Report Overview:
Total Clips (21)
Athletics (1)
Child Development Center; Foundation, Leadership and Administration; Research (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum (3)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
KSU at Salem; Scholarships; Students (1)
KSU Museum (2)
Office of the University Architect; Sustainability; University Facilities Management (1)
Psychology; Research (1)
Renovation at KSU; Tuition (1)
Town-Gown (2)
Tuition (2)
University Facilities Management (3)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (1)
On the record -- May 24 05/25/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Child Development Center; Foundation, Leadership and Administration; Research (1)
KSU using Lego Robotics to promote STEM learning (Kratcoski) 05/25/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Campus pets help relieve stress 05/24/2012 Shanghai Daily Text Attachment Email

...chews on a toy while law students enter, a grin breaking out on their weary faces when they see him. Puppy therapy - just in time for finals week. From Kent State University in Ohio to Macalester College in Minnesota, more pooches are around campus during exams to help students relax. "We had a...


Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum (3)
Kent State museum receives $1.1 million gift 05/24/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

By TIMOTHY MAGAW 9:04 am, May 24, 2012 The Kent State University Museum received its largest cash gift in the form of a $1.1 million donation from Gerald Schweigert, a local business leader...

Kent State University Museum receives record donation 05/25/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

WKSU News: Morning news headlines for May 24, 2012 05/24/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

State Senate passes pension bill Gambling bill held up by charity card room debate Judge rejects death penalty challenges Kent State receives largest museum donation in its history Mandel returning controversial campaign donations US Senate Candidate Josh Mandel...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Professor at KSU completes journey (Murray) 05/25/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
Kent State University Recycle Fashion Show 05/24/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

/ All Calendars / Community Events / Kent State University Recycle Fashion Show Sun, June 24, 2012 @ 2:00PM EAST LIVERPOOL — Kent State University at East Liverpool Environment...


KSU at Salem; Scholarships; Students (1)
Scholarship winner announced 05/24/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...7:16 a.m. The Men's Garden Club of Youngstown recently announced its 22nd scholarship winner, Emily Conrad of Louisville, Ohio. She is a student at Kent State Salem in the horticulture program. Above are Stan Jones, left, horticulture program director at Kent Salem, Conrad and Lynn Hoffman, chairman...


KSU Museum (2)
$1 million gift to KSU continues legacy of generosity 05/25/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Brunswick, Medina athletes advance to state track meet 05/24/2012 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...Local Akron Man Tops Million With KSU Gift An Akron man's desire to see to it that a friend's legacy stay strong is making the largest gift ever to Kent State University's Fashion Museum. More than $1.1 million... in Local UPDATE Plusquellic Social Media Test: #fail Mayor Plusquellic...


Office of the University Architect; Sustainability; University Facilities Management (1)
New Solar Array to Power Kent State Field House (Tom Euclide, Misbrener) 05/25/2012 Today's Energy Solutions Text Attachment Email

Home News New Solar Array to Power Kent State Field House Finance - State, Wind/Solar Energy, Industry News Covering almost one acre of roof area, this installation is believed...


Psychology; Research (1)
Data on Blood Pressure Discussed by Researchers at Kent State University 05/25/2012 Drug Week Text Email

...mindfulness-based stress reduction may produce clinically significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressure," wrote C.M. Goldstein and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "More randomized clinical trials are necessary before strong recommendations regarding...


Renovation at KSU; Tuition (1)
19 Action News First at Four 05/24/2012 19 Action News at 4 PM - WOIO-TV Text Email

...all undergrads this fall. That's an increase of more than $300. A vote on the tuition hike is expected next month. >>> And big changes may be coming to kent state. Ken deroos is at the big board with those details. >> Kent state administrators were hopish to live on until june 6th but we have...


Town-Gown (2)
Local news briefs -- May 25 05/25/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

PARTA seeks artisans for Kent vets memorial 05/24/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...present, fallen and POW-MIA veterans from all service branches of the U.S. military. The memorial is a joint project of PARTA, the City of Kent and Kent State University. A budget of $100,000 has been set to fund the design, fabrication and installation of the memorial. The project is to be...


Tuition (2)
COST OF COLLEGE OSU tuition about to go up, but so is financial aid 05/24/2012 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...universities are allowed to raise undergraduate tuition and mandatory fees by up to 3.5 percent. Many schools plan to raise tuition to the limit. Miami University, for example, will remain the most-expensive public college in Ohio with a 3.5 percent increase in the fall for a total cost of $13,067....

OSU tuition about to go up, but so is financial aid 05/24/2012 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...universities are allowed to raise undergraduate tuition and mandatory fees by up to 3.5 percent. Many schools plan to raise tuition to the limit. Miami University, for example, will remain the most-expensive public college in Ohio with a 3.5 percent increase in the fall for a total cost of $13,067....


University Facilities Management (3)
Mayor Jackson s education plan does not get legislative approval but deal is made to pass it soon 05/24/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...approved in the closing minutes of the debate required a second vote in the Senate later in the evening. That amendment allows only two universities -- Kent State University and the University of Cincinnati to classify their campus heating and power plants as "renewable energy" even though they...

Ohio lawmakers approve new oil and gas well regulations 05/24/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...approved in the closing minutes of the debate required a second vote the Senate later in the evening. That amendment allows only two universities -- Kent State University and the University of Cincinnati to classify their campus heating and power plants as "renewable energy" even though they...

Breaking: Emerald Ash Borer Found on Kent State Campus (White) 05/24/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Emerald Ash Borer Found on Kent State Campus Tree-killing beetle found on campus is first confirmed infestation in Kent new The Emerald Ash Borer. U.S. Department of...


News Headline: On the record -- May 24 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University junior Sara Oczypok placed 10th in the javelin with a throw of 152 feet in her final toss Thursday at the NCAA East Regional in Jacksonville, Fla., to qualify for the NCAA Championships.

Sophomore javelin thrower C.J. Carlisle placed 11th and will also advance to the championships.

The top 12 in each event qualify for the NCAA Tournament.

Freshman Matthias Tayala finished 14th in the discus, and freshman Robert Robbins placed 16th overall in the javelin.

The NCAA Championships will be June 6-9 in Des Moines, Iowa.

The University of Akron had six athletes in action Thursday at the NCAA East Regional, but none advanced to the NCAA Championships.

Daryl Baptiste finished 15th in the long jump, and Nick Banke finished 15th in the discus to lead the Zips.

Alexis Cooks, the winner of the MAC Championship in the discus this month, will compete in the discus at 3 p.m. today in an attempt to qualify for the championships.

Eric Hubbard will compete in the hammer throw and 2012 MAC Outdoor Champion Ariane Beaumont-Courteau will compete in the pole vault today.

All-American Katherine Lee and true freshman Claire Lucas will also compete in the pole vault.

KSU Hall of Fame

The Kent State Department of Athletics announced the 2012 Varsity “K” Hall of Fame class to be introduced at the 34th induction ceremony Sept. 28.

The eight new members consist of Jody Caldwell (women's track and field, 1989-92), John Densevich (men's track and field, 1994-98), Sean Freeman (baseball, 1991-94), Todd Lancaster (men's golf, 1995-98), Marci Ridenbaugh (softball, 2001-04), Demetric Shaw (men's basketball, 1999-02), Lindsay Shearer Milano (women's basketball, 2002-06) and Gabby Wedding DeHart (women's golf, 2002-05).

The hall of fame will also honor the 1972-73 men's track and field team as its first Team of Distinction.

Allan Kaupinen, a distinguished alumnus, and Nancy Schiappa, an honorary Varsity “K,” will receive special recognition for their accomplishments.

