Report Overview:
Total Clips (44)
Athletics (15)
Blossom Music; Music (1)
Blossom Music; Music; Theatre and Dance (2)
Blossom Music; Theatre and Dance (2)
Center for Gift and Estate Planning; Institutional Advancement (1)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS); College of Education, Health and Human Services; College of Technology; Global Education (1)
Digital Sciences (School of) (1)
English; Student Accessibility Services; Students; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Finance (1)
Higher Education (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (3)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Political Science (3)
Psychology (2)
Recreational Services (1)
Town-Gown (1)
University Facilities Management (1)
WKSU (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (15)
Kent State men's golf team wins playoff, falls to No. 1 Alabama in NCAA Tournament quarterfinal 06/04/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State tops Kentucky in 21-inning NCAA tournament marathon, 7-6 (Stricklin) 06/04/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball team beats Purdue, one win away from regional title (Stricklin) 06/04/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball beats Kentucky, advances to Oregon (Stricklin) 06/04/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

NCAA golf: Kent State eliminated by Alabama in match play (Page) 06/04/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

NCAA baseball/Kent State 7, Kentucky 6 (21 innings): Golden Flashes top Wildcats in marathon 06/04/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

NCAA baseball/Kent State 7, Purdue 3: Flashes top Boilermakers, one win away from Super Regional 06/04/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Flashes clinch regional title 06/04/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State, the No. 3 seed, won the Gary Regional in three straight games, finishing with a 3-2 win over No. 2 seed Kentucky Sunday night at U. S....

Kent State men's golf team finishes fifth in nation at NCAA Championship 06/04/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

It takes 21 incredible innings, but Kent State wins regional thriller against Kentucky 06/04/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

KSU on cusp of NCAA Super Regional after 7-3 victory over Boilermakers 06/04/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball team makes history with first-ever NCAA Super Regional berth 06/04/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A wild start for NCAA tournament 06/04/2012 ESPN Text Attachment Email

Kent St Edges Kentucky 7-6 in 21 Innings in NCAAs (Stricklin) 06/04/2012 ABC News - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Clips Kentucky in 21 (Stricklin) 06/04/2012 collegebaseballinsider.com Text Attachment Email


Blossom Music; Music (1)
Spring luncheon held at Twin Lakes 06/04/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Blossom Music; Music; Theatre and Dance (2)
'Damn Yankees' opens Porthouse's summer season (Kent) 06/03/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

Porthouse Theatre, the outdoor, professional summer stock theatre on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, kicks off its 2012 season with "Damn Yankees"...

'Damn Yankees' opens Porthouse's summer season (Kent) 06/03/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

‘Damn Yankees' opens Porthouse's 2012 summer season. Porthouse Theatre, the outdoor, professional summer stock theatre on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, kicks off its 2012 season with "Damn Yankees"...


Blossom Music; Theatre and Dance (2)
'Damn Yankees' opens Porthouse's summer season (Kent) 06/03/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Porthouse Theatre, the outdoor, professional summer stock theatre on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, kicks off its 2012 season with "Damn Yankees"...

'Damn Yankees' opens Porthouse's summer season (Kent) 06/03/2012 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

Porthouse Theatre, the outdoor, professional summer stock theatre on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, kicks off its 2012 season with "Damn Yankees"...


Center for Gift and Estate Planning; Institutional Advancement (1)
LEARN HOW TO PROTECT YOUR ASSETS AND MAKE YOUR MEDICAL WISHES KNOWN AT FREE KENT STATE SEMINAR (Aleman) 06/01/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

The 2nd annual Ask the Panel seminar on estate planning, taxes and medical directives will be held from 9 a.m.to noon on Friday, June 15, at Kent State University in the Moulton Hall Ballroom, located at 800 Hilltop Drive in Kent, Ohio.The lecture is presented by Kent State's Center...


College of Arts and Sciences (AS); College of Education, Health and Human Services; College of Technology; Global Education (1)
Kent State set to host Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program for Iraq (Lefton, Netty) 06/03/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...including visits to the Ohio Statehouse, the Ohio Board of Regents, local city council proceedings, local Rotary and Kiwanis Club meetings, Niagara Falls, Porthouse Theatre, an Indians-Yankees baseball game and more. University representatives also have made careful provisions for Ramadan, which will...


Digital Sciences (School of) (1)
A resource for human resource issues 06/04/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...those questions and more in an effort to help businesses enlarge their talent pool. And it's a robust group, consisting of Robert Walker, director of Kent State University's School of Digital Sciences; Evan Ishida, senior manager of performance and learning consulting at Eaton Corp.; and Alan Loos,...


English; Student Accessibility Services; Students; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Outstanding Faculty 06/01/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

... Introduction to Creative Writing Fall, 2010 Poetry Writing I Spring, 2011 Poetry Writing II Spring 2012 In the past, I took ASL classes at Kent State. However, my heart had always been in writing. Finally, I worked up the courage to take Introduction to Creative Writing. I wrote to the...


Finance (1)
Making sense of dollars and cents (Dumpe) 06/03/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...always important to not stop setting money aside. Do it as a payroll deduction." Dr. David Dumpe, associate professor in the department of finance at Kent State University, said that retirement should be the first priority to think about even when beginning a job. He said it is essential for graduates...


Higher Education (1)
Public colleges in Ohio asked to go totally smoke-free 06/04/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (3)
Job help, networking events: Business calendar 06/04/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Local pilot completes record-making flight in nine days (Murray) 06/03/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...flight which took him to each of Ohio's 88 counties while logging in 1,809 miles. The pilot, Joe Murray, a Hudson resident and journalism professor at Kent State University, set the record by being "the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all counties of...

Local pilots land in all 88 Ohio counties helping raise money for a Kent State scholarship (Murray) 06/02/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...know, they'd buy us a tank of gas, make a meal for us, put us up overnight, hangar our airplane," Murray said. Murray is a journalism professor at Kent State University. His flying companion is a retired doctor. They flew identical 1946 Piper Cubs on a first-of-its-kind mission. They crisscrossed...


KSU at Stark (2)
Herbert W. Hoover Foundation Supports Stark County Water Testing Project 06/04/2012 PRWeb - Online Text Attachment Email

...guest speaker, Edith Widder, Ph.D., acclaimed biologist and co-founder and CEO of Ocean Research and Conservation Association (ORCA). Widder will be at Kent State University at Stark on Tuesday, June 5, from 8:00-10:00 a.m. to address students, faculty and community leaders before they begin testing....

As of Sunday, the following changes will go into effect for SARTA routes in the Belden Village and Alliance areas. Proposed changes include: 06/02/2012 Review - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Route 120 -- This route will now provide direct service to Stark State College and Kent State-Stark first and then service Dressler Avenue between Belden Village Avenue and Munson Avenue. Service to Belden Village Avenue between...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Kent State Tuscarawas offers 'College for Kids' 06/02/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The 22nd annual College for Kids program is being offered by Kent State Tuscarawas. This summer's sessions offer 46 fun and interesting youth enrichment classes for students who were in first through eighth...

Philharmonic going country for finale 06/01/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Nashville, Tenn., returns for "Classic Country III: Bringin' It All Back Home!" The concert will be performed at 7:30 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. Also on the program are musician Red Marlow, singer and songwriter Amber Leigh White and...


Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Local teens to attend language academy (Baer) 06/02/2012 Parkersburg News and Sentinel - Online Text Attachment Email

...Cecelia Tio, who will be juniors in the next school year, have been accepted into the STARTALK Foreign Language Academy to be held for about a month at Kent State University. There will be 42 high school juniors and seniors from all over the state of Ohio participating, according to Brian Baer,...


Political Science (3)
Highway repair to go private? 06/03/2012 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...features. Privatization has been a controversial idea even when considered for government services not thought of as vital to public safety. For example, Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee's plan to lease a profitable campus parking operation for $375 million or more has been met with protests...

ODOT Considering Privatizing Highway Repairs in Central Ohio 06/04/2012 Construction.com Text Attachment Email

...features. Privatization has been a controversial idea even when considered for government services not thought of as vital to public safety. For example, Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee's plan to lease a profitable campus parking operation for $375 million or more has been met with protests...

Muslim presidency hopeful doubts al Qaeda role in 9/11 (Stacher) 06/01/2012 Washington Times Text Email

...has promised to uphold Egypt's peace treaty with Israel, despite having called Israelis "vampires." Joshua Stacher, a political science professor at Kent State University who has met Mr. Morsi several times, said it would be a mistake to extrapolate the Muslim Brotherhood's future behavior from...


Psychology (2)
KSU team studies accusation of "acting white' (Neal-Barnett) 06/04/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

New Schizophrenia Study Results from Kent State University Described 06/04/2012 Mental Health Weekly Digest Text Email

...have been associated with a higher risk of relapse in the patients." The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research by the authors from Kent State University, "Some patients appear to be especially vulnerable in this regard. One variable that could affect the degree of sensitivity...


Recreational Services (1)
Kent State Rec Center Best Place for Child's Birthday 06/04/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (1)
Too much new student housing could lead to abandoned neighborhoods, Kent official warns (Floyd) 06/04/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


University Facilities Management (1)
Wind group against energy provision 06/02/2012 Springfield News-Sun - Online Text Attachment Email

...Senate Bill 315, which will likely be signed into law, would allow combined heat and power technology systems in use at the University of Cincinnati and Kent State University to count as renewable energy. But Daina Baird, a spokeswoman for the American Wind Energy Association, said the legislation...


WKSU (2)
Ohio AP Broadcasters choose Schultze as president-elect 06/04/2012 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

Ohio AP Broadcasters choose Schultze as president-elect 06/04/2012 abc 6 News Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Kent State men's golf team wins playoff, falls to No. 1 Alabama in NCAA Tournament quarterfinal | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PACIFIC PALISADES, Calif. — Kent State's men's golf team advanced to the quarterfinals of the NCAA Division I golf championships at Riviera Country Club today before losing in match play to No. 1 Alabama, 3-1.

In the morning, the Golden Flashes, ranked 17th in the nation, held off No. 19 Florida State by a shot in a one-hole playoff for the right to finish eighth in stroke play and take on Alabama.

Corey Conners was the Golden Flashes' only winner against the Crimson Tide. He stopped Alabama's Bobby Wyatt, 4 and 2.

KSU's Kevin Miller dropped a 6-and-5 decision to Justin Thomas; Kyle Kmiecik (St. Ignatius) fell to Cory Whitsett by a 5-and-4 margin; and Taylor Pendrith bowed to Scott Strohmeyer, 2 and 1.

In the fifth match, Kent's Mackenzie Hughes was all square with Alabama's Hunter Hamrick when they stopped play after the 14th hole because KSU had no chance of winning the match.

In the morning playoff on the 18th hole, KSU posted a plus-2 as a team and FSU a plus-3. Kmiecik was the difference, as he posted the only birdie among the 10 players. His key shot was a 5-iron from 199 yards that stopped within 12 feet of the hole.

Scoring for the match-play rounds is available through ncaa.com.

And the NCAA also is streaming the event with coverage on holes No. 10, 14 and 18.

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News Headline: Kent State tops Kentucky in 21-inning NCAA tournament marathon, 7-6 (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GARY, Ind. — Lefty Michael Clark got a strikeout with two on and two outs in the 21st inning to give Kent State a hard-earned 7-6 victory Friday night in the opening game of the NCAA regional baseball tournament in Gary, Ind.

It was the second-longest game in NCAA Tournament history, trailing only Texas' 3-2 win over Boston College in 25 innings in 2009.

"I'm glad we didn't get it," KSU coach Scott Stricklin said of the 25-inning record. "It's certainly better to be on the winning side of that one."

Twice Kentucky used its potential final at-bat to extend the game at U.S. Steel Yard, scoring in the ninth and 18th innings to tie the Golden Flashes. But Kent scratched out a run in the top of the 21st, and Clark, despite letting runners get to second and third with two outs, got the strikeout he needed.

"I only remember the last hitter," Clark said of the 3 innings he pitched. He got two straight strikes on Kentucky's Thomas McCarthy, but did not waste the next one. "I went high and hard" and whiffed him on a checked swing.

That led to an eruption from a crowd that grew from 756 after nine innings to more than 5,000 by the end. Most seemingly waiting to see two Indiana schools, Purdue and Valparaiso, play the second game of the regional. The winner of that game will play Kent tonight at 7.

Clark isn't worried about the Golden Flashes being emotionally spent.

"If anything, I think this will help us. We're running on adrenaline."

Kent's winning rally in the top of the 21st began with a bunt single from senior Joe Koch. The ball just got past the outstretched hand of Kentucky pitcher A.J. Reed, who started the game as the DH for the first 10 innings. Reed then played two innings at first and pitched the final nine.

A sacrifice moved Koch to second, and with two outs, freshman Alex Miklos hit a triple to center that scored Koch. Derek Toadvine then became Kent's 26th strikeout victim of the game, but the good deed was already done. Twice before Kent was three outs away from victory, leading 5-4 in the ninth and 6-5 in the 18th, but could not close the win out.

"But I said it out loud in the dugout, 'Third time is the charm,' " Stricklin said.

The Flashes had a sweet opportunity to blow the game open in the second inning. They loaded the bases with none out behind a pair of singles and a hit batter. Kent picked up a run when the Kentucky shortstop booted a potential double-play ball, keeping the bases loaded with no outs.

But the next three batters were retired on two strikeouts and a soft liner.

The Wildcats scored twice in the third behind two singles and a hit batter to take a 2-1 lead. The hit batter was the third in the game, the second for Kent ace David Starn. That led to a warning for both teams.

Kent posted three runs in the fourth on a bunt single from Toadvine, a balk from Kentucky starter Alex Phillips, and a double from George Roberts, who went 5-for-10. But for the second time in four innings, KSU hitters could not deliver with the bases loaded. It was a pattern that lasted all game as KSU stranded 20 runners.

