public display _ it's a lot of work so he only accepts a handful of requests _ there is a universal reaction from those who learn such Hollywood treasure is kept locally.

"They love it, and it's great to see how people enjoy it," he said.

If there is any surprise, he said, it's that women aren't the only ones who are nostalgic for classic Hollywood.

"Men are equally fascinated," John said. "They really get into it."

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News Headline: A very special collection | Email

News Date: 05/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hamilton Spectator, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Richard John has one of the most interesting closets in America.

A Barbra Streisand concert gown. Costumes from The King and I, Camelot and The Ten Commandments. Suits worn by Bob Hope on stage and Laurence Olivier on the big screen. A Lana Turner necklace. Sequined shoes from Phyllis Diller's final Vegas act. An Elizabeth Taylor ensemble from a television appearance.

After more than 20 years of collecting clothing and accessories from classic-era movie stars, John's wardrobe is bursting at more than 900 pieces.

A handful of items takes turns on display at John's store, Hood & Hoover Jewelry, in Stow. A couple of times a year he'll assemble an exhibit for a charitable event, as he did Saturday for a fashion group's annual luncheon at Kent State University.

While the private collection doesn't see the light of day often, it's a collection that is still growing.

Auction houses that focus on the entertainment industry host two to three major online sales a year, and the industry knows John will be in front of his computer monitor.

"The Internet is making it a lot easier" to maintain his hobby, John said.

Most outfits cost more than $2,500. His most expensive pieces - a Liberace tuxedo and a Marilyn Monroe cocktail dress - set him back more than $5,000.

He flips through a scrapbook a friend made of a show he did at the Akron Civic Theatre. The catalogue of sophisticated fashions reveal a Who's Who of golden Hollywood: Bette Davis, Katharine Hepburn, Joan Crawford, Robert Redford, Gloria Swanson, Peter Lawford, Carol Burnett, Lucille Ball, Liza Minnelli, Cher, Eva Gabor, Carol Channing, Tina Turner, Mae West, Ginger Rogers, Grace Kelly, Mitzi Gaynor, Sophia Loren, Julie Andrews, Ann Miller.

John is also partial to their jewellery - not surprisingly, given his occupation.

He hesitates to name a favourite piece, but finally pulls out an 18-karat white gold cubic zirconium necklace, along with a photo of Lana Turner wearing it. He bought it in 1996 from a buyer who had the winning bid in a Christie's auction.

"Being a jeweller, I appreciated the work," he said.

Although the collection is rarely on public display - it's a lot of work so he only accepts a handful of requests - there is a universal reaction from those who see such Hollywood treasure.

"They love it, and it's great to see how people enjoy it," he said.

If there is any surprise, he said, it's that women aren't the only ones who are nostalgic for classic Hollywood.

"Men are equally fascinated," John said. "They really get into it."

Copyright © 2012 The Hamilton Spectator

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News Headline: OSU tuition about to go up, but so is financial aid | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio State wants to raise tuition and fees this fall for in-state undergraduate students by $312 per year, under a proposal released yesterday.

But the university hopes to offset some of the cost by expanding student financial aid.

Tuition for Columbus campus undergraduates would increase by 3.5 percent, effective with the fall semester. However, mandatory fees would be frozen for a second straight year, which would result in an overall increase of 3.2 percent over current rates.

Last year, OSU increased tuition and fees by a total of 3.3 percent. This hike would push the annual cost for the 2012-13 school year to $10,036, including $9,615 in tuition and $421 in mandatory fees.

Graduate and out-of-state tuition at Ohio State also would increase by 3.5 percent.

The Ohio State Board of Trustees is expected to vote on the recommendation at its meeting on June 22.

“We remain committed to keeping costs affordable for students without sacrificing quality,” said Joseph A. Alutto, OSU's executive vice president and provost. “However, we need these funds to maintain the quality of our academic programs.”

Under the current two-year state budget, public colleges and universities are allowed to raise undergraduate tuition and mandatory fees by up to 3.5 percent.

Many schools plan to raise tuition to the limit.

Miami University, for example, will remain the most-expensive public college in Ohio with a 3.5 percent increase in the fall for a total cost of $13,067. Ohio University also will raise costs by 3.5 percent, pushing the school's sticker price to $10,281.

Ohio State officials hope to cushion some of the blow by increasing financial aid.

In April, the university announced that it was increasing student aid by $50 million over the next four years to help attract the brightest students and to make sure that prospective enrollees aren't deterred by a lack of money.

As part of that initiative, Ohio State has created a new “Eminence Scholars” program that will provide four-year, full-ride scholarships, plus a $3,000 stipend for research, to 31 high-achieving students.

OSU also will increase its need-based “Scarlet and Gray” grants from $3,000 to $4,000 and increase the number of students receiving them by a third — to 7,800 — next fall. The additional money will allow the university to consider children from families with higher incomes than in the past. The school also is exploring other options to help students afford an education.

Even with an increase, Ohio State would remain a good value, said Geoffrey Chatas, OSU's senior vice president for business and finance.

In the past five years, OSU has held tuition increases to an average of 2.4 percent annually, Chatas said. The Big Ten and other large public universities to which Ohio State compares itself have increased costs by an average of 4.7 percent during those same years.

Ohio State still expects to have the second-lowest cost among the six Ohio public universities with selective admissions because most of the other schools are raising their prices, too, he said. Only Kent State costs less.

But many advocates said that Ohio historically has been a high-tuition state. Since 2002, tuition at Ohio State has increased by nearly 60 percent.

“It might not sound like that big of an increase, but it quickly adds up,” said Shonda Davis, whose 18-year-old daughter will attend Ohio State in the fall. “College debt is the next ticking time bomb.”