The ceremony will begin with a reception at 5:30 p.m. at Cartwright Hall. The 2012 class will be introduced on Sept. 29 at halftime of the football game against Ball State.

For more information, contact Kara Warnke Mayle, director of Athletic Alumni Relations, at 330-672-0439 or kwarnke@kent.edu.

Honor roll

Mount Union sophomore Emily Mazzaferri (GlenOak) was named to the Academic All-Ohio Athletic Conference track and field team.

Mazzaferri set an OAC Indoor Championship record with a winning time of 1:16.86 in the 500-meter dash and was an All-American at the NCAA Indoor Championships with a fourth-place finish in the 800-meter relay and a sixth-place finish in the 800 meter.

Mazzaferri won the 800-meter race and was on the winning 800-meter relay at the OAC Championships. She carries a 3.96 GPA.

— Staff report

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News Headline: KSU using Lego Robotics to promote STEM learning (Kratcoski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (PHOTO) Kindergarteners
Simon Hostler, 6, left, and
Aiden Williams, 5, built a Lego airplane
with a moving propeller in Nancy
Condit's class at Kent State University's
Child Development Center.

Knowing that young children
are natural engineers,
fascinated with how things
work and with building and
taking things apart, led the
Research Center for Educational
Technology staff
at Kent State University to
adopt the Lego WeDo Robotics
system to help promote
elementary content standards
for science, technology,
engineering and mathematics
learning.
The project, funded by
the Martha Holden Jennings
Foundation in Cleveland,
helps support local K-
5 grade teachers to design
curriculum that utilizes the
robotics system to introduce
young children to the engineering
design process. The
WeDo set contains blocks,
working motors and sensors,
and a computer software
program to run constructed
models, which can
range from dancing birds to
a hungry alligator to a soccer
goal kicker.
To date, four local schools
have participated in the
STEM learning project, including
KSU's Child Development
Center (kindergarten),
Akron Public Schools
(fourth and fifth grades),
Kent City Schools (first and
third grades) and Stow-Munroe
Falls City Schools (first
grade).
“The outcome of this project
will provide much-needed
classroom-tested examples
of how a variety of educational
technologies can effectively
create opportunities
for deep learning of STEM
content, and equally as important,
how such tools can
be used to build children's
capacity for using criticalthinking
and problem-solving
skills within the context
of rigorous content,” said Annette
Kratcoski, RCET's educational
researcher.
RCET will run a Lego
WeDo camp for children in
third, fourth and fifth grades
from July 10-13. To learn
more about this camp and
other RCET camps for elementary
students, such as
digital storytelling, video production
and game development,
contact Mary Stith at
330-672-5995 or mstith@kent.
edu.

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News Headline: Campus pets help relieve stress | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Shanghai Daily
Contact Name: Dorie Turner
News OCR Text: UST down the hall from the reference desk at Emory University's law library in a room housing antique legal texts is Stanley the golden retriever puppy.

Stanley rolls around on the floor and chews on a toy while law students enter, a grin breaking out on their weary faces when they see him. Puppy therapy - just in time for finals week.

From Kent State University in Ohio to Macalester College in Minnesota, more pooches are around campus during exams to help students relax.

"We had a student who came in and a staff person commented they had never seen that student smile," said Richelle Reid, a law librarian who started Emory's pet therapy program this year after hearing about one at the University of California, San Francisco. "It has had positive effects, helping them to just have a moment to clear their minds and not have to think about studies."

Pups are in counseling centers for students to visit regularly or faculty and staff bring their pets to lift spirits. Pet friendly dorms also are popping up where students can bring their dogs or cats from home.

Want to check out a pet? It's possible at Harvard Medical School and Yale Law School, which both have resident therapy dogs in their libraries that can be borrowed through the card catalog just like a book.

Some dogs, like Harvard Medical School's resident shih tzu Cooper, hold regular office hours. Researcher Loise Francisco-Anderson owns Cooper and said she got permission to bring him to campus after her husband read that Yale Law School had a therapy dog on campus named Monty.

Campus petition

Cooper is so popular that undergraduate students have been petitioning for him to spend time on their side of campus. Many take the shuttle across the river to the medical school just to visit the pup on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

"You can release some of the emotions to a pet that you can't to a human. A pet keeps it confidential. You don't have to worry about someone else saying, 'Oh, I think she's having a nervous breakdown over the science exam,'" said Francisco-Anderson.

Most schools, like Emory, partner with organizations that train companion dogs so that the canines get their social training while students get stress relief. Others, like Harvard, have faculty members bring their dogs - which are certified to be therapy pups - to campus certain hours during the week.

The service is almost always free.

Research shows that interaction with pets decreases the level of cortisol - or stress hormone - in people and increases endorphins, known as the happiness hormone. Scant research exists on how pet programs on college campuses help students cope with stress.

That's why Kathleen Adamle, a nursing professor at Kent State, hopes to garner a grant so she can conduct research as part of her "Dogs on Campus" program. Adamle launched the program in 2006 with just her dog and has since added 11 other therapy canines to the team that visits dorms regularly throughout the year.

The dogs belong to Adamle or other community members and are certified therapy dogs.

She has plenty of anecdotal evidence that her program works. As soon as there's a tragedy on campus - a student dying in a car wreck, for example - dorms scramble to book the dog team to help comfort upset students, she says.

"I don't care if it's 10 at night, we go to that dorm and sit on the floor. The kids are crying, and they grab the dog and put their face in the fur and just let it go," said Adamle.

First-year Emory law student Anna Idelevich took a break from studying for exams to visit Stanley and Hooch, two golden retrievers training to be companion dogs.

"I've literally been here every day," said Idelevich, 22. "They couldn't have thought of a better way to relieve stress. If they don't do it next year, I'll be upset."

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News Headline: Kent State museum receives $1.1 million gift | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By TIMOTHY MAGAW
9:04 am, May 24, 2012

The Kent State University Museum received its largest cash gift in the form of a $1.1 million donation from Gerald Schweigert, a local business leader and longtime donor to the university.

Mr. Schweigert, who owned several local hotels, was friends with fashion designer Shannon Rodgers, who along with his business partner Jerry Silverman, donated several fashion collections that started the museum.

“Shannon left a wonderful gift with his collection, but no endowment fund,” Mr. Schweigert said in a news release. “I'm just trying to do my part to keep the legacy going.”

John Crawford, dean of the university's College of the Arts, said in the release the gift will enable the museum to continue the “great legacy” of Mr. Schweigert's friends and help maintain and expand the programming at the museum for years to come.

Mr. Schweigert, who graduated from Kent State in 1955, in the past provided funding for the university's athletics program and a scholarship for fashion students.

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News Headline: Kent State University Museum receives record donation | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Marchae Grair
Special to the Beacon Journal
Published: May 24, 2012 - 09:56 AM | Updated: May 25, 2012 - 09:11 AM

KENT: An alumnus has donated $1.1 million to the Kent State University Museum.

The donation from Copley Township native Gerald Schweigert is the top cash contribution in the museum's history and will support maintenance of the fashion collections.

“As a Kent State graduate, Mr. Schweigert's generous gift sets an example for all our alumni,” said Gene Finn, vice president for Institutional Advancement at Kent State. “His support will be meaningful for future generations of students. That's a great legacy, as well as an important contribution to historical preservation.”

Although a graduate of KSU's College of Business and Administration, Schweigert has personal ties to the fashion school. He knew Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman, who donated the original pieces for the museum in the 1980s.

Schweigert was a close friend of Rodgers and wants to see his work preserved and continued.

“Shannon left a wonderful gift with his collection, but no endowment fund,” Schweigert said. “I'm just trying to do my part to keep the legacy going.”