With Kent leading, 5-4, in the bottom of the ninth, relief pitcher Brian Clark gave up a first-pitch single and the runner was sacrificed to second. A Kentucky single up the middle followed to tie it, 5-5.

The two teams would then go scoreless until the 18th. But there was plenty of drama.

The Flashes got a huge break to start the bottom of the 12th as Kentucky's Michael Williams hit a rocket off the left-field wall for an apparent double. But he missed first base, and Kent threw the relay to first to beat him back to the bag. One pitch later, Toadvine made a diving catch for the second out of the inning, saving another potential double. Then an infield out ended the inning.

In the bottom of the 15th, the Wildcats loaded the bases, but were retired on a pop-up on a pitch that looked like ball four.

NCAA Regional Insider
Play of the game With the bases loaded and one out in the 20th inning, Kent State relief pitcher Michael Clark got Kentucky's J.T. Riddle to hit a comebacker for an easy double play. "That's the one play that can get you out of that inning," Clark said.

Star of the game Joe Koch got a hard bunt just past the pitcher for a single to open the 21st inning and ultimately scored the winning run. "That was Koch special," KSU coach Scott Stricklin said.

Quote of the game "That has to go down as the best baseball game in college baseball history, just with the twists and turns, ups and downs," Stricklin said. "It's certainly better to be on the winning side of that. It's unbelievable how many things happened in that game."

Stat of the game The teams combined for 47 strikeouts and 43 men left on base.

-- Elton Alexander

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News Headline: Kent State baseball team beats Purdue, one win away from regional title (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GARY, Ind. — Ryan Bores did his job and then some as the junior Strongsville right-hander went the distance in Kent State's 7-3 triumph over Purdue on Saturday night in the winners' bracket in NCAA baseball tournament regional play.

"We were hoping for seven (innings), dreaming for eight and wishing for nine," Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said. "And we got it."

Bores' effort gave a much-needed break to a bullpen that was extended in KSU's 21-inning opening game victory over Kentucky on Friday. This game was shorter, but it had comparable drama at U.S. Steel Yard against the top-seeded Boilermakers.

A five-run second inning was the catalyst for Kent (43-17). The rally started with a two-out, two-strike single from Alex Miklos and did not end until after KSU had brought nine players to the plate.

"It was just one of those nights," Purdue coach Doug Schreiber said. "They bunched hits together with two outs. Give them credit. They're definitely a good offensive team." Kent finished the game with 13 hits and three walks, while limiting strikeouts to just five.

Second-seeded Kentucky rebounded from its loss to Kent State for an 8-1 victory over Valparaiso, eliminating the Crusaders and advancing the Wildcats to today's elimination game vs. Purdue (44-13) at 4 p.m. Kent will play the winner of that game and a KSU victory would give the Golden Flashes a regional title.

Kent entered the game with an 18-game win streak that started after an April 25 loss to Penn State, the only Big Ten team Kent played this season. Now the streak is at 19 thanks to Bores (9-2), who threw 112 pitches and was helped by three double plays.

Both teams scored a run in the first inning. Two singles and a wild pitch did the damage for the Boilermakers while a single and double aided Kent's cause.

Purdue did the same in the top of the second, scoring another run after a leadoff double. Kent then put together the two-out rally that produced a 6-2 lead. Derek Toadvine followed Miklos' two-out hit with another single, then a walk to Evan Campbell loaded the bases for shortstop Jimmy Rider.

He delivered a double that cleared the bases. David Lyon singled, then George Roberts drove him in with a double for the fifth run in the inning.

"They rattled off back-to-back hits and it just snowballed," Purdue's Tyler Spillner said.

That was a nice cushion for Bores to work with and he started to work on shutting down the Boilermakers. He promptly got a 1-2-3 third and survived some self-induced trouble in the fourth by loading the bases with a walk and two hit batters. But he got out of it with a big strikeout to end the threat.

Kent got another run in the bottom of the fourth after back-to-back singles put runners on first and third. Roberts then hustled on a grounder to short to prevent a double play, allowing another run to score for a 7-2 lead. Bores continued to dodge disaster in the top of the seventh as the Boilermakers opened with two singles before Kent turned its third double play, and the third out came on a long fly to right field.

In the eighth, Purdue scored on a triple and an infield out. The Flashes ran themselves out of a possible run in the eighth. Campbell hit a one-out triple but got caught in a rundown on Rider's chopper to third. Purdue then caught Rider in a rundown between first and second to end the inning.

That left the Boilermakers one last chance in the ninth. Bores got the first out on a dribbler back to the mound. The second out was a fly to left field. Then a fly to center ended the game.

NCAA Regional Insider
Play of the game Kent's Alex Miklos hit a two-strike, two-out single to start a five-run second-inning rally.

Star of the game KSU starting pitcher Ryan Bores (Strongsville) pitched a complete game, allowing three runs on nine hits and one walk. He threw 112 pitches and struck out two.

Quote of the game "We were hoping for seven, dreaming for eight and wishing for nine, and we got it." -- KSU coach Scott Stricklin, on the nine innings Bores pitched.

Stat of the game Kent turned two double plays -- one in the fourth inning and one in the seventh -- to snuff potential Purdue rallies.

-- Elton Alexander

Inside Kent State's 21-inning victory
Some numbers from Kent State's 7-6 victory over Kentucky in 21 innings Friday in the NCAA Baseball Tournament's Purdue Regional in Gary, Ind. It was the second-longest game in NCAA Baseball Tournament history.

Kent State had 20 hits, Kentucky 18.

Kent State had more strikeouts (26) than hits (20) and more walks (eight) than runs (seven).

•The teams combined for 47 strikeouts and 38 hits.

Kent State left 20 runners on base, Kentucky stranded 23.

•A combined 38 players (Kent played 17) were used.

•Four Kentucky pitchers had six or more strikeouts.

•Kentucky's AJ Reed was the DH for nine innings, the first baseman for three innings and pitched the last nine innings.

Kent State's first baseman, George Roberts, was 5-for-10. He opened with five straight hits and went hitless his final five at-bats.

•Ten pitchers (five on each team) threw a combined 678 pitches, 332 by Kent State.

•The game took 6:37 to play.

•Roberts and SS Jimmy Rider were a combined 9-for-19 with three RBI for KSU.

KSU catcher David Lyon was hitless (0-for-6) but had four walks. No other player walked more than twice.

•There were 132 baseballs used.

•Did you know? The college baseball Hall of Fame has requested Kent State's lineup card from the game.

•Did you know II? KSU left fielder Alex Miklos had the fewest hits of any starter (35) and was hitting .271, but had the biggest hit of the game when he drove in the winning run in the top of the 21st. He finished 2-for-8.

-- Elton Alexander

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News Headline: Kent State baseball beats Kentucky, advances to Oregon (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GARY, Ind. -- With Kent State shut out for six innings and scoreless through seven, the Golden Flashes' Evan Campbell was calm at the plate in the eighth inning, with two runners on and two outs. Nothing but an NCAA regional championship on the line.

"I wasn't thinking," Campbell said. "I was letting things happen."

It happened quickly, as Campbell hit the first pitch he saw from Kentucky's Alex Phillips for a three-run homer that held up in a 3-2 victory against Kentucky, sending KSU to its first ever NCAA super regional next week in Eugene, Ore., against the Oregon Ducks.

"That was the biggest hit in the history of Kent State baseball," said KSU coach Scott Stricklin of the junior outfielder from Beloit, Ohio.

Kent (44-17) got the job done, as every close call went its way -- all made by first-base umpire Ken Durham. But Stricklin also second-guessed a missed scoring opportunity for the Flashes in the seventh inning. Yet with starting pitcher Tyler Skulina and relief pitcher Casey Wilson getting clutch outs against Kentucky's dangerous cleanup hitter, Michael Williams, in key situations, the Flashes prevailed.

None was bigger than Wilson facing Williams to start the ninth -- Kentucky's last at-bat. Wilson jammed him with a 2-2 pitch that was fouled off and caught near the KSU dugout at U.S. Steel Yard.

"That was a big out," Stricklin said. "Wilson just got stronger after that," as the Wildcats went down in order.

Skulina held up for seven innings in a pitchers' duel with Kentucky's Chandler Shepherd. But once Shepherd was lifted with two on and two out in the eighth, Campbell greeted Phillips with a first-pitch home run.

Kentucky disputed the call after Durham ruled that the ball cleared the yellow railing above the 13-foot wall and fence.

"I hit it pretty good," Campbell said. "I was watching it. I saw it bounce off the chairs."

But in reality, it didn't, as TV replays showed that it hit the yellow rail and bounced back onto the field. Kentucky coach Gary Henderson, already miffed that Durham had ruled a first-base pickoff by KSU catcher David Lyon was good -- and that KSU's Derek Toadvine was safe on a potential inning-ending double play -- didn't challenge the home-run ruling.

"My initial thought was he couldn't have missed three plays," Henderson said. "I assumed he got it right. The law of averages were staggering for that [missed call] to happen."

The 3-0 lead held up, but as with every Kent game in the series, not without some drama.

No. 3 seeded Kent entered the contest on a 19-game winning streak and was looking for a regional sweep after defeating Kentucky in Friday's 21-inning opener, 7-6, then No. 1 seed Purdue, 7-3, on Saturday. It marks Kent's first NCAA baseball regional title in 12 tries.

Skulina, all 6-6, 235 pounds of him, cruised through the first four innings, giving up just two hits, and then survived a rocky fourth with runners at second and third by getting Williams to fly out to second base, followed by a sharp groundout to end the inning.

The problem for Kent was that its offense was suddenly silent. Kentucky's Shepherd was working on a no-hitter through five innings. Kent finally struck in the top of the sixth with a Joe Koch single, but Shepherd continued about his business to end the inning.

In the top of the seventh, Kent leadoff hitter Jimmy Rider singled. But catcher David Lyon was allowed to swing away instead of dropping a sacrifice, and he hit into a double play. George Roberts then hit a double into the left-center gap, and Stricklin grimaced in the dugout as a potential run was lost.

"You start to second-guess yourself," he said. "But he hits third for a reason."

No worries, as Skulina cruised through his half of the seventh, leaving the pitching duel statistically a dead heat.

Shepherd, however, didn't make it through his half of the eighth. Kent put runners on first and third with two outs courtesy of a single, a walk and a fielder's choice. Then Campbell launched a three-run home run 335 feet down the right-field line.

Skulina was done after giving up a single and double off the center-field wall to score Kentucky's first run of the game. The Wildcats weren't done, scoring another run off Wilson with another single and two long fly outs, closing within 3-2 going into the ninth inning.

Wilson earned the save.

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News Headline: NCAA golf: Kent State eliminated by Alabama in match play (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The No. 17-ranked Kent State men's golf team had its highest finish in school history on Friday as the Golden Flashes tied for fifth in the nation at the NCAA Championship at Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Calif.
The Golden Flashes lost to No. 2 Alabama 3-1-1 in the match-play quarterfinal after winning a one-hole playoff against Florida State.
“What a fabulous year and a very resilient group of young men,” coach Herb Page said. “We came up a little short in match play, but to get this far is a great accomplishment and I'm very proud of them.”
The historic day began on Friday morning with a victory over Florida State in a one-hole sudden-death playoff due to a tie score after Thursday's round. The Flashes defeated the Seminoles by a stroke after sophomore Kyle Kmiecik birdied the playoff hole.
“No one can really understand the pressure of the playoff this morning,” Page said. “What a great shot by Kmiecik looking down the 18th at Riviera.”
The Flashes moved on to play the Crimson Tide in Friday's quarterfinal round but could not overcome an early deficit to advance.
Junior Kevin Miller was defeated by Justin Thomas 6 and 5 in the first match and Kmiecik lost to Cory Whitsett 5 and 4. Sophomore Corey Connors defeated Bobby Wyatt 4 and 2 in the third match and senior Mackenzie Hughes halved his match with Hunter Hamrick to set up a pivotal final match between KSU sophomore Taylor Pendrith and Scott Strohmeyer.
Pendrith birdied holes 10 and 11 to get to 3-down after trailing 5-down after the turn. Pendrith missed birdie putts on 12 and 13 and made a birdie on 15 but Strohmeyer made a par saving putt from 25 feet on 16 to stay 2-up with two holes to play. They halved the 17th hole to give Strohmeyer a 2-and-1 win and Alabama the victory.
The top-5 showing puts Kent State among a select group of four schools that have finished in the top 20 at the NCAA Championships the past three seasons. The Flashes join USC, UCLA and Texas A&M as the only schools to accomplish the feat.

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News Headline: NCAA baseball/Kent State 7, Kentucky 6 (21 innings): Golden Flashes top Wildcats in marathon | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Alex Miklos tripled to score Joe Koch in the top of the 21st inning to lead Kent State to a 7-6 win over Kentucky on Friday in the first round of the NCAA Championship at U.S. Steel Yard in Gary, Ind.
The Golden Flashes took a 1-0 lead in the second inning when George Roberts scored on an error by Wildcats shortstop Matt Reida.
The Wildcats took the lead in the bottom of the third with two runs, but the Flashes answered with three runs in the top of the fourth.
Sawyer Polen scored on a balk and Jimmy Rider singled to score Derek Toadvine to give the Flashes a 3-2 lead. George Roberts doubled to score Evan Campbell two batters later to put the Flashes ahead 4-2.
The Wildcats added a run in the bottom of the fifth and tied the game in the bottom of the seventh before the Flashes took a 5-4 lead in the eighth when Roberts singled to right field to score Rider.
Luke Maile singled to score Austin Cousino in the bottom of the ninth to tie the score 5-5 and send the game to extra innings.
Koch singled home Campbell in the top of the 18th to give the Flashes a 6-5 lead, but the Wildcats answered in the bottom half of the inning when Michael Williams doubled to score Paul McConkey to tie the game 6-6.
The Flashes took the lead for good in the top of the 21st after Miklos tripled home Koch. Reliever Michael Clark struck out Thomas McCarthy with two men on base to end the game.
Roberts went 5-for-10 with two RBI and Rider went 4-for-9 for the Flashes. Koch, Nick Hamilton, Toadvine and Miklos each had two hits for the Flashes.
Starting pitcher David Starn went six innings and gave up four runs on eight hits and struck out six in the no decision. Clark went 3⅔ innings and gave up four hits and struck out four for the win.
The Flashes will play the winner of Friday's Purdue/Valparaiso game at 8 tonight at U.S. Steel Yard.

