Report Overview:
Total Clips (40)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Town-Gown (2)
Anthropology (2)
Art, School of (2)
Athletics (10)
College of Education, Health and Human Services; Educational Technology, Research Center for (RCET) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at E. Liverpool (4)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Office of the University Architect; Sustainability; University Facilities Management (2)
Political Science (2)
Psychology (4)
Student Involvement, Center for; Town-Gown (1)
Town-Gown (1)
University Facilities Management (1)
University Libraries (1)
University Press (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Town-Gown (2)
Fitness event honors slain soldier 05/29/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Family marks anniversary of Kent soldier Adam Hamilton's death 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Anthropology (2)
Study traces origins of monogamous coupling 05/28/2012 Los Angeles Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...sexual revolution for our species happened much, much earlier - probably several million years earlier." Owen Lovejoy, a biological anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio, said the paper fits with his own thoughts on the evolution of monogamy. Lovejoy, who edited Gavrilets' paper, said...

Research delves into how we arrived at monogamy 05/29/2012 Chicago Tribune Text Email

...formation of pair bonds," Gavrilets said. Pair-bonding ultimately swept through almost the entire group. Owen Lovejoy, a biological anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio, said the paper fits with his thoughts on the evolution of monogamy. Lovejoy, who edited Gavrilets' paper, said...


Art, School of (2)
Gouache master creates delicate, vibrant paintings (Turner) 05/27/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...stepchild" of watercolor. But it's a medium that in Lazzaro's hands seems to be astoundingly adroit and subtle, even on occasion delicate. An alumnus of Kent State University, his work is on view through June 16 in the KSU School of Art's Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., Kent, as part of Gallery...

Richard Lazzaro 05/27/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Show: Richard Lazzaro: Far East to West, A Series of Gouache Works When: Through June 16 Where: Kent State University School of Art Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., Kent Hours: Noon to 5 p.m. Wednesdays-Fridays; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays...


Athletics (10)
Avon's Josh Pierce helps Kent State win fourth straight Mid-American Conference baseball title (Stricklin) 05/29/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State coach pushes team toward World Series (Stricklin) 05/29/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

On the record - May 26 05/29/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

MAC Tournament baseball/Kent State 3, Central Michigan 1: Golden Flashes win fourth consecutive MAC title, earn spot in NCAA Tournament (Stricklin) 05/29/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Balanced and experienced, KSU golf is ready for the NCAA Championship (Page) 05/29/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KSU Baseball headed to NCAA Championship Regionals as No. 3 seed seeking a national identity (Stricklin) 05/29/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball captures fourth straight MAC championship (Stricklin) 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball team earns No. 3 seed at Gary Regional 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

KSU men's golf team tees off today alongside nation's best at NCAA Championship (Page) 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State will face Kentucky in NCAA Regionals on Friday 05/29/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email


College of Education, Health and Human Services; Educational Technology, Research Center for (RCET) (1)
KSU using Lego Robotics to promote STEM learning (Kratcoski) 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Ravenna to pay Kent State for advice on spending health funds 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum (1)
Our View: $1 million gift to Kent State Museum continues legacy of generosity 05/26/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The generosity of Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman provided Kent State University with the nucleus for a world-class collection of fashion and art more than 25 years ago. The Kent State University...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Kent State professor from Hudson completes record-making flight in nine days (Murray) 05/27/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...flight which took him to each of Ohio's 88 counties while logging in 1,809 miles. The pilot, Joe Murray, a Hudson resident and journalism professor at Kent State University, set the record by being "the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all counties of...

Hudson professor's airplane flight lands him in 88 Ohio counties, record books (Murray) 05/25/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

...flight which took him to each of Ohio's 88 counties while logging in 1,809 miles. The pilot, Joe Murray, a Hudson resident and journalism professor at Kent State University, set the record by being “the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all counties of...


KSU at E. Liverpool (4)
Twenty under 40! Kirt Conrad 05/29/2012 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

Mural design approved 05/28/2012 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...water-based paint on the mural, which will depict several area scenes, including the Jennings Randolph Bridge, Carnegie Public Library, the Alumni Clock Tower, Kent State University's logo, two bottleneck kilns, the world's largest teapot, two river boats, the Boy with the Boot statue, a locomotive, the YMCA,...

Mural design approved 05/27/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...water-based paint on the mural, which will depict several area scenes, including the Jennings Randolph Bridge, Carnegie Public Library, the Alumni Clock Tower, Kent State University's logo, two bottleneck kilns, the world's largest teapot, two river boats, the Boy with the Boot statue, a locomotive, the YMCA,...

Mural design approved 05/28/2012 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...water-based paint on the mural, which will depict several area scenes, including the Jennings Randolph Bridge, Carnegie Public Library, the Alumni Clock Tower, Kent State University's logo, two bottleneck kilns, the world's largest teapot, two river boats, the Boy with the Boot statue, a locomotive, the YMCA,...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Streetsboro Library plans summer programs 05/26/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...stories, games, crafts, and perhaps reader's theaters or puppet shows. Each child is asked to read at least 15 minutes a day between weekly meetings. The Kent State University Trumbull Summer Stock Theater will present a play at the July 3 meeting. Also, balloon storyteller Tess Shimko will present...


Office of the University Architect; Sustainability; University Facilities Management (2)
Higher Education 05/29/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

New Solar Array to Power Kent State Field House (Euclide, Misbrener) 05/29/2012 Today's Energy Solutions Text Attachment Email


Political Science (2)
Islamist casts himself as God's candidate in Egypt poll (Stacher) 05/25/2012 Gulf News - Online Text Attachment Email

...more conservative interpretation of the Muslim Brotherhood which now dominates” said Joshua Stacher, an assistant professor of Middle East studies at Kent State University. Born in the Nile River Delta, Mursi, who is 60, received a doctorate in engineering from the University of Southern California....

Egyptian military, Islamists claim slots in runoff (Stacher) 05/29/2012 Tribune-Review Text Attachment Email


Psychology (4)
Akron Children's, Kent State team up to explore anxiety disorders in kids 05/27/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

AKRON -- Akron Children's Hospital and Kent State University are collaborating on a study investigating risk factors and treatment for children with anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder...

Kent State and Akron Children's Hospital study childhood anxiety (Flessner) 05/29/2012 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Kent State study shows emotional impact of accusations of acting white (Neal-Barnett) 05/29/2012 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

How surroundings affect diet (Gunstad) 05/28/2012 Storm Lake Pilot-Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...people use their senses while eating can includence how we eat and how much we consume, according to Dr. John Gunstad, associate professor of psychology at Kent State University. "Things like music, bright lights, color and food texture have a strong influence on our eating habits," Gunstad explains....


Student Involvement, Center for; Town-Gown (1)
'A Spring Fling' gets connected with Contra Dance 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (1)
OUR VIEW Market for housing in Kent merits closer look 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Facilities Management (1)
OUR VIEW Kent State outlines blueprint for future 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Libraries (1)
Twin highrise would have been tallest in Portage 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Press (2)
'Jim Tully' biography earning accolades 05/29/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Community leaders mark Right to Read Week in Kent 05/26/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Free Library children's librarian), and standing, Dennis Goodhart (Ohio Highway Patrol and parent of former student), Will Underwood (director of the Kent State University Press), Mike Stabilla (St. Patrick Church deacon and parent of former student), Eric Davis (Tallmadge Fire Department and parent),...


News Headline: Fitness event honors slain soldier | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Today is the first anniversary of the day David Cruz lost a brother and gained a family.
It's a bittersweet observance, said Cruz, 26, of Kansas, who was in Kent Sunday for the sole purpose of participating in the second “Hammy” fitness event to honor his “brother-in-arms,” Kent native Adam S. Hamilton, who died in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, on May 28, 2011.
“That was probably the worst day of my life,” said Cruz, as he reminisced about the man who became his best friend while they were stationed at Fort Riley in Kansas. The men were sent to Afghanistan together in 2011 as part of a search team to round up the Taliban and push them out of the country, Cruz said.
To honor Hamilton, local gym and fitness center SPC CrossFit hosted “The Hammy,” a workout at Kent State University's Dix Stadium. Toby Jurging, owner of the gym that was an integral part of Hamilton's life before he joined the service, was sponsor for the event, which tested participants against themselves in Sunday's blistering heat. The grueling course featured exercises that Hamilton liked to do, such as pushups, sit-ups and two 1,000-meter runs, Jurging said.
Jurging, a teacher at Kent Roosevelt High School, where Hamilton was a 10-time letter winner, said the Hammy's youngest participant was in middle school and the oldest was nearly 60.
“This is how we honor our friends. We sweat and push ourselves to honor them,” Jurging said.
On May 27, 2011, Hamilton visited with Cruz in Afghanistan to say goodbye before he left for an air assault. It was the last time the two spoke.
“I just wanted to tell you that I love you and will see you in a few days,” Cruz remembered his friend saying.
The next day, Army Spc. Adam Hamilton, 4th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, 159th Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne Division, known by friends for his humor and hilarious antics, was killed when he stepped on an explosive device.
While waiting for his “heat” to begin Sunday in Kent, Cruz put his arm around Nancy Krestan, Hamilton's mother, and introduced her as his “other mother.” In turn, Krestan hugged Cruz and called him “her other son.”
She looked around the field in amazement at the number of participants.
“This is exactly what he would have wanted,” Krestan said.
Hamilton's father, Scott Hamilton, said about 250 people, including six of his son's fellow soldiers from Fort Riley, traveled to Kent for the event. Most of the men and women who participated walked up to shake Scott Hamilton's hand at some point. If he didn't know them, he greeted them, introduced himself and thanked them for participating.
“Adam had a knack of making every single person he met his best friend,” Scott Hamilton said.
His son chose the path he took in his short life as a willing participant, he said.
After graduating from Kent Roosevelt in 2007, Adam Hamilton went to college in Maryland.
“He called me and said, ‘Dad, this isn't for me. I have to join the ultimate team,' the United States Army,” Scott Hamilton said. “It truly was his calling.”
Scott Hamilton said it was with the deepest humility that he had the opportunity to help organize the event.
“I walk this Earth with pride and honor, and I just want to give back, like Adam did,” he said.
Proceeds from the event will benefit the Adam S. Hamilton Memorial Academic & Athletic Scholarship Fund. Donations may be made to 11783 Timber Pointe Trail, Mantua, OH 44255.

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News Headline: Family marks anniversary of Kent soldier Adam Hamilton's death | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scott Hamilton was surprised when he opened his door in Kent one recent day to find a man standing there with a $3,000 check.

The man was donating the money to a scholarship fund honoring Scott Hamilton's son, U.S. Army Spc. Adam Hamilton, who was killed in action in Afghanistan last year.

The monetary amount was a surprise, but the sentiment wasn't. Even in death, his father said, Adam Hamilton has brought out the best in others.

“People we don't even know from out of state send $50, $200 checks,” Scott Hamilton said. “It's truly something.”

Golf outings, dinners, car washes, a cornhole tournament and contributions from many individual donors recently enabled one boy and one girl from Theodore Roosevelt High School in Kent to receive $10,000 each from the Adam Hamilton Memorial Academic and Athletic Scholarship Fund. The awards were handed out to the students last week, Scott Hamilton said.

Adam Hamilton was only 22 when a bomb explosion took his life on May 28, 2011. A 2007 graduate of Roosevelt High School where he was a triple threat standout in football, lacrosse and ice hockey, he was serving as a sniper with his unit of the 1st Infantry Division based out of Fort Riley, Kan. at the time of his death.

Adam Hamilton could have played college sports or gone into business with his father, but his calling instead was to be on “the ultimate team,” Scott Hamilton said.

“He felt that was what he needed to do, so you have to take some pride in that. I don't like the end results but that was what he wanted to do,” he said. “To live in the conditions (soldiers) live in, with not a dime in their pocket, and for him to be happier than me and you is really something.”

Scott Hamilton said he still cries every day. The worst times are the nights when no one else is around and his mind has time to race and think about his son, he said.

“As the weeks and months went past, it just seemed that it's that much tougher and tougher, there's added pressure,” he said. “And Monday is the day, one year past. It seems like only yesterday, but then it seems like it's been five years because it's been so hard.”

Being around other people helps him get through, he said, and he said he was excited for today's “The Hammy” SPC CrossFit event at Kent State University's Dix Stadium, a special workout and benefit for the scholarship fund.

