Report Overview:
Total Clips (17)
Alumni (1)
Athletics (5)
Board of Trustees (2)
Chemistry and Biochemistry; Research (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Management and Information Systems; Research (1)
Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
University Press (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Heart transplant recipient Erik Compton one shot back of Scott Stallings for Memorial lead 05/31/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Among the nine players four shots off the lead after shooting 70 are Tiger Woods, Adam Scott, Ernie Els and Kent's Ben Curtis. Curtis, who played at Kent State and grew up about 40 minutes from Muirfield Village in Ostrander, certainly has his share of fans at the Memorial every year. He considers...


Athletics (5)
Confident Kent State baseball rides senior duo into NCAA quest 06/01/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

On the record -- May 31 06/01/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KSU in fight to make NCAA cut 06/01/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State having another golden year on the diamond entering NCAA playoffs: Terry Pluto 06/01/2012 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State most experienced team in Gary Regional field 06/01/2012 E-Times Text Attachment Email


Board of Trustees (2)
Will Brewing Corruption Scandals in Ohio Have an Impact on November's Election? 06/01/2012 AlterNet Text Attachment Email

...candidate, they told me I would be designated as the ‘Governor's Guy' in Portage County and that I would be given influence in who Gov. Kasich appoints to Kent State University boards and other state government appointments as they come open,” Manning's statement, provided to the Columbus Dispatch, said....

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEETING, JUNE 6 05/31/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, May 31 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The Kent State University Board of Trustees will hold its next regular business...


Chemistry and Biochemistry; Research (1)
New Research on Atmospheric Science from Kent State University Summarized 06/01/2012 Science Letter Text Email

...continental (PC) aerosols, which contain high anthropogenic and less dust aerosols." Our news editors obtained a quote from the research by the authors from Kent State University, "Contributions of carbonaceous particles having high absorbing (mostly black carbon, MBC) and low absorbing (mostly organic...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
In the Region (Murray) 05/31/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...nine-day flight which took him to each of Ohio's 88 counties while logging in 1,809 miles. Joe Murray, a Hudson resident and journalism professor at Kent State University, set the record by being "the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all counties of...


KSU Museum (1)
Woman of Substance 05/31/2012 www.ohiomagazine.com Text Attachment Email

September 2010 Issue Woman of Substance The Kent State University Museum unveils its newest acquisition: The couture of Katharine Hepburn. Linda Feagler "Adams Rib," 1949: This black evening...


Management and Information Systems; Research (1)
Research from Kent State University Yields New Findings on Management Science 06/01/2012 Science Letter Text Email

...window minimizes the expected penalty cost due to early and late delivery." Our news editors obtained a quote from the research by the authors from Kent State University, "The conditions for the optimal position of the delivery window are derived for the general form of a delivery time distribution....


Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Learning a new language on summer 'to do' list 06/01/2012 Marietta Times - Online Text Attachment Email


Renovation at KSU (1)
Bonds for Kent State Campus Renovation Get Positive Rating 06/01/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Browsing the Arts for June 1-7, 2012 05/31/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Classrooms." Exhibition is the result of an ongoing study in four classrooms in the Akron Public School District conducted by Professor Walter S. Gershon of Kent State University. Through Sunday, June 24. Exhibit: "String of Hearts: Photographs by Bea Nettles." Through Sunday, July 8. Cleveland Museum...


University Press (2)
About Books: Book tells how Ohio community saved jobs and its self-... 05/31/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...the 1970s, urban communities across the country have had to face the wrenching process of economic restructuring," notes publicity information for a new Kent State University Press book, "Rust Belt: How a Small Community Took on Big Oil and Won," by Perry Bush. "As the media announce the latest...

Page Turners: Our Place in History 05/31/2012 www.ohiomagazine.com Text Attachment Email

...Christ Minister William H. Armstrong, gives perspective on the Niles native's experiences in battle and how they shaped his days in the Oval Office. (The Kent State University Press ) More than 4,400 Ohio soldiers participated in the battle of Gettysburg, 30 percent of whom were killed, wounded or...


News Headline: Heart transplant recipient Erik Compton one shot back of Scott Stallings for Memorial lead | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Doug Lesmerises
News OCR Text: By Doug Lesmerises, The Plain Dealer

View full sizeJay LaPrete, Associated PressErik Compton wasn't happy with a missed birdie chance on the 18th hole, but he didn't have many other misses in posting a 4-under 68 Thursday at the Memorial.

DUBLIN, Ohio -- Erik Compton, a PGA Tour rookie who four years ago received a heart transplant from a Central Ohio native killed in a motorcycle accident, played one of the best rounds of his career Thursday and sits just one shot out of the lead after the first round of the Memorial Tournament.

Compton's 67 tied his low round of the year and put him behind only 27-year-old Scott Stallings, who has made just three cuts in 14 events this season. Spencer Levin is tied with Compton, with seven other players three shots off the lead in fourth.

Among the nine players four shots off the lead after shooting 70 are Tiger Woods, Adam Scott, Ernie Els and Kent's Ben Curtis.

Curtis, who played at Kent State and grew up about 40 minutes from Muirfield Village in Ostrander, certainly has his share of fans at the Memorial every year. He considers the event his fifth major because of how important it is to him. In nine previous starts here, his best finish was a tie for eighth in 2004.

But Compton, 32, should have his share of fans as well.

"I know there's a lot of people that are in town that may be familiar with the story, so that's obviously cool to play in front of people that are rooting for you," he said.

Compton was born with an enlarged heart and had his first heart transplant at age 12. He received his second heart in 2008 and in 2009 made his second cut since that transplant at the Memorial.

"For me, it's a special place," Compton said. "For me there's not a day that goes by that I don't think about my donor."

Stallings has one career PGA Tour win, at the Greenbrier Classic last year, while Compton is looking for his first. Only twice in the 36-year history of the Memorial has a first-round leader gone on to win, while this year in 22 tour events the first-round leader has won just twice.

After the course played fast and firm Thursday, rain is in the forecast Friday. Among those stalking the lead, weather permitting, should be U.S. Open champ Rory McIlroy, who recovered to shoot a 1-under 71 Thursday despite taking quadruple bogey on the par-3 12th on his way to shooting 39 over his first nine holes. He responded with a 32 on his second nine that got him back on track.

"I was just like, here we go again," said McIlroy, who missed the cut in his last two events. "But I hung in there well, and I'm proud of myself for the way I just fought back."

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News Headline: Confident Kent State baseball rides senior duo into NCAA quest | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By George M. Thomas
Beacon Journal sports writer
Published: June 1, 2012 - 12:28 AM | Updated: June 1, 2012 - 09:29 AM

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(PHOTO) Kent State University catcher David Lyon at practice at the fieldhouse in Kent. The team faces Kentucky in the NCAA tournament. (Phil Masturzo/Akron Beacon Journal)
_____

KENT: The Kent State baseball team isn't about to sneak up on anyone in the NCAA Tournament. The Golden Flashes have pushed teams to the limit before being ousted, the most recent being Texas last year.

They will stare up at another Goliath, Kentucky of the Southeastern Conference, at 4 p.m. today in Gary, Ind. The other two teams in the double-elimination regional are Purdue and Valparaiso.

The Flashes are confident, and they go into the game with a couple of advantages; the first being a battery of seniors — catcher David Lyon and pitcher David Starn.

“They've been together four years. They came in the same class. They were freshmen together and they are [on the same page] all the time,” KSU coach Scott Stricklin said earlier this week.

When talking to both they echo the other's statements, and when it comes to the Wildcats, they are definitely in simpatico.

“We just have to try to command pitches, keep the hitters off balance and throw a lot of strikes,” said Starn, who compiled a 10-3 record with a 1.77 ERA.

The most important thing for the Flashes ace?

“I think just doing what he does best,” Lyon said. “Which is kind of keeping hitters off balance, pounding the strike zone, getting ahead of hitters, getting ahead in the count, making his pitches instead of getting behind in counts and letting them have free swings.”

Stricklin said that sometimes the duo's best work comes off the field. He cited the opening game of the MAC Tournament in which he and Lyon spent their time going over strategy on the bench during the first few innings when their team was batting.

Given the Kentucky team batting average of .297, Starn will have to work for the win, and the duo will have to keep their heads together.

But there is something that he can exploit.

“They have four lefties in the lineup, so that's to my advantage,” he said. “Only four of them right now are hitting over .300. Right now they're struggling a little bit, but they're going to be ready to go.”

Considering that opponents normally bat just .205 against him — lefties come in slightly lower at .200 — he might very well be right.