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News Headline: KSU Museum gets $1.1 million gift | Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent – The Kent State University Museum has received a $1.1 million donation, the largest amount ever received, from businessman and alumnus Gerald Schweigert. Schweigert, who graduated from the university in 1955, has made several donations in the past to the university. The museum has a collection of 10,000 decorative pieces and about 30,000 dresses. The gift will help to preserve the collection and help with museum activities. Donations from dress manufacturers Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman helped to create the museum, which opened to the public in October 1985. More information on the museum can be found at www.kent.edu/museum.

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News Headline: Kent State University Museum gets $1.1 million donation (Crawford, Sokany) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Museum has received a $1.1 million donation — its largest cash gift ever — from local business leader and Kent State alumnus Gerald Schweigert. The donation, in the form of a charitable gift annuity, will be instrumental in the preservation and future support of museum collections and activities.

A longtime donor to Kent State whose past contributions include a Medallion Scholarship for a deserving fashion student, and a gift to Intercollegiate Athletics, Schweigert is a native of Copley who graduated from Copley High School and is a 1955 graduate of Kent State's College of Business Administration. He currently resides in West Akron.

His ties to the university were further strengthened over the years by his business links to Kent State — he owned several local hotels, including the Inn of Kent — and by his long friendship with Shannon Rodgers, who with Jerry Silverman, donated the fashion collections that founded the museum.

“Shannon left a wonderful gift with his collection, but no endowment fund,” Schweigert said. “I'm just trying to do my part to keep the legacy going.”

John Crawford, dean of the College of the Arts at Kent State, commented, “Jerry's gift will enable the museum to continue the great legacy that Schweigert's friends, Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman, left us. Thanks to Mr. Schweigert's generous donation, we'll be able to maintain and expand the programming of the Kent State University Museum for years to come.”

Schweigert was personally involved when Silverman and Rodgers first came to Kent and the fashion school/museum project was coming together in the early 1980s. He was particularly adept at hospitality and making everyone feel welcome and at home.

When the museum space was created in the former university library in Rockwell Hall, the original Silverman-Rodgers collection consisted of 4,000 dresses, 1,000 decorative pieces and a 5,000-volume reference library.

Today, the museum has some 30,000 dresses and 10,000 decorative pieces. Many of the artifacts are stored in climate-controlled facilities in the area.

According to Steve Sokany, Kent State's senior associate vice president for Institutional Advancement, the museum has had to turn down offers of additional pieces for the collection because of a lack of appropriate storage space.

Schweigert plans to continue his support of Rodgers' legacy. Furnishings, china and artwork that belonged to Rodgers, and are currently under Schweigert's care, will eventually revert to the museum and add to the commitment he has already made.
“The museum is my No. 1 philanthropic focus,” Schweigert said. “And I'm not through yet. I know Shannon would be happy to know that I'm helping out the museum.”

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News Headline: Kent State Museum gets Largest Cash Gift Ever (Crawford, Sokany, Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Alumnus Gerald Schweigert donates $1.1 million to fashion museum

The Kent State University Museum has received a $1.1 million donation – its largest cash gift ever – from local business leader and Kent State alumnus Gerald Schweigert. The donation, in the form of a charitable gift annuity, will be instrumental in the preservation and future support of museum collections and activities.

A longtime donor to Kent State whose past contributions include a Medallion Scholarship for a deserving fashion student, and a gift to Intercollegiate Athletics, Schweigert is a native of Copley, Ohio, who graduated from Copley High School and is a 1955 graduate of Kent State's College of Business Administration. He currently resides in West Akron. His ties to the university were further strengthened over the years by his business links to Kent State – he owned several local hotels – and by his long friendship with Shannon Rodgers, who with Jerry Silverman, donated the fashion collections that founded the museum.

“Shannon left a wonderful gift with his collection, but no endowment fund,” Schweigert said. “I'm just trying to do my part to keep the legacy going.”

John Crawford, dean of the College of the Arts at Kent State, commented, “Jerry's gift will enable the museum to continue the great legacy that Schweigert's friends, Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman, left us. Thanks to Mr. Schweigert's generous donation, we'll be able to maintain and expand the programming of the Kent State University Museum for years to come.”

Schweigert was personally involved when Silverman and Rodgers first came to Kent and the fashion school/museum project was coming together in the early 1980s. He was particularly adept at hospitality and making everyone feel welcome and at home. “Every Friday night people would come in from New York, like Bob Mackie (known for costuming entertainment icons such as Cher, Diana Ross and Tina Turner), Pauline Trigère (known for her crisp, tailored cuts and innovative ideas), and Princess Michael of Kent (an Austrian-Hungarian member of the British Royal Family),” Schweigert said. “I became very good friends with many of them, and entertained them in Kent and at my home in Palm Beach.”

When the museum space was created in the former university library in Rockwell Hall, the original Silverman-Rodgers collection consisted of 4,000 dresses, 1,000 decorative pieces and a 5,000-volume reference library. Today, the museum has some 30,000 dresses and 10,000 decorative pieces. Many of the artifacts are stored in climate-controlled facilities in the area. According to Steve Sokany, Kent State's senior associate vice president for Institutional Advancement, the museum has had to turn down offers of additional pieces for the collection because of a lack of appropriate storage space. “Recognizing how much Silverman and Rodgers meant to Jerry, this leadership support is very special and will ensure that the museum continues to thrive and grow,” Sokany said.

Schweigert plans to continue his support of Rodger's legacy. Furnishings, china and artwork that belonged to Rodgers, and are currently under Schweigert's care, will eventually revert to the museum and add to the commitment he has already made. “The museum is my number one philanthropic focus,” Schweigert said. “And I'm not through yet. I know Shannon would be happy to know that I'm helping out the museum.”