Adam Hamilton is buried at Standing Rock Cemetery in Kent, across the street from his alma mater. The city of Kent will dedicate a portion of North Mantua Street in front of the school in his memory during Monday's Memorial Day parade, with Adam Hamilton's family participating.

Scott Hamilton said it is his duty to never forget the reasons his son died and to remember all the men and women Memorial Day honors.

“They deserve it. Anything the city or state or anybody does to recognize the sacrifice of what they've done is very special,” he said. “They say the only thing worse than death is to be forgotten, so let us never forget.”

Scott Hamilton was in Columbus on Friday, where he met Gov. John Kasich and participated in a wreath laying ceremony honoring Ohio soldiers killed in the past year. He also met other parents who lost children in Iraq and Afghanistan, he said.

“You feel so bad knowing what they're going through,” Scott Hamilton said. “Whether it's from a car accident, illness or military service, your heart goes out them. It's the worst thing you can ever imagine to go through.”

Donations to the scholarship fund may be made at Portage Community Bank branches in Kent and Ravenna. Just seeing how Adam's legacy has touched others helps his father get through the hardest times, he said.

“He's our child, but he had something. It's pretty special, whatever he had,” Scott Hamilton said. “It's a pretty good feeling to know that, basically, Adam taught me how to give because he gave the ultimate.”

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News Headline: Study traces origins of monogamous coupling | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Los Angeles Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The roots of the modern family - monogamous coupling - lie somewhere in our distant evolutionary past, but scientists disagree on how it first evolved.

A new study says we should thank two key players: weak males with inferior fighting chops and the females who opted to be faithful to them.

These mating strategies may "have triggered a key step in the very long process of the evolution of the family," said study author Sergey Gavrilets, a biomathematician at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. "Without it, we wouldn't have the modern family."

The mating structure of humans is strikingly different than that of sexually promiscuous chimps, in which a few alpha males dominate other males in the group and, by dint of their superior fighting prowess, freely mate with the females. Lower-status males are largely shut out from mating opportunities.

In addition, male chimps don't contribute to rearing their young - that is left to the female.

Some scientists believe that ancestors of humans had chimp-like patterns of mating and child-rearing. The transition to pair-bonding was a key step for our big-brained species, because our children take years and much energy to raise to independence. It's hard for a mother to go it alone.

How did the transition take place? It's not a simple question, Gavrilets said.

Dominant, promiscuous males have it good - they don't have to invest in their young because they'll have plenty of offspring regardless, Gavrilets said.

Males that help feed and protect a smaller number of offspring can also be very successful, reproductively speaking - but only if they can be sure who their children really are or if they provide for all the young in a group. Otherwise, the "providers" will be wasting their resources on offspring that are not their own, and there is ample opportunity for some males to cheat and not do their part.

Gavrilets wanted to see how we might have gotten from A to B. In his work published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, he used mathematical models to test factors that scientists believe may have driven the transition to pair-bonding. These include mate-guarding (males hang around the females they've mated with so others cannot mate with them too) and provisioning (males offer food or other resources to a female in return for sexual favors).

His number-crunching found that these factors alone were not enough to move a species away from promiscuity. The models did work, though, with a few adjustments.

First, he stopped assuming that all males would act the same. Instead, he tested what would happen if only the low-ranking males in the group offered food to females in return for mating opportunities. These weaker males had less to lose by switching strategies because they wouldn't get very far through fighting anyway.

The other key change was realizing that these low-ranking males would select faithful females.

"When I factored those things in, then things start to happen with the formation of pair bonds," Gavrilets said. Pair-bonding ultimately swept through almost the entire group.

For all the talk of the free-love 1960s, he added, "people don't realize that the most important sexual revolution for our species happened much, much earlier - probably several million years earlier."

Owen Lovejoy, a biological anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio, said the paper fits with his own thoughts on the evolution of monogamy.

Lovejoy, who edited Gavrilets' paper, said he had theorized for decades that monogamy could be traced to males providing food to females. In a 2009 research paper, he proposed that monogamy was already in place in a 4.4-million-year-old member of the human family, Ardipithecus ramidus, based on such features as a lack of large, slicing canine teeth that would signify a lot of male competition as well as an upright skeleton that would leave arms free to carry food.

But David Buss, an evolutionary psychologist at the University of Texas at Austin and author of "The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human Mating," said that although the paper offered a "plausible" explanation for what may have jump-started monogamy, it hugely simplified human sexual behavior.

Human mating behaviors, for men and women, are quite varied, he said - including not just committed, long-term pairing but a smorgasbord of other strategies such as casual sex, serial monogamy, having a long-term mate with sexual partners on the side, and combinations thereof.

The study also fails to address the possibility that males didn't move straight from promiscuity to monogamy but instead to an intermediate pattern of polygyny - guarding a number of females on a long-term basis, said primatologist Bernard Chapais of the University of Montreal.

Once polygyny was in place, it would have been much easier to move to monogamy without Gavrilets' assumptions about providing food and care, Chapais said.

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News Headline: Research delves into how we arrived at monogamy | Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Chicago Tribune
Contact Name: Mestel, Rosie
News OCR Text: The roots of the modern family -- monogamous coupling -- lie somewhere in our distant evolutionary past, but scientists disagree on how it first evolved.

A new study says we should thank two key players: weak males with inferior fighting chops and the females who opted to be faithful to them.

These mating strategies may "have triggered a key step in the very long process of the evolution of the family," said study author Sergey Gavrilets, a biomathematician at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. "Without it, we wouldn't have the modern family."

The mating structure of humans is strikingly different than that of sexually promiscuous chimps, in which a few alpha males dominate other males in the group and, by dint of their superior fighting prowess, freely mate with the females. Lower-status males are largely shut out of mating opportunities.

In addition, male chimps don't contribute to rearing their young; that is left to the female.

Some scientists believe that ancestors of humans had chimplike patterns of mating and child-rearing. The transition to pair-bonding was a key step for our big-brained species, because our children take years and much energy to raise to independence. It's hard for a mother to go it alone.

How did the transition take place? It's not a simple question, Gavrilets said.

Dominant, promiscuous males have it good -- they don't have to invest in their young because they'll have plenty of offspring regardless, Gavrilets explained.

Males that help feed and protect a smaller number of offspring can also be very successful, reproductively speaking, but only if they can be sure who their children really are or if they provide for all the young in a group. Otherwise, the "providers" will be wasting their resources on offspring that are not their own, and there is ample opportunity for some males to cheat and not do their part.

Gavrilets wanted to see how we might have gotten from A to B. In his work published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, he used mathematical models to test a variety of factors that scientists believe might have driven the transition to pair-bonding. These include mate-guarding (males hang around the females they've mated with so others cannot mate with them too) and provisioning (males offer food or other resources to a female in return for sexual favors).

His number-crunching found that these factors alone were not enough to move a species away from promiscuity. The models did work, though, with a few adjustments.

First, he tested what would happen if only the low-ranking males in the group offer food to females in return for mating opportunities. These weaker males had less to lose by switching strategies because they wouldn't get very far through fighting anyway.

The other key change was realizing that these low-ranking males would select faithful females.

"When I factored those things in, then things start to happen with the formation of pair bonds," Gavrilets said. Pair-bonding ultimately swept through almost the entire group.

Owen Lovejoy, a biological anthropologist at Kent State University in Ohio, said the paper fits with his thoughts on the evolution of monogamy.

Lovejoy, who edited Gavrilets' paper, said he has theorized for decades that monogamy could be traced to males providing food to females. In a 2009 research paper, he proposed that monogamy was already in place in a 4.4-million-year-old member of the human family, Ardipithecus ramidus, based on features such as a lack of large, slicing canine teeth that would signify a lot of male competition as well as an upright skeleton that would leave arms free to carry food.

But David Buss, an evolutionary psychologist at the University of Texas at Austin and author of "The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human Mating," said that although the paper offers a "plausible" explanation for what might have jump-started monogamy, it hugely simplifies human sexual behavior.

Human mating behaviors, for men and women, are quite varied, he said, including not just committed, long-term pairing but a smorgasbord of other strategies, such as casual sex and serial monogamy.

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News Headline: Gouache master creates delicate, vibrant paintings (Turner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Richard Lazzaro's work doesn't reproduce well, especially in a newspaper.

In fact, you can't get a full appreciation of his paintings unless you see them all together, hanging in a gallery.

Since the early 1990s, Lazzaro has worked in gouache, a water-based medium that has occasionally been likened to the "red-headed stepchild" of watercolor.

But it's a medium that in Lazzaro's hands seems to be astoundingly adroit and subtle, even on occasion delicate.

An alumnus of Kent State University, his work is on view through June 16 in the KSU School of Art's Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., Kent, as part of Gallery Director Anderson Turner's homage to the school's alums in celebration of the university's centennial.

"My summer mission now is to bring alums back, and I'm doing that here, out at Eells [at Blossom Music Center] and at the School of Art Gallery," Turner explained.

"This started as part of our 100th anniversary - the university's and the school's - and I've just kept it going. I think we are now 102," he said.

Born in Cleveland in 1937, Lazzaro received his diploma from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 1959. He had been accepted into Yale's graduate school, but the artist he wanted to study with retired, so he went to Europe instead, according to Turner.

On his return to the U.S., he realized that in order to teach, he would need a bachelor of fine arts degree, so he approached then-director of the KSU School of Art, Elmer Novotny, who helped him devise a course of study for that degree.

He got his BFA in 1961 then went on to get his MFA at the University of Illinois in 1963.

He taught drawing and painting at the University of Illinois from 1961 to '63 and from 1963 to 2001 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he is an emeritus professor. He has lived and painted in Mexico, New York City and Europe.

He has been a student of the humanist philosophies of the American Scene School, as well as the Surrealist approaches of the Abstract Expressionists.

His work has evolved with the times, from the upheavals of the 1960s to the laissez-faire attitudes of the 1970s and the return to figuration in the 1980s and 1990s.

In 1969, he had to abandon oil paints because of an exposure to some of its more toxic pigments and solvents. He took up acrylics, but was never quite happy with the medium.

"For me gouache is like oils, in that it blends so nicely over the different surfaces, and it offers back more than you put in," Lazzaro explained.

"Acrylic isn't like that. You don't get information out of acrylics the way you do with oils and gouache. With acrylics you're always having to put stuff back in."

He said he's found a particularly fine gouache product made by Lascaux that comes in jars, not tubes, that has a much nicer consistency and doesn't dry as fast as that in the tubes.

Lazzaro's work at the Downtown Gallery seems to fall into three bodies of work:

• The Ramus Series, which developed from the 1970s into the 1980s, concerns itself with graffiti-like mark making and the strategies of painting, especially as the series made its way through the 1980s. The works featured several moving squiggly strokes of brightly hued color marks painted with brushes in several layers that merged into an overall structure and coalesced into expansive, overall compositions.

• The New York Series of the late 1980s, early 1990s portrayed personal iconography of events and circumstances appropriated from his own experiences - the houses he lived in, his father's tomb, his struggle with destiny, crossroads of his life, loss of friends. In these works he was "working out frustrations of age and the phasing of time that embraces us and carries us to the next state of existence." He sought to present the isolation and simultaneity of disparate images in order to create a sense of time that was neither three-dimensional nor chronological. He used specific, nonspecific and primal signs and gestures to evoke a variety of feelings ranging from joy to mystery and terror, while always alluding to its spiritual foundation.

• The Taiwan Series of the late 1990s evolved from Lazzaro's study of historical Chinese brush painting and the Rationalist Neo-Confucian philosophy of li and ch'i, two fundamental realities taught by Chu Hsi (1130-1200). While li is the unifying force connecting all things, giving them meaning, ch'i is the substance of things serving to differentiate and individualize things, and therefore making them inaccessible to reason, which can understand only uniformities.

The path of wisdom and of morality lies in pursuing li to the utmost, searching for it behind the many manifestations of ch'i. The world then is a well-ordered system governed by the harmonious interaction of li and ch'i. References to mythology are integral elements of these paintings and serve tactile functions as the paintings evolve, and as the language of the works evolves from painting to painting, Lazzaro develops his strategy of composition and color out of each work.

The luminosity and vibrancy of these works belie the poor reputation that historically has burdened the gouache medium.

As we can see from these delicate, yet powerful paintings, the medium is magical in the hands of a master.