Another issue also comes into play.

Despite a raised profile nationally, video footage of the Flashes is tough to come by.

“There isn't much out there, but we've got some. We've got some on the starting pitcher,” UK coach Gary Henderson told the media covering his team.

Henderson is especially leery of pitchers with breaking pitches — Starn has nice breaking stuff — and they won't be taking the Flashes and Starn for granted.

“All it takes is one pitcher with a curveball, and it's game on. It's a tight game,” Henderson said. “And as you guys know, we haven't played very many lopsided games either way recently.”

The Wildcats will start junior left-hander Taylor Rogers, who is 6-3 with a 4.60 ERA and whom the Baltimore Orioles drafted in 2009. He allowed just four hits in six scoreless innings in the SEC Tournament.

“The last couple of weekends they've actually pitched him in their No. 1 spot,” Stricklin said. “If you look at their rotation, they've got three guys who are all very good and all very equal. I don't think there's very much difference between their No. 1 and their No. 3.”

Stricklin said he will stick with his starting rotation for subsequent games, which means Ryan Bores (8-2, 3.22 ERA) will get the next start.

George M. Thomas can be reached at gmthomas@thebeaconjournal.com. Read the Zips blog at http://www.ohio.com/zips. Follow him on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/GeorgeThomasABJ and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/sports.abj.

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News Headline: On the record -- May 31 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: June 1, 2012 - 12:29 AM

Corey Connors shot a 2-under-par 69, and the Kent State golf team finished tied for eighth place with Florida State after the final round of the NCAA Championship on Thursday to force a sudden death playoff with the Seminoles at Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Calif.

The Golden Flashes and the Seminoles tied with a three-day total of 23-over-par 875. The Flashes were 7 over par on Thursday, 3 strokes better than the Seminoles. The playoff is at 8 a.m. today with all five players from each team playing the same hole and the team with the lowest four total scores advancing.

Connors finished tied for fourth with a three-day individual score of 1-under-par 212. Mackenzie Hughes shot a 1-over-par 72 and Kyle Kmiecik carded a 2-over-par 74 in the final round. Taylor Pendrith shot a 76 and Kevin Miller shot a 77 in the final round.

The winner of the playoff will play No. 1 seed Alabama in the match-play round beginning today.

Track and field

Ariane Beaumont-Courteau and Valerie Fraizer (Wert) of the University of Akron were named to the CoSIDA Academic All-District first team on Thursday. Beaumont-Courteau and Fraizer each won individual MAC Championships for the Zips in 2012 and will advance to the Capital One Academic All-American Team ballot to be selected this month.

— Beacon Journal staff report

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News Headline: KSU in fight to make NCAA cut | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Record-Courier Staff Report

(PHOTO) Kent State's Mackenzie Hughes watches his tee shot during Thursday's third round of the NCAA Men's Golf
Championship at Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Calif.

PACIFIC PALISADES, Calif. — Kent State spent Thursday's final nine holes at the NCAA Men's Golf Tournament in a dogfight with Florida State, Liberty, Oregon and Oklahoma in a battle to survive the third-round cut at Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Calif.

The top eight teams in the 30-team field advanced to match play after three rounds.

At press time Thursday night, that battle appeared to be heading for a playoff with Florida State.

The Golden Flashes and the Seminoles both finished at 23-over par, one better than Liberty and two shots clear of Oklahoma.

At press time, the KSU-FSU tie was for eighth place, but Oregon at 21-over-par was still on the course. Barring a hiccup by Oregon, the Flashes and Seminoles were preparing for a playoff battle. If there was enough daylight, that playoff would have been contested Friday night. If not, it will be played sometime this morning. For updates, check www.ncaa.com/golf-men/d1.>

KSU needed some help to pull into the tie after posting its 23-over-par score. That finish had the Flashes in ninth place, one behind Florida State until Seminoles' freshman Daniel Berger three-putted the 18th hole to fall back into an eighth-place deadlock.

FSU's final player, Brooks Koepka, drilled a five-footer to avoid another three putt that would have guaranteed Kent State a spot in the top eight.

The Flashes also left some opportunities on the course. Finishing on the ninth hole after beginning their third round on Riviera's back nine, KSU senior Mackenzie Hughes, freshman Kyle Kmiecik and sophomore Corey Conners all closed by narrowly missing birdie putts.

Conners had the best chance. As the last KSU player on the course, he hit his approach pin high to eight feet. His putt slid by the cup on the left side.

That final putt couldn't spoil a brilliant round by Conners, who posted a 2-under-par 69.

Hughes added a 1-over 72 while Kmiecik shot 74 and Taylor Pendrith added a 76. Kevin Miller shot 77 for the Flashes.

Alabama finished the third round as the leader at 7-over-par, two shots better than second-place UCLA. Texas was in third place, 10 shots behind Alabama with a handful of holes still to play at press time.

Assuming the leaderboard stayed the same, the winner of the Kent State-Florida State playoff would play Alabama today.

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News Headline: Kent State having another golden year on the diamond entering NCAA playoffs: Terry Pluto | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (PHOTO) "Guys may not be great players when they get here," says Kent State pitcher Tyler Skulina, who has a 10-2 record for the Golden Flashes this season, "but they improve because we have great coaching."

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(INSET) Scouting NCAA Regional Baseball

Site: U.S. Steel Yard, Gary, Ind.
Format: Double elimination.
Schedule -- Friday: Kent State vs. Kentucky, 4; Purdue vs. Valparaiso, 8; Saturday: KSU/Kentucky loser vs. Purdue/VU loser, 4; KSU/Kentucky winner vs. Purdue/VU winner, 8; Sunday: Elimination game, 4; championship bracket game, 8; Monday (if necessary): Final, 8.

No. 25 Kent State Golden Flashes (41-17)

Coach: Scott Stricklin, eighth season (308-162 overall).
Conference: Mid-American.
Seed: No. 3.
Player to watch: Shortstop Jimmy Rider has a team-leading 91 hits, and a .982 fielding percentage.
Strength: Depth on the mound and at the plate. The pitchers have a team ERA of 3.55, with 479 strikeouts in 519 innings. The Golden Flashes are hitting .308 with 148 doubles, 41 home runs and 369 RBI.
Notable: After going with two seniors at the start of the MAC Tournament title game, the Golden Flashes relied on freshmen Josh Pierce and Brian Clark to record the final six outs to clinch the program's fourth consecutive conference crown.

No. 13 Kentucky Wildcats (43-16)

Coach: Gary Henderson, fourth season (96-72 overall).
Conference: Southeastern.
Seed: No. 2.
Player to watch: Freshman leadoff hitter Austin Cousino. The Dublin, Ohio, native has a team-best .318 batting average. He is tied for the team lead in doubles (19) and is second in home runs (nine).
Strength: Power hitting. Of the team's 594 hits, the Wildcats have 174 extra-base hits.
Notable: The Wildcats were 11-10 on the road this spring, but that was a marked improvement from the 3-16 in in 2011. Kentucky has made an 18-game improvement in wins and suffered 14 fewer losses.

No. 16 Purdue Boilermakers (44-12)

Coach: Doug Schreiber, 14th season (424-360 overall).
Conference: Big Ten.
Seed: No. 1.
Player to watch: Sophomore infielder Cameron Perkins is batting .358, and has started 55 of 56 games. He has 82 hits, ranks second with 15 doubles and first with nine homers.
Strength: Hitting. Seven Boilermakers who have started at least 37 games have a batting average of at least .300.
Notable: Pitchers Blake Mascarello and Lance Breedlove have combined to go 16-6. Mascarello is 8-1 and has allowed 13 earned runs in 68 innings. Breedlove has a 2.82 ERA and an 8-5 mark in 15 starts. Fellow starter Joe Haase has a 10-1 record in 15 starts and has struck out 52 in 95 innings.

Valparaiso Crusaders (35-23)

Coach: Tracy Woodson, sixth season (155-180 overall).
Conference: Horizon League.
Seed: No. 4.
Player to watch: Junior infielder Tanner Vavra has a .335 batting average. He has 15 stolen bases in 19 attempts.
Strength: Jarad Miller in the bullpen. The fifth-year senior has a 5-2 record, eight saves and a 2.11 ERA in 27 games. Opponents are hitting .258.
Notable: This year's appearance in the NCAA Regional is the first in 44 years for the Crusaders.

— Matt Florjancic, special to The Plain Dealer

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KENT, Ohio -- At Kent State, expectations are high when it comes to baseball. But not even Golden Flashes coach Scott Stricklin imagined this.