Gene Finn, vice president for Institutional Advancement at Kent State, added, “As a Kent State graduate, Mr. Schweigert's generous gift sets an example for all our alumni. His support will be meaningful for future generations of students. That's a great legacy, as well as an important contribution to historical preservation.”

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News Headline: Akron Man Tops Million With KSU Gift (Finn, Sokany; Crawford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An Akron man's desire to see to it that a friend's legacy stay strong is making the largest gift ever to Kent State University's Fashion Museum.

More than $1.1 million dollars worth.

Longtime supporter Gerald Schweigert says he was inspired by friend Shannon Rodgers, who helped start the museum.

- - -

The Kent State University Museum has received a $1.1 million donation – its largest cash gift ever – from local business leader and Kent State alumnus Gerald Schweigert. The donation, in the form of a charitable gift annuity, will be instrumental in the preservation and future support of museum collections and activities.

A longtime donor to Kent State whose past contributions include a Medallion Scholarship for a deserving fashion student, and a gift to Intercollegiate Athletics, Schweigert is a native of Copley, Ohio, who graduated from Copley High School and is a 1955 graduate of Kent State's College of Business Administration. He currently resides in West Akron. His ties to the university were further strengthened over the years by his business links to Kent State – he owned several local hotels – and by his long friendship with Shannon Rodgers, who with Jerry Silverman, donated the fashion collections that founded the museum.

“Shannon left a wonderful gift with his collection, but no endowment fund,” Schweigert said. “I'm just trying to do my part to keep the legacy going.”

John Crawford, dean of the College of the Arts at Kent State, commented, “Jerry's gift will enable the museum to continue the great legacy that Schweigert's friends, Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman, left us. Thanks to Mr. Schweigert's generous donation, we'll be able to maintain and expand the programming of the Kent State University Museum for years to come.”

Schweigert was personally involved when Silverman and Rodgers first came to Kent and the fashion school/museum project was coming together in the early 1980s. He was particularly adept at hospitality and making everyone feel welcome and at home. “Every Friday night people would come in from New York, like Bob Mackie (known for costuming entertainment icons such as Cher, Diana Ross and Tina Turner), Pauline Trigère (known for her crisp, tailored cuts and innovative ideas), and Princess Michael of Kent (an Austrian-Hungarian member of the British Royal Family),” Schweigert said. “I became very good friends with many of them, and entertained them in Kent and at my home in Palm Beach.”

When the museum space was created in the former university library in Rockwell Hall, the original Silverman-Rodgers collection consisted of 4,000 dresses, 1,000 decorative pieces and a 5,000-volume reference library. Today, the museum has some 30,000 dresses and 10,000 decorative pieces. Many of the artifacts are stored in climate-controlled facilities in the area. According to Steve Sokany, Kent State's senior associate vice president for Institutional Advancement, the museum has had to turn down offers of additional pieces for the collection because of a lack of appropriate storage space.

"Recognizing how much Silverman and Rodgers meant to Jerry, this leadership support is very special and will ensure that the museum continues to thrive and grow,” Sokany said.

Schweigert plans to continue his support of Rodger's legacy. Furnishings, china and artwork that belonged to Rodgers, and are currently under Schweigert's care, will eventually revert to the museum and add to the commitment he has already made. “The museum is my number one philanthropic focus,” Schweigert said. “And I'm not through yet. I know Shannon would be happy to know that I'm helping out the museum.”

Gene Finn, vice president for Institutional Advancement at Kent State, added, “As a Kent State graduate, Mr. Schweigert's generous gift sets an example for all our alumni. His support will be meaningful for future generations of students. That's a great legacy, as well as an important contribution to historical preservation.”

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News Headline: Along the Way: From Stow, Ohio, to the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name: David Dix
News OCR Text: It's not everyone who can claim a career that has led to something others can enjoy for generations to come.

Al Beckwith can.

Beckwith, owner and founder of Commercial Aviation Corp. at Kent State University's Andrew Paton Airport in Stow, and a flying buddy, the late Peter Graichen, built in the late 1970s an airplane that is part of an exhibit owned and operated by the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center at Washington's Dulles Airport in northern Virginia.

The exhibit contains more than 50 unique airplanes, some originals, others copies, deemed important to the story of aviation. They range from a copy of the Wright Brothers' first 1903 flying machine and proceed forward in time through the Concorde, the British-French collaboration that resulted in the world's only airliner that flew at twice the speed of sound. These recently were joined by Discovery, a fleet leader in America's space shuttle program.

Also included in the exhibit are a scaled composite model of "SpaceShipOne," the first privately built reusable spacecraft whose construction was funded by Paul Allen, co-founder with Bill Gates, of Microsoft. The Lockheed XP-80, America's first operational jetcraft produced for, but never used in World War II, stands on the floor of the exhibition hall. So does the MiG 15, which dueled with the American F-86 over the skies of Korea in the early 1950s. Other aircraft include the Boeing 307 Stratoliner known as the "Clipper Flying Cloud," a Piper PA Super Cub, a Curtiss P-40, a Beech King Air 65-90, and a Bell XV-15 Tilt Rotar Research Aircraft that could be taken off vertically like a helicopter. There's even a Breitling Orbiter 3, the first helium balloon ever to be navigated in a single flight around the earth.

Among all these remarkable aircraft stands a tiny airplane only 13 feet in length with a 21-foot wingspan. Called the BD-5, it's the airplane that Beckwith and Graichen contributed.

The brainchild of an engineer, James Bede, it was the first light aircraft manufactured with bonded aluminum construction, a technique that enhanced the speed of the aircraft because of its smooth surface. The airplane was able to be constructed from a kit, which made it popular with home builders of airplanes. Bede kept refining his creation and in the early 1970s came up with the BD-5. He then sold his design to Grumman Aircraft, which had a factory at Cuyahoga County Airport. Beckwith was a Grumman dealer as well as a Cessna dealer at Akron Municipal Airport and bought a BD-5 kit for $2,500.