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News Headline: Richard Lazzaro | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Show: Richard Lazzaro: Far East to West, A Series of Gouache Works

When: Through June 16

Where: Kent State University School of Art Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., Kent

Hours: Noon to 5 p.m. Wednesdays-Fridays; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays

Information: 330-676-1549 or http://galleries.kent.edu

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News Headline: Avon's Josh Pierce helps Kent State win fourth straight Mid-American Conference baseball title (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AVON, Ohio — Josh Pierce had quite a homecoming celebration Saturday night at All Pro Freight Stadium.

Pierce, an Avon native and freshman pitcher for the Kent State baseball team, came into the Mid-American Conference Tournament championship game with two runners on and no outs in the top of the eighth inning. It was a tight spot, but he got a strikeout and induced a double play to help the Golden Flashes (41-17) earn their fourth straight conference tourney title with a 3-1 win over Central Michigan (34-29).

Pierce got five of the final six outs before freshman Brian Clark collected his fourth save of the season.

"It's a situation I replayed last night five or six times in my head and that was the exact situation," Pierce said. "I wanted to be in, back in my hometown, in front of friends and family. I just wanted to come out there, get an out and go from there and do whatever I could to keep my team in it and put up a zero. It's a great feeling."

Central Michigan pitcher Pat Kaminska called for work to be done on the mound before the bottom of the fourth inning, but the additional time seemed to help Kent State's bats more than the Chippewas' junior hurler.

George Roberts, the MAC Player of the Year, singled to left field. Designated hitter Nick Hamilton followed with a ground-rule double down the left-field line on the next pitch. The switch-hitting Hamilton batted from the left side and hit what looked to be a catchable fly ball, but Central Michigan left fielder William Arnold slowed up as he approached the foul line and let it drop in for a hit.

Hamilton's double put runners on second and third with one out for right fielder T.J. Sutton, who followed with a ground-rule double of his own to right field. Sutton's hit bounced short of the warning track, skipped over the wall and drove in both Roberts and Hamilton.

"Before Nick Hamilton's hit, I was thinking we needed a momentum changer, whether it be an error, a hit-by-pitch, just something to change the momentum," said Kent State coach Scott Stricklin. "With T.J., I was just hoping he hit a ground ball and just get the run because the infield was back. He got a good pitch to hit, barreled it up and I thought it was going to go out of the park. It was just a great hit and a clutch hit by a guy who was really good down the stretch for us."

Kent State's David Starn, who pitched in Wednesday's win over Buffalo and won the MAC Tournament Most Valuable Player Award, came on in relief at the start of the fifth inning and kept the Golden Flashes in front by working out of trouble with one out and a runner on second.

""""

Kent State added an insurance run in the bottom of the sixth.'

"We owed it to our pitchers; they've kept us in it all year," Sutton said of the insurance run. "We have a great pitching staff. Last year's pitching staff was amazing and I think this year's is just as good. We came back and we proved it, 24-3 in the MAC. [They're] just guys that go out there every day and just want to win, guys that work really hard."

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News Headline: Kent State coach pushes team toward World Series (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Kent State baseball coach Scott Stricklin is a man with a plan.

Now in his eighth season at the helm of the Golden Flashes program, Stricklin's goal is to take the team from the ranks of the mid-major programs to the same level reached by Wichita State and Cal State Fullerton.

Cal State Fullerton has won four championships (1979, 1984, 1995 and 2004) and was the runner-up in 1992. The Wichita State Shockers have been a three-time runner-up (1982, 1991 and 1993) and the College World Series champion in 1989. Stricklin wants Kent State to consistently compete for a College World Series berth.

"My vision for the program would be to get where Wichita State was in the mid-'80s, where they were going to Omaha on a regular basis," Stricklin said. "We've got to break through and get to a Super Regional first. That's the biggest thing for us, which is the equivalent of the Sweet 16 in basketball. We were close last year, but for us to be considered a national team, we've got to get to a Super Regional and contend for Omaha."

Last season, the Golden Flashes advanced to the regional final before they fell to Texas.

In the first two games of the 2011 Austin Regional, Kent State defeated Texas State, 4-2, and Texas, 7-5, before dropping its last two contests to the Longhorns.

"People know who we are," Stricklin said. "That's the one thing we said last year. We went to Texas, and Texas, they might not have known much about us when we got there, but when we left, they knew who we were. People around the country know who we are."

Kent State (41-17) will open the Gary (Ind.) Regional against Kentucky (43-16) on Friday at U.S. Steel Field. The tournament is double-elimination.

The Golden Flashes earned the postseason berth with their fourth consecutive Mid-American Conference Tournament championship last Saturday night. Kent State went 4-0, including a 3-1 win over Central Michigan in the championship game. The Flashes have won 17 straight.

"We've played our best baseball the last five weeks of the year," Stricklin said. "After the loss at Central Michigan [April 20], we didn't lose another game in the MAC. We lost one game overall and we're playing really good baseball. We're pitching, we're hitting. We're doing everything good baseball teams need to do, and we're doing it at the right time."

With a 2-1 lead heading into the fifth inning of the MAC championship game, Stricklin pulled starter Ryan Mace for fellow senior David Starn, the 2012 MAC Pitcher of the Year and winner of the team's tournament-opening game against Buffalo.

Mace had allowed one earned run over four innings of work. Starn came in and blanked the Chippewas despite surrendering four walks and striking out just three batters. Starn allowed the leadoff batter to reach in each inning, but none scored.

Starn (10-3) is no stranger to success, or pressure. He has a 1.77 earned run average in 15 starts and 16 appearances this season. He has surrendered just three home runs and 76 total hits in 101 innings. For his career, Starn has struck out a school record 332 batters.

In Kent State's opening win of 2012 at Georgia Tech, Starn did not give up a run in eight innings, struck out nine batters and allowed two walks. He has registered nine or more strikeouts in seven of his starts, including a season-high 12 against Buffalo on April 6.

Stricklin is hoping his ace can duplicate that success this weekend.

"David has stepped up his whole career," Stricklin said. "Since his freshman year, he got the final out in the one win we got in the regional against Cal Poly. Ever since his freshman year, he's been pitching in regionals. He pitched great his sophomore year at UCLA and just didn't get any help behind him. Last year, he pitched very admirably at Texas and came up a little bit short. It's time for him to take the next step. I know he will. He's outstanding in every single way, and it's going to be a great matchup. It should be a great game."

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News Headline: On the record - May 26 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State track team will have four representatives heading to the NCAA Championships.
Penina Acayo qualified Saturday in the triple jump by moving up from 15th to 12th with a personal best of 42 feet, 6¾ inches.
Acayo was the only Golden Flash to qualify for the NCAA Indoor Championships.
Jacklyn Leppelmeier also needed a personal best to move up from 16th to 10th in the women's hammer throw with a toss of 195 feet, 3 inches.
Joining their KSU teammates at the NCAAs will be Sara Oczypok and C.J. Carlisle, both in the women's javelin.
The University of Akron had four members of the men's team competing Saturday at the NCAA East Regional at the University of Florida, but none advanced to the NCAA Championships.
Three of the Zips competed in the pole vault. Joe Wesley and Shawn Light each cleared the bar at 16 feet, 11½ inches to finish 20th and 23rd, respectively. Dan Garrett vaulted 15 feet, 11¾ inches to place 38th.
Nick Banke was 40th in the shot put with a throw of 53 feet, 4¼ inches.
Brittany Funk, the Mid-American Conference champion in the women's hammer throw, was the lone female Zip to compete Saturday, finishing 27th with a best throw of 177 feet, 11 inches.
The lone Zip to move on to the NCAA Championships June 6-9 in Des Moines, Iowa, was Eric Hubbard, who broke his own school record of 207 feet, 4 inches in the hammer throw.
Honor roll
• David Redovian is one of four Baldwin-Wallace baseball players named to the Academic All-Ohio Athletic Conference team.
Redovian, a Copley graduate, was a key member of the Yellow Jackets' starting rotation and has a 3.63 grade-point average. Redovian posted a record of 5-3 with a 5.57 ERA with 45 strikeouts in 51⅔ innings pitched.
• Nicole Spehar, a Notre Dame College senior from Marlington, was named to the first team of the Ohio Independent Championships, a postseason softball tournament of seven schools that are independent for the 2011-12 season.

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News Headline: MAC Tournament baseball/Kent State 3, Central Michigan 1: Golden Flashes win fourth consecutive MAC title, earn spot in NCAA Tournament (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AVON: David Starn had pitched eight shutout innings Wednesday night to help Kent State cruise past Buffalo in the first round of the Mid-American Conference Tournament.
But when Golden Flashes coach Scott Stricklin asked his senior ace before Saturday's championship game whether he was available to pitch that afternoon if need be, Starn didn't hesitate. “I was pretty tired, but I thought I'd be able to come in,” said Starn, the Mid-American Conference Pitcher of the Year who also earned MAC Tournament Most Valuable Player. “I had extra time to warm up and everything, so I treated it like it was a normal start, like it was the first inning.”
So after starter Ryan Mace limited Central Michigan to a run on five hits in the first four innings, Stricklin didn't hesitate to send in Starn.
Starn was effectively wild in shutting out CMU for three scoreless innings on just one hit and four walks, and his gutsy performance was pivotal in Kent State's 3-1 win at All-Pro Freight Stadium.
“I asked David before the game if I needed to put his name up on the chart and he said, ‘Yes, absolutely,' ” Stricklin said. “He wanted to pitch, he wanted the ball.”
With the win, the Flashes (41-17) increase the nation's longest winning streak to 17 games. They also clinched their fourth consecutive MAC title and the conference's automatic bid to the upcoming NCAA Tournament.
Central Michigan scored first when Pat MacKenzie led off the third inning with a single, advanced on a sacrifice bunt and scored on William Arnold's single. After retiring the first two batters he faced the next inning, Mace issued a walk and then gave up a single to put two runners in scoring position.
Starn, a left-hander, began warming up, but Mace struck out Eric Wrozek to end the threat.
CMU starter Patrick Kaminska gave up three consecutive hits to the Flashes in the bottom of the inning, including back-to-back ground-rule doubles by Nick Hamilton and T.J. Sutton, and KSU scored two runs to take a 2-1 lead.
Ryan Longstreth relieved Kaminska in the sixth and gave up a run. Sutton was hit by a pitch with one out, advanced to third on Sawyer Polen's ground-rule double and scored on Alex Miklos' groundout to give KSU a 3-1 lead.
“Playing in a tournament like this, the biggest thing is the energy,” said Sutton, a GlenOak graduate who went 2-for-3 with two RBI and a run scored. “Early on, I don't think we had it. They definitely had a lot of momentum coming in off the big win last night, then gunning Miami down this morning. We came out a little flat before [the back-to-back doubles] got us going.”
Starn showed signs of vulnerability, allowing the leadoff man to reach in all three innings, but he worked out of trouble the first two innings and then gave way to freshman Josh Pierce, an Avon native, with two on and none out in the eighth.
Having pitched his senior season at the Lake Erie Crushers' ballpark as well as a tune-up game last week against Eastern Michigan, Pierce was comfortable on the mound. He got Jordan Adams to strike out looking, then induced Sam Russell to hit into an inning-ending double play.
Pierce got the first two outs of the ninth inning before giving way to closer Brian Clark, who'd allowed just one earned run all season. Clark got Tyler Hall to ground out to end the game.