How about a 24-3 record in the Mid-American Conference and a 17-game winning streak heading into Friday's 4 p.m. NCAA tournament opener against No. 17 Kentucky in Gary, Ind?

"Our goal is always to win the MAC," said Stricklin. "But we had four players picked in the top 10 rounds [of the MLB draft] last season. Six signed pro contracts. We lost our top two pitchers, our closer and several power bats."

But there is something about Kent State baseball, a program that has been to the last four NCAA tournaments. There's something about a program acknowledged by the NCAA as among the nation's top 30 academically in 2010 and 2011 -- and is expected to be selected again this season.

"We were one of only seven public institutions picked last year," said Stricklin. "Our team grade point average is 3.05, so we're still in good shape."

Make that great shape, as the Flashes are ranked No. 25 on the field and their 24 MAC victories tie a school record. While the Flashes are likely to have several players selected in the major-league draft, none is expected to be in the first dozen rounds.

There's David Starn, the first ever to win back-to-back MAC Pitcher of the Year. Not bad for a kid from Walsh who had to walk on to the team. No one thought a lefty with an 80 mph creeper of a fastball had the right stuff for major college baseball. But he'll leave Kent with school records in victories, strikeouts and innings pitched. His fastball is now in the 83-86 mph range.

"I hope he gets drafted," said Stricklin. "He deserves it. He's a left-handed pitcher who knows how to win games. He's like Jamie Moyer. He just gets you out."

Starn is now on scholarship, and he'll take the mound in the NCAA tournament with a 10-3 record and 1.77 ERA. He may not throw hard, but he's struck out 112 in 102 innings, walking only 37.

"This season has been a great achievement for us because it wasn't expected," said Starn. "But it's like Coach Birkie [pitching coach Mike Birkbeck] says, 'They know who we lost, but they don't know who we have coming up.' Kent always has good players coming."

Coming home

The remarkable part of the KSU story is nearly all the players are from Northeast Ohio or Western Pennsylvania. Sometimes, northern schools make an impact in college baseball by recruiting junior college players from the southern states, California or Texas.

"I can tell you, there's a lot of talent right in this area," said Tyler Skulina, who was a highly recruited pitcher from Walsh who attended Virginia for a year.

"There, we had players from all over the country," said Skulina. "Things didn't work out for me, so I decided to come home and play for Kent. Our talent is good enough to play with teams like Virginia."

Skulina is 10-2 with a 3.94 ERA this season. He throws in the 91-95 mph range, and is expected to be drafted when he's eligible in 2013.

"Tyler was so highly regarded, that we weren't in the running for him out of high school," said Stricklin. "I do think that sometimes when kids take a second look at our program, it looks better to them."

Strongsville's Ryan Bores (8-2, 3.32 ERA) began his career at Ohio, then pitched at Cuyahoga Community College before coming to Kent State. He has a chance to be drafted. Another player who came home was Nick Hamilton. The son of Tribe broadcaster Tom Hamilton, Nick batted .481 as a senior for Avon Lake. He began his college career at Xavier, but transferred to Kent State.

"I really wanted to play for a winner," he said. "This program has such great tradition."

Hamilton wears hearing aids. On the field, he sometimes needs hand signals or reads lips to cut through the crowd noise. He leads the Flashes with a .377 average.

He's not a power hitter -- one homer, 12 doubles -- "but he's gotten as many clutch hits as anyone on the team," said Stricklin. "It's amazing how he gets his bat on the ball. He's overcome a lot. I love him as a person and for what he's done for the program."

A junior, Hamilton is mostly a designated hitter. He also plays some third base. He has a 3.5 GPA with a double major in business and finance.

"To be in the NCAA tournament, that's my dream," he said. "I batted once last year and struck out. So it's great to get another chance."

Hamilton talked about the pride he felt last year when all the players were announced with their hometowns before the NCAA games in Texas.

"There is a lot of pride in the guys from our area," he said. "You come to our games, and you see the players' families and friends are there. It brings everyone together."

Determination to improve

(PHOTO) "When you have a team like this -- a team that exceeded expectations -- it just shows the character and hard work of the players." -- KSU coach Scott Stricklin.

Skulina said the key to their success "is developing players. Guys may not be great players when they get here, but they improve because we have great coaching."

Consider that Jimmy Rider (Venetia, Pa.) had only one Division I offer -- Kent State. He will leave as the MAC's all-time hit leader.

"He's 5-foot-9, 165 pounds," said Stricklin. "No one else wanted him because they thought he was too small. But we liked his energy, and he can hit."

MAC Player of the Year George Roberts (Summerhill, Pa.) was a part-time player in his first two seasons, then led the team in homers (7), RBI (57 in 56 games) and batted .368. There are a lot of stories like that. In the MAC championship game, the final two innings were handled by Josh Pierce (Avon) and Brian Clark (Stow). Ryan Mace (Tallmadge) started that game. Clark had an 0.44 ERA and four saves as a freshman.

"This has been such a special year," said Stricklin. "I'm really happy because when you have a team like this -- a team that exceeded expectations -- it just shows the character and hard work of the players. I'm really proud of them."

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News Headline: Kent State most experienced team in Gary Regional field | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: E-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GARY | Don't let the name and mid-major affiliation fool you.

This isn't Kent State's first rodeo.

The 25th-ranked Flashes (41-17) are the most-experienced team in the NCAA Gary Regional, qualifying for the tournament as Mid American Conference champions for the fourth straight year.

"Kent State has 42,000 students. We feel we are a big school," coach Scott Stricklin said after Thursday's afternoon workout at U.S. Steel Yard. "We feel like we belong here. We've established ourselves as a regional program and now we're trying to take the next step and establish ourselves as a national program."

Kent State reached the Texas Regional final last year as a three seed before falling twice to the Longhorns. Its five seniors have all been to four NCAA tournaments.

"This never really changes. We're always excited to be here," Stricklin said. "The seniors, juniors and sophomores all got a taste of it last year. It's been a motivating factor for the team and coaching all year, to get back to that position again and try to take the next step."

Stricklin, a 1995 Kent State grad, credits some of the Flashes' recent success to the continuity of the program.

"We've had the same coaching staff. We've been doing the same things the same way for eight years," he said. "They've been hearing the same thing. The upperclassmen have bought into what we're doing. It's a great group that wants to learn and get better."

The Flashes are led by 6-3 senior lefthander David Starn, a second-team all-American selection who is 10-3 with a scant 1.77 earned run and 112 strikeouts in 101 2/3 innings.

"We don't feel like we're a small school among the big schools," Starn said. "We've faced a lot of great teams. We've competed with the best. We're not intimidated by much. We've been here before. We know what we have to do and how to get it done."

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News Headline: Will Brewing Corruption Scandals in Ohio Have an Impact on November's Election? | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: AlterNet
Contact Name: Sarah Jaffe
News OCR Text: Investigations by the FBI into campaign donations and strong-arm tactics in Ohio's Republican Party implicate big-name politicians, like anti-union Governor John Kasich.

Sign up to stay up to date on the latest Labor headlines via email.

Ohio governor John Kasich has taken some hits since his election in 2010's Tea Party wave; the most famous was the “Citizen's Veto” of his anti-union legislation. 313,000 more people voted to overturn the law than had voted for Kasich himself a year earlier—and that was in an off year, with no big-ticket candidates on the ballot.

And now he's reportedly become the target of an FBI investigation looking into allegations that he abused his power and offered “influence” to a state Republican Party official if he would step down and allow someone loyal to Kasich to take his place.

This, combined with another investigation into campaign donations to Republicans Josh Mandel (running against Senator Sherrod Brown) and Congressman Jim Renacci, shows a Republican party in turmoil—but will it be enough to make a difference in the upcoming election? Ohio is one of the focal points of a presidential campaign all but guaranteed to get messy, and Democrats will be looking for any advantage. A split within the GOP, combined with FBI agents nosing around campaign finance records and political backroom dealings, could be something with which a savvy candidate can make hay.

Battling for Party Control

In March, Andrew Manning, chairman of the Republican Party in Portage County, went to the FBI as well as state law enforcement with a complaint about Kasich. Specifically, he said that Kasich's allies (Bryan Williams of the Ohio Board of Education and Summit County Republican Party Chairman Alex Arshinkoff) asked him to withdraw from the race for the state party's central committee.

Kasich's people wanted to consolidate their hold over the state party, then run by Kevin DeWine. DeWine is close to John Husted, the current Secretary of State, who has made no secret of the fact that he wants to be governor one day—so close, in fact, that reporters in the Statehouse press corps used to refer to them as “Damon and Affleck”. Kasich and his allies waged an all-out campaign--including robocalls from the governor, paid for by his campaign--to win control of the party and swept DeWine from power, putting in his place Bob Bennett, who'd been party chair for 20 years before DeWine. The party's central committee chooses the party chair.