Some 10,000 kits were purchased by home-building flight enthusiasts, but only a minimum number ever flew. The one that Beckwith and Graichen built over six years time in Graichen's basement, completing their task in 1981, is one of these.

UNIQUE PLANE LACKED ENGINE

Finding an appropriate engine was the major problem with the plane, Beckwith said. "Bede never supplied an engine for his plane."

Beckwith, with his mechanical background, and Graichen, who had an engineering degree, solved that problem by extending the fuselage. They then installed a four-cylinder Honda Civic engine with a turbo charger to power the plane.

They continued their modifications, designing a larger radiator to make the aircraft's cooling system effective. They also added a modified carburetor, a retractable landing gear, safety lights for night flying, and a transponder to send radar messages to alert airports of their presence. The plane's design specified the propeller be mounted on the tail.

Even with all the changes their version of the BD-5 weighed only 570 pounds without fuel. Including fuel and a certified Instrument Flight Rules pilot, the small plane was capable of carrying 430 pounds.

By the time they had completed their modifications and assembly, Beckwith said he and Graichen had more than $80,000 invested in their BD-5. Although both were accomplished pilots, they hired an experienced test pilot for the plane's maiden voyage, paying him $500 to take off at Akron Municipal Airport.

"Its propeller was at the tail and I fly planes with propellers in a plane's nose," Beckwith said some 30 years after the test flight. "The difference with the propeller in the nose is that when power is reduced, the nose goes down whereas with the propeller in the rear and power reduced, the tail goes down and the nose goes up."

Their BD-5 tested out at speeds of up to 200 mph.

"Mostly we hauled it on trailers to air shows where it was always popular with those who attended," he said.

DONATED BD-5

TO SMITHSONIAN

In May 1984, the airplane was donated to the Smithsonian after it had approximately 20 hours of flight time.

The two men transported their aircraft to Silver Hill in Suitland, Md., where the Smithsonian prepares its aircraft for exhibit.

Proud of their accomplishment, both Beckwith and Graichen would occasionally visit the Udvar-Hazy facility to view their contribution.

Nearly 30 years later, their BD-5 still stands on exhibit, an information placard listing the details of the tiny aircraft and naming its donors, Albert C. Beckwith and Peter K. Graichen.

Whereas Beckwith has made training pilots and selling aircraft and leasing of airplanes his life's work, Graichen worked for General Tire as an engineer and later as a manufacturers' representative. Aviation was his passion. He once said he had immigrated to the United States as a young man in 1957 partly because America has fewer restrictions on flying.

Here in the U.S., he married his wife, Jackie, and established a home at Wyoga Lake, where the couple raised two children.

Proximity to Kent State's Andrew Paton Airport and Graichen's interest in aviation fated his meeting Beckwith and the formation of a lifelong friendship.

Graichen, nearly 77, died last year after a six-year battle with colon cancer.

Despite the loss of his good friend, Beckwith, accompanied by his wife, Harriotte, plus family and friends, plans to continue visiting Dulles to check up on the BD-5, "every couple of years."

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News Headline: Andrea Adolph named director of academic affairs | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Penn State Live
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Andrea Adolph named director of academic affairs

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Andrea Adolph has accepted the position of director of academic affairs at Penn State New Kensington, replacing Arlene Hall, who retires this summer.

Adolph is currently associate professor of English and coordinator of service-learning at Kent State University of Stark in North Canton, Ohio. Her work there has involved academic planning and program development. She also brings from that position knowledge of accreditation and assessment processes and experience in budget and labor oversight.

"I think one of the things I am really excited about is this job rolls together all the things I've done so far in my administrative life," Adolph said. "So many aspects of the job really speak to the things I like to do so much. I think that part of what makes it really interesting to me is it's a lot of different kinds of work. It's an eclectic mix of skills and tasks."

In her new role on the campus's senior management team, Adolph will be responsible for areas such as faculty recruitment, academic planning and program development. She will lead faculty in community outreach and efforts to secure funding to support academic programs. Student activities such as study-abroad, internships and service-learning opportunities will also fall under her supervision.

Adolph holds a doctorate in English literature from Louisiana State University. While at Kent State University of Stark, she served as a member of Kent State University's Faculty Professional Development Center, received the Ohio Campus Compact's David Hoch Memorial Award for Excellence in Service and created the Service Scholars program.

In addition to service-learning, a form of experiential education which takes the lessons of the classroom out into the community to give students hands-on learning experience, Adolph includes public education and higher education as two of her main interests.

"Those are passions for me," she said. "I'd like to see how these passions can be fulfilled for me in this job."

Adolph is looking forward to joining the Penn State New Kensington campus. She also is excited to work with Chancellor Kevin Snider and be a part of the plans he has for the campus.

"I can tell the campus is full of a lot of people who do a lot of hard, good work, and I appreciate that, because that's what it takes to make a successful campus, especially (on a) smaller campus."

Adolph is also looking forward to exploring Pittsburgh and the Alle-Kiski Valley, in which the Penn State New Kensington campus is located. She said she finds the Alle-Kiski Valley quite beautiful.

"I like the fact that the valley is out of the city enough that you can have your own little place," she said.

Adolph and her daughter, Ella, 7, will reside in the Natrona Heights section of Harrison Township.

Contact

Karen Harlan

The Pennsylvania State University 2002-2012 Penn State: Making Life Better

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News Headline: Space Harvesting of Antimatter Might Fuel Starships (Zhang) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Discovery News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Space Harvesting of Antimatter Might Fuel Starships

Over the coming decades there will be increasing discussion about sending robotic interstellar probes to nearby stars.