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News Headline: Balanced and experienced, KSU golf is ready for the NCAA Championship (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Under director of golf and coach Herb Page's tutelage, Kent State is headed to the NCAA Championship for the fourth time in five seasons.
This year's five-man squad consists of sophomore Corey Connors (71.8 scoring average), sophomore Taylor Pendrith (72.5), senior Mackenzie Hughes (72.8), junior Kevin Miller (73.1) and sophomore Kyle Kmiecik (74.3)
It may be the most balanced team Page has ever brought to the NCAA Championships, this year held at Riviera Country Club in California.
“Balance is really key,” Page said. “We've had low scores from every single player. Top-5s, top-10s ... any day, any of our players can go low. I really haven't had a team as deep as this.
“We really don't have a No. 1 or No. 2 or No. 3 man. They're just all very good, and I mean that honestly.”
Kent State enters the 30-team tournament as the No. 16 seed and holds the No. 16 national ranking according to Golfweek.
The Golden Flashes finished 19th and 20th at the NCAA Championships the past two years, respectively, after placing a school-best sixth in 2008. KSU's five-man team has three sophomores and a junior, but they'll have about as much championship experience as anyone.
“These guys definitely know how to win, and that's very important,” Page said. “We've played a top-20 schedule, we've played all over the country. I'd say these guys are ready to go and I think we can beat anyone. It's not like they're coming to the national championship with their eyes wide open.”
KSU is playing about as well as any team in the 30-team field. The Golden Flashes recently won the Mid-American Conference Championship by a conference-record 40 strokes.
“Let's hope so,” Page said when asked if his team was peaking at the right time. “We played very well at the MAC Tournament and very well at regionals. These guys don't have to do anything they haven't done before, just have to play to their ability. Bottom line, you gotta go out and manage your nerves.”
The five guys representing KSU not only post similar scores, but also attain those scores in a similar fashion — with a flurry of birdies that befits golf's transformation to a power game.
“These guys are explosive,” Page said. “They all hit pretty long, which shortens the Par 5s. We make a lot of birdies. And this course will favor our length. I think we could go on a few birdie binges. Golf has changed. It's a powerful game. You gotta make birdies, that's what we want to do and these guys aren't afraid.”
Page's group can make birdies, that's not in question. The real test will be to not take one step forward, two steps back on the scorecard. Page says he received a text from former KSU standout and current PGA Tour Pro Ben Curtis, saying “Don't forget coach, pars are very valuable.”
“If we can eliminate some of the bigger mistakes, I think we can pretty competitive,” Page said. “It's a hard golf course, but there's a lot of resiliency in this team. I'm proud of that.”
As Page says, it's all down to execution now. And if you do that and still get beat?
“Well, then that's just golf.”

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News Headline: KSU Baseball headed to NCAA Championship Regionals as No. 3 seed seeking a national identity (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Finally, the Kent State baseball family is staying close to home.
After traveling to California and Texas the last two years for an NCAA regional, the Golden Flashes will barely have to change time zones after being selected as the No. 3 seed in the regional in Gary, Ind.
Players, coaches, family and fans filled the Water Street Tavern in downtown Kent to watch the selection show, which aired on ESPNU Monday afternoon.
A few rounds of applause were offered as KSU dodged the regionals on the other side of the country, namely Eugene, Ore., and Palo Alto, Calif., before erupting once “Kent State” flashed across the screen for the next state over.
“Gary, Indiana's not necessarily a vacation destination, but it's close to home,” said coach Scott Stricklin. “It's a true regional. You've got four teams from the Midwest region. It's great for our families that they'll be able to be there.”
Kent State (41-17) will face No. 2-seed Kentucky (43-16) on Friday at noon. Purdue, the top seed, and fourth-seeded Valparaiso complete the field at the regional.
Entering Friday, Kent State carries the nation's longest winning streak at 17 games and has won 21 of its last 23, including the 3-1 clincher over Central Michigan to secure the Golden Flashes' fourth consecutive Mid-American Conference Tournament championship.
“No question, we've played our best baseball the last five weeks of the year,” Stricklin said. “We're pitching good, we're playing good defense, we're hitting, we're getting clutch hits. We're doing everything that good baseball teams need to do and we're doing it at the right time.”
That hot streak has people in Kent thinking the Golden Flashes — ranked No. 25 in the nation by Collegiate Baseball Newspaper — can play with any team in the country, especially after KSU knocked off Georgia Tech (then ranked No. 9 in the nation) to open the season.
“We can compete with anyone if we play our game,” said senior ace David Starn, who this year became the first two-time MAC Tournament MVP. “We've been there before and we know what we have to do to win. And absolutely we're playing our best baseball. Those are all key factors.”
Friday's game with Kentucky could be another step for a program trying to shred its “mid-major” label, despite the team's record over the past few years. Last season, the Golden Flashes tied for the best postseason run in the school's history (2001) after they beat Texas State and then took the first game of a three-game series against national powerhouse Texas before dropping the next two. They didn't win the series, but taking the first game opened some eyes. And Stricklin knows it.
‘‘We said this last year when we went to Texas … They might have not known very much about us when we got there, but when we left they knew who we are,” he said.
Winning cures all. And winning, those at KSU know, is the quickest way to get noticed.
“We gotta beat 'em, gotta win,” Starn said, speaking of not just the first game against Kentucky but the potential series with top-seeded Purdue. “I feel like people are just starting to realize who we are and what we're capable of. We can do some damage.”
Stricklin's vision for Kent State is to mirror the Wichita State teams of the 1980s and '90s that broke through the regional and super regional [equivalent to the Sweet 16 in basketball] rounds and made it to the College World Series seven times. Wichita State won the national title in 1989.
Getting past the regional round is the line that needs to be crossed.
“For us to be considered a national team, we've got to get to a super regional and contend for Omaha (site of the College World Series),” Stricklin said.
The Golden Flashes will have to go through Kentucky (No. 13 nationally) and its “not overpowering, but consistent” pitching staff, along with the Wildcats' freshman standout and Dublin, Ohio, native Austin Cousino, whom KSU heavily recruited. Cousino leads the team in batting average (.318) and extra-base hits (29).
Sophomore Derek Toadvine looks at this game as just another chance to put KSU on the map after a “prove-it” season.
“A lot of people thought we'd be pretty weak this year, so the pressure was off a bit,” Toadvine said. “They didn't know what we could do after losing a top-50 draft pick [pitcher Andrew Chafin, to Arizona]. Now we just have to go out and shock the world again.”
Everyone in a Kent State uniform knows their name doesn't carry as much weight as a Florida State or UCLA. But the talent is there, they believe. And nothing carries more weight in breaking down stigmas than winning.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball captures fourth straight MAC championship (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jimmy Rider, David Lyon, Ryan Mace, David Starn and Joe Koch can officially be considered the most successful senior class in Mid-American Conference baseball history.

The Kent State quintet completed the career sweep of league titles on Saturday as the top-seeded Golden Flashes knocked off Central Michigan 3-1 in the MAC Tournament championship game at Avon's All Pro Freight Stadium.

Until the 2012 tournament, no other program had ever captured four straight MAC championships and earned the right to represent the league in four consecutive NCAA Regionals.

As if those accomplishments weren't enough, the win by the 27th ranked team in the nation extended the longest active winning streak in Division I baseball to 17 games.

Anyone wondering if winning could have grown old for KSU's senior class and the rest of a 33-man roster that knows only the taste of victory at the MAC tournament needed only to watch the celebratory pile-on near the pitchers mound after second baseman Derek Toadvine tossed the ball to first baseman George Roberts to record the final out.

“It certainly doesn't get old, and it doesn't get easier,” said Scott Stricklin, who has guided KSU to seven MAC Tournament title games in his eight years as the Golden Flashes' head coach. Saturday was the 10th tournament title in the history of the KSU program. “It's still nerve racking. You bite your nails right to the very end.”

Just as they have done all year while compiling a 41-17 record, KSU's seniors played a big role in the win – Mace starting and allowing just one over four innings; the ace Starn coming on in relief for three more shutout innings and the win (10-3) while pitching on short rest after throwing eight scoreless innings of a tournament-opening win on Wednesday; Rider starting a key double-play to end the eighth inning and foil a potential Chippewas rally.

“What these guys accomplished is remarkable,” said Stricklin. “This is a team we knew would be good. We thought we had some talent, but to lose all the guys we lost last year? We lost six guys to professional baseball, and to come back and do this is really incredible. I can't say enough about our five seniors. Hopefully they'll still be able to play for a while.”

The future of KSU baseball also shined on Saturday as freshmen Josh Pierce and Brian Clark came on in relief to shut the door on the Chippewas.

“We went with two senior (pitchers) to start it and two freshmen to end it,” said Stricklin. “What that shows is the future is still very bright for our program.”

It was Pierce, pitching in his hometown on the same field that was the home of his high school team during his senior season, who coaxed Central's Sam Russell into grounding to short for the double play that ended the eighth and preserved KSU's 3-1 lead. Just minutes earlier, he entered the game to a two-on, no-out situation and promptly stuck out Jordan Adams looking.

“That was a situation I had replayed five or six times in my head last night,” said Pierce, who was cheered on by some 20-to-25 friends and family members. “It was the exact situation I wanted to be in … I couldn't go to sleep last night thinking about it, and about the dog pile at the end.”

Every time he imagined it as he lay awake on Friday night, the result was exactly the same as what happened on Saturday night.

That's why he knew the ground ball off of Russell's bat was destined to be a double play right at contact.

“With (Roberts and Toadvine), those guys are almost for-sure up the middle,” said Pierce. “Any time you get a ground ball, you know it's two. I turned around before George (Roberts) caught the ball at first because I knew it was going to get two.”

Clark recorded the final out and secured his fourth save of the year, getting Central's Pat MacKenzie to ground weakly to second.

No. 3 Central Michigan couldn't rediscover the same magic that led them to the MAC championship game with back-to-back semifinal wins over Miami on Friday night and then earlier Saturday afternoon. The Chippewas came from behind to stave off elimination in an 11-10 Friday night thriller that actually ended at 1:30 a.m. on Saturday. They returned to blank the RedHawks 7-0 in a noon start on Saturday to earn the right to face the Flashes.

It was exactly the situation Stricklin hoped for after his team punched its ticket for the championship game with a semifinal win over No. 8 Buffalo on Friday. Being forced to play one more game meant either Central or Miami would have a depleted pitching staff when it faced KSU for the title.

“We wanted Central to win (on Friday) to at least force another game,” said Stricklin. “We didn't care who we played. We knew both would be very good, but we knew it would be good for us if they were forced to play one more. But Central's starter (Patrick Kaminska) was unreal to come back on one day rest and throw the way he did. He was lights out.”

Kaminska held the Flashes in check until the fourth inning when a one-out single by Roberts was followed by back-to-back ground-rule doubles by Nick Hamilton and T.J. Sutton.

Sutton's rope down the right-field line bounced over the fence to score Roberts and Hamilton and put the Flashes ahead for good at 2-1.

“Playing in a tournament like this, the biggest thing is energy, and we didn't have it early on,” said Sutton, who accounted for two of of KSU's six hits. “Central Michigan had the monetum coming off the big win last night and shutting Miami down this morning while we were a little flat.”

When Kaminska hung a changeup on his second pitch to Sutton, “that was the one I needed to drive and I got a good piece of it,” sutton said.

Sutton scored an insurance run on in the sixth on an RBI fielders choice by Alex Miklos.

“It was a great win and the nation's longest streak continues,” said Stricklin. “Now we'll find out where we are going (for the NCAA Tournament) on Monday.”

KSU will host a NCAA Tournament Selection Show party beginning at 11: 30 a.m. on Monday at Water Street Tavern in Kent.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball team earns No. 3 seed at Gary Regional | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For the second consecutive season, the Kent State baseball team was awarded the No. 3 seed for the NCAA Championship Regionals.

The announcement came on Monday morning as the team sat inside the Water Street Tavern in Kent surrounded by family, friends and fans.

The Selection Show, which was televised on ESPNU, provided the first information of Kent State's seed and opponent after winning its unprecedented fourth consecutive Mid-American Conference Tournament title.

That opponent for the 25th-ranked Golden Flashes will be the Kentucky Wildcats, with the first game scheduled for 4 p.m. on Friday. The game will be played as part of the Gary (Ind.) Regional.

Kentucky (43-16) is the No. 2 seed of the regional and will enter the game as the 13th-ranked team in the nation, according to a poll by the Collegiate Baseball Newspaper. Kent State brings a 41-17 overall record into the matchup, along with a nation-long 17-game win streak.

The Flashes have won 32 of their last 39 games, including 21 of their last 23, and are the only program in MAC history to win back-to-back-to-back-to-back conference tournament crowns.

The Flashes and Wildcats join regional No. 1 seed Purdue (ranked No. 16 in the nation) and regional No. 4 seed Valparaiso.

The regionals are a double-elimination event. The winner of Kent State-Kentucky will play the winner of Purdue-Valparaiso, while the losers will square off in an elimination game on Saturday.

The appearance in the NCAA Regional is the fourth in a row for Kent State and 12th in program history.

The Golden Flashes will face the Wildcats for the sixth time ever and seek their first-ever victory against the Wildcats.

In 2011, Kent State earned a berth in the NCAA Championship Austin Regional and the program's first-ever national tournament regional No. 3 seed.