Schweigert, Rodgers and Silverman surrounded themselves with fashion and met with people now considered fashion icons. Schweigert hosted people in his home who designed for such entertainers as Cher, Diana Ross and Tina Turner.

The museum's collection has grown from 4,000 to 30,000 dresses.

Schweigert cares for artifacts from Rodgers and plans to make those pieces part of the museum. More cash gifts also might be in the future.

“The museum is my No. 1 philanthropic focus,” Schweigert said. “And I'm not through yet. I know Shannon would be happy to know that I'm helping out the museum.”

Marchae Grair can be reached at mgrair1@kent.edu.

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News Headline: WKSU News: Morning news headlines for May 24, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: State Senate passes pension bill

Gambling bill held up by charity card room debate

Judge rejects death penalty challenges

Kent State receives largest museum donation in its history

Mandel returning controversial campaign donations

US Senate Candidate Josh Mandel is returning over $100,000 in campaign donations that are the target of a federal investigation. The Plain Dealer reports the donations came from 21 employees of North Canton's Suarez Corporation Industries. The investigation came amid questions about the employees' ability to afford such large donations. Mandel's campaign treasurer said in a letter to Suarez the campaign is giving the money back "out of an abundance of caution" and has no reason to be concerned with the legality of the contributions. US Congressman Jim Renacci also received money from Suarez employees. Renacci and Mandel are both Republicans. Renacci's campaign is taking a wait-and-see approach before it returns donations. The company's president, Benjamin Suarez, tells the Canton Repository the investigation is retaliation for being Republican donors and is hurting his business.

Energy bill could pass General Assembly today

Environmental advocates in Ohio are blasting a newly added energy-bill provision, which they say would limit the rights of drilling opponents to sue energy companies for withholding chemical trade secrets. Their opposition came yesterday even as an Ohio House committee addressed their earlier concern by clarifying that doctors given new access to drillers' proprietary chemical recipes could share them with public health officials. The Ohio Environmental Council says one amendment would make it virtually impossible for most Ohioans to challenge oil and gas companies claims that fracking chemicals should be shielded as a trade secret. The bill does not require producers and contractors to reveal those chemicals until after the well is drilled.

Alleged Chardon shooter in court today

A prosecutor in northeast Ohio is ready to argue that a 17-year-old charged in the school shooting deaths of three students should face trial as an adult. Geauga County Prosecutor David Joyce was scheduled to outline the case against T.J. Lane at a hearing today. The decision rests with Juvenile Court Judge Timothy Grendell. If tried in adult court, Lane could face life in prison if convicted. Minors are not eligible for the death penalty in Ohio. A psychiatrist has testified Lane suffers from hallucinations, psychosis and fantasies. Authorities say Lane has admitted to taking a pistol to Chardon High School and firing at students sitting at a cafeteria table at the school, which is east of Cleveland. The motive for the Feb. 27 shooting remains unclear.

Closed Catholic churches expected to reopen this summer

The Roman Catholic bishop in Cleveland says some of the dozen Northeast Ohio churches that were closed but later spared by the Vatican might begin reopening in mid-June. Bishop Richard Lennon hopes to complete the process before August. He says some of the churches might have to share a pastor. The churches were among 50 in the Cleveland Diocese that were closed or merged because of a shortage of priests, parishioners and money.

Smoking ban fight headed for Statehouse

An attorney who spearheaded an unsuccessful challenge to Ohio's smoking ban says he expects the fight to move now to the state Legislature. The Ohio Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the statewide ban was constitutional. Justices rejected the claims of a Columbus tavern owner who argued that $33,000 in fines for violating the ban were an illegal taking of his property. The executive director of 1851 Center for Constitutional Law that litigated the suit says a bill is already in the works to exempt bars from the no-smoking rule.

Cruze recall expanded

U.S. safety officials have added the 2012 model year to an investigation of engine fires in the Chevrolet Cruze. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said last month it was investigating the 2011 Cruze because of two complaints of fires that engulfed the compact cars. Investigators are focusing on wiring and a computer that controls the transmission. They've asked GM for any allegations of overheated wiring or smoke and fire in the engine compartment. GM says the investigation now covers about 370,000 cars. The car has not been recalled and no one was hurt in the two fires reported to the government.

State Senate passes pension bill

The Ohio Senate has passed the last in a package of bills aimed at shoring up the state's five public pension funds. The Senate voted unanimously yesterday to pass a measure that would make changes to the State Highway Patrol Retirement System. The chamber approved bills addressing the other four public pension funds last week. Senate leaders had fast-tracked the measures, which affect 1.7 million Ohioans. Pension fund audits showed long-term solvency was at risk without the proposed changes. The House wants to wait until an independent study on the fiscal health of the retirement systems is completed.

Gambling bill held up by charity card room debate

A Statehouse hearing on a wide-ranging gambling bill was delayed until today due to a disagreement over the legalization of charity card rooms. The House version of the bill allows the Nautica Charity Poker Festivals in the Flats to continue. The Senate version originally allowed one card room in each county before all card room language was removed. Representative Lou Blessing tells the Columbus Dispatch members of the conference committee reconciling the two versions of the bill are in different spots on the issue. Members of the committee did work out an agreement to give cities that host horse tracks with video slot machines around $500,000 each per year to help pay for additional police and fire services.

Judge rejects death penalty challenges

A federal judge has rejected claims by two condemned Ohio inmates challenging the constitutionality of the state's lethal injection process. The two are the next inmates scheduled to die in the state, with Abdul Awkal set for execution June 6 and John Eley set to die July 26. The two challenged Ohio's lethal injection process on the grounds it fails to guarantee the state won't execute someone who is insane, mentally disabled or was a juvenile when the crime was committed. A U.S. District Court Judge said Wednesday that Awkal and Eley don't understand Ohio's long-running injection lawsuit, which focuses on the process of administering the lethal drugs, and don't back up their claims.

Kent State receives largest museum donation in its history

Businessman and Kent State alum Gerald Schweigert donated $1.1 million to the University's fashion museum. Schweigert says was inspired to make his gift after a friend helped start the museum's collection in the 1980s. Much of Schweigert's gift will go to preserving the collection of over 30,000 dresses and 10,000 decorative pieces.

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News Headline: Professor at KSU completes journey (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By TIM TROGLEN | HUDSON HUB

A l o -
cal pilot
touched
down safely
in Dayton
Tuesday
after
a nine -
day flight
w h i c h
took him to each of Ohio's
88 counties while logging
in 1,809 miles.
The pilot, Joe Murray, a
Hudson resident and journalism
professor at Kent
State University, set the
record by being “the first,
longest, slowest and most
peculiar flight to Wright
Brothers Airport via all
counties of Ohio in an antique
aircraft,” he said.
“We were met by an enthusiastic
crowd of folks
from the community,
the Wright B Flyer Museum,
and several of our
ground crew drove even
in from Kent,” Murray
said. “A local photographer
surprised us with a
painting of the two Cubs
(airplanes) on our route
around Ohio.”
Murray made the flight
in a 1946 Piper J3 Cub,
with friend and fellow pilot
Ron Siwik of Chagrin
Falls flying alongside in an
identical vintage plane.
The weather “was remarkable
for the entire
nine days,” according to
Murray.
The pair was delayed
a bit by thunderstorms
while they were on the
ground in Clinton County,
he said.
“But while we waited,
we had a good conversation
with Bob the line boy
at Clinton and his giant
German shepherd, Buddy,”
Murray said. “An Ohio
Trooper Pilot arrived in
one of OHP's 172s (Ohio
Highway Patrol's traffic
airplanes) and we shared
some popcorn and talked
to him for a while as
well.”
Murray said the trip
raised a few thousand dollars
toward a scholarship
fund for disadvantaged
families, which was short
of the goal but will continue
next year.
Funds for the scholarship
are still being accepted.
Donations can be made
by contacting Murray or
sending a check to the
Kent State University
Foundation at 101-G
Franklin Hall, Kent, OH
44242-0001.