“Had I agreed to withdraw as a candidate, they told me I would be designated as the ‘Governor's Guy' in Portage County and that I would be given influence in who Gov. Kasich appoints to Kent State University boards and other state government appointments as they come open,” Manning's statement, provided to the Columbus Dispatch, said.

On May 17, Manning's attorney confirmed that FBI agents were in fact looking into his allegations, had interviewed Manning, and that he would have no further comment until the conclusion of the investigation.

But Manning isn't the only one accusing Kasich of shady dealings. Maggie Cook, who worked as membership director for the Associated Builders and Contractors, told the Cleveland Plain Dealer that she was fired from her job after refusing to get out of a similar central committee race. Like Manning, Cook was a supporter of DeWine. She was cagey, and wouldn't say directly that she thought Kasich's people had pushed for her firing, but she did tell them, "I don't really know what to think because they brought a new president on, but I was in sales and it was really easy to see if you were doing your job well or not. I was making all my targets. I had sales metrics, monthly and quarterly goals, and I had met all of my metrics for the year.”

The Plain Dealer noted that Kasich's ally Rebecca Heimlich won that race after another candidate, Jean Raga, also dropped out. “Raga is married to former State Rep. Tom Raga, who after the election was appointed executive director of the Dayton Power & Light Foundation,” the paper noted.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEETING, JUNE 6 | Email

News Date: 05/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, May 31 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The Kent State University Board of Trustees will hold its next regular business meeting Wednesday, June 6.The Board will convene at 1:30 p.m.in the George Urban Board of Trustees Conference Room, which is located on the second floor of the Kent Campus Library.

Trustees will retire into executive session at 8:30 a.m.in the Urban Conference Room to consider specific topics as provided for under Ohio's "Sunshine Law."

Board committees will meet as follows:

* Academic Excellence and Student Success Committee - 10:30-11:30 a.m.in the Urban Conference Room.

* Audit & Finance and Administration Committees - 10:30-11:30 a.m.in Room 222.

* External Relations and Development Committee - 11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m.in the Urban Conference Room.

The Board meeting agenda will be made available at www.kent.edu/bot/meetings/index.cfm.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: New Research on Atmospheric Science from Kent State University Summarized | Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Science Letter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- Current study results on Atmospheric Science have been published. According to news reporting originating from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx correspondents, researchers stated "A discrimination of aerosol types over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) region during pre-monsoon period was made using multi-year ground based sun/sky radiometer measured aerosol products associated with the size of aerosols and radiation absorptivity. High dust enriched aerosols (i.e. polluted dust, PD) were found to contribute more over the central IGB station at Kanpur (KNP, 62%) as compared to the eastern IGB station at Gandhi College (GC, 31%) whereas vice-versa was observed for polluted continental (PC) aerosols, which contain high anthropogenic and less dust aerosols."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research by the authors from Kent State University, "Contributions of carbonaceous particles having high absorbing (mostly black carbon, MBC) and low absorbing (mostly organic carbon, MOC) aerosols were found to be 11% and 10%, respectively at GC, which was similar to 46% and 62% higher than the observed contributions at KNP: however, very less contribution of non-absorbing (NA) aerosols was observed only at GC (2%). Variability in aerosol types together with single scattering albedo (SSA) at both the stations were also studied during the forenoon (FN) and afternoon (AN) hour, which suggests their strong association with emission sources. Results were well substantiated with the air mass back-trajectories and the fire products. Spectral information of SSA for each aerosol type discriminates the dominance of natural dust (SSA increases with increasing wavelength) with anthropogenic aerosols (SSA decreases with increasing wavelength) at both the locations."

According to the news editors, the researchers concluded: "The estimated absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) values suggest relative dominance of absorbing type aerosols over the central part of IGB (due to dominant dust absorption) as compared to the eastern part during pre-monsoon period."

For more information on this research see: Inferring aerosol types over the Indo-Gangetic Basin from ground based sunphotometer measurements. Atmospheric Research, 2012;109():64-75. Atmospheric Research can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Inc, 360 Park Ave South, New York, NY 10010-1710, USA. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Atmospheric Research - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/503323)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A.K. Srivastava, Kent State University, Dept. of Chem, Kent, OH 44242, United States (see also ).

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, United States, Atmospheric Science, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2012 Science Letter via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: In the Region (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jobless rate 7.8 percent

in Portage during March

Portage County's jobless rate dropped nearly a full percentage point in April, dropping from 7.8 percent in March to 6.9 percent last month, according to statistics released Tuesday by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services.

It was the lowest rate in Portage since November 2008, when the rate was 7.9 percent, and the third monthly drop from this past February's 8.3.

A year ago, Portage's jobless rate was 8.3 percent. During the past recession, the jobless rate in Portage peaked at 11.5 percent in January, 2010.

Across the state, rates dropped in 86 of the 88 counties and ranged from a low of 4.5 percent in Mercer County to a high of 13.5 percent in Pike County.

There were 6,200 people jobless out of a workforce of 89,900 in the county, according to ODJFS.

Rates of counties contiguous to Portage were: Cuyahoga, 7.0; Geauge, 5.7; ; Stark, 7.8; Summit, 7.1; and Trumbull 7.6.

Seven motorists nabbed

A checkpoint May 18-19 on Route 43 in Brimfield Township intended to deter drunken driving resulted in seven arrests, police said.

Three drivers were charged with operating a vehicle under the influence. Three were charged with driving under suspension and one was held on a drug charge, Brimfield Police Chief David Oliver said.

The Ohio Highway Patrol, Brimfield police and Portage County sheriff's deputies manned the checkpoint in the southbound lanes of Route for five hours.

Additional officers and troopers conducted saturation patrols to catch other impaired drivers who did not go through the checkpoint.

Poker run benefits pets

Rose's Rescue, a non-profit pet rescue agency, will psonsor a poker run on June 17. Cost is $15 for riders and $10 for passengers, and the fee includes dinner. Register at Carlton Harley Davidson on Route 44 in Mantua. For more information, visit www.rosesrescue.net.

Dozens line up for jobs

People hoping for a job with Rubbermaid started lining up hours before the official start of a job fair May 25 in Ravenna.

The fair was set for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Portage County Administration Building. By 9 a.m. there were some 50 people waiting.

Rubbermaid is hiring for openings at its expanding Mogadore production plant and a new warehouse facility being built in Brimfield.

Pilot lands in 88 counties

A local pilot touched down safely in Dayton on May 22 after a nine-day flight which took him to each of Ohio's 88 counties while logging in 1,809 miles.

Joe Murray, a Hudson resident and journalism professor at Kent State University, set the record by being "the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all counties of Ohio in an antique aircraft," he said.

"We were met by an enthusiastic crowd from the community, the Wright B Flyer Museum and several of our ground crew drove even in from Kent."

Murray made the flight in a 1946 Piper J3 Cub, with friend and fellow pilot Ron Siwik of Chagrin Falls flying alongside in an identical vintage plane.

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News Headline: Woman of Substance | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: www.ohiomagazine.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: September 2010 Issue

Woman of Substance

The Kent State University Museum unveils its newest acquisition: The couture of Katharine Hepburn.

Linda Feagler

"Adams Rib," 1949: This black evening gown shared the screen with Hepburn (center) and co-star Spencer Tracy (top right).

Courtesy of the Kent State University Museum/Herbert Ascherman/Jeannette Palsa

"The Little Minister," 1934: As Scottish noblewoman Lady Babbie, Hepburn sported a Gypsy look created by Walter Plunkett.

Courtesy of the Kent State University Museum/Herbert Ascherman/Jeannette Palsa

"The Philadelphia Story," 1940: Valentina's silk creations were favorites of Hepburn's socialite alter ego, Tracy Lord, here with co-star James Stewart.

Courtesy of Turner Classic Movies/Herbert Ascherman/Jeannette Palsa

Saucy, sporty, sophisticated.

No matter what part she played, Katharine Hepburn exuded a charisma all her own.

This month, the Kent State University Museum will begin showcasing that allure by unveiling its newest acquisition: a collection of 700-plus pieces from the actress' personal and performance wardrobes, ranging from designer gowns and denim shirts to lingerie, hairpieces and makeup. The resulting exhibit, “Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen,” will open to the public Oct. 2 and run through Sept. 4, 2011.