The Flashes tallied an 11-inning 4-2 win over Texas State and followed it with a 7-5 winner's bracket final triumph over regional host and No. 5-ranked Texas to earn the school's second-ever berth in a regional final.

Kent State won its fifth MAC Tournament title under eighth-year head coach and 2012 MAC Coach of the Year Scott Stricklin, who lettered three seasons as a catcher at Kent State, earning All-MAC honors in 1992 and 1993.

Stricklin guided Kent State to a wire-to-wire MAC regular-season championship, which was the squad's fourth regular-season crown under his watch. The program then cruised to a perfect 4-0 finish in the double-elimination MAC Tournament.

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News Headline: KSU men's golf team tees off today alongside nation's best at NCAA Championship (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State may take a look around at the other men's golf teams waiting to tee off this morning at Riviera Country Club near Los Angeles for today's first round of the NCAA Championship and notice the absence of some familiar school colors.

Among the teams failing to qualify for 2012's main event are traditional college golf powerhouses like Arizona, Arizona State, Duke, Wake Forest, Georgia Tech and Oklahoma State.

No Oklahoma State alone would makes this year's event feel a little topsy-turvy. This week marks the end of a string of 65 consecutive appearances in the NCAA Championship for the Cowboys.

Meanwhile, the field includes schools like Liberty, Lamar, Chattanooga, and five Conference-USA Schools — Central Florida, Alabama-Birmingham, Memphis, Tulsa and East Carolina.

“There really is some parity now in college golf,” said KSU coach Herb Page, whose team is ranked 16th in the country and seeded 13th among the NCAA Championship's 30 teams. “We are one of the veteran teams now, one of the old standbys. We should be proud of that. Not too many teams have been like us, getting here three years in a row and four out of the last five.”

KSU's three straight is the seventh-longest active streak of NCAA finals apperances, trailing only Florida (12 straight), UCLA (10), USC (6), Texas (6), Texas A&M (5) and Illinois (5). The Flashes have faced 20 of the field's other 29 teams this year, going 18-17-1 in 36 combined rounds.

Senior Mackenzie Hughes, junior Kevin Miller, sophomores Taylor Pendrith and Corey Conners and freshman Kyle Kmiecik for KSU will join Florida and Florida State on the first tee at 7 a.m. Pacific Time today in the first group off in the morning wave.

How the Flashes figure out the tricky slopes on Riviera's tiny greens and the kikuyu rough and collars that surround them could be the key to the their hopes of capturing a third top-10 national finish and perhaps even bettering their sixth place from 2008 after the event flips from medal to match play for the fourth, fifth and championship rounds on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The top eight teams after Thursday advance to match play.

“The ball kind of sits up on the kikuyu,” said Page. “You can't use the fringes at all. You can't bump-and-run the ball up there because the kikuyu kind of grabs the ball.”

The Flashes did a good job of handling the kikuyu and figuring out how to get the ball on the greens during Monday's practice round.

Avoiding rocketing 20-foot putts another 20 feet beyond the hole was a different story.

“The slope of the greens and the optical illusions on the greens can be just mind boggling,” said Page. “You'll think you are putting uphill and its actually downhill.”

Page remembered just how difficult the greens at Riviera can be from a previous visit, walking the course in 2005 with KSU alum Ben Curtis during a practice round for the PGA Tour's Northern Trust Open.

After the Flashes qualified for NCAA Championship with a third-place regional finish in Ann Arbor, Mich., Page made a few calls to get the PGA Tour guides that chart every bump, rise and fall of every green. All five of his players will carry those booklets with their yardage books this week.

“Honestly, it's all going to come down to focusing really hard on the green surfaces,” said Page. “We were smart enough to make some phone calls to get the PGA Tour books before we came here, so we have the greens charted. We are really going to have to study because the eye just can't tell those optical illusions. That's the key.

“If we hit lag putts close, we'll have a chance. We're going to have enough chances, so we'll have to make sure we commit to a line and be positive because you can get kind of tentative on these greens if you are not positive. The good thing is these PGA Tour grid books have a lot of good info.”

The Flashes will take some other strategies into competition tomorrow.

After going for the green on the driveable par-4, 10th hole during practice today and finding impossible-to-hold second shots from the greenside bunker, KSU's players have decided to adopt a different plan of attack today. Instead, the Flashes will hit their tee shots over the fairway bunker, hopefully leaving 70 yards from the fairway to the tiny and severely sloped green. The risk versus the reward is one reason Jack Nicklaus once called Riviera's 10th hole the best short par-4 in major championship golf.

The 10th is just one of the classic holes that will make this year's NCAA Championship “extremely special,” according to Page.

“There's the sixth hole with the bunker right in the middle of the green,” said Page. “And I love the 16th, a little par-3 with a tiny green that looks like (the Kent State University Golf Course). There's just nothing there. The green is as big as a bed.”

The Flashes will have the green light at the 590-yard, par-5 11th hole — a green Pendrith and Kmiecik hit in two shots on Monday — before playing a stretch of long par-4s and a 190-yard par-3 between No. 12 and No. 16.

That stretch could decide the tournament.

All are typically played into the wind before turning to play the 590-yard, par-5 17th and the famous 475-yard, par-4 finishing hole with a helping wind.

“Coming up 18 is so cool with that blind tee shot over the hill and the natural amphitheater at the green,” said Page. “It's a spectacular setting. The conditions are perfect out here. The greens are lightning fast. It's a very special place.”

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News Headline: Kent State will face Kentucky in NCAA Regionals on Friday | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - After winning the MAC tournament on Saturday and clinching a spot in the NCAA regionals, the Kent State Golden Flashes baseball team found out who they will face this upcoming weekend.

The Flashes, the third seed in the West Lafayette regional will take on the second seeded Kentucky Wildcats on Friday in Gary, Indiana. The Purdue Boilermakers are the top seed in the region. The Valparaiso Crusaders are the fourth seed.

Kent State will enter the NCAA regionals with a 41-17 record. The Flashes hold the NCAA's longest active winning streak of 17 games.

"I think we're very balanced all over," Flashes baseball coach told News Channel 5 on Monday. "We've got great pitching, our starting pitching has been outstanding, our bullpen is really strong. One through nine our lineup has been very good. Defensively we're in the top 20 in the country, we've got some guys that can run, we've got some guys who can bunt, we've got guys who can hit home run. I think we're a real balanced team.

The Flashes watched the announcement of the NCAA regional matchups as a team at the Water Street Tavern on Monday afternoon.

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News Headline: KSU using Lego Robotics to promote STEM learning (Kratcoski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Knowing that young children are natural engineers, fascinated with how things work and with building and taking things apart, led the Research Center for Educational Technology staff at Kent State University to adopt the Lego WeDo Robotics system to help promote elementary content standards for science, technology, engineering and mathematics learning.

The project, funded by the Martha Holden Jennings Foundation in Cleveland, helps support local K-5 grade teachers to design curriculum that utilizes the robotics system to introduce young children to the engineering design process. The WeDo set contains blocks, working motors and sensors, and a computer software program to run constructed models, which can range from dancing birds to a hungry alligator to a soccer goal kicker.

To date, four local schools have participated in the STEM learning project, including KSU's Child Development Center (kindergarten), Akron Public Schools (fourth and fifth grades), Kent City Schools (first and third grades) and Stow-Munroe Falls City Schools (first grade).

“The outcome of this project will provide much-needed classroom-tested examples of how a variety of educational technologies can effectively create opportunities for deep learning of STEM content, and equally as important, how such tools can be used to build children's capacity for using critical-thinking and problem-solving skills within the context of rigorous content,” said Annette Kratcoski, RCET's educational researcher.

RCET will run a Lego WeDo camp for children in third, fourth and fifth grades from July 10-13. To learn more about this camp and other RCET camps for elementary students, such as digital storytelling, video production and game development, contact Mary Stith at 330-672-5995 or mstith@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Ravenna to pay Kent State for advice on spending health funds | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The city of Ravenna is investing its savings from hiring a lower-paid health commissioner to pay for an assessment of how it should spend its limited dollars for the department.

City Council's Finance Committee recently approved the $20,000 study, which will be done by Kent State University. The cost will be paid by unused money set said for the health commissioner's salary.

The city recently hired Joe Fisher to be the part-time interim health commissioner. Fisher, who works 20 hours a week and has no health insurance through the city, earns half of the $59,488 salary that Lynnette Blasiman earned as a full-time employee.

The post had been vacant since last summer, when Blasiman left the post she held for 14 years to follow the Safe Communities Grant to Family & Community Services. Service Director Kelly Engelhart initially added the administration duties to her job with no additional compensation, and the money remained unspent in the city budget since then.

KSU originally wanted $32,000 for the assessment, but reduced the cost after the city's health department agreed to do some of the legwork in-house.

Engelhart said she is hoping to give Fisher some direction on how to run the department, and said KSU would be doing more than just a study.

"It's an assessment of what our health needs are, and that will help the health commissioner decide where to put our limited dollars as we restructure," she said.

Mayor Joseph Bica said the Portage County Health Department will be asked to contribute toward the cost of the assessment, saying KSU will use county-wide data that will benefit the county health department as well.

Councilman Scott Rainone said he knows of another community doing a slightly larger study that will cost $400,000.

"If this makes us more competitive for federal and state grants, it will pay for itself," he said.

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News Headline: Our View: $1 million gift to Kent State Museum continues legacy of generosity | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The generosity of Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman provided Kent State University with the nucleus for a world-class collection of fashion and art more than 25 years ago.

The Kent State University Museum, which houses their collection, and the School of Fashion Design and Merchandising that bears the name of the two benefactors are distinctive elements of Kent State's academic "brand" that have attracted international notice.

The generosity of one of Shannon Rodgers' friends, Gerald Schweigert, a 1955 graduate, will ensure continued preservation of the museum collection and support for its activities.

Schweigert's $1.1 million donation to the museum in the form of a charitable gift annuity is the largest cash gift the facility has received.

A benefactor of the fashion school as well as intercollegiate athletics at KSU, Schweigert is a longtime supporter of his alma mater. His gift to the fashion museum was prompted by his friendship with Shannon Rodgers as well as the need for an endowment fund to support the museum.

"Shannon left a wonderful gift," he said. "I'm just trying to do my part to keep the legacy going."

The original Silverman-Rodgers collection included 4,000 dresses and costumes, 1,000 artifacts and a 5,000-volume reference library. The museum's holdings have grown to 30,000 dresses and 10,000 decorative pieces, but the facility has had to turn down offers of additions to the collection because of a lack of appropriate storage. Schweigert's donation will help to enable the museum to maintain and expand its collection.

Schweigert, an Akron resident who owned several area hotels, including the Inn of Kent, says that the KSU museum will be his "No 1. philanthropic focus." He plans to continue his support of Rodgers' legacy, including donating to the museum elements of Rodgers' personal collection that he acquired after the fashion magnate's death. "I know Shannon would be happy to know that I'm helping out the museum," he said.

Schweigert's generosity to Kent State is a wonderful tribute to his friend. It's also a fine example of stewardship on the part of a Kent alumnus.

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News Headline: Kent State professor from Hudson completes record-making flight in nine days (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name: Tim Troglen
News OCR Text: A local pilot touched down safely in Dayton May 22 after a nine-day flight which took him to each of Ohio's 88 counties while logging in 1,809 miles.

The pilot, Joe Murray, a Hudson resident and journalism professor at Kent State University, set the record by being "the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all counties of Ohio in an antique aircraft," he said.

"We were met by an enthusiastic crowd of folks from the community, the Wright B Flyer Museum, and several of our ground crew drove even in from Kent," Murray said. "A local photographer surprised us with a painting of the two Cubs irplanes] on our route around Ohio."

Murray made the flight in a 1946 Piper J3 Cub, with friend and fellow pilot Ron Siwik of Chagrin Falls flying alongside in an identical vintage plane.

The weather "was remarkable for the entire nine days," according to Murray.

The pair was delayed a bit by thunderstorms while they were on the ground in Clinton County, he said.

"But while we waited, we had a good conversation with Bob the line boy at Clinton and his giant German shepherd, Buddy," Murray said.

"An Ohio Trooper Pilot arrived in one of OHP's 172s (Ohio Highway Patrol's traffic airplanes) and we shared some popcorn and talked to him for a while as well."

Murray said the trip raised a few thousand dollars toward a scholarship fund for disadvantaged families, which was short of the goal.