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News Headline: Kent State University Recycle Fashion Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: / All Calendars / Community Events /

Kent State University Recycle Fashion Show

Sun, June 24, 2012 @ 2:00PM

EAST LIVERPOOL — Kent State University at East Liverpool Environment Club will be hosting their annual Recycle Fashion Show at 2 p.m. June 24.

The club is currently accepting entry forms from designers who wish to be a part of this contest. First place winner will receive $250, second place $150, and third place $100.

Anyone 16 or older is welcome to design and make an outfit. The creator of the garment or designated model must appear in the fashion show wearing the outfit. If you are interested in participating, packets with rules and regulations along with entry forms are available at the East Liverpool campus from the front desk or e-mail mrodger8@kent.edu.

The Review

210 East Fourth St. , East Liverpool, OH 43920 | 330-385-4545

2012. All rights reserved.| Terms of Service and Privacy Policy

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News Headline: Scholarship winner announced | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Username:

Password:

Published: Thu, May 24, 2012 @ 7:16 a.m.

The Men's Garden Club of Youngstown recently announced its 22nd scholarship winner, Emily Conrad of Louisville, Ohio. She is a student at Kent State Salem in the horticulture program. Above are Stan Jones, left, horticulture program director at Kent Salem, Conrad and Lynn Hoffman, chairman of the scholarship committee.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

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News Headline: $1 million gift to KSU continues legacy of generosity | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: DONATION TO KSU MUSUEM SETS
EXAMPLE FOR ALUMNI STEWARDSHIP

THE GENEROSITY OF SHANNON
Rodgers and Jerry Silverman provided
Kent State University with
the nucleus for a world-class collection of
fashion and art more than 25 years ago.
The Kent State University
Museum, which
houses their collection,
and the School of Fashion
Design and Merchandising
that bears
the name of the two benefactors are distinctive
elements of Kent State's academic
“brand” that have attracted international
notice.
The generosity of one of Shannon Rodgers'
friends, Gerald Schweigert, a 1955
graduate, will ensure continued preservation
of the museum collection and support
for its activities.
Schweigert's $1.1 million donation to
the museum in the form of a charitable
gift annuity is the largest cash gift the facility
has received.
A benefactor of the fashion school as well
as intercollegiate athletics at KSU, Schweigert
is a longtime supporter of his alma
mater. His gift to the fashion museum was
prompted by his friendship with Shannon
Rodgers as well as the need for an endowment
fund to support the museum.
“Shannon left a wonderful gift,” he said.
“I'm just trying to do my part to keep the
legacy going.”
The original Silverman-Rodgers collection
included 4,000 dresses and costumes,
1,000 artifacts and a 5,000-volume reference
library. The museum's holdings have
grown to 30,000 dresses and 10,000 decorative
pieces, but the facility has had to
turn down offers of additions to the collection
because of a lack of appropriate
storage. Schweigert's donation will help
enable the museum to maintain and expand
its collection.
Schweigert, an Akron resident who
owned several area hotels, including the
Inn of Kent, says that the KSU museum
will be his “No 1. philanthropic focus.” He
plans to continue his support of Rodgers'
legacy, including donating to the museum
elements of Rodgers' personal collection
that he acquired after the fashion magnate's
death. “I know Shannon would be
happy to know that I'm helping out the
museum,” he said.
Schweigert's generosity to Kent State is
a wonderful tribute to his friend. It's also
a fine example of stewardship on the part
of a Kent alumnus.

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News Headline: Brunswick, Medina athletes advance to state track meet | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Top Story

Vegas grocer accused of war crimes sent to Bosnia

LAS VEGAS (AP) -- A man accused of commanding a police squad that rounded up Bosnian Muslims for slaughter in 1995 fashioned a new life in Las Vegas as a modest grocery store owner before being arrested and deported to his native country, a lawyer and U.S. officials said Thursday.......

Trio Arrested For Alleged Home Robbery

An Akron woman is now facing robbery charges in connection with an incident that occurred last month. 28-year-old Tyieshia Shellman is accused of helping her brother Tony Shellman and Steven Young ...

in Local

VIDEO Lane Will Be Tried As Adult

There wasn't much argument today in Geauga County Juvenile Court on whether T.J. Lane would be tried as an adult for the shootings at Chardon High School which left three dead...

in Local

Security Concerns Follow Timber Top Fire

Questions concerning security and safety at Timber Top apartments have come up following the recent fire that tore through an office building at the complex Tuesday morning. Records show 35 burglaries...

in Local

Brimfield Township Man Arrested For Alleged Meth-Making

Police have arrested a Brimfield Township man for allegedly manufacturing meth inside his home. After a brief investigation, officers obtained a search warrant at David Efferson's Sunnybrook Road home Wednesday. Brimfield...

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Akron Man Tops Million With KSU Gift

An Akron man's desire to see to it that a friend's legacy stay strong is making the largest gift ever to Kent State University's Fashion Museum. More than $1.1 million...

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UPDATE Plusquellic Social Media Test: #fail

Mayor Plusquellic ranking near the bottom when it comes to social media after a "response test" conducted by WKYC Channel 3. They asked public officials and agencies questions through social...

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CAK Sets 13th Straight Record Month

Akron-Canton Airport has busted another record - the 13th record breaking month in a row. In April, more than 146,000 passengers flew in and out of the airport. The number...

in Local

VIDEO Lane Will Be Tried As Adult

There wasn't much argument today in Geauga County Juvenile Court on whether T.J. Lane would be tried as an adult for the shootings at Chardon High School which left three dead...

Security Concerns Follow Timber Top Fire

Questions concerning security and safety at Timber Top apartments have come up following the recent fire that tore through an office building at the complex Tuesday morning. Records show 35 burglaries...

UPDATE Plusquellic Social Media Test: #fail

Mayor Plusquellic ranking near the bottom when it comes to social media after a "response test" conducted by WKYC Channel 3. They asked public officials and agencies questions through social...

AUDIO Can Romney Break The Stained Glass Ceiling?

A new study suggests expected GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney has his work cut out for him when it comes to his Mormon faith, especially among Christian voters who may...

Deputies Save 3-Year Old

Did you ever feel like you were in the right place at the right time? That's exactly how Summit County sheriff's deputies Bill McKinney and Mark McElroy felt during a recent...

AUDIO Fishing Lawyer Reels In A Big One

Can you imagine camping along a beautiful lake or river bank, fishing the waters with your son or daughter, only to be told that fish you caught for dinner can't...

AUDIO Tribe's Perez: Attendance Record "Embarrassing"

Cleveland Indians Closer Chris Perez is blasting fans for what he calls their lack of support and an "embarrassing" attendance record to date. While the Tribe is ranked first in the American...

Philadelphia Politicians to Romney: Walk Our Streets

Authors: ABC News RadioMario Tama/Getty Images(PHILADELPHIA) -- As Mitt Romney went on a tour of a charter school in urban Philadelphia, sitting in on a music class and participating in...

Rick Santorum Announces Latest Endorsement

Authors: ABC News RadioJay LaPrete/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Rick Santorum has endorsed Texas U.S. Senate candidate Ted Cruz, announcing Thursday his backing of the former state solicitor general and Tea Party...