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News Headline: NCAA baseball/Kent State 7, Purdue 3: Flashes top Boilermakers, one win away from Super Regional | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jimmy Rider, David Lyon and George Roberts drove in all seven runs, Ryan Bores pitched the first complete game of his career and Kent State advanced in the NCAA Division I Gary Regional double-elimination tournament with a 7-3 victory over Purdue on Saturday night in Gary, Ind.
Kent State will play at 8 tonight against the winner of the Kentucky-Purdue game today at 4 p.m.
If the Golden Flashes win, they advance to the Super Regional.
If they lose, they will play again at 8 p.m. Monday.
The Golden Flashes drove Purdue starter Lance Breedlove out of the game in the second inning, scoring five runs after the Boilermakers right-hander got the first two batters out.
Trailing 2-1, Rider, who had three hits and scored twice, hit a three-run double and scored when Lyon singled him home.
Lyon scored on a double by Roberts, who also drove in the Flashes' first run in the first inning and their final run in the fourth.
Bores, a right-hander, pitched out of trouble with help from his defense, including a key double play in the seventh inning, after giving up a run in both the first and second inning.
Bores gave up three runs on nine hits, walked one, hit two batters and struck out two.

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News Headline: Flashes clinch regional title | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State, the No. 3 seed, won the Gary Regional in three straight games, finishing with a 3-2 win over No. 2 seed Kentucky Sunday night at U. S. Steel Yard in Gary, Ind.

With the victory, the Flashes (44-17) recorded a nation's best 20th consecutive win and advance to the Super Regional to play Oregon (45-17) in a best two-of-three series.

This is the first time the Golden Flashes have won a regional and advanced to the Super Regional.

The game was scoreless until KSU rallied in the top of the eighth inning.

Designated hitter Nick Hamilton started off with a single and moved to second on a sacrifice bunt by third baseman Sawyer Polen and Joe Koch, who got KSU's first hit of the game with one out in the sixth, walked.

After Derek Toadvine's fielder's choice moved the runners to second and third, Evan Campbell hit a three-run home run to give the Golden Flashes a 3-0 lead.

The Wildcats rallied in the bottom of the eighth when pinch hitter Jeff Boehm doubled to center to score J.T Riddle and a sacrifice fly by Thomas McCarthy scored Boehm.

Tyler Skulina pitched seven innings before Casey Wilson came in with no outs in the eight inning. The sophomore gave up both runs on five hits with two walks, a hit batter and five strikeouts.

Wilson got the save, giving up just one hit in his two innings and getting the Wildcats to go down 1-2-3 in the ninth.

The Wildcats, whom KSU defeated 7-6 Friday in a 21-inning marathon, earlier in the day earned the rematch with the Golden Flashes by defeating No. 16 Purdue, 6-3. KSU defeated the Boilermakers 7-3 Saturday night.

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News Headline: Kent State men's golf team finishes fifth in nation at NCAA Championship | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PACIFIC PALISADES, Calif. — The 2012 season was certainly one to remember for the Kent State men's golf team.

The No. 17-ranked Golden Flashes advanced to the match-play portion of the NCAA Championship and secured the highest finish in school history by tying for fifth in the nation.

Kent State's previous best finish came in 2008 when the team placed sixth at Purdue's Kampen Course. The Golden Flashes also placed in the top 10 with a ninth-place finish in 2000.

In the match-play quarterfinal, Kent State fell by a count of 3-1-1 to No. 2 Alabama.

“What a fabulous year and a very resilient group of young men,” said Kent State head coach Herb Page. “We came up a little short in match play, but to get this far is a great accomplishment and I'm very proud of them.”

The drama and excitement of the final day began early on Friday morning at Riviera Country Club, when Kent State outlasted No. 19 Florida State in a one-hole sudden death playoff to earn the right to play the Crimson Tide.

The Golden Flashes earned the victory by a 2-over to 3-over score. The big difference for Kent State was sophomore Kyle Kmiecik, who had the only birdie amongst the 10 players. Playing in the first five-some, Kmiecik set up the vital shot with a 5-iron from 199 yards out that nestled to within 12 feet of the cup.

“No one can really understand the pressure of the playoff this morning,” said Page. “What a great shot by Kmieck, looking down the 18th at Riviera. It was very memorable, not just for Kyle and his family, but for all of us at Kent State.”

Against Alabama, Kent State fell behind early, but kept it close down to the end. In the first pairing junior Kevin Miller was defeated by Justin Thomas 6-and-5.

Kmiecik then fell to Cory Whitsett 5-and-4 in match No. 2.

With match two being controlled by sophomore Corey Conners and match one featuring senior Mackenzie Hughes even, the decisive third score was going to come down to match three between sophomore Taylor Pendrith and Scott Strohmeyer.

Pendrith appeared to be in trouble early after losing holes No. 1, 4, 5, 5 and 9 on the front nine to fall 5-down at the turn. He would rally back, however, with birdies on Nos. 10 and 11 to get back to 3-down.

With the momentum starting to swing back in his favor, Pendrith had opportunities to inch even closer on 12 and 13, but both birdie putts just missed and Strohmeyer saved par to keep it at a three-hole difference. He made up one hole on No. 15 and looked to be in position for another on the par-3 16th, but Strohmeyer hit a huge par-saving putt from 25 feet to stay at 2-up with two holes to play.

The duo then halved No. 17 to give Stromeyer a 2-and-1 win and the decisive third match needed for victory.

As Pendrith was finishing up, Conners continued his stellar play that led to a fourth-place finish in stroke play. The No. 2 ranked Canadian Amateur won his match against Bobby Wyatt 4-and-2. Hughes, meanwhile, was all square with Hunter Hamrick through 14 holes when the overall outcome was decided.

“This will only just add to our expectations and to our rankings, and we will keep battling every year until we win the whole thing,” said Page. “We've been here for three straight years now and have four of our guys coming back so let's hope we get back here again next year and go a little deeper.”

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News Headline: It takes 21 incredible innings, but Kent State wins regional thriller against Kentucky | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GARY, Ind. — The opening game of the NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament's Gary Regional between No. 25 Kent State and No. 13 Kentucky turned into the game that wouldn't end.

In fact, the game that started at 4 p.m. wasn't over until after 10:30 p.m., when the Golden Flashes finally secured a 7-6 win in 21 innings of incredible, unbelievable and almost never-ending baseball.

It is the second-longest game in NCAA Championship history.

To win the game, Anthony Miklos hit a triple to plate Joe Koch with the winning run in the top of the 21st that finally put an end to the six-hour, 37-minute game.

Both teams had their chances to win earlier than that, though.

KSU took one-run leads into both the ninth and 18th innings only to watch Kentucky score the tying runs in the bottom halves of both frames. The Golden Flashes also stranded 12 runners on base in the first nine innings, failing to take full advantage of two different bases-loaded situations.

Kentucky, meanwhile, watched as some spectacular Kent State defense spoiled its chances in the second nine innings.

A perfect relay by Evan Campbell in centerfield to shortstop Jimmy Rider and finally to catcher David Lyon cut down Kentucky's A.J. Reed at the plate with a a second that would have allowed Michael Williams' double end the game.

In the 20th, KSU reliever Michael Clark started a pitcher-to-catcher-to-first-base double play to foil Kentucky's bases-loaded opportunity with one out.

A double by Michael Williams scored Paul McConky with a run that re-tied the game at six, but the Flashes' relay cut down the Kentucky's A.J. Reed at the plate with a run that would have ended it.

KSU had seized a 6-5 lead in the top half of the 18th when Koch's infield single plated a run for the Flashes.

The win advances Kent State into a matchup against either Purdue or Valparaiso today. Those two teams were originally scheduled to play on Friday night at 8:30 p.m., but had to wait until the Kent State-Kentucky marathon game completed.

The question for the Flashes, though, will they enough arms to compete.

KSU starting pitcher David Starn gave up four runs in six innings on Friday before the Flashes turned to Casey Wilson for 12/3 innings, Brian Clark for 51/3, Josh Pierce for 41/3 and Clark for three more.

That quintet of KSU pitchers combined for 19 strikeouts. The bullpen surrendered just two runs.

KSU first baseman George Roberts was 5-for-10 with two RBI. Rider was 4-for-9 with an RBI and a run scored.

Kentucky used five pitchers. The Wildcats offense was led by Zac Zellers, who was 4-for-6 through 21 innings. Luke Maile was 3-for-4 off the bench.

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News Headline: KSU on cusp of NCAA Super Regional after 7-3 victory over Boilermakers | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GARY, Ind. — Ryan Bores hurled the first complete game of his career and Kent State punched its ticket to a second consecutive NCAA Championship Regional Final with a 7-3 win over top-seed Purdue on Saturday's second day of the regional tournament at Gary's U.S. Steel Yard.

The win also extended the winning streak for the 25th-ranked team in the nation and third-seeded team in the regional to 19 games — the longest active streak in the Division I baseball.

One night after surviving a 21-inning thriller with Kentucky in the regional opener — the second longest game in NCAA Championship history — the Golden Flashes gave themselves some breathing room early with a big five-run second inning that was keyed by Jimmy Rider's bases-clearing double.

Rider erased a 2-1 Purdue lead with a two-out rocket into the left-field corner to plate Evan Campbell, Derek Toadvine and Alex Milos. The double was the 151st of the season for the Flashes — the most by any team in the nation.

David Lyon followed with a single to score Rider before George Roberts capped the two-out rally by adding to KSU's double total with a looping RBI hit to right.

KSU (43-17) chased Purdue starting pitcher Ryan Breedlove after just 1 2/3 innings. The Boilermakers' senior was 8-5 with a 2.82 ERA coming into the night, but left with a line that included six runs and seven allowed.

Flashes' starter Ryan Bores improved to 9-2 with the win, surrendering single runs in the first two innings, then holding Purdue's hitters in check over the next five innings. The Boilermakers (45-13) missed a chance to cut into KSU's lead in the fourth inning when they loaded the bases with two out, only to watch Bores strike out Purdue leadoff hitter Andrew Dixon swinging to end the threat.

Back-to-back hits to open the seventh inning gave Purdue another chance before Bores forced speedy Eric Charles into a double-play. A flyout by Cameron Perkins to short right stranded a run at third and secured the fifth consecutive scoreless frame by Bores.

Purdue finally got to Bores in the eighth when Big Ten player of the year Kevin Pawlecki tripled off the wall in left and then scored on a fielder's choice to make it 7-3, but that lone run wasn't the inning the Boilermakers needed.

Bores allowed three runs on nine hits while walking just one.

Getting a starter to go deep into the game was a big key for the Flashes after their bullpen was forced to work 15 innings in the marathon win over Kentucky on Friday.

Lyon (3-for-4) and Rider (3-for-5) both recorded three hits to lead a Kent State offense that collected 33 hits in two regional wins.

Saturday's victory put KSU in the driver's seat to advance out of the Gary Regional to an NCAA Super Regional. The Flashes could only be eliminated by back-to-back losses in the regional finals tonight at 8 p.m. and again on Monday. Purdue and No. 3 Kentucky will play today at 4 p.m. for the right to meet KSU in the finals.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball team makes history with first-ever NCAA Super Regional berth | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GARY, Ind. — Evan Campbell hit a three-run home run and Kent State held off a Kentucky rally to defeat the Wildcats 3-2 on Sunday night.

The victory gave the Golden Flashes (44-17) their first NCAA regional crown in school history. Kent State will travel to Oregon for their first-ever Super Regionals.

Campbell's three-run blast was the first home run in more than 64 innings of play at the U.S. Steel Yard over the weekend.

The championship game was defined by strong starting pitching from both team as Kentucky's Chandler Shepherd and Kent State's Tyler Skulina kept the opposition scoreless through the first seven innings.

The Wildcats (45-18) answered Campbell's three-run home run with two runs in the bottom of the eighth inning, but were unable to complete the rally.

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News Headline: A wild start for NCAA tournament | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: ESPN
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Crawford Throws No-Hitter In Florida's Regional Opener

Teammates celebrated a Florida pitcher's milestone by shoving a whipped-cream pie in his face, Kentucky and Kent State played the second-longest game in postseason history, and two No. 1 seeds were upset at home.

All in one day.

The 2012 NCAA baseball tournament couldn't have gotten off to a more compelling start. Here's a rundown of some of the more notable moments and performances from Friday's opening-round games -- and also a look ahead at a few key Saturday matchups.

Game of the day

Kent State and Kentucky played 21 innings before the Golden Flashes emerged with a 7-6 victory in Gary, Ind. An RBI triple by Alex Miklos in the top of the 21st proved to be the game winner for Kent State, which used five pitchers in the win. Kentucky's Thomas McCarthy struck out looking with runners on second and third to end the game. The Wildcats also squandered a golden opportunity in the bottom of the 20th when J.T. Riddle hit into a 1-2-3 double-play with one out and the bases loaded. Kentucky's A.J. Reed pitched nine innings in relief in a contest that lasted six hours and 37 minutes. The game was the second-longest in NCAA postseason season history, as Texas beat Boston College in 25 innings in 2009.