“This is such an exciting time for us,” says museum director Jean Druesedow. “Katharine Hepburn. Her name is pure magic. She was a true fashion icon who served as a role model for generations of women.

“And this collection,” she adds, “reflects that magnetism.”

As they say in Hollywood, timing is everything. That adage certainly played a vital role when it came to the museum's most recent coup: It was Hepburn's desire that her clothing be bequeathed to an educational facility and, following the star's death in 2003, the executors of her estate began the process of making that request a reality.

Druesedow credits Gladys Toulis, the former director of the KSU Fashion School now living in New York, with suggesting the museum's attributes be brought to the attention of the actress' lawyers.

“I received a letter from Gladys, telling me the costumes were available and encouraging me to write the executors,” Druesedow recalls. “It was Miss Hepburn's wish that the garments be preserved in a public institution, not a private one, and Gladys thought the Kent State Museum would be an ideal fit.”

Two years of correspondence and discussion followed. “The [legal team] was very respectful of Miss Hepburn,” Druesedow explains. “They really did their homework in order to find a place for the clothes that would be respectful of her as well.”

In 2008, the museum director learned that her perseverance had paid off.

“When I got word we would receive them,” Druesedow recalls. “I went limp.”

The Hepburn collection joins the renowned assortment of more than 20,000 objects amassed by the museum since it opened 25 years ago. New York fashion designers Jerry Silverman and Shannon Rodgers were the first benefactors, contributing more than 4,000 costumes. Since then, impressive collections of fashion by Oscar de la Renta and Halston have been added to the mix.

As she scrupulously catalogs the items and chronicles which productions they appeared in, Druesedow marvels at the exquisite workmanship and design of the attire. The collection ranges from the black silk evening gown created by Walter Plunkett for Hepburn's role as lawyer Amanda Bonner in the 1949 George Cukor comedy “Adam's Rib,” to a linen ensemble with intricate lace detailing that the English design firm Motley fashioned for her portrayal of the drug-addicted matriarch in the 1962 film adaptation of Eugene O'Neill's “Long Day's Journey Into Night.”

“Katharine Hepburn was extraordinarily astute in understanding what costume conveyed about character,” she muses. “And as soon as she had clout, she began to work very closely with her costumers. She eventually got what she wanted, regardless of what they wanted.”

As a result, Druesedow adds, “the clothing was appropriate, comfortable to perform in and expressed what she wanted it to express.”

Hepburn enthusiasts from around the country will be in attendance when the collection debuts during “25 Years of Dazzle,” a benefit that will take place on Sept. 25 at the museum. Emceed by Turner Classic Movies film historian Robert Osborne and actress Ann Rutherford (best known for her role as the youngest O'Hara sister in “Gone With the Wind”), the fete also commemorates the museum's silver anniversary. The evening will feature a screening of the autobiographical documentary, “All About Me,” which Hepburn produced in 1993.

“Katharine Hepburn was a ground-breaker all the way down the line,” Osborne tells Ohio Magazine. “She never did anything that wasn't of high quality. So what you got were pristine films that were all top-tier projects.”

When the exhibition closes next year, plans call for it to travel the world, which will make it easily accessible to the actress' legion of fans around the globe.

“The exhibit will become a good-will ambassador for the wonderful collection the museum has,” Druesedow says.

For more information, visit kent.edu/museum

Tender Moments

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News Headline: Research from Kent State University Yields New Findings on Management Science | Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Science Letter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- Current study results on Management Science have been published. According to news reporting originating from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx correspondents, researchers stated "The paper introduces a concept of the optimal positioning of the delivery window to the final customer in a serial supply chain. Optimally positioning the delivery window minimizes the expected penalty cost due to early and late delivery."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research by the authors from Kent State University, "The conditions for the optimal position of the delivery window are derived for the general form of a delivery time distribution. Closed form expressions for the optimal position of the delivery window are presented for several different forms of delivery time distributions that have been reported in the literature to model delivery performance."

According to the news editors, the researchers concluded: "The optimal positioning of a delivery window is illustrated for an industrial case study."

For more information on this research see: Optimal position of supply chain delivery window: Concepts and general conditions. International Journal of Production Economics, 2012;137(2):226-234. International Journal of Production Economics can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; International Journal of Production Economics - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/505647)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M.A. Bushuev, Kent State University, Coll Business Adm, Dept. of Management & Informat Syst, Kent, OH 44242, United States (see also ).

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, United States, Management Science, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2012 Science Letter via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Learning a new language on summer 'to do' list | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Marietta Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: May 31, 2012
By Ashley Rittenhouse (arittenhouse@mariettatimes.com) , The Marietta Times

Many teenagers would cringe at the thought of replacing their cell phones and television time with hours of studying a foreign language over their summer break, but two Marietta High School students see it as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

Josh Burke and Cecelia Tio, who will be juniors in the next school year, have been accepted into the STARTALK Foreign Language Academy to be held for about a month at Kent State University.

There will be 42 high school juniors and seniors from all over the state of Ohio participating, according to Brian Baer, director of the program. He said a total of 78 students applied.

"It's rare we have more than one student from a school," he noted.

The academy will be held on the campus in Kent, Ohio from June 17 to July 14, but participants will also be required to travel to the campus one Saturday a month for mini-immersion sessions and participate in distance learning sessions throughout the next school year.

"The idea is by the time they finish both components of the academy they are ready to go into intermediate language (courses) at the college or university of their choice," Baer said.

Participants were able to choose whether they want to study Arabic, Chinese or Russian. Burke will study Arabic, while Tio decided to learn Russian.

"I chose Arabic because I want to go into genetic anthropology," said Burke, 16. "Arabic is one of the top 10 languages throughout the entire world."

Tio, 16, said she chose Russian because she has cousins who were adopted from Russia and she would like to be able to speak their language.

"I have never spoken Russian. I just thought it sounded interesting," she said. "I want to go into engineering and maybe become a doctor so I think that's going to help me on my career path (to learn) many different languages."

"I'm super excited," Tio added. "It's going to be an awesome experience."

The students will be in class Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m., with a lunch break being held from noon to 1 p.m. They will have free time daily from 3 to 5 p.m., then dinner will be from 5 to 6 p.m. and they will participate in activities in the evenings related to the languages they are studying.

They will stay in Kent State University's Stopher-Johnson Honors Complex and will not return home on the weekends.

The students will only be permitted to use their cell phones during free time and although they are being provided with laptop computers, they will only be able to use them in public areas for class work. They will only watch television one night a week.

"At lunch and dinner you have to eat with your group and as far as I know you have to more or less speak your language as much as you can," Burke said. "I'm completely excited and can't wait but at the same time I am very nervous because I have no idea what it's going to be like."

Baer said the program is intense, which is why not all applicants are accepted. He said program organizers look for students who are emotionally mature and can handle being away from home.

"We look at grades but we're not hung up on grades," he added. "We're more interested in success and persistence in the study of another foreign language, that's one of the indicators of success in our program."

Baer noted that the academy's instructors are from Kent State University and surrounding colleges and high schools. The students participating will receive college credit.

The program is offered free of charge through a federal grant, he said.

"It's a post 9-11 government initiative to increase the number of students proficient in these languages," he said.
© Copyright 2012 The Marietta Times. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: Bonds for Kent State Campus Renovation Get Positive Rating | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Perhaps not surprisingly, the anticipated $170 million in bonds Kent State University will issue to renovate the main campus have received a solid financial rating from Wall Street.

Moody's Investor Services assigned a rating of "Aa3" to the $170 million in Series 2012A general receipt bonds, which are scheduled to go on sale Monday to pay for the largest renovation of the Kent campus in its 100-year history.

The "Aa" rating means the long-term bonds are judged to be of high quality with very low credit risk, according to Moody's.

"The Aa3 rating reflects Kent State's solid balance sheet, stable market position with growing enrollment and favorable operating performance," Moody's advisers said.

The rating came as good news for university officials.

"We're very pleased that both Standard & Poor's and Moody's held a strong financial rating for Kent State despite the assumption of the added debt being issued," said Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for finance and administration at Kent State.

Including the bonds for construction, Kent State's outstanding debt will rise to $436 million, according to Moody's.

You can read the entire rating from Moody's via the .pdf file attached to this article.