"But we will continue our efforts over the next year while we work on the book project," Murray said. "I am overwhelmed at the generosity of the people we met throughout Ohio who bought fuel for us, provided meals and overnight hangars for the airplanes, and purchased T-shirts and raffle tickets."

Funds for the scholarship are still being accepted. Donations can be made by contacting Murray or sending a check to the Kent State University Foundation at 101-G Franklin Hall, Kent, OH 44242-0001.

"It was a journey of 1,809 miles and 36 hours and six minutes in the air," Murray said. "We averaged about 50 miles per hour over the route; so, while it is not the most efficient way to see Ohio, it is still one of the most remarkable I have ever experienced."

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News Headline: Hudson professor's airplane flight lands him in 88 Ohio counties, record books (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name: Tim Troglen
News OCR Text: A local pilot touched down safely in Dayton May 22 after a nine-day flight which took him to each of Ohio's 88 counties while logging in 1,809 miles.

The pilot, Joe Murray, a Hudson resident and journalism professor at Kent State University, set the record by being “the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all counties of Ohio in an antique aircraft,” he said.

“We were met by an enthusiastic crowd of folks from the community, the Wright B Flyer Museum, and several of our ground crew drove even in from Kent,” Murray said. “A local photographer surprised us with a painting of the two Cubs irplanes] on our route around Ohio.”

Murray made the flight in a 1946 Piper J3 Cub, with friend and fellow pilot Ron Siwik of Chagrin Falls flying alongside in an identical vintage plane.

The weather “was remarkable for the entire nine days,” according to Murray.

The pair was delayed a bit by thunderstorms while they were on the ground in Clinton County, he said.

“But while we waited, we had a good conversation with Bob the line boy at Clinton and his giant German shepherd, Buddy,” Murray said.

“An Ohio Trooper Pilot arrived in one of OHP's 172s (Ohio Highway Patrol's traffic airplanes) and we shared some popcorn and talked to him for a while as well.”

Murray said the trip raised a few thousand dollars toward a scholarship fund for disadvantaged families, which was short of the goal.

“But we will continue our efforts over the next year while we work on the book project,” Murray said. “I am overwhelmed at the generosity of the people we met throughout Ohio who bought fuel for us, provided meals and overnight hangars for the airplanes, and purchased T-shirts and raffle tickets.”

Funds for the scholarship are still being accepted. Donations can be made by contacting Murray or sending a check to the Kent State University Foundation at 101-G Franklin Hall, Kent, OH 44242-0001.

“It was a journey of 1,809 miles and 36 hours and six minutes in the air,” Murray said. “We averaged about 50 miles per hour over the route; so, while it is not the most efficient way to see Ohio, it is still one of the most remarkable I have ever experienced.”

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News Headline: Twenty under 40! Kirt Conrad | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kirt Conrad, the executive director of the Stark Area Regional Transit Authority, didn't wait before jumping into a life of public service.

A Sherrodsville and Carroll County native, Conrad, 39, served on his alma mater's Conotton Valley School District Board of Education for five years in the 1990s, right after graduating from the district's high school.

After graduating from Kent State University, the Republican ran unsuccessfully in 1996 to become Carroll County's clerk of courts. After he got his master's degree in public administration from the University of Akron in 1996, he got a job as a planner for Summit County's METRO Regional Transit Authority and moved to Akron in 1997, where he later served on the Akron City School District Board of Education.

“It's just so easy to go home after your job and don't do anything and not be involved,” said Conrad. “You need to find some way to be involved and give back.”

By age 36, Conrad, as Metro's director of planning had years of experience planning complex transit projects — he oversaw construction of the downtown Akron bus station and Metro's purchase of the CSX rail line — and had developed a deep understanding of the federal transit grant system and new transit technology.

In 2009, SARTA's board appointed him executive director to succeed Charles Odimgbe. Conrad, his wife Amy — a New Philadelphia native — and two daughters moved to Plain Township.

“Stark County was more home than Akron was,” he said. “It's close to our family. It's a good community. ... it's not often you get to move up in your own industry without having to move halfway across the country.”

SARTA under Conrad's watch has replaced much of its bus fleet, purchased buses that run on natural gas, revamped many routes, built the Belden Village Transit Center, advanced the Mahoning Road corridor project and experienced a recovery in ridership.

“To really have a successful community, you need to have a successful public transit system, and you really need to understand what people need from it,” said Conrad. “You need to design it so it's friendly, it's efficient, it's safe.”

Conrad, who's flown to France in February and April to attend classes at the University of Grenoble to obtain a graduate certificate of finance, said to help keep young people in the county will take jobs. But attracting jobs will require a cohesive vision of how the community wants to develop especially as the local oil and gas industry expands.

“There's a lot of good things in Stark County that you're not going to get anywhere else,” he said. “Cost of living. ... the quality of life .... schools are pretty decent around here. .... you don't have to worry about a lot of things here you have to worry about other places. It's relatively safe.”

Kirt Conrad, the executive director of the Stark Area Regional Transit Authority, didn't wait before jumping into a life of public service.

A Sherrodsville and Carroll County native, Conrad, 39, served on his alma mater's Conotton Valley School District Board of Education for five years in the 1990s, right after graduating from the district's high school.

After graduating from Kent State University, the Republican ran unsuccessfully in 1996 to become Carroll County's clerk of courts. After he got his master's degree in public administration from the University of Akron in 1996, he got a job as a planner for Summit County's METRO Regional Transit Authority and moved to Akron in 1997, where he later served on the Akron City School District Board of Education.

“It's just so easy to go home after your job and don't do anything and not be involved,” said Conrad. “You need to find some way to be involved and give back.”

By age 36, Conrad, as Metro's director of planning had years of experience planning complex transit projects — he oversaw construction of the downtown Akron bus station and Metro's purchase of the CSX rail line — and had developed a deep understanding of the federal transit grant system and new transit technology.

In 2009, SARTA's board appointed him executive director to succeed Charles Odimgbe. Conrad, his wife Amy — a New Philadelphia native — and two daughters moved to Plain Township.

“Stark County was more home than Akron was,” he said. “It's close to our family. It's a good community. ... it's not often you get to move up in your own industry without having to move halfway across the country.”

SARTA under Conrad's watch has replaced much of its bus fleet, purchased buses that run on natural gas, revamped many routes, built the Belden Village Transit Center, advanced the Mahoning Road corridor project and experienced a recovery in ridership.

“To really have a successful community, you need to have a successful public transit system, and you really need to understand what people need from it,” said Conrad. “You need to design it so it's friendly, it's efficient, it's safe.”

Conrad, who's flown to France in February and April to attend classes at the University of Grenoble to obtain a graduate certificate of finance, said to help keep young people in the county will take jobs. But attracting jobs will require a cohesive vision of how the community wants to develop especially as the local oil and gas industry expands.

“There's a lot of good things in Stark County that you're not going to get anywhere else,” he said. “Cost of living. ... the quality of life .... schools are pretty decent around here. .... you don't have to worry about a lot of things here you have to worry about other places. It's relatively safe.”

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News Headline: Mural design approved | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - A mural project proposed for the downtown cleared its last hurdle Thursday with a certificate of appropriateness was approved by the Design Review Board.

The East Liverpool Masonic Temple Company had filed the application for its project, which entails painting a mural on the side of the Masonic Temple which faces the Ohio River.

The mural will be painted by artist Gina Hampson, who also painted the floodwall murals in Wellsville.

According to the application filed by the group, Kevin Fullerton has already filled in cracks in the building with mortar and pressure washed it then used a tinted base paint to cover the wall in preparation for the mural. In addition, Fullerton removed a stone cap on the rear of the building which had been leaning.

The board was advised that Hampson will be using a latex water-based paint on the mural, which will depict several area scenes, including the Jennings Randolph Bridge, Carnegie Public Library, the Alumni Clock Tower, Kent State University's logo, two bottleneck kilns, the world's largest teapot, two river boats, the Boy with the Boot statue, a locomotive, the YMCA, emblems from both East Liverpool and Wellsville high schools and logos representing the Mason organization.

Three scrolls will be painted at the bottom in which silver, gold and platinum sponsors will be listed.

According to Paul Blevins of the Masonic Temple Company, an Ohio River Border Initiative Grant, coupled with generous donations from many organizations and individuals are making the mural possible.

"I've been delighted by the response," he said after the meeting.

Blevins said he expects Hampson to begin immediately on the mural, which he anticipates will be completed by fall.

"We're right on target," he said.

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News Headline: Mural design approved | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - A mural project proposed for the downtown cleared its last hurdle Thursday with a certificate of appropriateness was approved by the Design Review Board.

The East Liverpool Masonic Temple Company had filed the application for its project, which entails painting a mural on the side of the Masonic Temple which faces the Ohio River.

The mural will be painted by artist Gina Hampson, who also painted the floodwall murals in Wellsville.

According to the application filed by the group, Kevin Fullerton has already filled in cracks in the building with mortar and pressure washed it then used a tinted base paint to cover the wall in preparation for the mural. In addition, Fullerton removed a stone cap on the rear of the building which had been leaning.

The board was advised that Hampson will be using a latex water-based paint on the mural, which will depict several area scenes, including the Jennings Randolph Bridge, Carnegie Public Library, the Alumni Clock Tower, Kent State University's logo, two bottleneck kilns, the world's largest teapot, two river boats, the Boy with the Boot statue, a locomotive, the YMCA, emblems from both East Liverpool and Wellsville high schools and logos representing the Mason organization.

Three scrolls will be painted at the bottom in which silver, gold and platinum sponsors will be listed.

According to Paul Blevins of the Masonic Temple Company, an Ohio River Border Initiative Grant, coupled with generous donations from many organizations and individuals are making the mural possible.

"I've been delighted by the response," he said after the meeting.

Blevins said he expects Hampson to begin immediately on the mural, which he anticipates will be completed by fall.

"We're right on target," he said.

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News Headline: Mural design approved | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - A mural project proposed for the downtown cleared its last hurdle Thursday with a certificate of appropriateness was approved by the Design Review Board.

The East Liverpool Masonic Temple Company had filed the application for its project, which entails painting a mural on the side of the Masonic Temple which faces the Ohio River.

The mural will be painted by artist Gina Hampson, who also painted the floodwall murals in Wellsville.

According to the application filed by the group, Kevin Fullerton has already filled in cracks in the building with mortar and pressure washed it then used a tinted base paint to cover the wall in preparation for the mural. In addition, Fullerton removed a stone cap on the rear of the building which had been leaning.

The board was advised that Hampson will be using a latex water-based paint on the mural, which will depict several area scenes, including the Jennings Randolph Bridge, Carnegie Public Library, the Alumni Clock Tower, Kent State University's logo, two bottleneck kilns, the world's largest teapot, two river boats, the Boy with the Boot statue, a locomotive, the YMCA, emblems from both East Liverpool and Wellsville high schools and logos representing the Mason organization.

Three scrolls will be painted at the bottom in which silver, gold and platinum sponsors will be listed.

According to Paul Blevins of the Masonic Temple Company, an Ohio River Border Initiative Grant, coupled with generous donations from many organizations and individuals are making the mural possible.

"I've been delighted by the response," he said after the meeting.

Blevins said he expects Hampson to begin immediately on the mural, which he anticipates will be completed by fall.

"We're right on target," he said.

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News Headline: Streetsboro Library plans summer programs | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Dream Big: Read" is the theme for programs this summer at the Pierce-Streetsboro Branch of the Portage County District Library. Registration for Summer Reading Club and Storytime begins Tuesday online at www.portagelibrary.org . To register, click on "Programs."

Summer Reading Club is for children who have finished kindergarten through grade four. Programs will be on Tuesdays from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. or Wednesdays from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. beginning the week of June 11 and ending the week of July 9. Each week will include stories, games, crafts, and perhaps reader's theaters or puppet shows. Each child is asked to read at least 15 minutes a day between weekly meetings.

The Kent State University Trumbull Summer Stock Theater will present a play at the July 3 meeting. Also, balloon storyteller Tess Shimko will present "Sweet Dreams" at 2 p.m. July 18 in the city park behind the library for participants of both Summer Reading Club and Storytime.

There will be a drawing each week in July for students in grades five to 12.

Storytime for ages 2 to 5 will meet at 11:15 a.m. Tuesdays or 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays starting the week of June 11 and ending the week of July 9. Storytimes include stories, music, crafts, puppets, finger plays and flannel board stories.