Star performances

Florida's Jonathan Crawford threw the NCAA's first postseason no-hitter since 1991 in Friday's 4-0 victory over Bethune-Cookman in Gainesville. Crawford, who wasn't even on the Gators' postseason roster last season, used a 95 mph fastball to strike out five hitters while walking only one. Seventy of his 98 pitchers were strikes. "Around the eighth inning, it just hit me," Crawford said of the potential of throwing a no-hitter. "I couldn't sit down because I was so nervous."

New Mexico's D.J. Peterson went 4-for-4 with a home run and two RBIs in the Lobos' 4-0 win over San Diego in Los Angeles.

UCLA got a complete-game effort out of starting pitcher Adam Plutko, who struck out seven and allowed just two hits in a 3-0 win over Creighton.

Also tossing a complete game was Stanford's Mark Appel, who struck out 11 in a 9-1 win over Fresno State.

North Carolina State's Ryan Matthew was 3-for-5 with four RBIs in a 16-5 win over Sacred Heart in Raleigh.

Dallas Baptist's Joel Hutter was 3-for-5 with five RBIs in a 10-0 win over Texas-Arlington in Waco.

South Carolina's Colby Holmes struck out nine and allowed just one hit in eight innings in the Gamecocks' 7-0 victory over Manhattan in Columbia.

LSU's Aaron Nola struck out 10 in eight innings in a 4-1 victory over Louisiana-Monroe in Baton Rouge.

Biggest surprise

It's not unheard of for No. 1 seeds to lose opening-round games -- but rarely do they suffer thumpings like the one No. 4 seed Stony Brook doled out to host Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The big blow occurred in the top of the eighth, when William Carmona gave Stony Brook a 9-2 lead by belting a three-run homer.

Biggest upset

Oral Roberts' 4-2 victory over No. 1 seed Baylor in Waco snapped the Bears' 22-game home winning streak. The Bears had two runners on base in the bottom of the ninth when Logan Vick grounded out to end the game. Baylor -- the tournament's No. 4 overall seed -- will face Texas-Arlington in an elimination game today. Steve Smith's Bears were ranked as high as No. 2 less than a month ago. But the Big 12 regular-season champions have now lost seven of their last 12 games, with five of those setbacks coming against Oklahoma.

Other notables

Two-time defending NCAA champion South Carolina won its 17th consecutive postseason game Friday, an NCAA record. The Gamecocks haven't lost in the postseason since falling to Oklahoma to open the 2010 College World Series.

Samford hit four home runs in a 5-0 upset of Mississippi State in Tallahassee.

Oregon, the tournament's No. 5 overall seed, needed two runs in the bottom of the ninth to escape with a 6-5 victory over Austin Peay in Eugene.

Georgia Tech won its season-best sixth straight game by defeating the College of Charleston 8-4. The Yellow Jackets are hitting .329 as a team in their last five contests.

Saturday's intriguing matchup

Oregon coach George Horton will be facing his former team when the Ducks host Cal State Fullerton. In Horton's 11 seasons (1997-2007) as head coach, the Titans won eight Big West championships and made six appearances in the College World Series. They captured the NCAA title in 2004.

Elimination gates to watch

No. 1 seeds Baylor and Miami could both go home early if they don't turn things around today. The Bears host UT-Arlington in Waco, while Miami faces Missouri State in Coral Gables.

2012 NCAA baseball tournament
For complete coverage of the 2012 NCAA baseball tournament, from the first pitch of the regional round to the final pitch at the CWS in Omaha, turn to ESPN.com. College sports home »

• Regional scores: Fri. | Sat. | Sun.
• Complete tourney schedule/results

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News Headline: Kent St Edges Kentucky 7-6 in 21 Innings in NCAAs (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: ABC News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For as long as Friday night's 21-inning marathon between Kent State and Kentucky lasted at the NCAA Gary Regional, the game still fell four innings short of the Texas-Boston College affair in 2009.

Alex Miklos hit a go-ahead RBI triple in the 21st inning as the Golden Flashes outlasted Kentucky 7-6 in the second-longest game in NCAA tournament history.

"That might not have been the longest game in college baseball history, but it was certainly the best baseball game in college baseball history," Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said. "There were so many twists and turns. The game was just unbelievable."

The Golden Flashes (42-17) held the lead in the ninth and 18th innings, but the Wildcats (43-17) answered both times to extend it. Kentucky had numerous chances to end the game in extra innings, including having the bases loaded with one out in the 20th, but Kent State relief pitcher Michael Clark was able to get J.T. Riddle to bounce into an inning-ending double play.

"I got the one play that could get us out of that inning," Clark said. "We would throw a punch and then they would throw a punch. It was a great game to be a part of."

Each team used four pitchers that threw at least 60 pitches in the game. Kentucky reliever A.J. Reed started the game as the designated hitter and pitched the final nine innings of the game for the Wildcats. Clark threw the final three and two-thirds innings for Kent State and got the win while recording four strikeouts.

"This type of game is going to help us down the line," Clark said. "We're riding on adrenaline right now, but once we get a meal, if anything is still open, we'll start to get focused on tomorrow's game."

The Golden Flashes were two outs away from the victory in the ninth inning when Kentucky first baseman Luke Maile tied the game 5-5 with an RBI single that scored Austin Cousino. The teams played eight innings of scoreless baseball before Joe Koch gave Kent State a 6-5 lead with an RBI single. Kentucky catcher Michael Williams answered with a run-scoring double in the bottom of the 18th and the teams continued playing.

"It was a great game for the fans, two tremendous efforts out of the bullpen," Kentucky coach Gary Henderson said. "Both sides pitched extremely well after the fourth inning. Forty-runners left on base, it was a very unique game."

Miklos was an unlikely hero for the Golden Flashes as the freshman left fielder entered with the least amount of hits (35) in the starting lineup and with just a .271 batting average. Miklos came to the plate in the 21st inning having gone 1 for 7 and striking out three times. He hit a shot to the center-field wall that drove in Koch with the go-ahead run.

"I was just looking for something to work with," Miklos said. "I'd say it's definitely the biggest hit of my career."

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News Headline: Kent State Clips Kentucky in 21 (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: collegebaseballinsider.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The average roller coaster lasts a few minutes.

An emotional roller coaster? Try six hours, 37 minutes.

That's how long third-seeded Kent State and second-seeded Kentucky toiled for 21 innings on the baseball diamond at the Gary Regional Friday afternoon and night. In the end, the Golden Flashes claimed a 7-6 win in the second-longest game in NCAA tournament history.

“Not only was it 21 innings, but to have the twists and the turns with unbelievable defensive plays made, pitching on both sides, a lot of chances to win by both teams,” Kent State coach Scott Stricklin (pictured above) said by phone about an hour after it was over. “An emotional roller coaster.”

In a game that featured 38 hits, 47 strikeouts and 43 runners left on base, the Golden Flashes were left standing, capturing their nation's best 18th straight win. Alex Miklos' second triple scored Joe Koch go-ahead run in the top of the 21st. And Michael Clark finished off 3.2 scoreless innings of relief by retiring the Wildcats in a game for the college baseball ages.

“Emotionally, that's probably the biggest win any of us have been a part of,” Stricklin said.

Kent State led 5-4 entering the bottom of the ninth, but Kentucky, as it has done all season, produced late-inning drama. Luke Maile (3 for 4, 2 RBI) plated the tying run with a single up the middle.

The teams would go another eight innings without scratching. Not that they weren't trying. George Roberts went 5 for 10, and Jimmy Rider 4 for 9 for Kent State. Zac Zellers went 5 for 7 for Kentucky.

Koch's infield single gave the Golden Flashes a 6-5 lead in the top of the 18th.

Then, the play of the game. With runners on first and second in the bottom half, the Wildcats' Michael Williams drilled a ball to center. Paul McConkey scored the tying run from second, and A.J. Reed – the eventual losing pitcher who was brilliant in relief with nine innings, two earned runs and eight strikeouts – tried to score the winning run from first. The relay from center fielder Evan Campbell to shortstop Rider to catcher David Lyon had to be perfect.

“He was dead out,” Stricklin said. “But if the throw is off-line at all, he's probably safe.”

The teams played on. And on. And on, challenging the epic, 25-inning Boston College-Texas NCAA Tournament game from 2009.

That same night, Kent State's current seniors were freshmen playing in the Tempe Regional. They allowed seven runs in the top of the ninth to Cal Poly but held on for a 10-9 win.

The next year, the Golden Flashes went to the Los Angeles Regional. And last year, they went to the Austin Regional, shocking Texas to advance to the Regional Final, where the Longhorns took two wins from the Flashes to advance.

Friday night was the 10th Regional game for Kent State's seniors. That's called experience.

“I don't think it's any question it plays a factor in our favor,” Stricklin said. “No other team in this Regional has played in a Regional [with their current players]. Our seniors, it's their fourth Regional.”

The roller coasters of college baseball – even the really long ones – aren't as scary the fourth time around.

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News Headline: Spring luncheon held at Twin Lakes | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Chapter of Blossom
Music Women's Committee
met for the season's
opening meeting and luncheon
at The Fairways of
Twin Lakes.
Two new members were
introduced by co-president,
Barb Cox. Welcomed as newest
members were Alice Hurd
and Gingr Vaughan. Also attending
were three guest visitors
from the Aurora chapter.
Sylvia Armstrong announced
the upcoming new
membership brunch taking
place at the home of Nancy
Madonio at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.
Further details will be included
in the invitations being
sent to all chapter members.
Following the luncheon,
Maryalice Seaholts, treasurer,
introduced the afternoon's
entertainment. Performing
several jazz selections were
the Kent State University
Jazz Combo, Jessica Stover
on saxophone, Leo Hazama
on bass, and Max Michael on
keyboard.
Those attending were invited
to take home one of
the individual viola plants
centered around each of the
watering cans adorned with
spring floral arrangements
set at each of the eight dining
tables.

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News Headline: 'Damn Yankees' opens Porthouse's summer season (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre, the outdoor, professional summer stock theatre on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, kicks off its 2012 season with "Damn Yankees" June 14.

The musical can be seen June 14 through 16, June 19 through 23 and June 26 through 30 at 8 p.m. and June 17 and 24 at 2 p.m. For tickets, call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

The story centers on real estate agent Joe Boyd, who, one night, is up late grumbling that if his favorite team, the Washington Senators, just had a "long ball hitter" they could beat the "damn Yankees." Enter sleek car salesman Applegate, who is really the devil ready to wheel and deal with Joe Boyd's soul. With some persuasion, Applegate wins and Joe Boyd becomes the newly discovered baseball prodigy Joe Hardy. Suddenly, fans have the slugger they need to win the pennant, and baseball season is starting to look up.

"This show is like an Indians game I remember in the late '90s with Jose Mesa on the mound with a full count, two outs and bases loaded - audiences won't know what hit 'em," said Terri Kent, director. "I am so thrilled to be directing 'Damn Yankees' because it is just such a fun show."

"Damn Yankees" is directed by Kent, the theatre's artistic director, whose work at Porthouse includes "Chicago," "Bye Bye Birdie," "The Music Man," "Dames at Sea," "Annie Get Your Gun" and "Oklahoma!."

MaryAnn Black of Copley stars as the seductress Lola. Marc Moritz of Cleveland Heights is Joe Boyd. Mary Anne Prevost of Cuyahoga Falls is Meg Boyd. Rohn Thomas of Kent as Coach Benny Van Buren. Eric van Baars of Cuyahoga Falls will play the devilish Applegate.

Porthouse Theatre features free parking and allows patrons to bring in picnics (including alcohol) to its grounds. A covered picnic pavilion is available for reservation at $2 per person or free for subscribers and is based on availability. There is also a concession stand of light snacks and beverages. Many picnic tables are available for everyone's enjoyment at no cost.

Porthouse Theatre is at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road. Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday, from 11:30 a.m. to p.m., or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online. Subscriptions are currently on sale and range for adults from $63 to $90 and for seniors from $54 to $90 for the three-show package. Student pricing is available as well. Group tickets are available for groups of 20 or more.

Single tickets, ranging from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students, go on sale after May 29. The box office is on the Kent State campus in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of East Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent. For more information, visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

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News Headline: 'Damn Yankees' opens Porthouse's summer season (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ‘Damn Yankees' opens Porthouse's 2012 summer season.

Porthouse Theatre, the outdoor, professional summer stock theatre on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, kicks off its 2012 season with "Damn Yankees" June 14.

The musical can be seen June 14 through 16, June 19 through 23 and June 26 through 30 at 8 p.m. and June 17 and 24 at 2 p.m. For tickets, call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com .

The story centers on real estate agent Joe Boyd, who, one night, is up late grumbling that if his favorite team, the Washington Senators, just had a "long ball hitter" they could beat the "damn Yankees." Enter sleek car salesman Applegate, who is really the devil ready to wheel and deal with Joe Boyd's soul. With some persuasion, Applegate wins and Joe Boyd becomes the newly discovered baseball prodigy Joe Hardy. Suddenly, fans have the slugger they need to win the pennant, and baseball season is starting to look up.

"This show is like an Indians game I remember in the late '90s with Jose Mesa on the mound with a full count, two outs and bases loaded - audiences won't know what hit 'em," said Terri Kent, director. "I am so thrilled to be directing 'Damn Yankees' because it is just such a fun show."

"Damn Yankees" is directed by Kent, the theatre's artistic director, whose work at Porthouse includes "Chicago," "Bye Bye Birdie," "The Music Man," "Dames at Sea," "Annie Get Your Gun" and "Oklahoma!."

MaryAnn Black of Copley stars as the seductress Lola. Marc Moritz of Cleveland Heights is Joe Boyd. Mary Anne Prevost of Cuyahoga Falls is Meg Boyd. Rohn Thomas of Kent as Coach Benny Van Buren. Eric van Baars of Cuyahoga Falls will play the devilish Applegate.

Porthouse Theatre features free parking and allows patrons to bring in picnics (including alcohol) to its grounds. A covered picnic pavilion is available for reservation at $2 per person or free for subscribers and is based on availability. There is also a concession stand of light snacks and beverages. Many picnic tables are available for everyone's enjoyment at no cost.