The discovery and cataloging of inhabited planets within just a few light-years of Earth will provide the motivation -- we'll want to see how Darwinian evolution has played out on other worlds.

Remote sensing from huge space telescopes may never definitively prove that life is elsewhere -- we’ll want to see it squirming under a microscope or, better yet, walking on all six legs.

But how to get to the stars? Both scientists and science fiction writers have long favored matter-antimatter propulsion. In the Star Trek TV series, antimatter fuel is discussed as casually as buying a propane cylinder for the barbecue grill.

Antimatter is the mirror image of the electrical charges found in normal matter. It was abundant after the big bang. But when it came into contact with normal matter-- *poof!* The Ying-Yang forms of matter annihilated with each other in a powerful burst of gamma rays.

Fortunately for us, there was a very slight excess of normal matter in the early universe to make stars, planets, and people. This is call a CP violation: the breakdown of the predicted symmetry between the number of particle and antiparticles made in the Big Bang.

ANALYSIS: Antimatter Matters: Fermilab Glimpses 'The Toe of God'

The problem is that God doesn't make half the universe out of antimatter any more. And even if there were whole antimatter galaxies out there you'd want to stay far away from them.

But as a source of fuel antimatter can't be beat, as Jennifer Ouellette describes in her recent article.

In the 2009 film "Angels & Demons" antimatter extracted from the Large Hadron Collider is use to manufacture a terrorist bomb for leveling the Vatican. Talk about overkill!

In reality, some estimates suggest that it would take 1,000 years to make a microgram of antimatter with present-day accelerators. However, the intensity of beams of antiprotons in accelerators has increased about four orders of magnitude per decade. Coincidentally, the growth in production of liquid hydrogen, which propelled NASA's space shuttle, has likewise increased exponentially over the past few decades.

A stash of antihydrogen may grow exponentially such that a microgram of fuel might be produced by the middle of the 21st century say some experts.

The trouble is that a lot more antimatter is needed for an interstellar mission. For a planet reconnaissance and landing mission, the starship will have to have enough fuel to decelerate into the target star system. A starship with a 100-ton payload designed for a cruising at 40 percent the speed of light would require the equivalent of 80 ocean supertankers full of antimatter fuel. If the cruise speed were limited to 25 percent the speed of light or less, fuel requirements would be dramatically lower.

Antimatter propelled starships can only become more than a sci-fi dream if it ever becomes feasible to accumulate antimatter in large quantities. And, once it's collected it has to be stored safely, shielded from contact with normal matter. In 2011, CERN's Antihydrogen Laser Physics Apparatus (ALPHA) trapped 309 atoms of antimatter for more than a quarter of an hour .

NEWS: Record Smashed: Antimatter Trapped for 16 Minutes

The upshot is: we'll likely have to turn to nature to make the antimatter for us.

Antiprotons have been discovered trapped by the Earth's magnetic field by the international PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter/Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics) satellite . The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer recently installed on the International Space Station should also be able to detect, identify, and measure antiparticles in Earth orbit.

Theoretical studies suggest that the magnetospheres of much larger planets, like Jupiter, should have more antiprotons than Earth. "If feasible, harvesting antimatter in space would completely bypass the obstacle of low energy efficiency when an accelerator is used to produce antimatter," writes Ronan Keane (Western Reserve Academy) and Wei-Ming Zhang (Kent State University) in a recently published paper on antimatter engine design.

As far-fetched as all of this may sound, imagine trying to explain to Lord Kelvin or Thomas Edison the mastery we'd have over matter and energy at the start of the 21st century. Even Albert Einstein was quoted in 1932 as saying, "There is not the slightest indication that nuclear energy will be obtainable." Therefore, the seemingly impossible challenges of using anitimatter as the ultimate power source may be comparatively routine a century from now.

Antimatter harvesting fuel tankers may someday ply interplanetary space between Earth and Jupiter. Orbiting antimatter fuel depots may be built up as a resource for launching our first interstellar mission to rendezvous with "Earth II."

Image credits: NASA, CERN

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News Headline: Elections in Egypt | Essential Public Radio | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: WESA-FM (Essential Public Radio)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Elections in Egypt

With historic elections still going on in Egypt, we talk to Joshua Stacher, an experiment in Middle East politics at Kent State University. We'll ask him about the political situation in Egypt since Mubarak was forced from office, and what the present election could mean for the country and its place in the world.

(Joshua Stacher)

Professor Joshua Stacher, an expert on Middle East politics at Kent State University, joins us to discuss elections in Egypt.

With historic elections still going on in Egypt, we talk to Joshua Stacher, an experiment in Middle East politics at Kent State University. We'll ask him about the political situation in Egypt since Mubarak was forced from office, and what the present election could mean for the country and its place in the world.

Hear this story Thursday at noon on 90.5 FM . It will be rebroadcast at 8:00 PM and posted online.

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News Headline: Mild winter and warm spring should make for a fabulous farmers market season | Email

News Date: 05/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Abraham, Lisa
News OCR Text: May 23--Akron-area residents will have more opportunities than ever this summer to purchase locally grown produce.

Farmers market season is under way, with two new markets making their debut and dozens of others returning, including the Haymaker Market in downtown Kent, which this year celebrates its 20th anniversary.

Ravenna residents have their first farmers market, thanks to an $85,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Market manager Sally Kelly said one of the goals of the market, which is at Meridian and Cedar streets, is to provide a place where senior citizens, who live in nearby high-rise apartments and don't drive, can purchase fresh produce.

Kelly was director of Portage County Senior Services for 17 years and helped to administer the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program, in which senior citizens, who meet income eligibility guidelines, are given vouchers to use for produce at farmers markets.

After years of receiving vouchers, Ravenna seniors now have a nearby market where they can use them, Kelly said. She said 3,800 Ravenna residents who live near the area where the market is held have poverty-level incomes and little access to fresh food.