Jon Huntsman 'Sexy' Despite Views on Entitlements

Authors: ABC News RadioJeff Kardas/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- He couldn't get the votes for the Republican nomination, but Jon Huntsman has gained an accolade of a different kind.His rock band past...

Romney, Philly Teacher Go Head-to-Head on Class Size

Authors: ABC News RadioMario Tama/Getty Images(PHILADELPHIA) -- During a visit to a struggling West Philadelphia charter school Thursday meant to highlight his newly unveiled education platform, Mitt Romney was challenged...

VP Beat: Rubio on Divisive Politics, Trump Wants In?

Authors: ABC News RadioMike Stobe/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- PORTMAN ADMITS HE'S ‘BORING' Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, in an in depth Washington Post profile of the first term Ohio senator, admits, "I...

Obama Is ‘Attacking Capitalism,' Romney Says

Authors: Jeanette TorresMario Tama/Getty Images(PHILADELPHIA) -- Mitt Romney on Thursday said he agrees with conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh, who says that President Obama is running a campaign against...

Bill Clinton Poses with Porn Stars

Authors: Jeanette TorresFrank Polich/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Bill Clinton posed for an impromptu photo with two porn stars on Wednesday, the celebrity news-gossip site TMZ reported.The former president reportedly posed at...

Many Americans with Mortgages Still Underwater

Authors: ABC News RadioHemera/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Nearly a third of homeowners with a mortgage are underwater, according to a new report, owing more on their loans than their properties are worth."It's...

Facebook Camera: New Camera App for iPhone, iPod Touch

Authors: ABC News RadioFacebook(NEW YORK) -- The world might be focused on the issues surrounding Facebook's stock price and Mark Zuckerberg's relationship with investors, but the social media giant is...

Mortgage Rates Fall Again

Authors: ABC News RadioZoonar/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Right now could be the best time to buy a home _ if you qualify. Prices are close to 10-year lows in most markets, and...

Man Pays Off $114K Student Loan Debt in Cash

Authors: ABC News RadioAlex Kenjeev(LONDON) -- When Toronto resident Alex Kenjeev realized he was finally in a position to pay off more than $114,000 in student loans, he wanted to...

Cops: Alleged Lego Scammer Sold 2,100 Boxes Through Website

Authors: Jeanette TorresVladimir Weiss/Bloomberg via Getty Images(SANTA CLARA, Calif.) -- The California software exec arrested for allegedly switching bar codes on high priced Lego sets resold them online through "TomsBrickyard,"...

Jobless Claims Drop to 370,000

Authors: Jeanette TorresSpencer Platt/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- After staying put last week, jobless claims have taken a slight turn downwards, falling by 2,000, the Labor Department reported Thursday.For the week ending...

Frito-Lay Jumps into Gluten-Free Craze with New Labels

Authors: Jeanette TorresAlicia Hansen/Bloomberg via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Junk food giant Frito-Lay is poised to roll out new labeling this week on a host of snacks -- including Lay's,...

Weekly Forecast

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News Headline: New Solar Array to Power Kent State Field House (Tom Euclide, Misbrener) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Today's Energy Solutions
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Home News New Solar Array to Power Kent State Field House

Finance - State, Wind/Solar Energy, Industry News

Covering almost one acre of roof area, this installation is believed to be the largest roof-mounted system among Ohio's public universities.

Manufacturing Group May 25, 2012

Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, is installing 1,716 solar panels on the Kent State Field House. Covering almost one acre of roof area, this installation is believed to be the largest roof-mounted system among Ohio's public universities. Scheduled to be completed in July, it is the first renewable energy project for Kent State, and is being completed by Third Sun Solar of Athens, Ohio.

The solar array will generate about 500,000 kilowatt hours of clean electricity per year – about one-third of the annual consumption of both the Field House and Dix Stadium, or enough to power about 50 average homes. The project will eliminate an average of 779,000 pounds of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per year, which is roughly equivalent to removing 70 cars from the road per year.

“We have been searching for funding opportunities to install solar panels on this roof for many years, and it is great to see the installation underway,” says Tom Euclide, Kent State's associate vice president for Facilities Planning and Operations. “The benefits of adding this renewable energy source to our campus energy portfolio will not only help keep our costs lower for decades to come, but will also provide a visual reminder of Kent State's leadership in sustainability, energy conservation, and the use of renewable energy.”

“Facilitating the installation of energy-saving technologies—and now, renewable solar energy systems—is extremely satisfying,” said Robert Misbrener, project manager, sustainability, energy conservation, commissioning in the Office of the University Architect at Kent State. “The true goal is to demonstrate our stewardship of the environment and empower generations of students to carry that mission to the world.”

Kent State does not initially own the solar panel system, but will purchase all of the electricity produced by the system, while retaining the option to purchase the system after seven years. Some larger system components are being included to allow for the potential expansion of the Kent State Field House facility.

“Potentially, the sun's energy can fulfill all of the world's power needs many times over,” Misbrener says. “Sunlight contains energy that can be turned into electrical current, which can be harnessed for power. There are no harmful emissions from the sun as an energy source; it won't run out, and best of all, it's free.”

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News Headline: Data on Blood Pressure Discussed by Researchers at Kent State University | Email

News Date: 05/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Drug Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Investigators discuss in "Current perspectives on the use of meditation to reduce blood pressure" new findings in Blood Pressure. According to the authors of recent research from Kent, Ohio, "Meditation techniques are increasingly popular practices that may be useful in preventing or reducing elevated blood pressure. We reviewed landmark studies and recent literature concerning the use of meditation for reducing blood pressure in pre-hypertensive and hypertensive individuals."

"We sought to highlight underlying assumptions, identify strengths and weaknesses of the research, and suggest avenues for further research, reporting of results, and dissemination of findings. Meditation techniques appear to produce small yet meaningful reductions in blood pressure either as monotherapy or in conjunction with traditional pharmacotherapy. Transcendental meditation and mindfulness-based stress reduction may produce clinically significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressure," wrote C.M. Goldstein and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "More randomized clinical trials are necessary before strong recommendations regarding the use of meditation for high BP can be made."

Goldstein and colleagues published their study in International Journal of Hypertension (Current perspectives on the use of meditation to reduce blood pressure. International Journal of Hypertension, 2012;2012():578397).