The library is looking for volunteers who have completed at least grade five to help with the Summer Reading Club program. To participate, stop by the library or call 330-626-4458.

The library is located at 8990 Kirby Lane. For more information, visit www.portagelibrary.org.

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News Headline: Higher Education | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Solar panels at Kent State: Kent State University is installing 1,716 solar panels that will cover almost one acre of roof area on its field house.

The project, believed to be the largest roof-mounted system at Ohio's public universities, will be completed in early July. It is the first renewable energy project for Kent State. The solar panels will generate about 500,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year, which is about one-third of the annual power used by both the university's field house and Dix Stadium – enough to power about 50 average homes.

The solar panels will be installed by Third Sun Solar and Wind Power in Athens, Ohio, and contractor Thompson Electric Inc. in Munroe Falls.

Kent State will purchase all the electricity produced with the option to purchase the system after seven years. Some larger electrical system components are being included for the potential expansion of the field house.

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News Headline: New Solar Array to Power Kent State Field House (Euclide, Misbrener) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Today's Energy Solutions
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Covering almost one acre of roof area, this installation is believed to be the largest roof-mounted system among Ohio's public universities.

Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, is installing 1,716 solar panels on the Kent State Field House. Covering almost one acre of roof area, this installation is believed to be the largest roof-mounted system among Ohio's public universities. Scheduled to be completed in July, it is the first renewable energy project for Kent State, and is being completed by Third Sun Solar of Athens, Ohio.

The solar array will generate about 500,000 kilowatt hours of clean electricity per year – about one-third of the annual consumption of both the Field House and Dix Stadium, or enough to power about 50 average homes. The project will eliminate an average of 779,000 pounds of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per year, which is roughly equivalent to removing 70 cars from the road per year.

“We have been searching for funding opportunities to install solar panels on this roof for many years, and it is great to see the installation underway,” says Tom Euclide, Kent State's associate vice president for Facilities Planning and Operations. “The benefits of adding this renewable energy source to our campus energy portfolio will not only help keep our costs lower for decades to come, but will also provide a visual reminder of Kent State's leadership in sustainability, energy conservation, and the use of renewable energy.”

“Facilitating the installation of energy-saving technologies—and now, renewable solar energy systems—is extremely satisfying,” said Robert Misbrener, project manager, sustainability, energy conservation, commissioning in the Office of the University Architect at Kent State. “The true goal is to demonstrate our stewardship of the environment and empower generations of students to carry that mission to the world.”

Kent State does not initially own the solar panel system, but will purchase all of the electricity produced by the system, while retaining the option to purchase the system after seven years. Some larger system components are being included to allow for the potential expansion of the Kent State Field House facility.

“Potentially, the sun's energy can fulfill all of the world's power needs many times over,” Misbrener says. “Sunlight contains energy that can be turned into electrical current, which can be harnessed for power. There are no harmful emissions from the sun as an energy source; it won't run out, and best of all, it's free.”

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News Headline: Islamist casts himself as God's candidate in Egypt poll (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gulf News - Online
Contact Name: Leila Fadel
News OCR Text: Cairo - In many ways, Mohammad Mursi, a conservative Islamist, has been an accidental candidate in the race to become Egypt's next president.

It was not until his mentor, Khairat Al Shater, was disqualified from the race that Mursi became the choice of the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's most powerful Islamist group.

Some Egyptians deride him as the “spare tire,” a reference to his backup role. He is an engineer and a university professor not known for gravitas or charisma. But Mursi is very much a product of the Brotherhood, having risen through its ranks over the past two decades.

The group faced criticism this spring when it reneged on a promise to stay out of the presidential race.

But by Thursday night, Mursi's apparent success in advancing to a runoff appeared to confirm the Brotherhood's enduring reach and efficiency, unrivaled in Egypt even under Hosni Mubarak, when the group was nominally outlawed.

“It was the Muslim Brotherhood machine that brought him to this point. Mursi has modest political skills with a strong commitment to the Muslim Brotherhood ideology and leadership,” said Khalil Al Anani, an expert on Egyptian Islamist movements at Durham University in Britain.

“He is a shell for the Muslim Brotherhood, and he will sacrifice himself for the sake of the Brotherhood's survival.”

Egyptian analysts say Mursi was chosen because of his loyalty to the organisation's dominant conservative wing.

During his campaign, Mursi cast himself as God's candidate, promising that the Quran would be the foundation of a future constitution and vowing to implement a strict version of Islamic law.

In recent weeks, the Brotherhood had appealed to conservative clerics, asking that they urge followers to vote for him.

Mursi has said that he has no plans to revise the peace treaty with Israel for now but has been harsh on Israelis, calling them “killers” because of their treatment of Palestinians.

He has also said that women shouldn't be allowed to run for president. He told The

“Mursi is not going to betray the more conservative interpretation of the Muslim Brotherhood which now dominates” said Joshua Stacher, an assistant professor of Middle East studies at Kent State University.

Born in the Nile River Delta, Mursi, who is 60, received a doctorate in engineering from the University of Southern California.

He taught until recently at Egypt's Zagazig University.

His rise in the Brotherhood came with the support of Shater, the group's top financier and strategist.

Mursi led the group's parliamentary bloc in Egypt from 2000 to 2005, a period in which it held 20 per cent of legislative seats. The group was shut out of the legislature after elections in the fall of 2010, which was widely rigged by then-president Mubarak's ruling party.

His biography on the Muslim Brotherhood's English website describes him as a “hard worker,” an academic and a man who was arrested multiple times for his opposition to the Mubarak government, including during the early days of last year's revolt.

In a recent interview with CNN he struck a moderate note.

“There is no such thing called an Islamic democracy. There is democracy only and democracy is the instrument that is present now. The people are the source of authority,” he said.

“I see it being called the presidency of the Muslim Brotherhood, but it is the presidency of Egypt.”

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News Headline: Egyptian military, Islamists claim slots in runoff (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune-Review
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Analysis

CAIRO -- Two candidates claim spots in a June runoff as the country awaits official results of its first free, multi-party presidential election.

Mohammed Morsy, whose Muslim Brotherhood controls parliament, and Ahmed Shafiq, the ousted regime's last prime minister, appear to have won voting on Wednesday and Thursday here.

Liberal Egyptians and largely youthful revolutionaries who helped to bring down Hosni Mubarak last year howled with dismay and fear over the apparent outcome.

One blogger compared the choice in the June 16-17 runoff to Egypt's defeat by Israel in the 1967 Six-Day War.

Liberal activists say Shafiq and Morsy represent a choice of "military fascism and religious fascism."

The Brotherhood's deep pockets and organizational skill carried Morsy -- widely ridiculed as a "spare tire" because he was the party's back-up candidate -- to a reported 25 percent of the vote.

Shafiq, who has called the deposed Mubarak his "spiritual father," was reported to be neck-and-neck with the former Brotherhood leader.

The country's revolutionary ranks were momentarily heartened when Nasserite/socialist candidate Hamdeen Sabahi won in the capital and the Islamist-dominated Mediterranean port of Alexandria. His lead vanished as results were counted across the country.

Joshua Stacher, an assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt, said "this election doesn't mean anything anymore."

He predicted "an increase of instability on the streets because this is such an utter rejection" of last year's revolution.

Abdel Moneim Aboul Fatouh, another former Brotherhood official, and former foreign minister Amr Moussa placed fourth and fifth in unofficial results.

Former Brotherhood followers warned in advance of the organization's ability to turn out votes.

Morsy adopted an "Islam is the solution" mantra during the campaign.

Shafiq, a former air force general, was widely seen as favored by the military junta that has ruled Egypt since last year. With his motto, "Deeds Not Words," he cast himself as a military strongman who would restore security and rescue a collapsing economy.

He appealed to Egypt's beleaguered Coptic Christian minority, about 10 percent to 20 percent of the populace, who have suffered increasing attacks by Muslims since last year. Many Christians said before voting that they want a return to the rule of law.

Islamists already accuse Christians of supporting Shafiq; Gama'a Al Islamiya member Tamer Zumor called them "the great traitors."

The Gama'a Al Islamiya is a terrorist group that renounced violence and has members in the Islamist-dominated parliament.

"That is super-dangerous stuff -- the accusations that the Christians are voting for the old regime, trying to subvert the revolution," said Michael Hanna, a fellow and Egypt expert at The Century Foundation, a New York-based research group.

"Clearly, the weakest factor in society will suffer the most in any breakdown in law and order. ... I worry about that a lot," he said.

Many U.S. and Egyptian analysts believe the military influenced the outcome.

Hanna said the military, backed by the state-run media, convinced many Egyptians that it is "the one thing between the country and chaos" and that "subversive forces (want) to bring the country to ruin."

He said the military has effectively stigmatized protesters and "foreign interference."

Kent State's Stacher thinks the election is part of the military's long-term plan to maintain control.

"(If) Morsy wins, the military will shut off the state apparatus, which will not allow the Muslim Brotherhood to do what (it is) good at, which is providing goods and services," he said.

"I think you could have calls for a corrective coup to stop the Muslim Brotherhood from Islamizing the state."

Omar Suleiman, Egypt's former spymaster, recently predicted a coup if Islamists win the presidency.

"If Shafiq wins, then you will see the 'Putinization' of Egyptian politics," Stacher predicted. He said the former general "is not going to ... rock the boat too much until the military can groom a military intelligence official to eventually take over."

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News Headline: Akron Children's, Kent State team up to explore anxiety disorders in kids | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: AKRON -- Akron Children's Hospital and Kent State University are collaborating on a study investigating risk factors and treatment for children with anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), hair pulling and related problems.

The researchers are screening children 9 to 17 years old who:

Have worries, thoughts, or pictures they can't shake

Worry about dirt, germs, or catching an illness

Wash hands frequently or shower for a long time

Check, touch, tap or rub things over and over - a certain number of times or until it feels "just right" or "even"

Worry that something bad will happen to their family

Spend a lot of time erasing schoolwork

Worry about saying or doing the wrong thing

Worry about many things like grades, being rejected by peers, leaving home

Feel that certain numbers, colors or words are lucky

Ask reassuring questions over and over

Even children who have just one symptom on this checklist may be eligible for the study, which is led by Christopher Flessner, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Kent State, and Sumru Bilge-Johnson, M.D., a pediatric psychiatrist at Akron Children's.

According to Dr. Bilge-Johnson, it is important to diagnose these conditions early in children. "OCD and hair pulling can go unrecognized and become more severe if not treated," she said. "They can also lead to depression and other mental health problems."

The study involves a diagnostic assessment for OCD, playing a computer game, and written and verbal feedback, such as possible diagnoses, treatment options and referrals, if the child qualifies. Not all children will qualify for the study.

For more information, call the Child Anxiety Research Program at Kent State at 330-672-2200.

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News Headline: Kent State and Akron Children's Hospital study childhood anxiety (Flessner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Researchers are testing families to figure out what causes the disorders

Kent State University and Akron Children's Hospital are teaming up to find out what causes anxiety disorders in kids. The disorders affect one in eight children, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

Dr. Sumru Bilge-Johnson of Akron Children's is co-investigator in the study, which will focus on children with risk factors that lead to obsessive compulsive disorder, hair-pulling and other anxiety disorders. The researchers will look at physical and environmental clues.

“They can start quite early in childhood, but they can go unrecognized or under-diagnosed [or] they can come into treatment in later phases," she says. "We first want to make a study about it so it can be more known and early diagnoses is very important for these disorders because early treatment brings better prognosis.”

After interviews, children involved in the study will complete computer tasks and other forms. About two weeks later, parents will complete the same computer tasks their children did earlier.

Kent State psychologist Christopher Flessner is the principal investigator of the study. He says there's little research on children with anxiety disorders.

Flessner expects family influences will be key in how anxiety manifests itself.

“Kids with OCD or kids who pull their hair would fall into sort of one group – that is their parents would kind of behave . . . similarly to the child's symptoms and the kids would perform similarly on those neuropsychological tasks – the computer tasks – compared to the kids with other anxiety disorders,” he says.

Flessner plans to recruit for the study for the next five years.

Please click on link for audios:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/31835

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News Headline: Kent State study shows emotional impact of accusations of acting white (Neal-Barnett) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Black teens are shown to have higher levels of anxiety from the accusations

A recent study by Kent State researchers shows that African-American teens accused of “acting white” have higher levels of anxiety.