Porthouse Theatre is at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road. Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday, from 11:30 a.m. to p.m., or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online. Subscriptions are currently on sale and range for adults from $63 to $90 and for seniors from $54 to $90 for the three-show package. Student pricing is available as well. Group tickets are available for groups of 20 or more.

Single tickets, ranging from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students, go on sale after May 29. The box office is on the Kent State campus in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of East Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent. For more information, visit www.porthousetheatre.com .

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News Headline: 'Damn Yankees' opens Porthouse's summer season (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre, the outdoor, professional summer stock theatre on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, kicks off its 2012 season with "Damn Yankees" June 14.

The musical can be seen June 14 through 16, June 19 through 23 and June 26 through 30 at 8 p.m. and June 17 and 24 at 2 p.m. For tickets, call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

The story centers on real estate agent Joe Boyd, who, one night, is up late grumbling that if his favorite team, the Washington Senators, just had a "long ball hitter" they could beat the "damn Yankees." Enter sleek car salesman Applegate, who is really the devil ready to wheel and deal with Joe Boyd's soul. With some persuasion, Applegate wins and Joe Boyd becomes the newly discovered baseball prodigy Joe Hardy. Suddenly, fans have the slugger they need to win the pennant, and baseball season is starting to look up.

"This show is like an Indians game I remember in the late '90s with Jose Mesa on the mound with a full count, two outs and bases loaded - audiences won't know what hit 'em," said Terri Kent, director. "I am so thrilled to be directing 'Damn Yankees' because it is just such a fun show."

"Damn Yankees" is directed by Kent, the theatre's artistic director, whose work at Porthouse includes "Chicago," "Bye Bye Birdie," "The Music Man," "Dames at Sea," "Annie Get Your Gun" and "Oklahoma!."

MaryAnn Black of Copley stars as the seductress Lola. Marc Moritz of Cleveland Heights is Joe Boyd. Mary Anne Prevost of Cuyahoga Falls is Meg Boyd. Rohn Thomas of Kent as Coach Benny Van Buren. Eric van Baars of Cuyahoga Falls will play the devilish Applegate.

Porthouse Theatre features free parking and allows patrons to bring in picnics (including alcohol) to its grounds. A covered picnic pavilion is available for reservation at $2 per person or free for subscribers and is based on availability. There is also a concession stand of light snacks and beverages. Many picnic tables are available for everyone's enjoyment at no cost.

Porthouse Theatre is at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road. Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday, from 11:30 a.m. to p.m., or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online. Subscriptions are currently on sale and range for adults from $63 to $90 and for seniors from $54 to $90 for the three-show package. Student pricing is available as well. Group tickets are available for groups of 20 or more.

Single tickets, ranging from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students, go on sale after May 29. The box office is on the Kent State campus in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of East Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent. For more information, visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

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News Headline: 'Damn Yankees' opens Porthouse's summer season (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre, the outdoor, professional summer stock theatre on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, kicks off its 2012 season with "Damn Yankees" June 14.

The musical can be seen June 14 through 16, June 19 through 23 and June 26 through 30 at 8 p.m. and June 17 and 24 at 2 p.m. For tickets, call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

The story centers on real estate agent Joe Boyd, who, one night, is up late grumbling that if his favorite team, the Washington Senators, just had a "long ball hitter" they could beat the "damn Yankees." Enter sleek car salesman Applegate, who is really the devil ready to wheel and deal with Joe Boyd's soul. With some persuasion, Applegate wins and Joe Boyd becomes the newly discovered baseball prodigy Joe Hardy. Suddenly, fans have the slugger they need to win the pennant, and baseball season is starting to look up.

"This show is like an Indians game I remember in the late '90s with Jose Mesa on the mound with a full count, two outs and bases loaded - audiences won't know what hit 'em," said Terri Kent, director. "I am so thrilled to be directing 'Damn Yankees' because it is just such a fun show."

"Damn Yankees" is directed by Kent, the theatre's artistic director, whose work at Porthouse includes "Chicago," "Bye Bye Birdie," "The Music Man," "Dames at Sea," "Annie Get Your Gun" and "Oklahoma!."

MaryAnn Black of Copley stars as the seductress Lola. Marc Moritz of Cleveland Heights is Joe Boyd. Mary Anne Prevost of Cuyahoga Falls is Meg Boyd. Rohn Thomas of Kent as Coach Benny Van Buren. Eric van Baars of Cuyahoga Falls will play the devilish Applegate.

Porthouse Theatre features free parking and allows patrons to bring in picnics (including alcohol) to its grounds. A covered picnic pavilion is available for reservation at $2 per person or free for subscribers and is based on availability. There is also a concession stand of light snacks and beverages. Many picnic tables are available for everyone's enjoyment at no cost.

Porthouse Theatre is at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road. Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday, from 11:30 a.m. to p.m., or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online. Subscriptions are currently on sale and range for adults from $63 to $90 and for seniors from $54 to $90 for the three-show package. Student pricing is available as well. Group tickets are available for groups of 20 or more.

Single tickets, ranging from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students, go on sale after May 29. The box office is on the Kent State campus in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of East Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent. For more information, visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

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News Headline: LEARN HOW TO PROTECT YOUR ASSETS AND MAKE YOUR MEDICAL WISHES KNOWN AT FREE KENT STATE SEMINAR (Aleman) | Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 2nd annual Ask the Panel seminar on estate planning, taxes and medical directives will be held from 9 a.m.to noon on Friday, June 15, at Kent State University in the Moulton Hall Ballroom, located at 800 Hilltop Drive in Kent, Ohio.The lecture is presented by Kent State's Center for Gift and Estate Planning and is free and open to the public.To register, call 330-672-0421 or visit www.kent.edu/event/plannedgiving y Friday, June 8.

The panel features four local experts on estate planning and asset management, tax changes and documenting medical wishes.There also will be information on options in charitable planning.

Doors open at 8:15 a.m.for registration.A continental breakfast will be served.The seminar begins promptly at 9 a.m.

This year's panelists are: Paula Divencenzo, tax manager, Kent State; Michele K.Keith, attorney, Flynn, Keith & Flynn in Kent, Ohio; Alice Yoho, patient advocate, Robinson Memorial Hospital; and Mindy Aleman, executive director, Gift and Estate Planning, Kent State.

"Understanding what you need to ensure that your medical directives are known and that your assets are protected is a very significant topic," Aleman noted."We also feel that many of our donors enjoy learning that there are ways to provide for loved ones and for the charities they support."

The Center for Gift and Estate Planning is part of the division of Institutional Advancement at Kent State, and it provides charitable planning services for the eight-campus university system.It serves as a resource to the advancement team in the division as well as alumni, emeriti, faculty and staff, and friends of Kent State who wish to remember the institution through their estate plans.

For more information about the Ask the Panel seminar on June 15, contact Jane Ickes from the Center for Gift and Estate Planning at Kent State at jrickes@kent.edu or 330-672-0421.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

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News Headline: Kent State set to host Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program for Iraq (Lefton, Netty) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is one of five institutions selected to host the 2012 Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program for Iraq this summer.

The program is sponsored by the Council for International Exchange of Scholars and supported by the U.S. Department of State's Educational and Cultural Affairs Bureau and the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.

Now in its third year, the program will host 35 Iraqi scholars in five discipline-based groups at five selected U.S. institutions from July 7 through Sept. 15. KSU will host the science and technology scholars from Iraq. The other institutions will host scholars in agricultural science, engineering, teaching English as a foreign language/linguistics and environmental science.

"This selection reflects our commitment to building global bridges, from increasing the number of international students on our campuses to creating more academic and cultural opportunities through partnerships with the world's leading universities," KSU President Lester Lefton said.

Under the leadership of I. Richmond Nettey, Ph.D., a Stow resident and associate dean of KSU's College of Technology, a Kent State team of administrators, faculty and staff from the Office of Global Education and the colleges of Technology, Arts and Sciences, and Education, Health and Human Services prepared and submitted a proposal to the Council for International Exchange of Scholars to host the visiting scholars.

The interdisciplinary proposal, which was submitted to the Council for International Exchange of Scholars in December 2011, was approved by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau for Educational and Cultural Affairs in February 2012.

"Kent State's proposal came in so high above the bar that the Council for International Exchange of Scholars asked us about increasing the number of assigned scholars from the original number of seven to 10 Fulbright Iraq scholars," Nettey said.

Mentoring the Fulbright Iraq scholars will be a team of 13 KSU experts in science and technology, consisting of Vice President for Research Grant McGimpsey; Derek Damron, Xiaozhen Mou, Colleen Novak, Joseph Ortiz and Hassan Peyravi from the College of Arts and Sciences; Denise Bedford and Joe Murray from the College of Communication and Information; Gail Bromley from the College of Nursing; and Darwin Boyd, Michael Fisch, Verna Fitzsimmons and Roberto Uribe-Rendon from the College of Technology. John Stalvey, associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, will serve as facilitator.

To welcome the Fulbright Iraqi scholars, the KSU team has planned a series of activities in the first week that include a luncheon with President Lester A. Lefton and Provost Todd Diacon, and cross-cultural training workshops sponsored by the Office of Global Education. In addition to scholarly work in science and technology with their assigned mentors, the Fulbright Iraq scholars will engage in a wide range of cultural and civic activities, including visits to the Ohio Statehouse, the Ohio Board of Regents, local city council proceedings, local Rotary and Kiwanis Club meetings, Niagara Falls, Porthouse Theatre, an Indians-Yankees baseball game and more.

University representatives also have made careful provisions for Ramadan, which will include an Iftar dinner with KSU's Muslim Students Association and local host families.

"This is a wonderful honor and opportunity for Kent State," Nettey said. "Hosting the Fulbright program is a major step in meeting President Lefton's goal of increasing the international focus of the university, and we are looking forward to working with these esteemed Iraqi scholars." For more information on the Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program for Iraq, visit www.cies.org/fulbright/Iraq .

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News Headline: A resource for human resource issues | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: So, how many times over, say, the last 12 months have you found yourself in something like the following conversation?

YOU: “We've been trying to fill a management job for months now, and we just can't seem to find great candidates.”

THEM: “I know what you mean. We had a director leave three months ago, and have tried everything — recruiters, trade publication ads, digital job services and the results are maddening.”

YOU: “Same with us. And it's a good job, with a nice salary and benefits package.”

THEM: “Yeah, same here. With this supposed bad economy and high unemployment, how can there not be more good people out there?”

Talent retention and acquisition is a problem for all businesses right now, and it's likely to get worse long before it gets better. It's one reason we launched our weekly e-newsletter on staffing and human resources issues a few months ago. It's free and you can register for it on our home page at www.crainscleveland .com.

But the events we've held on this topic also have drawn an interesting mix of folks from all sorts of industries across Northeast Ohio. Savvy business owners and HR leaders know that if it's difficult now to find good people, it's going to get far worse as the Baby Boomers continue to leave the work force.

We believe a key to keeping talented employees is learning what makes them tick. And believe me, it's more than just a salary and benefits package and interesting work.

Think about it: For perhaps the first time in American history, workplaces are filled with people from three distinctly different generations, each of which looks at job and career differently than the other. What jazzed the Boomers might have little value to Generation X, and what that crowd cares about in their work might have no meaning at all to the Millennials.

To have the best work force, you just might need to manage differently. For example, is there technology you can employ to bridge the generations? Are you trying to identify values that are shared across all these generations so they can pull together? Do you understand what are truths and myths about each generation?

On June 21, we will host a breakfast panel that will delve into those questions and more in an effort to help businesses enlarge their talent pool. And it's a robust group, consisting of Robert Walker, director of Kent State University's School of Digital Sciences; Evan Ishida, senior manager of performance and learning consulting at Eaton Corp.; and Alan Loos, manager of information technology at FedEx International.

The event at the Ritz Carlton starts with networking from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m., followed by the panel discussion and Q&A. To register, call 216-771-5158 or visit www .crainscleveland.com/breakfast. See you there.

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News Headline: Outstanding Faculty | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: http://kent.patch.com/blog_posts/outstanding-faculty/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1338569527

Student Accessibility Services

Outstanding Faculty Nomination

Student's Name: Angela Orlando

Faculty Name: Dr. Katherine Orr

Classes Taught:

Introduction to Creative Writing Fall, 2010

Poetry Writing I Spring, 2011

Poetry Writing II Spring 2012

In the past, I took ASL classes at Kent State. However, my heart had always been in writing. Finally, I worked up the courage to take Introduction to Creative Writing. I wrote to the department chair and told him about my situation and needed accommodations. My professor would have to be flexible, easy-going, creative and determined. He told me to sign up for a class with Dr. Katherine Orr. That's how my amazing experience began.

I sent an email to Dr. Orr to introduce myself and explain about my disabilities. I got the feeling she was truly excited to have a deaf-blind student in her class. Her mind went right to work on what would be needed. She even contacted Student Accessibility Services (SAS) and made an appointment with Sue Smith before the semester began. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss what could be done to help me succeed. No other professor ever thought to do that.

I always felt so alive in my writing classes with Dr. Orr. She made me part of the class. She arranged the seats so I wasn't sitting in a corner in the back of the room.  I was physically and emotionally included. Dr. Orr called on me often. She had me read my work in class, just like everyone else. Sometimes I wrote poems or stories about my disabilities. Dr. Orr used that as an opening to discuss the challenges I face and ways I triumph. But she wasn't talking so much about my disabilities. She was referring to my life and showing the other students that I'm not so different. To Dr. Orr, I'm not a deaf-blind student or a student with disabilities.  I'm just a student with the desire to learn.