For additional information, contact C.M. Goldstein, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Copyright © 2012 Drug Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: 19 Action News First at Four | Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: 19 Action News at 4 PM - WOIO-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >>> Good thursday afternoon. We do have some issues out there, starting with an accident. This is at 77 south at fleet avenue. That could absolutely slow you down. Everybody is trying to get out of town now, expect delays there until they get that cleaned up and slow on 480 east and due to that water main break from a couple days ago, brecksville road down to one lane and that could slow you down, as well. Here's 71 at 480. You could see traffic looking pretty good there. Those tail lights moving south on 771 and 480 in the foreground and near 77 and 480 near independence, looking good right now, it might get slow very soon. Ashley johncola, 19 action news. >>> A consumer alert for buckeyes and those who want to be one. Ohio state wants to charge you more money. A plan has just been announced to raise tuition fees? How much? 3.2% for all undergrads this fall. That's an increase of more than $300. A vote on the tuition hike is expected next month. >>> And big changes may be coming to kent state. Ken deroos is at the big board with those details. >> Kent state administrators were hopish to live on until june 6th but we have gotten a few of the details. We're talking about a $170 million plan for new construction and renovation there at kent state. Here's a bit of it. $45 million for a brand-new college of architecture and environmental design. $10 million for a new college of technology and then $64 million in renovations to cunningham, smith and williams halls and then $25 million in renovations to the school of art. How are they going to pay for this? Well, with $170 million worth of bonds, but very interesting something quentkent state has voted in. What they're calling a course overload fee to the students. Any student who takes over 17 semester hours a semester, $440 per credit hour. Very interesting move. You have a lot of ambitious kids that are trying to graduate early or graduate on time. They're going to be penalized with 44$440 in fees, which is very interesting. >> How hot was it today? >> It was so hot I was downtown and I actually found, because I was looking for a parking place in the shade and those are rare on days like this. At a meter, nothing illegal here. >> I got it. You know, it's hot when you stick to the seats and everything. >> There you go. Jeff, you want to get us out of here. This is our attempt to get to weather. >> Sticking to the seats, yeah, that's not good. You know, this has been the warmest it's been downtown in a while because remember we had lake breezes the last few days and no lake breeze today. In fact, this evening, south wind 13 to 18 knots out there on the lake and that stiff south wind and that's what led to temperatures well in the 80s today. We'll still be at 83 at 7:00. Note the word isolated storm here this evening. Right now we have nothing on radar but one cad could pop up and midnight, 72. Pretty breezy 10 to 12 12-mile-per-hour wind, but it's out of the south. Here's what I'm talking about. Dry right now but you head down here towards pittsburgh and west virginia, a little disturbance that has been out to the east of us all week long. We do have a few storms here. We'll see if a couple of these guys sneak up here, but whenever we say isolated, that means small chance. That means most of us will stay dry, but we threw it in there. Tomorrow, 84 and that's with a weak front coming through. Saturday we're at 87. There will be some isolated storms in there, as well. We just continue to heat up right through the weekend. So, there's your 84. Small chance of a storm. There's going to be a wind shift, south to northwest. So, that's the front coming through. Akron/canton, isolated storms for you tomorrow and 86 the high. Now, the risk of storms, even though it's small, pretty much with us all day and same deal on saturday. More of a mostly cloudy sky. Unbelievable. 87 on saturday and 90 on sunday and 92 on memorial day and we could be coming close to some records there on memorial day. Best threat of rain and storms on this seven-day is actually tuesday with a stronger front that comes through and then we turn cooler and drier midweek. >> Am I missing things. Wasn't it supposed to be nice on sunday, or was it always kind of rainy? >> Small chance of a storm. If you like it like that. >> Yeah. >> All right.

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News Headline: Local news briefs -- May 25 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Portage County
Vet memorial
KENT: Local artists, architects and city planners are invited to participate in a design competition for the building of the new Kent Gateway Veterans Memorial.
The Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority (PARTA), city of Kent and Kent State University have organized the contest in search of someone to be the “designer of record” in an effort to design, fabricate and install a $100,000 memorial.
The project will be along Haymaker Parkway (state Route 59) and adjacent to the PARTA Kent Central Gateway Multi-Modal facility under construction.
Contestants are asked to submit images of past work and their resumes.
The memorial is a joint project of PARTA, the city of Kent and Kent State University.
For more information about the memorial plans, visit http://www.kentcentralgateway.com/VetsMemorial.html.

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News Headline: PARTA seeks artisans for Kent vets memorial | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jobs

Autos

MarketplaceOhio

DiscountGuru

By Mike Sever | Staff Writer

The Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority is making a call for qualified artists, architects, landscape architects, city planners and others interested in designing a veterans' memorial at the Kent Gateway transit center.

PARTA is asking those interested to submit images of past work and their resumes as evidence of their qualifications to be chosen as the "designer of record' for the memorial.

Bryan Smith, project director for PARTA, said the only requirement for the memorial is that include an American flag and markers for each of the service branches. The memorial is to honor past, present, fallen and POW-MIA veterans from all service branches of the U.S. military.

The memorial is a joint project of PARTA, the City of Kent and Kent State University. A budget of $100,000 has been set to fund the design, fabrication and installation of the memorial.

The project is to be located on city property along Haymaker Parkway (S.R. 59), adjacent to the PARTA Kent Central Gateway Multimodal facility.

For more information, visit the Kent Central Gateway website and click on the Veterans Memorial link for details.

More information is available on the Ohio Arts Council website .

PARTA is Portage County's public transportation provider, with fixed route and door to door service throughout the region. PARTA was founded more than 36 years ago and provided 1.6 million passenger trips in 2011.

For more information about PARTA, visit www.partaonline.org , or call 330-678-7745.

Email: msever@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-298-1125

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News Headline: COST OF COLLEGE OSU tuition about to go up, but so is financial aid | Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Pyle, Encarnacion
News OCR Text: Ohio State wants to raise tuition and fees this fall for in-state undergraduate students by $312 per year, under a proposal released yesterday.

But the university hopes to offset some of the cost by expanding student financial aid.

Tuition for Columbus campus undergraduates would increase by 3.5 percent, effective with the fall semester. However, mandatory fees would be frozen for a second straight year, which would result in an overall increase of 3.2 percent over current rates.

Last year, OSU increased tuition and fees by a total of 3.3 percent. This hike would push the annual cost for the 2012-13 school year to $10,036, including $9,615 in tuition and $421 in mandatory fees.

Graduate and out-of-state tuition at Ohio State also would increase by 3.5 percent.

The Ohio State Board of Trustees is expected to vote on the recommendation at its meeting on June 22.

"We remain committed to keeping costs affordable for students without sacrificing quality," said Joseph A. Alutto, OSU's executive vice president and provost. "However, we need these funds to maintain the quality of our academic programs."

Under the current two-year state budget, public colleges and universities are allowed to raise undergraduate tuition and mandatory fees by up to 3.5 percent.

Many schools plan to raise tuition to the limit.

Miami University, for example, will remain the most-expensive public college in Ohio with a 3.5 percent increase in the fall for a total cost of $13,067. Ohio University also will raise costs by 3.5 percent, pushing the school's sticker price to $10,281.

Ohio State officials hope to cushion some of the blow by increasing financial aid.

In April, the university announced that it was increasing student aid by $50 million over the next four years to help attract the brightest students and to make sure that prospective enrollees aren't deterred by a lack of money.

As part of that initiative, Ohio State has created a new "Eminence Scholars" program that will provide four-year, full-ride scholarships, plus a $3,000 stipend for research, to 31 high-achieving students.

OSU also will increase its need-based "Scarlet and Gray" grants from $3,000 to $4,000 and increase the number of students receiving them by a third -- to 7,800 -- next fall. The additional money will allow the university to consider children from families with higher incomes than in the past.

The school also is exploring other options to help students afford an education.

Even with an increase, Ohio State would remain a good value, said Geoffrey Chatas, OSU's senior vice president for business and finance.

In the past five years, OSU has held tuition increases to an average of 2.4 percent annually, Chatas said. The Big Ten and other large public universities to which Ohio State compares itself have increased costs by an average of 4.7 percent during those same years.

Ohio State still expects to have the second-lowest cost among the six Ohio public universities with selective admissions because most of the other schools are raising their prices, too, he said. Only Kent State costs less.

But many advocates said that Ohio historically has been a high-tuition state. Since 2002, tuition at Ohio State has increased by nearly 60 percent.

"It might not sound like that big of an increase, but it quickly adds up," said Shonda Davis, whose 18-year-old daughter will attend Ohio State in the fall. "College debt is the next ticking time bomb."

epyle@dispatch.com

@EncarnitaPyle

Copyright © 2012 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH and may not be republished without permission.

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News Headline: OSU tuition about to go up, but so is financial aid | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OSU tuition about to go up, but so is financial aid

Encarnacion Pyle

May 24, 2012 (The Columbus Dispatch - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) --

Ohio State wants to raise tuition and fees this fall for in-state undergraduate students by $312 per year, under a proposal released yesterday.