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News Headline: Browsing the Arts for June 1-7, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: John Kappes
News OCR Text: ART -- MUSEUMS

Akron Art Museum. 1 S. High St. 330-376-9185 or akronartmuseum.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Thursday), and holidays. $7; $5, those 65 and older and students (with valid ID); free, children ages 12 and younger. Free admission the first Sunday of the month. Exhibit: "Stranger in Paradise: The Works of Reverend Howard Finster." Closes Sunday. Exhibit: "Making Sense of Science: The Sounds of Teaching and Studenting in Four Urban Classrooms." Exhibition is the result of an ongoing study in four classrooms in the Akron Public School District conducted by Professor Walter S. Gershon of Kent State University. Through Sunday, June 24. Exhibit: "String of Hearts: Photographs by Bea Nettles." Through Sunday, July 8.

Cleveland Museum of Art. 11150 East Blvd. 216-421-7340 or clevelandart.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Wednesday and Friday). Closed major holidays. Free admission to the permanent collection. Admission may apply to touring exhibitions. Highlights Tours. Visit the information desk in the north lobby to find out the day’s tour topic and meeting place. 1:30 p.m. today-Sunday and Tuesday.

ART -- GALLERIES

Brunswick Art Works. Brunswick City Hall, 4095 Center Road. 330-225-9144 or brunswickartworks.org. Featured Artists: Bill Beuther on photography; and Leslie Panfil on ways to use photos to make other things like note cards. Talk: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Ashtabula Arts Center Gallery. 2928 West 13th St. 440-964-3396 or ashartscenter.org. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday, Saturday; and during theater performances. Exhibit: "Great Lake." Karen Schneider, paintings. Opens: today. Through Thursday, June 28.

Chardon Square. Ohio 44 and U.S. 6. 440-286-2600 or chardon.cc. Event: Chardon Square Flea Market's "Stop! Shop! or Swap" (bring your artworks, up to six, to sell or swap). Meet the Artists: 9 a.m. Saturday; Monday.

Euclid Art Association. East Shore Methodist Church's Fellowship Hall, 23002 Lake Shore Blvd. 216-692-0538. Critique session: Artist John Beukemann will critique members' works of art. Meet the Artist: 7 p.m. Monday.

Fairmount Center for the Arts Gallery. At 8400 Fairmount Blvd., Russell Township. fairmountcenter.org. Due to on-going classes, viewing times are limited for the gallery. Call 440-338-3171. Exhibit: The 36th annual Fairmount Art Exhibition. Opening reception: 6:30-9 p.m. Saturday. Through Thursday, June 14.

Green House Gallery. 441 N. Main St., North Canton. 330-497-2526 or chestnuthillgifts.com. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit: "Lay of the Land." Rudy Amatangelo and Doreen St. John, landscape paintings; Bob Yost, pottery. Opening reception: 1-4 p.m. Saturday. Through Saturday, July 14.

Spaces. At Loren Naji Studio, 2138 West 25th St., Cleveland. spacesgallery.org. Noon-6 p.m. Friday, Saturday; 3-6 p.m. Tuesday. Exhibit: "Beautiful Possibility Pop Up," Alison Pebworth's cross country traveling show; and "Celebrate Cleveland," works by Michael Nekic, Victoria Miller and Rick Novario. Opening reception: 5:30 p.m.-midnight today. Through June 23.

William Busta Gallery. 2731 Prospect Ave., Cleveland. 216-298-9071 or williambustagallery.com. 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Exhibit: Susan Umbenhour, constructed reliefs. Opening reception: 5-9 p.m. today. Through Saturday, July 28. Exhibit: "Occupying a Space." Works by Darius Steward. Opening reception: 5-9 p.m. today. Through Saturday, July 28.

BOOKS -- AUTHORS

Case Western Reserve University. Adelbert Gym, 2128 Adelbert Road, Cleveland. 216-368-2090. or case.edu/booksale. Sale: The 66th annual CWRU Book Sale. Saturday: Preview ($20), 10 a.m.-noon; free admission, noon-5 p.m. Sunday: Coupon Day ($5 off purchase of $15 or more), noon-5 p.m. Monday: Reduced Prices, noon-5 p.m. Tuesday: Box Sale ($5/box), 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Chagrin Valley Little Theater. River Street Playhouse, 40 River St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-8955 or cvlt.org. Hear Who's Here series: Cinda Williams Chima on "Magic on the Page: Writing and Publishing Teen Fantasy Fiction." 7 p.m. Wednesday. $12. Proceeds benefit the Chagrin Valley Little Theatre.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Strongsville branch. 18700 Westwood Drive, Strongsville. 440-238-5530 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Meet a Local Author: James Renner, "The Man From Primrose Lane." 7-8 p.m. Wednesday. Free, but registration requested.

Learned Owl Book Shop. 204 N. Main St., Hudson. 330-653-2252 or learnedowl.com. Meet a Local Author: Sarahbeth Caplin, "Confessions of a Prodigal Daughter." 1 p.m. Sunday.

Logo's Bookstore. 976 W. Main St., Kent. 330-673-6099 or kentlogos.com. Meet the Author: Russell A. Minar, "The Mirror of Freedom." 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday.

Scribbles Coffee Company. 237 N. Water St., Kent. 330-346-0337 or scribblescafe.com. Meet the Author: Diane Adams Taylor, "Circles in Time." 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.

Visible Voice Books. 1023 Kenilworth Ave., Cleveland. 216-961-0084 or visiblevoicebooks.com. Workshop: Write Here, Write Now Creative Writing Workshop with T.L. Champion. 5:45-7:45 p.m. Thursday. $30 fee.

DANCE

Shaker Dance Performing Arts Academy. Cuyahoga Community College's Eastern Campus, 4250 Richmond Road, Highland Hills. 216-987-6000 or shakerdanceacademy.net. Performance: "Dancin' 2012." 6 p.m. today-Saturday; 4 p.m. Sunday. $15.

MUSIC -- ORCHESTRAL, OPERA

Bay Village Community Band. Cahoon Memorial Park Gazebo, Cahoon Road between Lake and Wolf roads 440-871-6755 or bayrec.org. Summer Concert. 7 p.m. Sunday. Bring lawn chairs. Free.

Cleveland International Piano Competition. Breen Center for the Performing Arts, 1911 West 30th St. 216-707-5397 or clevelandpiano.org. Concert: "Musical Encounters," featuring the Competition Orchestra. Sergei Babayan, conductor. Kyu Yeon Kim, laureate and Mozart prize winner in 2011; and Daniil Trifonov, winner of the 2011 International Tchaikovsky Competition. Works by Mozart. 8 p.m. today. $25-$35.

Cleveland Orchestra. Severance Hall, 11001 Euclid Ave. 216-231-1111 or clevelandorchestra.com. Concert: Verdi's "Requiem." Robert Porco, conductor; Liudmyla Monastyrska, soprano; Michelle DeYoung, mezzo-soprano; Dimitri Pittas, tenor; Richmond Aceto, bass; and Cleveland Orchestra Chorus. 8 p.m. Saturday. $44-$120.

Cleveland Pops Orchestra. Nighttown, 2387 Cedar Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-765-7677 or clevelandpops.com. Event: The annual "Cool Jazz, Hot Party." A three-course dinner with wine featuring Carl Topilow's Charismatic Combo. 6 p.m. Thursday. $125. Reservation requested.

Hillcrest Concert Band. Willoughby Presbyterian Church, 4785 Shankland Road, Willoughby. hillcrestconcertband.org. Concert: "Americana." Paul Lawrence, conductor. Features music from the Revolutionary War through early American pieces. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Free.

Shaker Symphony Orchestra. Stephanie Tubbs Jones Community Center, 3450 Lee Road, Shaker Heights. 216-491-1360. Concert: Allan Hinkle, conductor; Luiz F. Coelho, clarinet. Works by von Weber and Mozart. 3:30 p.m. Sunday. $10; $6 students and senior citizens ages 60 and up.

Voices of Canton Inc. Lions Lincoln Theater, 156 Lincoln Way East, Massillon. 330-455-1000 or voicesofcanton.org. Concert: "Titanic, the Musical." 8 p.m. Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. $15-$25.

Western Reserve Chorale. Grace Lutheran Church, 13001 Cedar Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-791-0061 or westernreservechorale.org. Concert: The 20th Anniversary Celebration. David Gilson, guest conductor. 7 p.m. Sunday.

MUSIC -- RECITALS, COMMUNITY CONCERTS

Broadway School of Music & the Arts. Trinity Commons' Cathedral Hall, 2230 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-641-0630 or broadwayschool.org. Concert: "An Evening of Tchaikovsky," a benefit concert for school operations and student financial aid fund. Featuring members of the Cleveland Orchestra (violinists Katherine Bormann, Elayna Duitman, Chul-In Park and Ying Fu; violists Lisa Boyko and Lembi Veskimets; cellists Tanya Ell and Byran Dumm; and bass Thomas Sperl. 7 p.m. today. $75.