By June 1, the market will be equipped to accept Ohio Direction cards (used by those receiving food assistance) and some vendors will accept credit and debit cards as well, she said.

The market officially opened Thursday, and while the initial number of vendors was small, Kelly said 18 have signed up to sell at the market once the growing season begins to produce a bigger harvest.

All of the produce sold at the market must be grown within 100 miles of downtown Ravenna, Kelly said. Current vendors sell honey, maple syrup, flowers, plants, artisan breads and goat cheese from Lucky Penny Farm Creamery in Kent.

The market also will offer nutrition education programs from the Ohio State University Extension and health screenings from the Ravenna Health Department

The farmers market in Randolph Township in Portage County will not return this year, but some of its vendors are expected to take part in the Ravenna and Kent markets nearby.

The Haymaker Farmers Market in Kent ushers in its 20th season on Saturday.

The market officially opens for the season at 9 a.m. on Franklin Avenue, under the Haymaker overpass between College and Summit streets. The market, which runs until 1 p.m., will continue on Saturdays through Oct. 27.

Market manager Kelly Ferry said the anniversary will be celebrated with a large harvest party closer to the end of the season, when the market mural on the Haymaker overpass will be unveiled.

Ferry said the market raised $8,500 of the $11,000 needed to complete the mural project.

The Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University donated a large portion of the money for the project and worked with children from Kent's Holden Elementary School (the school nearest to the market) to help them write poetry based on food and their gardens.

Artist Elaine Hulihen, a KSU fine arts graduate, will paint the mural, which will include lines from the students' poetry intertwined with images from the market and Kent's history.

The children will be on hand to read their poems at the harvest party, Ferry said.

Work to prepare the bridge for the mural will begin this week, she said.

Throughout the summer, this year's market will feature a booth from the Campus Kitchen at Kent State University, where student chefs will offer dishes made with seasonal market ingredients and provide recipe cards so customers will know how to prepare the dishes at home.

The market will accept Ohio Direction cards, credit cards and debit cards.

There will be musical performances each week from 10 a.m. to noon, and educational activities for children.

Residents of Macedonia will have a new market beginning June 26.

Alan Hamski, recreation coordinator for the city, said his department recognized how farmers markets are growing and decided to put one together so the community would have something new.

"One of the things we've noticed was the growing popularity of farmers markets throughout Northeast Ohio," he said. "Twinsburg has one that was very nice and we decided to try one, too."

The market will be at the city recreation center, 1494 E. Aurora Road, on Tuesday afternoons.

Macedonia is hosting a growers market, and is still looking for produce vendors. "We have less than 10 so far," he said.

In Akron, the market in Highland Square sponsored by the Countryside Conservancy moves from Wednesdays to Thursdays. It had been on Thursdays until 2011, when it moved from the grounds of Stan Hywet to Highland Square. This year it opens May 31 and will be held from 4 to 7 p.m.

Market manager Beth Knorr said the Wednesday market was competing with other established Wednesday markets, and Thursday seems to be a preferred market day for many customers in the city.

The conservancy's Saturday market, at Howe Meadow in Cuyahoga Falls, already has begun.

Knorr said this year is shaping up to be a bountiful season, which will be a welcome relief for growers after last year's season was plagued by excessive rain and a cold spring planting season.

"Last season was really a tough season for produce growers, it was so wet and cold," she said, adding that this year's mild winter, coupled with a warm, dry spring has made for excellent planting conditions.

"Following such a rough year, I hope our growers can catch up for lost sales last year," she said.

Knorr said the food truck Zydeco Bistro, operated by Wadsworth chef Johnny Schulze, will be at both markets to offer prepared foods. It marks the first time a food truck will be a fixture at the farmers markets, and Knorr said Schulze will be at the markets as often as his schedule permits.

The conservancy's markets will continue to accept debit cards and Ohio Direction cards

A grant from Wholesome Wave also will allow the conservancy to continue its "Carrot Cash" program. Wholesome Wave, a nonprofit health-care organization, operates the program in more than 20 other states.

Through the program, anyone who uses an Ohio Direction card to purchase $20 of produce at the market will be given an additional $20 to use toward the purchase of fruits and vegetables.

"It's an effort to help people bridge the gap to be able to purchase healthy foods," Knorr said.

In addition to Macedonia, many markets are still accepting applications from vendors. (See market contact numbers in market list).

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News Headline: Mild winter and warm spring should make for a fabulous farmers market season - Top Stories - Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Akron-area residents will have more opportunities than ever this summer to purchase locally grown produce.

Farmers market season is under way, with two new markets making their debut and dozens of others returning, including the Haymaker Market in downtown Kent, which this year celebrates its 20th anniversary.

Ravenna residents have their first farmers market, thanks to an $85,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Market manager Sally Kelly said one of the goals of the market, which is at Meridian and Cedar streets, is to provide a place where senior citizens, who live in nearby high-rise apartments and don't drive, can purchase fresh produce.

Kelly was director of Portage County Senior Services for 17 years and helped to administer the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program, in which senior citizens, who meet income eligibility guidelines, are given vouchers to use for produce at farmers markets.

After years of receiving vouchers, Ravenna seniors now have a nearby market where they can use them, Kelly said. She said 3,800 Ravenna residents who live near the area where the market is held have poverty-level incomes and little access to fresh food.

By June 1, the market will be equipped to accept Ohio Direction cards (used by those receiving food assistance) and some vendors will accept credit and debit cards as well, she said.

The market officially opened Thursday, and while the initial number of vendors was small, Kelly said 18 have signed up to sell at the market once the growing season begins to produce a bigger harvest.