Psychology professor Angela Neal-Barnett supervised the study. She says the teens' anxiety is usually rooted in an experience in middle school or high school that had an emotional impact.

Neal-Barnett says when black adolescents are targeted by the accusations, some try to act out what they perceive as being “black.” She advocates that, instead, they have confidence in who they are.

“The adolescents who are successful say, ‘You know, it's not about acting white, it's not about acting black, it's about being myself. And so, I'm just being myself and I have to feel confident enough in that that it doesn't increase my anxiety when somebody makes that accusation.'”

Neal-Barnett says the reasons for black adolescents being accused of acting white can come from how they speak, who they hang out with, how they dress or what kinds of music they listen to.

Please click on link for audio:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/31837

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News Headline: How surroundings affect diet (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Storm Lake Pilot-Tribune - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The way people use their senses while eating can includence how we eat and how much we consume, according to Dr. John Gunstad, associate professor of psychology at Kent State University.

"Things like music, bright lights, color and food texture have a strong influence on our eating habits," Gunstad explains. "If we don't pay attention to our surroundings, it can result in poor food choices. The key is to be aware of how these forces subtly influence our eating habits."

Sound: Loud, fast music, often played at restaurants, encouraging people to eat and live more quickly. Unfortunately, eating fast can also lead to overeating.

Most people eat until their brain signals a full feeling, but there is a five to ten minute lag between when our stomachs are full and when our brain recognizes that fact.

Eating more slowly allows the brain to realize it is time to stop eating before the person has overeaten. Rather than simply avoiding music all together, look for settings or create your own environment that plays slow, soft music.

A relaxing tempo can lead to more conductive eating habits.

Sight: Similar to loud music, bright lights encourage people to increase the rate of all behaviors. Eating faster is a natural byproduct of bright lights. When possible, plan your meals in a setting that does not include bright, harsh lighting; the impulse to eat fast will be reduced.

Color can also affect the way we eat: Red and yellow tend to make people feel hungrier, even when they are not, while blue can help suppress appetite.

Choosing colored plates that contrast sharply with the color of food makes it easier to pay attention to portion size.

Beware of optical illusions: We often eat with our eyes, which means we frequently base how full we are on what we think we ate rather than how many calories we actually consumed.

A popular method for portion control is to gradually switch to smaller plates.

Touch: The texture of food can provide guidance for more healthful choices. Rough or fibrous foods can promote weight loss because they create feelings of satiety with less calories.

Taste/Smell: The key is not to allow taste or smell dictate whether we are hungry or full. Stop and ask yourself, "Am I actually hungry? Or is it actually my positive reaction to a tasty smell or delicious bite of food encouraging me to keep eating?"

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News Headline: 'A Spring Fling' gets connected with Contra Dance | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The recent Kent
Community Dinner,
“A Spring Fling,”
was hosted by Trinity
Lutheran Church
in Kent.
Before dinner,
the “Great Room”
was filled with
dancers, moving to
the sounds of Jon
Mosey and David
Rice on guitar
and mandolin. Carol
Kopp called the
dances.
Donated bread
for the bread breaking
ceremony was
cooked the Village
Cafe.
The Rev. Julie
Fisher of Christ
Episcopal Church
in Kent offered the
blessing.
Boy Scout Troops
No. 3253 and No. 259
served, along with
Girl Scout Troop
No. 91306 and a contingent
of students
from Kent State
University's Center
for Student Involve-
ment.
Franklin Tarver
cooked extra organic,
grass-fed beef donated
by Camigaem
Farm. Kent Floral donated
fresh flowers,
as they have for every
dinner over the
course of more than
six years.
The all-volunteer
affair gave the greater
Kent college and
town community the
chance to “Get Connected
Through Contra
Dance."

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News Headline: OUR VIEW Market for housing in Kent merits closer look | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ASSESSMENT OF NEEDS OF SENIORS
KSU STUDENTS WOULD BE WISE MOVE

CITY MANAGER DAVID RULler's
suggestion that Kent State
University and the city of Kent
hire a qualified consultant to assess the
community's housing needs is a good one
as the boom in student housing developments
continues.
Student housing
projects set for completion
this fall will add
roughly 1,700 beds in
Kent. Nearly 600 more
are on the drawing
board for the Campus Crest Communities
development proposed for a site near
Dix Stadium in Franklin Township. Two
other relatively new complexes on S.R.
59 east of Kent also have added several
hundred beds.
“We need to ask ourselves how much
student housing will the market support,”
Ruller said recently during a Kent
Area Chamber of Commerce gathering.
“We do not want to get into a situation
where new housing displaces older housing,
causing the older housing to become
blighted neighborhoods the city must
contend with.”
Ruller raises a good point. While there
appears to be a market for new student
housing, the need for additional beds is
not infinite. A saturation point eventually
will be reached; if the community finds itself
overbuilt in terms of student housing,
that could open the door for alternative
uses that may not be beneficial. Cubicles
built for short-term tenancy by students
do not necessarily make suitable housing
for families.
Large student apartment complexes,
housing hundreds of tenants, place a burden
on city services. Strained resources
pose budgetary and personnel concerns,
as well as potential safety issues if the developments
become congregating points
for unruly student gatherings, as has been
the case in the past.
Ruller suggests that an outside consultant
could focus full-time on accurately
projecting student housing needs, which
would aid both the city and Kent State in
future planning. That's a good idea, but
we'd add another aspect to the consultant's
task — assessing the need for housing
for senior citizens. That might be another
prime market to be tapped, too.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW Kent State outlines blueprint for future | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: $170 MILLION OVERHAUL AMBITIOUS
AND EXPENSIVE BUT NECESSARY

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S
plan for $170 million in new construction
and renovation is a
blueprint for the future for a campus focused
on academic excellence.
A proposal submitted
to the Ohio Board
of Regents outlines a
long-range progam for
improvements that will
be Kent State's most
comprehensive since the years following
World War II when President George
Bowman transformed what had been a
teacher training institution into the second-
largest state university in Ohio.
The proposal calls for construction of
new academic buildings for the College
of Architecture and Environmental Design
and the College of Technology, new
facilities for the sciences and a major renovation
of School of Art facilities. Other
improvements are planned for existing
academic buildings.
Many of the academic buildings at Kent
State were designed to meet the educational
needs of the 1960s and 1970s, when
a great deal of construction took place on
the campus. Upgrading them to ensure
that they can function efficiently for a
21st Century campus makes sense, not to
mention that any 40- to 50-year-old building
requires basic maintenance.
The College of Technology is housed
in Van Deusen Hall, which dates to 1950,
and the School of Art is located in a building
constructed in 1972 whose design has
made it problematic since it opened. Both
facilities need to be upgraded to make
them more functional.
KSU plans to pay for the construction
by issuing bonds that will be paid back
through new fees on students taking large
course loads. That might not be the ideal
means of financing brick-and-mortar improvements
but it's better than a previous
proposal that tied the campus overhaul
to progressive increases in tuition.
The KSU Board of Trustees is set to
consider final action on the improvements
plan on June 6. Approval by the Board of
Regents also is required.
Kent State's agenda for the future is an
ambitious one and an expensive one. It
also is necessary for the university to continue
to provide its students with a firstrate
education in the years to come.

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News Headline: Twin highrise would have been tallest in Portage | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: What would have been Portage
County's tallest building — a twintower
complex housing 360 apartments
— didn't get much further
than the drawing board, but plans
for it generated considerable interest
in 1965.
University Tower, a 14-story
structure proposed for the Kent-
Brimfield border, was touted by
its would-be developer as an innovation
in housing, “the only project
of its type between Washington
and Chicago.”
“There is nothing comparable,”
Herbert Bern of Akron Homes Inc.
told Portage County commissioners
during an annexation hearing
in June 1965.
With a price tag of $4 million —
roughly $27 million today — the facility
would have been a significant
residential development.
The commissioners — James
Kline, Charles Paulus and Bob
Brown — held the key to its fate,
Bern said. Unless they approved
annexation of the site from Brimfield
Township to Kent, the development
wouldn't go forward because
city utilities were needed.
Brimfield Township residents
weren't as enthusiastic about the
project as Bern. And they definitely
weren't happy about losing
23 acres of township land to their
city neighbor.
The apartment complex was to
be built along the west side of S.R.
43, on Kent's southern border, running
west to Sunnybrook Road. Akron
Homes had purchased another
tract north of it, within the Kent
city limits, with plans to build half
of the development there, according
to Bern.
Plans called for 180 apartments
in the upper 13 stories of both towers.
The ground floors would include
space for tenant services,
such as dry cleaners, as well as offices
for doctors, attorneys and other
professionals. A theater also was
planned for the complex.
Bern said that 70 percent of the
living units would be efficiency
units or one-bedroom apartments;
the remaining apartments would
be two-bedroom units.
The highrises were designed primarily
for adults. “This type of living
is not conducive to families with
children,” he said.
The June hearing drew several
Brimfield residents, led by Township
Trustee Earl Wertenberger,
who voiced objections to losing
more township land to Kent, which
they said would deprive Brimfield
of potential areas for growth.
The Brimfield residents also said
they didn't want their township
“carved up as Franklin Township
has been,” an apparent reference
to Kent's recent annexation of 149
acres for the Whitehall apartment
complex east of Kent State University.
The site was located near the
Brimfield border.
The annexation request was
prompted solely by the need for
city water and sewer, according
to Bern, who said he had been unable
to obtain those services from
Brimfield.
Kent city officials, including Mayor
Frank Lange, told commissioners
that it was city policy not to extend
water or sewer service to areas
outside of Kent.
Commissioners were presented
with a petition signed by 25 property
owners opposed to annexation
and a petition signed by 14 favoring
it. Some property owners had
signed both petitions.
The commissioners ended the
June 1 hearing split on the proposal.
Brown said he opposed it, Paulus
favored it, and Kline said he
was undecided. An earlier annexation
proposal had been turned
down, but Bern had sought reconsideration.
A final decision came three weeks
later, when the annexation bid was
approved by Paulus and Kline, with
Brown abstaining. Kline said he believed
the development was “good
planning and developing for this
particular area” and would “help
the housing problem.”
While the commissioners' decision
cleared the way for Kent to annex
the site, University Tower never
was built.
What would have been the site of
twin 14-story towers became the location
of S.R. 261, which was constructed
in the 1970s. Another major
housing development, Indian
Valley Apartments, was built in the
area on land annexed by Kent.
The 12-story Kent State University
Library became the tallest
building on the Portage County
skyline when it was built in 1970. It
continues to hold that distinction
more than 40 years later.
And, while Kent is currently experiencing
a boom in apartment
construction, there's no chance
of a 14-story complex being built
there now. The city's zoning code
states that high-density multi-family
structures can be no higher than
65 feet tall.

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News Headline: 'Jim Tully' biography earning accolades | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: “Jim Tully: American Writer,
Irish Rover, Hollywood Brawler”
by Paul J. Bauer and Mark Dawidziak
has been selected for a
silver medal in the biography category
of the 2012 Independent
Publisher Book Awards (IPPYs).
The book was published by the
Kent State University Press.
The IPPY awards will be handed
out June 4 in New York.
In addition, Bauer and Dawidziak's
book is a finalist in the
biography category for 2012
Benjamin Franklin Award of the
Independent Book Publishers
Association.
Trophies will be awarded the
first week of June.
The book describes the life of
the Irish American from St. Marys,
Ohio, who spent time with both
hoboes and members of the Hol-
lywood elite.
Tully wrote several books about
his travels, as well as magazine articles
about life in Hollywood.

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News Headline: Community leaders mark Right to Read Week in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: St. Patrick School in Kent held Right to Read Week activities recently. Ten community leaders visited the classrooms to talk about reading, shared a favorite book or passage, and spoke about how reading has affected their lives. From left, seated, are Mike Finley (Hall-Green Insurance Agency and parent of a St. Patrick student), Francine Livezey (Goodyear Tire & Rubber and grandparent), John Mazan (principal), Cathy Ricks (Kent Department of Parks and Recreation), and Sarah Wilsman (Kent Free Library children's librarian), and standing, Dennis Goodhart (Ohio Highway Patrol and parent of former student), Will Underwood (director of the Kent State University Press), Mike Stabilla (St. Patrick Church deacon and parent of former student), Eric Davis (Tallmadge Fire Department and parent), Hal Foster (University of Akron professor), and the Rev. Richard Pentello (St. Patrick Church pastor).

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