We ran into a problem right away. I discovered that I can't understand poetry in American Sign Language (ASL). Dr. Orr was on top of it.  She would not let this be a setback. She had all students send their work ahead of time to Sue Smith, so it could be converted into braille. Sue Smith would make a braille book and send electronic copies via email so I had every students' writing in a format that I could appreciate. When the students recited their work in class, I read along with my braille book.

Through this class, I also discovered I liked to attend poetry readings. Again, we needed a system so I could read the poetry instead of using an interpreter. We figured out how to use my assistive technology to solve the  problem. Someone would type on a keyboard connected to my Deaf-Blind Communicator (DBC), and I could read it in braille. During the very first reading, it was Dr. Orr who did the typing. I couldn't believe that a professor would take the time to type for me. To Dr. Orr, it was no big deal. She just wanted me to be able to enjoy the reading.  And I did.

During these readings, she always came over to talk to me. Sometimes she just said hello. Other times she asked me what I thought of the reading. She always made sure I got the opportunity to meet the poets. This is how I met one of my most supportive writing mentors.

Unfortunately, things were not going well with my health. I was experiencing horrible pain in my arms, shoulders and neck. I could no longer handle the signing, reading and typing. It was with a heavy heart that I told Dr. Orr I would have to withdraw from the class. Her response was, "No way." If I couldn't come to class, that was fine. She was determined to keep me writing. I finished the rest of the semester via email and earned an “A” in the class.  I felt such pride in myself that I was able to complete the class. It was all because of Dr. Orr.

My health was not improving. I had no intention of taking another class. But Dr. Orr wrote and encouraged me to keep on going. I took Poetry Writing I during the next semester.  It was all through email.  I never actually stepped foot in the classroom.  But she made sure I was still a part of the class. She read my work to the students and had them send me comments and suggestions through email. I managed to write the eight required poems. That was a huge accomplishment considering the pain I was in.

I did not sign up for a class in Fall 2011. Ironically, that's when I started to feel better.  Dr. Orr gave me information about what her classes were studying and the textbooks they used. I did my own reading and never stopped writing new poetry. She also sent me the Wick Poetry Center schedule for readings. I attended a few that semester. Even though I wasn't a student, Dr. Orr still took the time to chat with me.

I am a new writer with little confidence in my skills. Dr. Orr seems to see budding talent in my work. She's so encouraging.  She makes me feel like I'm doing something special. Maybe I am a good writer. Perhaps I can make a career out of this. If she really believes in me, it must be true.

I was shocked when she asked me to do a reading with two other "Outstanding Poetry Students" at the Wick Poetry Center. This was my first poetry reading. There was an official flier with my name and picture. There were people there who came just to hear me read my work. They introduced me like I was a "real" writer. I was terrified and exited at the same time. It was one of the most thrilling moments in my life. Once again, I owe it all to Dr. Orr.

For this Spring semester, I signed up for Poetry Writing II. It's obvious how much I love Dr. Orr, considering this is my third class in a row with her. In this class, she upped the level of inclusion. If students don't send their work to Sue Smith for my braille book, they lose points. She encouraged them to talk to me through my interpreters. Again, my work often led to discussions about ASL, braille, mobility and other aspects related to my life. Since she expressed so much interest in the topic, I gave all students a card with the braille alphabet and a paper showing the sign language alphabet. Dr. Orr had each student learn to sign their name and introduce themselves by spelling directly into my hand. Some students went further and tried signing phrases so we could have a conversation. I was totally astonished by this.

One day I was sitting on a bench before class when someone touched my arm and gently took my hands. Slowly, she signed, "Katherine."  That's Dr. Orr. She prefers to be called Katherine.  Then she sat with me for five or ten minutes just chatting.  She worked so hard to remember how to form each letter. Her willingness to do that touched my heart.

I love having Dr. Orr as my teacher. It saddens me that this is the last class I can take with her. But I have a strong feeling that she is not done with me. No matter what, she will always be a writing mentor - a friend. For all these reasons combined, I nominated Dr. Katherine Orr as an outstanding faculty member.

Note: Dr. Orr was chosen as the nominee who best exemplified the following criteria; taking an interest in students' unique learning style, exhibiting creativity in their teaching methods relative to student need and normalizing the classroom experience for students with disabilities.

Dr. Orr was honored last and received a special trophy.  The trophy is made of natural wood stained in different shades of brown with the following inscription: Making the Difference.

Awarded to Katherine Orr for your commitment to students with disabilities. April 2012.  Professor Orr also received a framed certificate.

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News Headline: Making sense of dollars and cents (Dumpe) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Variables make budgeting a challenge

With a college diploma and a job offer in hand, the world looks bright and promising. But that regular paycheck demands budgeting for expenses and unexpected bumps in the road.

David Burgess, a 2007 graduate of Youngstown State University and a resident of Struthers, said that unexpected expenses are a common difficulty.

"Unexpected expenses like car repair are difficult to budget," he said. "Online banking helps me keep track of expenses and schedule bill payments.

"It helps me see what I am spending my money on and I can make adjustments to my monthly budget," Burgess said.

Jim Marsh, business consultant at J.P. Marsh and Co. CPAs in Hubbard, said it's best for individuals starting out in the work force to look over their expenses. Marsh said that setting up a budget makes the expense tracking process easier.

"Once people set up a budget, they can track any variances in their budget versus the actual for that month and for that period," he said. "People should put an amount for savings for unexpected expenses and major purchases in any budget.

"People think it's always a question of how much they earn," he said. "It's really how much they spend, and that budget can help someone identify problems with their spending."

Matt Lattanzi of Youngstown said that being a graduate student at Youngstown State has made it exceptionally difficult for him to budget.

"During the semesters, I can't hold a job outside of my graduate assistantship," he said. "So my expenses such as car payment, cell phone, car insurance, rent utilities, food, gas and other necessities, such as leisure, far outweigh my intake.

''I was taking out some subsidized loans to make up the difference, but now that graduate students don't qualify, I most likely will have to be incredibly strict when it comes to food and leisure expenditures, keeping myself at no more than $10 per day for all nonbill expenses."

But in addition to the day-to-day expenses, recent grads should start thinking about the future.

"The big thing that college students and graduates should think about is setting some money aside for retirement," said Dr. Raymond Shaffer, professor and director of the Lariccia School of Accounting and Finance at Youngstown State University. "They should do this as soon as they get their paycheck, because over a 40- or 50-year career, the compounding is just tremendous. It's always important to not stop setting money aside. Do it as a payroll deduction."

Dr. David Dumpe, associate professor in the department of finance at Kent State University, said that retirement should be the first priority to think about even when beginning a job. He said it is essential for graduates to start a 401(k) fund if there is a matching contribution with their employer.

"If an employee contributes 6 percent and employer contributes 3 percent, then the employee can start immediately with the 401(k)," Dumpe said. "Defined pension plans are gone these days and if the employer does not start a 401(k) fund, then they have no pension plan."

"People should start an IRA (Individual Retirement Account) as soon as possible," Shaffer said. "The longer people have the money in these accounts, the more they can earn income on these accounts."

Michael McMahon, administrative support specialist of the department of career services at Trumbull Business College in Warren, agrees that responsible practices during college years lead to a well-planned future.

McMahon is a graduate of Trumbull Business College and is also currently a student enrolled in a program for a bachelor of science degree in information technology at Western Governor's University, an online university.

"I would like to start a 401(k) fund, but I am financially unable to right now," she said. "In my situation, all the money coming in goes out in rent for my apartment in which I pay full rent. This includes electricity and water. In addition to rent, I have to pay a car payment and food expenses."

For budgeting beginners, there are many tools available to manage money.

"I use Quicken software to keep track of my money going in and out," McMahon said. "Quicken has a feature that reminds me of upcoming bills and expenses and recurring expenses."

"It's good to keep track of expenses through creating an Excel spreadsheet or even a spending diary," Dumpe said. "It takes discipline. Individuals can have a debit card to track expenses electronically."

Lattanzi relies on his online banking services to keep track of his expenses.

"I don't use any iPhone apps to track my expenses," he said. "Typically, I just refer to my online banking statements. I have accounts with two different banks. One of them is just for bills and the other is for everything else. Once I am sure I can cover the bills for the month, I start putting money on my second account for other expenses."

Devon Cretella, owner of Cretella Agency in Girard, said that websites such as Mint.com are helpful tools in helping people track their expenses.

"People can upload savings, spending information, bank account information into this system to keep track," Cretella said.

A paycheck can be an exciting reward, but it should be mindfully used.

"The real secret to financial health and success is living beneath our means," Marsh said.

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News Headline: Public colleges in Ohio asked to go totally smoke-free | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Public colleges in Ohio could become totally smoke-free.

Ohio Board of Regents Chairman James Tuschman said he will introduce a resolution at this month's meeting asking boards of trustees at two- and four-year institutions to ban tobacco on campuses.

"It's the right thing to do," he said.

Tuschman, other regents and Chancellor Jim Petro were influenced by a plea from Dr. Toby Cosgrove, chief executive of the Cleveland Clinic, who spoke at the regents' May 22 meeting at Lorain County Community College.

"Universities take a great deal of thought, time and expense to educate the brain," Cosgrove said. "You have to think about educating the bodies."

Cosgrove, who gained national attention when he announced in 2007 that the Clinic, which already was smoke-free, would no longer hire anyone who uses tobacco, said 37 percent of college students who smoke begin the habit after they enroll.

"Twenty percent of people in the U.S. continue to smoke," Cosgrove said. "There has been a recent uptick, and it is very worrisome for us in terms of public health. College is a main concern for us because that is when the incidence really jumps up."

College students begin smoking because of stress, drinking and social pressure and to control their weight, Cosgrove said.

Petro said he began smoking at Denison University, even though he was an athlete. He smoked a pack a day in college, then five or six cigarettes daily for 40 years, he said.

"I was a secret smoker," Petro said. "I tried to quit 40 times." He did four years ago.

In 2009 he was diagnosed with laryngeal cancer, in the soft tissue of the neck. At least one doctor said it could have been caused by smoking, he said. Petro now is cancer-free.

He said all of the state's 23 community colleges and 14 universities should consider going smoke-free. Each college's board would have to vote on a policy for that campus.

Many colleges in Ohio banned smoking in buildings even before a state law went into effect in 2007 that restricts smoking inside most public places and workplaces or within 25 feet of buildings.

But students, staff and employees on most campuses can light up as they cross college greens and socialize away from buildings.

There are no state regulations regarding smokeless tobacco, but some colleges are considering adopting a tobacco-free policy that would ban all tobacco products.

Miami University is the only public university in Ohio that bans smoking on campus. The University of Toledo bans all tobacco products but allows their use in seven huts around campus and in personal vehicles parked on campus. Several private colleges in Ohio, including Notre Dame College in South Euclid, have smoke-free campuses.

Bronson Frick, associate director of Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights in Berkeley, Calif., said that the number of smoke-free college campuses across the nation has grown from a handful to around 700 since his organization began tracking information about a decade ago.

"We are seeing a tremendous increase in smoke-free campus policies across the country," he said. "There used to be smoking indoors, then increasingly campus communities started questioning what is the role of tobacco in an academic setting knowing that tobacco companies are targeting young adults to be future addicts."

Arkansas, Iowa and Oklahoma have banned smoking on all state college campuses.

In Northeast Ohio, officials say, there has been no discussion at Kent State University, the University of Akron or Cleveland State University about going smoke-free.

Cosgrove said he talked to Northeast Ohio college presidents two years ago.

"I got no response," he said.

Regent Vinny Gupta said he spoke to seven college presidents about smoke-free campuses.

"They said, 'Vinny, if I had to do it I would lose enrollment to the next county,' " he said. "If the whole state of Ohio did, it would level the playing field."

Enrollment and employment have not been affected at campuses that go smoke-free, and in many cases they improve, said Frick and Dr. Michael Roizen, the Cleveland Clinic's chief wellness officer, who also spoke to the regents last month.

"The schools that carefully tracked their policy found the efforts resulted in a significant reduction of tobacco use among their students as well as faculty," Frick said. And many schools save money on health care costs.

The smoke-free policy has not been detrimental at Miami University, which expanded smoking restrictions campuswide in the fall of 2008, said spokeswoman Claire Wagner.

"People are happy not to have to walk through smoke," she said.

The university, like others that go smoke-free, offers smoking-cessation classes. It recently began offering a $15-per-month discount on its health care premiums for employees and spouses/partners who are nonsmokers.

There are still people who smoke but they will do it in their cars," Wagner said. "People walk outside the boundary of campus into Oxford to catch a smoke, students included."

When students push for a smoke-free campus they usually succeed and will police each other, according to Frick and Roizen.

In August 2011, University of Toledo trustees adopted a smoke-free and tobacco-free policy that restricts tobacco use to designated areas. They acted after recommendations were made by a committee established by the student government and administration, said spokesman Jon Strunk.

"I have not heard a great deal of pushback," he said. "You certainly see folks in the designated zones smoking."

A graduate student in public health at Ohio State University began an effort last fall to establish a tobacco-free campus.

Buckeyes Against Butts is not a registered student organization, but efforts to conduct research, meet with university officials and draft a policy are continuing.

Some of OSU's Big Ten counterparts, Penn State, Indiana University, the University of Iowa and the University of Michigan, have smoke-free campuses.

It is easier to adopt smoke-free policies at community colleges, where there are no residential students, and at smaller colleges, said Frick.

Notre Dame College has had a campuswide smoking ban since December 2006, said human-resources director Susan Anderson.

It does offer three locations where people can smoke -- at the farthest reaches of the campus. There is no shelter, just a receptacle to deposit cigarette butts into, she said.

"If you smoke, you should be uncomfortable," she said. "You should be really warm, really cold or really wet."

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News Headline: Job help, networking events: Business calendar | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JOBS HELP

MONDAY

Monday Morning Jumpstart: 10 a.m. to noon, Career Transition Center at Shaker Heights Public Library, 16500 Van Aken Blvd., Shaker Heights. Held every Monday. To register, call 216-991-2030, ext. 3011.