Cleveland Institute of Music. 11021 East Blvd. 216-791-5000, ext. 411 or cim.edu. Most events free unless indicated. Seating passes will be distributed in lobby 30 minutes before the concert and may be reserved one week in advance. Classical Guitar Weekend (master class in Studio 113): Gaelle Solal. 1-3:30 p.m. today. Free. Classical Guitar Weekend (master class in Studio 113): SoloDuo. 4-6:30 p.m. today. Free. Classical Guitar Weekend (recital in Mixon Hall): Pavel Steidl. Works by Bach, de Ferranti, Mertz, Paganini and Sor. 8 p.m. today. $22. Classical Guitar Weekend (lecture in Studio 217): Bernhard Kresse on "The Viennese 19th-Century Guitar Making Tradition." 9:30 a.m. Saturday. Free. Classical Guitar Weekend (master class in Mixon Hall): Jason Vieaux and Anne Waller. Noon Saturday. Free. Classical Guitar Weekend (lecture in Studio 113): Jonathan Fitzgerald on "Listening and Re-listening: Opening Your Ears to New Sounds." 3 p.m. Saturday. Free. Classical Guitar Weekend (recital in Mixon Hall): Gaelle Solal. Works by Albeniz, Gallardo del Rey, Garoto, Gismonti, Guinga, Nazareth, Ohana, Pereira and Seddike. 4:30 p.m. Saturday. $22. Classical Guitar Weekend (recital in Mixon Hall): SoloDuo. Works by Bach, Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Debussty, Giuliani, and Rebay 8 p.m. Saturday. $22. Classical Guitar Weekend (lecture in Studio 113): Alan Bise on "The Recording Process: From Artistic Vision to Retail Sale." Noon Sunday. Free. Classical Guitar Weekend (master class in Studio 113): Pavel Steidl. 1:15-3:45 p.m. Sunday. Free. Classical Guitar Weekend (CIM faculty recital in Mixon Hall): Jason Vieaux with Jung Eun Oh. Works by Britten and Dowland. 4 p.m. Sunday. $22.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Fairview Park branch, 21255 Lorain Road, Fairview Park. 440-333-4700 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Concert: Cleveland Chinese Music Ensemble's "Year of the Dragon: A Concert of Traditional Chinese Music." 2 p.m. Sunday. Free, but registration required.

Trinity Lutheran Church. 2031 West 30th St., Cleveland. 216-321-1393 or clevelandbeckerath.org. Concert: "Celebration." Coeli Ingold, soprano; Sean Gabriel, flute; Mark DeMio, bassoon; and David Tidyman, organ. Works by Delalande, Purcell, bach and Villa-Lobos. 3 p.m. Sunday. Offering. Brownbag Concert: "Rhythm of the Dance." Florence Mustric, organ. 12:15 p.m. Wednesday. Free.

THEATER -- PROFESSIONAL

Actors' Summit Theater. Greystone Hall, 6th Floor, 103 S. High St., Akron. 330-374-7568 or actorssummit.org. "I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $19-$30; $9, full-time students with ID.

Beck Center for the Arts. Studio Theatre, 17801 Detroit Ave., Lakewood. 216-521-2540 or beckcenter.org. $28, adults; $25, seniors; $17, students with ID; $10, children ages 12 and under. An additional $3 service fee per ticket at time of purchase. Alex Timbers and Michael Friedman's "Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 7 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 1. $28; $25, senior citizens; $17, students with valid ID. An additional $3 service fee per ticket at time of purchase.

Cleveland Public Theatre. 6415 Detroit Ave. 216-631-2727 or cptonline.org. CPT Storefront Studio: Pandora Robertson's "13 Most American Dreams." 7 p.m. today-Saturday. $10-$25. Gordon Square Theatre: Jen Silverstein's "Akarui." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday, Monday and Thursday. Through Saturday, June 9. $10-$25.

Convergence-Continuum. The Liminis. 2438 Scranton Road, Cleveland. 216-687-0074 or convergence-continuum.org. Buddy Thomas and Kenneth Elliott's "Devil Boys From Beyond." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. $15; $12, seniors; $10, students.

Dobama Theatre. 2340 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-932-3396 or dobama.org. The 34rd annual Marilyn Bianchi Kids’ Playwriting Festival. 7:30 p.m. today; 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. $10. The Dobama Young Playwrights Competition. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Through Sunday, June 10. $10.

Great Lakes Theater. Hanna Theatre, 2067 East 14th St., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or greatlakestheater.org. "Sondheim on Sondheim." 7:30 p.m. today, Tuesday-Thursday; 4 and 8:30 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 8. $10-$60.

Karamu Performing Arts Theatre. 2355 East 89th St., Cleveland. 216-795-7070 or karamu.com. August Wilson's "Gem of the Ocean." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. $21-$25, Friday, Saturday; $16-$20, Sunday.

Pickwick & Frolic Restaurant and Club. Frolic Cabaret, 2035 East Fourth St., Cleveland. 216-241-7425 or pickwickandfrolic.com. Michael Rogaliner's murder mystery dinner theater with three endings: "Murder at the Oasis." 7:15 p.m. today-Saturday. Through Saturday, Aug. 25. $45.95, choice of five entrees.

PlayhouseSquare. Ohio Theatre, 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or playhousesquare.org. The 13th Annual Cleveland Metropolitan School District's All-City Musical: "Footloose." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. $15.

PlayhouseSquare. 14th Street Theatre, 2037 East 14th St., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or playhousesquare.org. "Girls Night, the Musical." 8 p.m. today; 4 and 8 p.m. Saturday; 4 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, June 3. $54.50-$75.

THEATER -- COMMUNITY

Cassidy Theatre. 6200 Pearl Road, Parma Heights. 440-842-4600 or cassidytheatre.com. Arthur Laurents, Jule Styne and Stephen Sondheim's "Gypsy." 8 p.m. Thursday. $10 (preview Thursday). For all other performances through Sunday, June 24: $20; $15, senior citizens and students.

Chagrin Valley Little Theatre. 40 River St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-8955 or cvlt.org. Robin Hawdon's "A Night to Provence." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. Through Saturday, June 23. $16; $12, senior citizens and students.

Cleveland Shakespeare Festival. Market Avenue Wine Bar, 2521 Market Ave. 216-965-7917 or cleveshakes.org. Open Mic Shakespeare: "Coriolanus." 7 p.m. Monday. Details: email info@cleveshakes.org. Free. A limited number of copies available for readers, but if you have a copy of your own, please bring it.

Coach House Theatre. 732 W. Exchange St., Akron. 330-434-7741 or coachhousetheatre.org. Ray Cooney and John Chapman's "Move Over, Mrs. Markham." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $18; $12, students.

East Cleveland Public Library. Main branch's Greg L. Reese Performing Arts Center, 14101 Euclid Ave. 216-541-4128 or ecpl.lib.oh.us. Stage reading: "Chronicles: Journey of the History of Black Americaq Through Poetry, Music and Theatre." 4 p.m. Saturday. Presented in collaboration with the Arts Factory. Offering.

Fine Arts Association. Corning Auditorium, 38660 Mentor Ave., Willoughby. 440-951-7500 or fineartsassociation.org. Mark O'Donnell, Thomas Meehan, Scott Wittman and Mark Shaiman's "Hairspray, the Broadway Musical." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, June 17. $25; $23, senior citizens and students ages 11 and up; $15, children ages 10 and under.

Huntington Playhouse. 28601 Lake Road, Bay Village. 440-871-8333 or huntingtonplayhouse.com. Dan Goggin's "Nunsense." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $18-$20; $10, students. Reservations strongly suggested.

Lantern Theatre. Big Red Barn at Canal Corners Farm and Market, 7243 Canal Road, Valley View. The Pot Luck Meet & Greet the Barn Party. 4 p.m. Saturday. Free. Bring a potluck dish and learn about a new theater opening Saturday, June 23.

New World Performance Laboratory Studio 2 Production. Balch Street Theatre, 220 S. Balch St., Akron. 330-867-3299 or nwplab.org. Benjamin Paloff's translation of Dorota Maslowska's "A Couple of Poor, Polish-Speaking Romanians." 8 p.m. Thursday. Through Saturday, June 23. For mature audiences. $10 (two for one on Thurday).

Rabbit Run Barn Theater. 5648 Chapel Road, Madison. 440-428-5913 or rabbitrunonline.com. Peter Ackroyd's "The Mystery of Charles Dickens." 8 p.m. today-Sunday and Thursday. Through Saturday, June 9. $17-$19.