All of the produce sold at the market must be grown within 100 miles of downtown Ravenna, Kelly said. Current vendors sell honey, maple syrup, flowers, plants, artisan breads and goat cheese from Lucky Penny Farm Creamery in Kent.

The market also will offer nutrition education programs from the Ohio State University Extension and health screenings from the Ravenna Health Department

The farmers market in Randolph Township in Portage County will not return this year, but some of its vendors are expected to take part in the Ravenna and Kent markets nearby.

The Haymaker Farmers Market in Kent ushers in its 20th season on Saturday.

The market officially opens for the season at 9 a.m. on Franklin Avenue, under the Haymaker overpass between College and Summit streets. The market, which runs until 1 p.m., will continue on Saturdays through Oct. 27.

Market manager Kelly Ferry said the anniversary will be celebrated with a large harvest party closer to the end of the season, when the market mural on the Haymaker overpass will be unveiled.

Ferry said the market raised $8,500 of the $11,000 needed to complete the mural project.

The Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University donated a large portion of the money for the project and worked with children from Kent's Holden Elementary School (the school nearest to the market) to help them write poetry based on food and their gardens.

Artist Elaine Hulihen, a KSU fine arts graduate, will paint the mural, which will include lines from the students' poetry intertwined with images from the market and Kent's history.

The children will be on hand to read their poems at the harvest party, Ferry said.

Work to prepare the bridge for the mural will begin this week, she said.

Throughout the summer, this year's market will feature a booth from the Campus Kitchen at Kent State University, where student chefs will offer dishes made with seasonal market ingredients and provide recipe cards so customers will know how to prepare the dishes at home.

The market will accept Ohio Direction cards, credit cards and debit cards.

There will be musical performances each week from 10 a.m. to noon, and educational activities for children.

Residents of Macedonia will have a new market beginning June 26.

Alan Hamski, recreation coordinator for the city, said his department recognized how farmers markets are growing and decided to put one together so the community would have something new.

"One of the things we've noticed was the growing popularity of farmers markets throughout Northeast Ohio," he said. "Twinsburg has one that was very nice and we decided to try one, too."

The market will be at the city recreation center, 1494 E. Aurora Road, on Tuesday afternoons.

Macedonia is hosting a growers market, and is still looking for produce vendors. "We have less than 10 so far," he said.

In Akron, the market in Highland Square sponsored by the Countryside Conservancy moves from Wednesdays to Thursdays. It had been on Thursdays until 2011, when it moved from the grounds of Stan Hywet to Highland Square. This year it opens May 31 and will be held from 4 to 7 p.m.

Market manager Beth Knorr said the Wednesday market was competing with other established Wednesday markets, and Thursday seems to be a preferred market day for many customers in the city.

The conservancy's Saturday market, at Howe Meadow in Cuyahoga Falls, already has begun.

Knorr said this year is shaping up to be a bountiful season, which will be a welcome relief for growers after last year's season was plagued by excessive rain and a cold spring planting season.

"Last season was really a tough season for produce growers, it was so wet and cold," she said, adding that this year's mild winter, coupled with a warm, dry spring has made for excellent planting conditions.

"Following such a rough year, I hope our growers can catch up for lost sales last year," she said.

Knorr said the food truck Zydeco Bistro, operated by Wadsworth chef Johnny Schulze, will be at both markets to offer prepared foods. It marks the first time a food truck will be a fixture at the farmers markets, and Knorr said Schulze will be at the markets as often as his schedule permits.

The conservancy's markets will continue to accept debit cards and Ohio Direction cards

A grant from Wholesome Wave also will allow the conservancy to continue its "Carrot Cash" program. Wholesome Wave, a nonprofit health-care organization, operates the program in more than 20 other states.

Through the program, anyone who uses an Ohio Direction card to purchase $20 of produce at the market will be given an additional $20 to use toward the purchase of fruits and vegetables.

"It's an effort to help people bridge the gap to be able to purchase healthy foods," Knorr said.

In addition to Macedonia, many markets are still accepting applications from vendors. (See market contact numbers in market list).

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State planning $170 million campus overhaul (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A proposal Kent State University sent to the state detailing plans for $170 million in new construction and renovation on the campus calls for new architecture and technology buildings, among other improvements.

Kent State plans to pay for the construction by issuing bonds, which will be paid back through new fees on students taking large course loads.

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent said the Kent State Board of Trustees has approved issuing the $170 million in debt and the new student fees, but the details of the construction plan has not been finalized.

“Nothing is set in stone as to what's being worked on,” Vincent said, adding that the board would discuss the specifics of the plan at its June 6 meeting.

According to a proposal on the Ohio Board of Regents' website, the most expensive single project in the plan will be a $45 million new building for the College of Architecture and Environmental Design, which currently resides in 45-year-old Taylor Hall.

The College of Technology also would receive a new home under the plan, which allocates $10 million for a new building with classrooms, research laboratories and faculty offices. The college is currently housed in Van Deusen Hall, which was built in 1950.

The university would also split $64 million of the funds among Cunningham, Smith and Williams halls and new interdisciplinary science labs as Kent State revamps its biology, physics and chemistry facilities.

Kent State will receive an additional $16 million in funding for renovations at the three buildings, which were constructed in 1967-68, from the state of Ohio's annual capital budget.

A $25 million renovation is planned for facilities used by the KSU School of Art.

The school's central location is the Art Building, completed in 1972, though different art classrooms are scattered throughout the campus.

Professors and students at the school have pushed for a new building for years, citing disrepair at current facilities and a desire for all art majors to be located in one building.

Kent State also plans to set aside:

•$12 million to make sure the campus meets Americans with Disabilities guidelines, and fund building shell, roof and fire alarm replacements at multiple buildings.
•$8 million to renovate to existing academic buildings.
•$5 million to revamp the undergraduate center adjacent to Olson Hall, which originally was used as a dining hall and kitchen.
“It is premature to go into specifics about the proposed projects that were outlined,” Vincent said in an email.