But the university hopes to offset some of the cost by expanding student financial aid.

Tuition for Columbus campus undergraduates would increase by 3.5 percent, effective with the fall semester. However, mandatory fees would be frozen for a second straight year, which would result in an overall increase of 3.2 percent over current rates.

Last year, OSU increased tuition and fees by a total of 3.3 percent. This hike would push the annual cost for the 2012-13 school year to $10,036, including $9,615 in tuition and $421 in mandatory fees.

Graduate and out-of-state tuition at Ohio State also would increase by 3.5 percent.

The Ohio State Board of Trustees is expected to vote on the recommendation at its meeting on June 22.

"We remain committed to keeping costs affordable for students without sacrificing quality," said Joseph A. Alutto, OSU's executive vice president and provost. "However, we need these funds to maintain the quality of our academic programs."

Under the current two-year state budget, public colleges and universities are allowed to raise undergraduate tuition and mandatory fees by up to 3.5 percent.

Many schools plan to raise tuition to the limit.

Miami University, for example, will remain the most-expensive public college in Ohio with a 3.5 percent increase in the fall for a total cost of $13,067. Ohio University also will raise costs by 3.5 percent, pushing the school's sticker price to $10,281.

Ohio State officials hope to cushion some of the blow by increasing financial aid.

In April, the university announced that it was increasing student aid by $50 million over the next four years to help attract the brightest students and to make sure that prospective enrollees aren't deterred by a lack of money.

As part of that initiative, Ohio State has created a new "Eminence Scholars" program that will provide four-year, full-ride scholarships, plus a $3,000 stipend for research, to 31 high-achieving students.

OSU also will increase its need-based "Scarlet and Gray" grants from $3,000 to $4,000 and increase the number of students receiving them by a third -- to 7,800 -- next fall. The additional money will allow the university to consider children from families with higher incomes than in the past. The school also is exploring other options to help students afford an education.

Even with an increase, Ohio State would remain a good value, said Geoffrey Chatas, OSU's senior vice president for business and finance.

In the past five years, OSU has held tuition increases to an average of 2.4 percent annually, Chatas said. The Big Ten and other large public universities to which Ohio State compares itself have increased costs by an average of 4.7 percent during those same years.

Ohio State still expects to have the second-lowest cost among the six Ohio public universities with selective admissions because most of the other schools are raising their prices, too, he said. Only Kent State costs less.

But many advocates said that Ohio historically has been a high-tuition state. Since 2002, tuition at Ohio State has increased by nearly 60 percent.

"It might not sound like that big of an increase, but it quickly adds up," said Shonda Davis, whose 18-year-old daughter will attend Ohio State in the fall. "College debt is the next ticking time bomb."

epyle@dispatch.com

@EncarnitaPyle



___ (c)2012 The Columbus Dispatch (Columbus, Ohio) Visit The Columbus Dispatch

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Copyright (C) 2012, The Columbus Dispatch, Ohio

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News Headline: Mayor Jackson s education plan does not get legislative approval but deal is made to pass it soon | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mayor Jackson's education plan does not get legislative approval but deal is made to pass it soon

Published: Thursday, May 24, 2012, 10:05 PM Updated: Thursday, May 24, 2012, 10:08 PM

By Joe Guillen, The Plain Dealer

The Plain Dealer

Follow

Joshua Gunter, The Plain Dealer Mayor Frank Jackson, right, was still in talks with officials as they try to reach an agreement on Jackson's plans to reform the city school district.

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Mayor Frank Jackson did not get final approval from state lawmakers on his education reform plan, but they struck a deal late Thursday that it would be passed soon.

Jackson was adamant he wanted his sweeping plan to pass Thursday so he could move ahead with a school tax campaign. Raising property taxes would help offset the school district's projected budget deficit.

Lawmakers in both chambers did not vote on his plan, but they could by as early as next week, or put it off until mid-June. Jackson's plan first must clear the House before moving to the Senate.

Sen. Nina Turner, a Cleveland Democrat who supports Jackson's plan, said the delay would make passing the levy more difficult. The levy has a greater chance of success if Jackson can show voters he is committed to turning schools around with his reform plan, she said.

"We need all the time we can get in Cleveland to get the buy-in from the community," Turner said. "Every minute, every second counts."

While the Cleveland schools reform plan stalled, an energy bill that deals with shale gas production and a bill that updates the state's gambling laws were among several bills that lawmakers adopted Thursday.

Jackson's plan had stalled earlier this week due to opposition from charter-school advocates with Republican allies. The mayor was in Columbus Thursday and he appeared to be making progress, but it was unclear if his plan was compromised to satisfy opponents.

"We're trying to get an agreement in principle," said Rep. Ron Amstutz, a Republican from Wooster who is involved in the negotiations. "We're focused on it, there's pressure. The right people are talking, but they're not done talking."

Jackson was unavailable to comment late Thursday because negotiations were ongoing.

The holdup has revolved around a panel Jackson proposed with oversight over charter schools in Cleveland. The panel, known as the Transformation Alliance, would decide whether to approve charter school sponsors -- the people or groups who want to open a school in the Cleveland school district.

Charter school advocates have been trying to weaken the alliance.

Jackson's plan deals with a wide range of education topics, including teacher contracts and salaries, teacher evaluations, layoff procedures and a tax levy structure that would allow charter schools to receive a portion of the levy money. The proposal before lawmakers would affect only the Cleveland school district.

The plan has the support of the Cleveland Teachers Union, the business community and some charter school groups. Jackson has said the plan must be approved by lawmakers if the levy is to succeed.

The Cleveland school board has not discussed publicly the amount of the tax increase it will seek, but is tentatively scheduled to take the two votes it needs at its June 12 and 26 meetings.

School district chief Eric Gordon has left open the possibility of a construction bond being part of any tax request. The board must vote by July 9 for any bond issue to be on the November ballot and by Aug. 9 for an operating tax, Gordon said.

Jackson's plan had stalled earlier this week due to opposition from charter-school advocates with Republican allies. The mayor was in Columbus Thursday and he appeared to be making progress, but it was unclear if his plan was compromised to satisfy opponents.

"We're trying to get an agreement in principle," said Rep. Ron Amstutz, a Republican from Wooster who is involved in the negotiations. "We're focused on it, there's pressure. The right people are talking, but they're not done talking."

Jackson was unavailable to comment late Thursday because negotiations were ongoing.

The holdup has revolved around a panel Jackson proposed with oversight over charter schools in Cleveland. The panel, known as the Transformation Alliance, would decide whether to approve charter school sponsors -- the people or groups who want to open a school in the Cleveland school district.

Charter school advocates have been trying to weaken the alliance.

Jackson's plan deals with a wide range of education topics, including teacher contracts and salaries, teacher evaluations, layoff procedures and a tax levy structure that would allow charter schools to receive a portion of the levy money. The proposal before lawmakers would affect only the Cleveland school district.

The plan has the support of the Cleveland Teachers Union, the business community and some charter school groups. Jackson has said the plan must be approved by lawmakers if the levy is to succeed.

The Cleveland school board has not discussed publicly the amount of the tax increase it will seek, but is tentatively scheduled to take the two votes it needs at its June 12 and 26 meetings.

School district chief Eric Gordon has left open the possibility of a construction bond being part of any tax request. The board must vote by July 9 for any bond issue to be on the November ballot and by Aug. 9 for an operating tax, Gordon said.

Meanwhile, new regulations for the oil and gas industry in Ohio are heading to Gov. John Kasich's desk today.

An excited Kasich issued a statement praising lawmakers for bipartisan support of the legislation his administration initiated months ago.