TUESDAY

Online Job Applications: 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Cuyahoga County Public Library, Warrensville Heights Branch, 4415 Northfield Road, Warrensville Heights. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/7vt7237 to register.

WEDNESDAY

Developing a Career Action Plan: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Cuyahoga County Public Library, Maple Heights Branch, 5225 Library Lane, Maple Heights. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/89l8ufr to register.

MONDAY, JUNE 11

Online Job Applications: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Cuyahoga County Public Library, Maple Heights Branch, 5225 Library Lane, Maple Heights. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/898ppqh to register.

R sum & Cover Letter Writing Quickfire: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Cuyahoga County Public Library, Fairview Park Branch, 21255 Lorain Road, Fairview Park. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/7d69tsq to register.

TUESDAY, JUNE 12

"Keys to Getting an Interview": 10 a.m. to noon at the Hudson Library & Historical Library, 96 Library St., Hudson. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/87gpsu4 to register.

CALENDAR

TUESDAY

Outside Sales Training Camp, "Solutions for the Challenges of an Outside Salesperson's Daily Work": 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Courtyard Marriott, 5051 West Creek Road., Independence. $278. Go to tinyurl.com/7ywldpj to register.

Behavioral Interviewing: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the ERC Workplace Center, 6700 Beta Drive, Suite 300, Mayfield. $250 for ERC members, $300 for nonmembers. Go to web.ercnet.org/events to register.

American Association of Individual Investors Business Cycles & Sector Investing Group, Akron, "Asset Protection through Limited Liability Companies": 6:30 p.m. at the Akron-Summit County Public Library, Main Library Building, Meeting Room 2AB, 60 S. High St. Free. Parking free after 6 p.m. Email aaii-neo@googlegroups.com.

WEDNESDAY

Historic Downtown Cleveland Luncheon Forum, "Cultural Heritage Tourism Means Business for Cleveland!": 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Sammy's Metropolitan Ballroom, 925 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. $65. Proceeds will benefit the Historic Gateway Neighborhood, PlayhouseSquare District and the Historic Warehouse District. To register, go to warehousedistrict.org or call 216-344-3937.

American Business Women's Association, Sheauga Chapter: 5:30 p.m. at Dino's Restaurant at Ohio 306, south of I-90, in Mentor. $10. To register, call Donna Gedeon 440-666-4160.

O'Rourke & Associates Co. LPA webinar, "Ohio Statutes Do Protect You in Some Circumstances: Ohio's Fairness in Contracting Act Revealed": 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/7n38jwu to register.

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY

Connecting with Industry Conference: Cuyahoga Community College Corporate College East, 4400 Richmond Road, Warrensville Heights. Go to tinyurl.com/88nqhgk for information about times and costs and to register.

THURSDAY

Lakeland Community College Nonprofit and Public Service Center, "Ohio Ethics Law: Can I Do That?": 7 to 9 p.m. on the college's main campus, H Building, Room 101, 7700 Clocktower Drive, Kirtland. Free. Must register. To register, go to tinyurl.com/787v3tr and search for 13UNPC109.01 or call 440-525-7116 and mention registration number 13UNPC109.01.

"Reach for the Top": 6 to 9 p.m. at the Velvet Dog Rooftop Patio, 1280 West Sixth Street, Cleveland. $50. Register by Monday. Go to tinyurl.com/7xs3vyg to register.

Paragon Consulting Inc. and Sitecore, breakfast seminar with Louis Tetu of Coveo: 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the DoubleTree Hotel, 6200 Quarry Road, Independence. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/88vat5r to register.

FRIDAY

Lake County Development Council Inc., "Updates on the City of Mentor": Noon to 1:30 p.m. at Dino's Restaurant & Banquet Center, 4145 Ohio 306, Willoughby. $15 for members, $17 for nonmembers. To register, go to tinyurl.com/7wcnssk to register or email Melissa McArthur at cmb6899@sbcglobal.net or call 440-336-4355.

Small Business Administration seminar: 10 a.m. to noon at the SBA's Cleveland District office, Suite 211, 1350 Euclid Ave. The seminar will explain government-contracting opportunities available for small businesses. Free. Seating is limited. Call 216-522-4180.

TUESDAY, JUNE 12

Professional Communication Series (three-part series): Also held June 19 and June 26 from 9 a.m. to noon at the ERC Workplace Center, 6700 Beta Drive, Suite 300, Mayfield. $300 for ERC members, $350 for nonmembers. Go to web.ercnet.org/events to register.

Lake County Entrepreneurs President's Council Meeting: 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Moving Solutions, 8001 Moving Way (off Tyler Boulevard), Mentor. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/7p27n3j to register.

Entrepreneurs Club STS meeting: 5 to 7 p.m. at the Willoughby Brewing Co., Back Room, 4057 Erie St., Willoughby. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/6lw9bmh to register.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13

Cleveland Council on World Affairs annual meeting with keynote speaker Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald: 5:30 to 8 p.m. at the Shaker Heights Country Club, 3300 Courtland Blvd., Shaker Heights. Free. Must register by going to tinyurl.com/6olzxpo or calling 216-255-9002.

Lake Communicators, "Market Trends, Labels (and Wine) -- It Will Stick!": 11:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. at Dino's Restaurant, 4145 Ohio 306, Willoughby. $15 for members, $25 for nonmembers. Must register by June 11. Go to tinyurl.com/cl4hy6p to register.

Geauga Growth Partnership: 7:15 to 10:30 a.m. at the Fowlers Mill Golf Club, 13075 Rockhaven Road, Chesterland. Free. Seating is limited. Registration is requested by Friday. To register, go to tinyurl.com/7567t8o or email Leslie Bednar at info@geaugagrowth.com or call her at 440-564-1060.

LinkedIn -- The Basics: 9 to 10 a.m. at the ERC Workplace Center, 6700 Beta Drive, Suite 300, Mayfield.:00 $20 for ERC members, $25 for nonmembers. Go to web.ercnet.org/events to register.

O'Rourke & Associates Co. LPA webinar, "So the Contractor or Owner Has Gone Bankrupt -- Now What?!": 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/7n38jwu to register.

THURSDAY, JUNE 14

CRU Solutions Webinar, "Designing an IT Framework for Owners and IT Decision-Makers in Small Business": 2 to 3 p.m. at your computer. Free. Go to www.crusolutions.com to register.

Business Volunteers Unlimited, "Crisis Communications & Media Relations": 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Brecksville Recreation Center, One Community Drive, Brecksville. $65 for members, $95 for nonmembers. Go to tinyurl.com/d8tnj82 to register.

WIRE-Net Plant Tour at Astro Manufacturing & Design Inc.: 8 to 10 a.m., 34459 Curtis Blvd., Eastlake. $25 for members, $35 for nonmembers. Add $5 if registered after Thursday. To register, go to tinyurl.com/6ma7g6j or call Mari-Elen Sammon at 216-588-1442.

ERC Orientation: 9 to 10 a.m. at the ERC Workplace Center, 6700 Beta Drive, Suite 300, Mayfield. Free. Go to web.ercnet.org/events to register.

JUNE 14-16

Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Kent Multimedia Workshop: A three-day, hands-on video and photography multimedia storytelling workshop at 201 Franklin Hall, Kent State University, Kent. $195 for professionals and general public, $95 for Ohio college students, $295 for out-of-state participants. Go to tinyurl.com/bnp5bte for more information and to register.

SATURDAY, JUNE 16

Computer Assisted Genealogy Group, Cleveland Area Meeting: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Fairview Park Regional branch of Cuyahoga County Public Library, 21255 Lorain Road, Fairview Park. Morning program: "Cemeteries: What Can They Tell You?"; afternoon program: "Archiving Email and Internet Sources." For more information, go to tinyurl.com/cz3utzc or call Bill Frank, 440-734-2021.

TUESDAY, JUNE 19

Greater Cleveland Mortgage Bankers Association Annual Installation Luncheon, "$10 Million Dollar Development Project at University Circle": 11 a.m. at the Union Club, 1211 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. $35 for members, $45 for nonmembers, $25 for students. Add $5 if registered at the door. Go to tinyurl.com/cve79dx to register.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20

Summer Sports Series at Landerhaven, The Cleveland Indians: 11:15 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., Executive Caterers at Landerhaven, 6111 Landerhaven Drive, Mayfield Heights. $35. To register, go to tinyurl.com/6s7s854 or call Sharon at 440-449-0700, ext. 241.

Future Emerging Leaders of Lake County (FUEL), Bocce Tournament and Networking: 4 to 7:30 p.m. at Hellriegel's Inn, 1840 Mentor Ave., Painesville. Registrations are accepted in teams of two for the tournament. $40/team for FUEL members, $50 for nonmembers. $15 for networking and dinner, $5 for networking only. Register by June 17. Email fuel.lakecounty@gmail.com to request a registration form.

THURSDAY, JUNE 21

Lake/Geauga Area Chapter of the Society for Human Resource Management, "HR Metrics": 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at United Way of Lake County, 9285 Progress Parkway, Mentor. $99 for members, $124 for nonmembers. Add $26 if registered after June 10. Go to tinyurl.com/6mhnydk to register.

Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Cleveland Chapter and Campbell & Co., "First Look at Giving USA 2011 Findings & The Impact on Greater Cleveland Non-Profits": 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza, 5300 Rockside Road, Independence. $25 for members, $40 for nonmembers. Register by noon June 18. To register, go to tinyurl.com/bp6t627 or email admin@afpcleveland.org or call 216-696-1613.

American Association of Individual Investors, Mutual Fund Technical Analysis Group: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Westlake Porter Public Library, 2733 Center Ridge Road, Westlake. Free. Email bsmindek@aol.com with any questions.

Association of Corporate Counsel America, Northeast Ohio Chapter, "Lending Issues for Corporate Counsel": 8 to 10 a.m., Calfee, Halter & Griswold, 1405 East Sixth St., Cleveland. $20 for members, $40 for nonmembers, free to law students and faculty. To register, call Nancy Schneider 440-988-3213.

TUESDAY, JUNE 26

Disney Institute professional development program, "Building a Culture of Healthcare Excellence": 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Cuyahoga Community College, Corporate College East, Super Conference Room, 4400 Richmond Road, Warrensville Heights. $395. To register, go to tinyurl.com/6wkpk9c or call 216-987-3075.

THURSDAY, JUNE 28

GIS Users of Northern Ohio, What's new with ArcGIS 10.1?: 1:30 to 3 p.m. at the Utilities Learning and Business Center, 1981 Blase Nemeth Road, Painesville. Note alternative location. Free.

Go to cleveland.com/business for more calendar listings. Send new items at least two weeks in advance to Eileen Zakareckis, Business Calendar, The Plain Dealer, 1801 Superior Ave., Cleveland 44114, or email her at

bizlists@plaind.com. Include "Notebook," "Appointments," or "BizCal" in the subject line.

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News Headline: Local pilot completes record-making flight in nine days (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A local pilot touched down safely in Dayton May 22 after a nine-day flight which took him to each of Ohio's 88 counties while logging in 1,809 miles.

The pilot, Joe Murray, a Hudson resident and journalism professor at Kent State University, set the record by being "the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all counties of Ohio in an antique aircraft," he said.

"We were met by an enthusiastic crowd of folks from the community, the Wright B Flyer Museum, and several of our ground crew drove even in from Kent," Murray said. "A local photographer surprised us with a painting of the two Cubs [airplanes] on our route around Ohio."

Murray made the flight in a 1946 Piper J3 Cub, with friend and fellow pilot Ron Siwik of Chagrin Falls flying alongside in an identical vintage plane.

The weather "was remarkable for the entire nine days," according to Murray.

The pair was delayed a bit by thunderstorms while they were on the ground in Clinton County, he said.

"But while we waited, we had a good conversation with Bob the line boy at Clinton and his giant German shepherd, Buddy," Murray said.

"An Ohio Trooper Pilot arrived in one of OHP's 172s (Ohio Highway Patrol's traffic airplanes) and we shared some popcorn and talked to him for a while as well."

Murray said the trip raised a few thousand dollars toward a scholarship fund for disadvantaged families, which was short of the goal.

"But we will continue our efforts over the next year while we work on the book project," Murray said. "I am overwhelmed at the generosity of the people we met throughout Ohio who bought fuel for us, provided meals and overnight hangars for the airplanes, and purchased T-shirts and raffle tickets."

Funds for the scholarship are still being accepted. Donations can be made by contacting Murray or sending a check to the Kent State University Foundation at 101-G Franklin Hall, Kent, OH 44242-0001.

"It was a journey of 1,809 miles and 36 hours and six minutes in the air," Murray said. "We averaged about 50 miles per hour over the route; so, while it is not the most efficient way to see Ohio, it is still one of the most remarkable I have ever experienced."

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News Headline: Local pilots land in all 88 Ohio counties helping raise money for a Kent State scholarship (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Chris Flanagan
News OCR Text: RAVENNA, OHIO - Two local pilots are back home after flying nearly 2,000 miles without ever leaving Ohio. They pulled it off in vintage airplanes that had no electricity.

Joe Murray and Ron Siwik took-off and landed in every county in Ohio. All 88 of them.

"What I didn't expect was the interest from the communities, the people who came out to the airport to shake our hands and see us. You know, they'd buy us a tank of gas, make a meal for us, put us up overnight, hangar our airplane," Murray said.

Murray is a journalism professor at Kent State University. His flying companion is a retired doctor. They flew identical 1946 Piper Cubs on a first-of-its-kind mission. They crisscrossed the state in nine days while flying 1,809 miles. They landed on several farm field and grass runways. Their total flight time was 36 hours and 6 minutes.

"We had sort of the perfect mission, you might say, with Ohio's place in aviation history," Siwik said.

One of the highlight's of their trip was making new friends and rekindling old acquaintances.