Kent State will pay back the $170 million in bonds with the newly created course overload fee. Starting this fall, students will be charged an extra $440 per credit hour taken over 17 hours. By the 2013-14 school year, the surcharge will apply to every credit hour taken over 16 hours.

Students originally protested the surcharge, though protests died down within a week.

The university originally planned to make $250 million in renovations, which it would have paid for through an increase in student fees. The increase would have started at an extra $7 for each credit hour taken and increased to $24 per credit hour by 2017.

That plan was rejected by Eric Fingerhut, former chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents.

Kent State later submitted the smaller renovation plan, paid for by course overload fees, which was approved by Jim Petro, the current chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents.

PROPOSAL ADDS BUILDINGS, RENOVATES FACILITIES
■ $45 million for a new building for the
College of Architecture and Environmental
Design.
■ $10 million for a new building for the
College of Technology.
■ $64 million for new biology, physics
and chemistry facilities.
■ $16 million for renovations at Cunningham,
Smith and Williams halls.
■ $25 million for renovations to School
of Art facilities.
■ $12 million to meet Americans with
Disabilities guidelines, and to fund building
shell, roof and fire alarm replacements.
■ $8 million to renovate to existing academic
buildings.
■ $5 million to revamp the undergraduate
center adjacent to Olson Hall.
Source: Ohio Board of Regents

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News Headline: School Notes: KSU installing panels to capture power from sun | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is installing 1,716 solar panels on its fieldhouse near Dix Stadium.

The panels will cover almost one acre of roof area or nearly 0.5 megawatts of panel capacity. The installation is believed to be the largest roof-mounted system at any of Ohio's public universities.

The project, scheduled to finish in early July, is the first renewable energy project for KSU.

The solar panels will generate about 500,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year, which is about one-third of the annual power used by the fieldhouse and Dix Stadium.

The project will eliminate an average of 779,000 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions per year, which is roughly equivalent to removing 70 cars from the road per year.

The solar panels will be installed by Ohio developer Third Sun Solar and Wind Power in Athens, and contractor Thompson Electric Inc. in Munroe Falls.

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News Headline: Projects creating 1,728 new beds for students | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A spokesman for a North
Carolina developer said the
company's plans to build
a new apartment complex
for Kent State University
students in Franklin Township
would bring 584 beds
to an area across the street
from Dix Stadium.
That would be in addition
to 1,728 new beds of
student housing that are
scheduled to open in the
city of Kent this fall.
Chris Russ, vice president
of land development
entitlement at Campus
Crest Communities in Raleigh,
N.C., said in an e-mail
that the company is still
in the “very early stages”
of working with Franklin
Township's government
to make the project work,
but added that the company
believes there is a need
for student housing in the
area.
“Franklin (Township),
Ohio happens to be one
of the many markets we
have looked at closely over
the past year due to its
compelling student housing
supply-demand dynamics
and college enrollment
growth trends
at Kent State University,”
Russ wrote in an e-mail.
“Based on our research,
we identified a significant
shortfall in the availability
of purpose-built student
housing in the area.”
Two new apartment
complexes, the Province
on South Lincoln Street
and University Edge on
Rhodes Road, are scheduled
to open this fall in
Kent. The Province will
have 596 beds, while University
Edge will have 612
beds.
In addition to those two
complexes, 520 beds of student
housing are expected
to open at the newly renovated
University Oaks, the
former Silver Oaks senior
apartment complex, located
off of Horning Road.
In order to move ahead
with its project, Campus
Crest is seeking to change
the zoning of the property
for the site, six lots located
at the corner of Cline
and Summit roads, from
low-density residential to
multi-family residential.
The Franklin Township
Zoning Commission will
begin discussion of this
project tonight at its 7 p.m.
meeting at the Franklin
Township Hall on Gougler
Avenue in Kent.
The 20-acre site the company
is looking to build on
is now mostly vacant land.
In the mid-1990s, a firm
planned to build a senior
housing community on the
land, but it never came to
fruition.

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News Headline: Ruller: Kent State University, Kent need consultant on housing | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University and the city of Kent urgently needs to hire a qualified consultant to better project the community's housing needs particularly in regard student housing, especially with another large student housing proposal in the offing in Franklin Township near the Kent State football stadium.

That opinion was offered by City Manager David Ruller at his monthly breakfast meeting with members of the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce at Mike's Place Wednesday.

The subject came up in regards to the recent request by Campus Crest Developments of Raleigh, N.C. for the rezoning of six lots in Franklin Township across from the football stadium to make possible a cluster of 13 apartment buildings that could house as many as 600 students.

“I do not want to say this is all good or all bad for Kent,” Ruller said. “It's probably some of both, but we need to ask ourselves how much student housing will the market support. We do not want to get into a situation where new housing displaces older housing, causing the older housing to become blighted neighborhoods the city must contend with,” he said.

The city manager referred to three large student housing developments already under construction off campus. The Province at Kent on South Lincoln Street, University Edge on Rhodes Road and University Oaks, the former Silver Oaks Place on Horning Road will, when completed this fall, bring in 1,600 additional beds of housing. They will join two other large recently opened student housing developments, Pebblecreek and Campus Pointe on S.R. 59 in Franklin Township that have added significantly to availability of off-campus student housing.

Student apartment complexes, the city manger said, place a burden on city services and, “although this proposal is in Franklin Township, there are a number of services the city provides to the township that could be affected.”

Bringing in an outside consultant who can focus full-time on accurately projecting student housing needs would help both the city and Kent State complete a projection more expeditiously, Ruller said, “since both of us already have a lot on our plates right now.”

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