"We've accomplished something truly unprecedented. We'll be better stewards of our environment because of it, and our kids and grandkids will thank us for it," he said.

The House approved the measure in a 79-to-19 bipartisan vote that followed several hours of partisan battling as Democrats tried to add what they saw as stronger environmental rules and consumer-friendly measures.

The law will require companies to disclose chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing and during part of the drilling and to identify proprietary, or "trade secret" formulas to doctors treating injured well workers.

Gas producers will have to take well water samples within 1,500 feet of a proposed horizontal well and include the test results in permit applications, compared to the present 300 feet. The state will retest wells later if there are complaints. In the past, rural wells were not tested.

The Republican majority tabled 9 of 10 proffered amendments, including one requiring drillers to identify the country of origin of the pipe used in wells and pipelines, one requiring that 60 percent of gas workers be Ohio residents, another requiring drillers of proposed injection wells to notify local officials, and requiring companies drilling gas wells to submit to arbitration if they were unable to negotiate a road maintenance agreement with local governments.

One major change to a section about renewable energy approved in the closing minutes of the debate required a second vote in the Senate later in the evening.

That amendment allows only two universities -- Kent State University and the University of Cincinnati to classify their campus heating and power plants as "renewable energy" even though they burn natural gas.

An earlier Senate version would have encouraged all of the state universities and colleges to build such plants, partially financing them with "renewable energy credits" electric utilities must buy if they don't use wind and solar on their own. Wind farm developers, who also count on the credits for financing, said the measure would stop development.

Tom Stewart, executive director of the Ohio Oil and Gas Association, lawmakers had improved on Kasich's original proposal.

He dismissed environmental opponents as "anti-development," saying their allegations "were based on fantasy."

Kari Matsko, director of the People's Oil & Gas Collaborative _Ohio and a former review team member for the State Review of Oil and Natural Gas Environmental Regulations, said the law will diminish property rights.

"The most troubling part of (the bill) is the continued erosion of a citizen's basic property and constitutional rights. Neither a community nor it's leaders will have permission to authorize locations of industrial size drilling units or massive gas compressor and fractionation plants through zoning.," she said.

Plain Dealer Reporter Patrick O'Donnell contributed to this story.

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News Headline: Ohio lawmakers approve new oil and gas well regulations | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio lawmakers approve new oil and gas well regulations

Published: Thursday, May 24, 2012, 9:25 PM Updated: Thursday, May 24, 2012, 9:30 PM

By John Funk, The Plain Dealer

The Plain Dealer

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View full size Gus Chan/Plain Dealer A Chesapeake Energy drilling platform in Carroll County, Ohio

New regulations for the oil and gas industry in Ohio are heading to Gov. John Kasich's desk today.

Lawmakers on Thursday approved a compromise bill that environmentalists immediately criticized and the industry praised despite some of the new rules.

An excited governor issued a statement praising lawmakers for bipartisan support of the legislation his administration initiated months ago.

"We've accomplished something truly unprecedented. We'll be better stewards of our environment because of it, and our kids and grandkids will thank us for it," he said.

The House approved the measure in a 79-to-19 bipartisan vote that followed several hours of partisan battling as Democrats tried to add what they saw as stronger environmental rules and consumer-friendly measures.

When signed, the law will require companies to disclose chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing and during part of the drilling and to identify proprietary, or "trade secret" formulas to doctors treating injured well workers.

The law will require gas producers to take well water samples within 1,500 feet of a proposed horizontal well and include the test results in permit applications, compared to the present 300 feet. The state will retest wells later if there are complaints. In the past, rural wells were not tested.

The Republican majority tabled 9 of 10 proffered amendments, including one requiring drillers to identify the country of origin of the pipe used in wells and pipelines, one requiring that 60 percent of gas workers be Ohio residents, another requiring drillers of proposed injection wells to notify local officials, and requiring companies drilling gas wells to submit to arbitration if they were unable to negotiate a road maintenance agreement with local governments.

One major change to a section about renewable energy approved in the closing minutes of the debate required a second vote the Senate later in the evening.

That amendment allows only two universities -- Kent State University and the University of Cincinnati to classify their campus heating and power plants as "renewable energy" even though they burn natural gas.

An earlier Senate version would have encouraged all of the state universities and colleges to build such plants, partially financing them with "renewable energy credits" electric utilities must buy if they don't use wind and solar on their own. Wind farm developers, who also count on the credits for financing, said the measure would stop development.

Tom Stewart, executive director of the Ohio Oil and Gas Association, lawmakers had improved on Kasich's original proposal.

He dismissed environmental opponents as "anti-development," saying their allegations "were based on fantasy."

Kari Matsko, director of the People's Oil & Gas Collaborative -Ohio and a former review team member for the State Review of Oil and Natural Gas Environmental Regulations , said the law will diminish basic property rights.

"The most troubling part of (the bill) is the continued erosion of a citizen's basic property and constitutional rights. Neither a community nor it's leaders will have permission to authorize locations of industrial size drilling units or massive gas compressor and fractionation plants through zoning.," she said.

Related topics: kasich , shale gas

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News Headline: Breaking: Emerald Ash Borer Found on Kent State Campus (White) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Emerald Ash Borer Found on Kent State Campus

Tree-killing beetle found on campus is first confirmed infestation in Kent

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The Emerald Ash Borer. U.S. Department of Agriculture

Credit U.S. Department of Agriculture

http://kent.patch.com/articles/ash-borer-found-on-kent-state-campus/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1337866983

Trees infested with the Emerald Ash Borer were found and removed on the Kent State University campus this week.

Kent City Arborist Gerald Shanley said the discovery on campus is the first confirmed infestation of the borer in the city of Kent.

"Even though Kent State has found an infestation it doesn't mean all our trees are going to start falling over," Shanley said. "It's very manageable right now. What it means to me is we're going to start seeing a decline in our ash trees over the next several years."

The borer is a shiny green beetle about the size of a thumbnail. The beetles, originally from Asia, lay eggs in ash trees that hatch and feed on the trees, eventually destroying its means of dispersing water and nutrients throughout the tree.

The bug has proven deadly to thousands of ash trees as it's marched from Michigan, across the Midwest and through Ohio in the past decade. The beetle was first found in Ohio in 2003.

Heather White, manager for university facilities management at Kent State, said they found the borer Tuesday in multiple ash trees on campus.

"The largest concentration of trees was at Taylor (Hall) Parking lot, where five were removed," she said.

White said all trees on campus that were found with an ash borer infestation have since been removed.

Prior to this week, there was at least one confirmed infestation in Portage County and several in Summit County. The entire state has been quarantined by the United States Department of Agriculture, making it illegal to transport ash trees, parts of ash trees and all hardwood firewood out of Ohio, according to the Ohio Department of Agriculture's website.

Last spring, the city received $37,500 from the state to remove and replace ash trees as part of a pre-emptive measure against the emerald ash borer.

Shanley said the city was able to remove and replace 228 ash trees in the city's public right of way with non-host trees. There are less than 100 ash trees left in city right-of-ways now, but the number of ash trees in city parks and on private property could still number in the thousands.

He recommends residents continue doing what they've been doing: calling him to confirm if they have an ash tree and if it has signs of infestation.

"What I recommend to residents is, if it's not infected, start a treatment program as soon as possible or plan on having it removed," Shanley said. "If it's a large tree, that's going to cost a lot of money, so they should start thinking about it over the next year or two."

Shanley said he'll continue working with Kent's Shade Tree Commission and The Davey Tree Expert Company to educate the public, identify ash trees and replace them when possible.

"We've known about this since 2003," he said. "We've known it was coming."

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