Western Reserve Playhouse. 3326 Everett Road, Bath. 330-620-7314 or westernreserveplayhouse.org. Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope and James Wooten's "The Dixie Swim Club." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. Through Saturday, June 16. $10-$12.

AUDITIONS

For the region's most comprehensive look at auditions at theaters and other arts organizations, go to cleveland.com/auditions.

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News Headline: About Books: Book tells how Ohio community saved jobs and its self-... | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Gary Brown

CantonRep.com staff writer

Posted May 31, 2012 @ 02:00 PM

Economic restructuring. Most of us don't even know what that term means, much less comprehend how to deal with the real-life results of it.

"Since the 1970s, urban communities across the country have had to face the wrenching process of economic restructuring," notes publicity information for a new Kent State University Press book, "Rust Belt: How a Small Community Took on Big Oil and Won," by Perry Bush.

"As the media announce the latest plant closings and politicians slam each other for outsourcing jobs, events are too often framed with a kind of economic determinism that denies agency to individual communities. To what degree can industrial cities in such an era still imagine themselves as authors of their own economic fates?"

In "Rust Belt Resistance" Bush tries to increase our economic understanding by focusing on Lima, Ohio, which faced not only economic restructuring, but also "economic desperation" when British Petroleum announced it would close its refinery there. The closure would cost the community 500 jobs paying $31.5 million, community leaders knew.

"Lima's story, however, deviated from the usual sad narrative of other Midwest plant closures and began to assume a drama of its own," the publisher notes in the promotional material. "Led by an unlikely cast of characters - an uncommonly stubborn set of civic leaders, a conservative local newspaper publisher, and the city's determined and progressive mayor - Lima refused to take its place quietly on the industrial scrap heap. Instead of collapsing in despair, the refinery's workers continued to function as a model of industrial efficiency and hard work, partly in a determined effort to build profitability and preserve their jobs and also because hard work was the essence and tradition of this blue-collar town."

Bush's book is billed by the publisher as an "instructional lesson" for those interested in "the continuing viability of American industrial cities."

"In a story replete with a number of dramatic twists and turns, Bush describes how this collection of individuals led a resistant multinational corporation to a financial deal it could not refuse, located an acceptable buyer for the refinery, and saved not only a sizable share of the city's financial foundation but also the community's identity and self-respect."

BOOK SIGNINGS

• Russell A. Minar of Lakemore, author of "The Mirror of Freedom," will sign copies of the book from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Logo's Bookstore at 976 W. Main St., Kent. "One day, Charles meets a man who takes him into another realm of existence and changes the way he looks at his life," explains publicity material. "Will he escape reality? Or will he learn, through his Mirror of Freedom, that he can be happy in reality?"

Economic restructuring. Most of us don't even know what that term means, much less comprehend how to deal with the real-life results of it.

"Since the 1970s, urban communities across the country have had to face the wrenching process of economic restructuring," notes publicity information for a new Kent State University Press book, "Rust Belt: How a Small Community Took on Big Oil and Won," by Perry Bush.

"As the media announce the latest plant closings and politicians slam each other for outsourcing jobs, events are too often framed with a kind of economic determinism that denies agency to individual communities. To what degree can industrial cities in such an era still imagine themselves as authors of their own economic fates?"

In "Rust Belt Resistance" Bush tries to increase our economic understanding by focusing on Lima, Ohio, which faced not only economic restructuring, but also "economic desperation" when British Petroleum announced it would close its refinery there. The closure would cost the community 500 jobs paying $31.5 million, community leaders knew.

"Lima's story, however, deviated from the usual sad narrative of other Midwest plant closures and began to assume a drama of its own," the publisher notes in the promotional material. "Led by an unlikely cast of characters - an uncommonly stubborn set of civic leaders, a conservative local newspaper publisher, and the city's determined and progressive mayor - Lima refused to take its place quietly on the industrial scrap heap. Instead of collapsing in despair, the refinery's workers continued to function as a model of industrial efficiency and hard work, partly in a determined effort to build profitability and preserve their jobs and also because hard work was the essence and tradition of this blue-collar town."

Bush's book is billed by the publisher as an "instructional lesson" for those interested in "the continuing viability of American industrial cities."

"In a story replete with a number of dramatic twists and turns, Bush describes how this collection of individuals led a resistant multinational corporation to a financial deal it could not refuse, located an acceptable buyer for the refinery, and saved not only a sizable share of the city's financial foundation but also the community's identity and self-respect."

BOOK SIGNINGS

• Russell A. Minar of Lakemore, author of "The Mirror of Freedom," will sign copies of the book from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Logo's Bookstore at 976 W. Main St., Kent. "One day, Charles meets a man who takes him into another realm of existence and changes the way he looks at his life," explains publicity material. "Will he escape reality? Or will he learn, through his Mirror of Freedom, that he can be happy in reality?"

•Minar also will have a book signing from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday at Hartville MarketPlace at 1289 Edison St. NW.

•Kristi Beatty of Mount Vernon, author of "Punked by Prince Charming," will sign copies of her book from 6:30 to 8 p.m. June 8 at Tree City Coffee & Pastry at 135 E. Erie St., Kent. "Pull up a comfy chair, pour yourself a glass of wine, and join Kristi Beatty on her hunt for the elusive Prince Charming," suggests promotional material. "Married women will be thanking their lucky stars they're done dating and single girls will laugh out loud at Kristi's disastrous dates."

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News Headline: Page Turners: Our Place in History | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: www.ohiomagazine.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: July 2011 Issue

Page Turners: Our Place in History

Brush up your Civil War

knowledge with these riveting books. Each gives a fascinating glimpse into

Ohio's involvement in the conflict.

Linda Feagler

From the battlefields of Gettysburg and Antietam to the generals who plotted strategy, Blood, Tears & Glory: How Ohioans Won the Civil War , by historian James Bissland, chronicles the extraordinary circumstances created by heroic men, which helped bring victory to the North, as well as the sacrifices of the families who kept the home fires burning.. (Orange Frazer Press )

President William McKinley was the last of the Civil War veterans to reach the White House, and the only one who served in the ranks: He enlisted as a private in the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry (later commanded by another Ohioan and future president Rutherford B. Hayes). Major McKinley: William McKinley and The Civil War , by retired United Church of Christ Minister William H. Armstrong, gives perspective on the Niles native's experiences in battle and how they shaped his days in the Oval Office. (The Kent State University Press )

More than 4,400 Ohio soldiers participated in the battle of Gettysburg, 30 percent of whom were killed, wounded or captured. In Buckeye Blood: Ohio at Gettysburg, author Richard A. Baumgartner uses diaries and letters to paint a poignant portrait of the citizens who gave their all to the cause. (Blue Acorn Press )

During the Civil War, the women back home spent countless hours writing letters to lonely soldiers on the battlefield. The task clearly boosted troop morale. So much so that it often led to romantic relationships. And when Edwin Lewis Lybarger, a 21-year-old member of Company K of the 43rd Ohio from Knox County, placed a lonely-hearts ad, he was besieged with a deluge of responses. Wanted — Correspondence: Women's Letters to a Union Soldier , edited by Lybarger's granddaughter, Nancy L. Rhoades, and Oklahoma State University professor Lucy Bailey, offers insightful glimpses of women's lives as they waited, worked, worried and wrote from the home front. (Ohio University Press )

Akron native Simon Perkins Jr. and his fellow quartermasters helped make Union victory possible by ensuring that the Federal army had the equipment it needed. During his service with the Army of the Ohio, the Army of the Cumberland and the Department of the North, Perkins held key assignments in Tennessee and Alabama, directing wagon trains during the Kentucky campaign and managing railroad transportation in Nashville during the Chattanooga campaign. He also settled labor disputes and paid bills. In The Supply for Tomorrow Must Not Fail , Lenette S. Taylor, a member of the Summit County Historical Society, describes Perkins' never-a-dull-moment days behind the lines. (The Kent State University Press )

When his captain was killed during the Battle of Perryville — the largest Civil War battle fought in Kentucky — John Calvin Hartzell of Portage County was made commander of Company H, 105th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He led his men during the Battle of Chickamauga, the siege of Chattanooga and the Battle of Missionary Ridge. Ohio Volunteer: The Childhood and Civil War Memoirs of Captain John Calvin Hartzell , OVI, edited by Eastern Illinois University English professor Charles I. Switzer, documents his military strategies and the triumph and tragedy of life on the battlefield. (Ohio University Press )

Copyright © 2011 Ohio Magazine All rights reserved. | webmaster@ohiomagazine.com

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