"I don't think there's a bad person living in Ohio. If you ask me, I couldn't pick one out from anyone we met on this flight," Murray said.

The pilots met a lot of generous people. They raised about $3,000 towards a scholarship that Murray wants to establish at Kent State that will help disadvantaged students attend the university.

"But I got to tell you, the people who donated came from the heart and that really meant a lot to me. I had farmers walk up to me and stick dollars in my pocket and say ‘Give it to the kids.' I had a student put $100 in my envelope and leave it on my seat. I knew she couldn't afford that, so the people that donated truly donated from the heart and that meant a lot,"  said Murray.

If you are interested in donating to the scholarship fund you can find more information on the pilots' website:  lostinoscarhotel.com

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News Headline: Herbert W. Hoover Foundation Supports Stark County Water Testing Project | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: PRWeb - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In a unique and groundbreaking collaboration, students from five colleges and universities in Stark County, and several nationally recognized science and environmental partners, will focus on testing local water resources beginning June 5. The water sampling project, Making the Invisible Visible: Water Quality in Stark County, is funded by the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation.

In addition, the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation is pleased to sponsor guest speaker, Edith Widder, Ph.D., acclaimed biologist and co-founder and CEO of Ocean Research and Conservation Association (ORCA). Widder will be at Kent State University at Stark on Tuesday, June 5, from 8:00-10:00 a.m. to address students, faculty and community leaders before they begin testing. Nearly 20 students are expected to participate from Kent State University at Stark, Stark State College, Malone University, the University of Mount Union and Walsh University.

Students will utilize ORCA’s Fast Assessment of Sediment Toxicity procedure to analyze water and collect baseline sediment particles from 75 sites along the Nimishillen Creek Watershed. The samples will then be scientifically analyzed for pollutants in laboratories at the universities and colleges, as well as ORCA’s home base in Florida. This will complement and support EPA-mandated monitoring in the region. Researchers from the local colleges and universities who specialize in these areas will lead the efforts in additional testing, which include sampling of other water quality parameters, macro invertebrates, pH levels and habitat type and quality, among others.

An environmental filmmaking team composed of award-winning filmmaker, Ali Habashi; filmmaker Colton Hoover Chase; and journalism professors and students from Kent State University, will document the project. Making the Invisible Visible is an ongoing component of the HOOVER INITIATIVE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA at Kent State University at Stark.

“The Herbert W. Hoover Foundation is proud to fund such an important project that brings multiple educational institutions and disciplines together working toward a common goal: to help us better understand our environment,” said Colton Hoover Chase, Vice Chairman of the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation. Chase’s primary focus is on ecosystem science and specifically how to articulate issues facing the environment to the general public through the use of film and other new media forms. He continued, “The Foundation funded this water sampling project in the hopes that we could enhance the visibility of water issues, and help communities like ours work on solutions to keep these waterways pristine.”

According to Dr. Penny L. Bernstein, Associate Professor Biological Sciences at Kent State University at Stark and project coordinator, “Agencies do not have the resources needed to sample water throughout Stark County on a regular basis. Making the Invisible Visible provides science education to students throughout the County, and additional baseline water quality data for the County’s watershed, supplementing the more periodic data from the EPA and other agencies.”

For more information regarding Making the Invisible Visible: Water Quality in Stark County, or to see clips of the students in action, please visit http://www.ourwaterwebs.org .

About the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation

Herbert W. Hoover was an industrialist and early leader in the conservation movement, fighting to protect natural resources in both Ohio and Florida through accurate scientific research, public information and education. Founded in 1990, the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation has taken up the mantle, and established itself as a leader in funding unique opportunities that provide solutions to issues related to the Community, Education, and the Environment. For more information, visit http://www.hwhfoundation.org or email contacthwh(at)hwhfoundation(dot)org.

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News Headline: As of Sunday, the following changes will go into effect for SARTA routes in the Belden Village and Alliance areas. Proposed changes include: | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Review - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Route 120 -- This route will now provide direct service to Stark State College and Kent State-Stark first and then service Dressler Avenue between Belden Village Avenue and Munson Avenue. Service to Belden Village Avenue between Everhard Road and Dressler Avenue will be added. Service on Everhard Road between Belden Village Avenue and Dressler Avenue will be deleted. Changes to the schedule have been made. These changes only apply to the weekday 120 route. No changes have been made to the Saturday 120 route.

Route 130 -- This route will now service Nantucket Circle to Klinger Avenue on the outbound trip only. Service will be added to Klinger Avenue from Mayfield Avenue to West Vine Street. Changes have been made to the schedule.

Route 132 -- This is a new route. This route will service the former 135/136 routes. This route will follow the former Route 136 to College Plaza then follow the former Route 135 to the Alliance Transit Center. This new route will provide half-hour service along both former routes. Alliance Middle School will still be serviced on a limited basis. A new schedule will be provided.

Route 135 -- This route number will be deleted. The route will now be serviced by the Route 132.

Route 136 -- This route number will be deleted. The route will now be serviced by the Route 132.

Route 801 -- This route has been re-established to service summer tourist travel. Service on this route will run now through Aug. 25 (annual change for summer months).

New schedules can be found at all transfer stations or by visiting www.SARTAonline.com.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas offers 'College for Kids' | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 22nd annual College for Kids program is being offered by Kent State Tuscarawas.

This summer's sessions offer 46 fun and interesting youth enrichment classes for students who were in first through eighth grades during the 2011-2012 school year.

Session I is offered from June 18-22 and Session II is July 23-27. Each five-day session offers courses from 10 a.m. to noon and 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.

A sampling of this year's classes include:

• Legal Eagles.

• Hip Hop.

• Line Dancing.

• Developing the Theater of Your Imagination.

• Reptiles and Amphibians.

• Kids in the Kitchen.

• Cool Cupcakes.

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News Headline: Philharmonic going country for finale | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tuscarawas Philharmonic will bring back one of its most popular concerts June 9 when champion fiddler Liz Langford, a Dover native now residing in Nashville, Tenn., returns for "Classic Country III: Bringin' It All Back Home!"

The concert will be performed at 7:30 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia.

Also on the program are musician Red Marlow, singer and songwriter Amber Leigh White and multi-instrumentalist Jon Eastes, all of Nashville.

The "OneNightStandBand" featuring area musicians Rick Troyer of Hummingbird Studio in Sugarcreek on steel guitar, Greg Neff of Sugarcreek at the keyboard, and Philharmonic members Neal Frey and Richard Moore, both of North Canton, on bass and drums will make  return appearance.

The concert will feature classic standards such as "Country Roads" and "Georgia On My Mind," as well John William's "Cowboy Overture" and Copland's "Hoedown" from "Rodeo." More recent country pieces will also be featured along with the classics.

Langford's connections with the Philharmonic date to the age of 3 when she began taking violin lessons at the Canton Suzuki Institute directed by Marjorie Henke, music director of the Philharmonic for 21 years.

Henke recruited Langford into the Philharmonic orchestra when she was 11 to "give her orchestra experience," and she remained a member of the orchestra until she went to college.

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News Headline: Local teens to attend language academy (Baer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Parkersburg News and Sentinel - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MARIETTA - Many teenagers would cringe at the thought of replacing their cell phones and television time with hours of studying a foreign language over their summer break, but two Marietta High School students see it as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

Josh Burke and Cecelia Tio, who will be juniors in the next school year, have been accepted into the STARTALK Foreign Language Academy to be held for about a month at Kent State University.

There will be 42 high school juniors and seniors from all over the state of Ohio participating, according to Brian Baer, director of the program. He said a total of 78 students applied.

"It's rare we have more than one student from a school," he noted.

The academy will be held on the campus in Kent, Ohio, from June 17 to July 14, but participants will also be required to travel to the campus one Saturday a month for mini-immersion sessions and participate in distance learning sessions throughout the next school year.

"The idea is by the time they finish both components of the academy they are ready to go into intermediate language (courses) at the college or university of their choice," Baer said.

Participants were able to choose whether they want to study Arabic, Chinese or Russian. Burke will study Arabic, while Tio decided to learn Russian.

"I chose Arabic because I want to go into genetic anthropology," said Burke, 16. "Arabic is one of the top 10 languages throughout the entire world."

Tio, 16, said she chose Russian because she has cousins who were adopted from Russia and she would like to be able to speak their language.

"I have never spoken Russian. I just thought it sounded interesting," she said. "I want to go into engineering and maybe become a doctor so I think that's going to help me on my career path (to learn) many different languages."

"I'm super excited," Tio added. "It's going to be an awesome experience."

The students will be in class Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m., with a lunch break being held from noon to 1 p.m. They will have free time daily from 3 to 5 p.m., then dinner will be from 5 to 6 p.m. and they will participate in activities in the evenings related to the languages they are studying.

They will stay in Kent State University's Stopher-Johnson Honors Complex and will not return home on the weekends.

The students will only be permitted to use their cell phones during free time and although they are being provided with laptop computers, they will only be able to use them in public areas for class work. They will only watch television one night a week.

"At lunch and dinner you have to eat with your group and as far as I know you have to more or less speak your language as much as you can," Burke said. "I'm completely excited and can't wait but at the same time I am very nervous because I have no idea what it's going to be like."

Baer said the program is intense, which is why not all applicants are accepted. He said program organizers look for students who are emotionally mature and can handle being away from home.

"We look at grades but we're not hung up on grades," he added. "We're more interested in success and persistence in the study of another foreign language, that's one of the indicators of success in our program."

Baer noted the academy's instructors are from Kent State University and surrounding colleges and high schools. The students participating will receive college credit.

The program is offered free of charge through a federal grant, he said.

"It's a post 9-11 government initiative to increase the number of students proficient in these languages," he said.

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News Headline: Highway repair to go private? | Email

News Date: 06/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Vitale, Robert
News OCR Text: State transportation officials are considering paying private contractors to plow snow, fill potholes and take over maintenance of I-270 in central Ohio and a 100-mile stretch of I-71 between Columbus and Cincinnati.

The plans are part of a stepped-up effort to cut costs and produce new income that could shorten threatened delays for dozens of highway projects statewide. The Ohio Department of Transportation says it needs $1.6 billion to keep its construction schedule on track, and it has an additional $10 billion in work being planned with no current way to pay for its completion.

"We cannot wait for Washington to send more money," Director Jerry Wray said last week in an address to department employees, contractors, legislators and local officials.

"We have to focus on what we control and what we can change now in Ohio."

Jim Riley, a deputy ODOT director hired in March to run a new division that will spearhead such revenue efforts, said he has just begun studying the idea of privatizing maintenance and couldn't project how much money it might save.

Every year, Ohio spends $5,253 on maintenance for each mile of each lane of state, federal and interstate highway within its borders.

That amounts to $1.9 million on I-270 and more than $6.4 million for the Columbus-to-Cincinnati stretch of I-71.

Private contractors would be considered to perform every maintenance job along the highways, including removing dead animals, painting lane markers, spreading road salt, laying new asphalt and performing minor repairs.

The state already hires private companies to do some of that work on a task-by-task basis, Riley said. If privatization moves forward, one company would get a contract to do it all -- "fence to fence" in ODOT lingo -- along one or more stretches of highway.

"We've got a lot of other stuff to do," Riley said. "We're in the business of roads and bridges."

The state is considering handing over more maintenance work to private contractors as part of future contracts to build a new Ohio River bridge in Cincinnati and a new highway bypass around Portsmouth in Scioto County.

I-270 and I-71 are the only highways now being considered for privatized maintenance, Riley said.

The new ODOT division also is considering commercial development at rest stops on state and federal highways, and it is exploring the idea of selling naming rights for roads, bridges and other highway features.

Privatization has been a controversial idea even when considered for government services not thought of as vital to public safety. For example, Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee's plan to lease a profitable campus parking operation for $375 million or more has been met with protests by some students and faculty members.

"There is this presumption that the private sector is always going to cost less, and that isn't the case," said Sally Meckling, spokeswoman for the Ohio Civil Service Employees Association, a union that represents workers at ODOT and other state agencies.

The transportation department already has discovered that the private sector can't always do better, Meckling said. ODOT backed away from a plan to privatize sign-making when it found out that the state wouldn't save money.

Riley said ODOT would set strict performance standards for privatized highway maintenance and wouldn't pay for shoddy work. He also said current state highway workers wouldn't lose their jobs. Payroll would be cut through attrition, he said.

Florida began outsourcing highway maintenance in 2000 as part of a pledge by then-Gov. Jeb Bush to reduce the number of state employees. About 80 percent of the work -- $300 million worth -- is performed today by private contractors, said Tim Lattner, maintenance-office director for the Florida Department of Transportation.

He said his state hasn't compared costs of outsourced vs. in-house work. Its maintenance budget was cut 12 percent this year, though, he said, because road conditions had far exceeded state standards.

Mark Cassell, a political-science professor at Kent State University who has studied privatization efforts, said governments don't shed responsibility when they contract out public services. He said they still must devote resources to oversight and management.

rvitale@dispatch.com

@crawlumbus

Copyright © 2012 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH and may not be republished without permission.

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News Headline: ODOT Considering Privatizing Highway Repairs in Central Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Construction.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: June 3--State transportation officials are considering paying private contractors to plow snow, fill potholes and take over maintenance of I-270 in central Ohio and a 100-mile stretch of I-71 between Columbus and Cincinnati.

The plans are part of a stepped-up effort to cut costs and produce new income that could shorten threatened delays for dozens of highway projects statewide. The Ohio Department of Transportation says it needs $1.6 billion to keep its construction schedule on track, and it has an additional $10 billion in work being planned with no current way to pay for its completion.

"We cannot wait for Washington to send more money," Director Jerry Wray said last week in an address to department employees, contractors, legislators and local officials. "We have to focus on what we control and what we can change now in Ohio."

Jim Riley, a deputy ODOT director hired in March to run a new division that will spearhead such revenue efforts, said he has just begun studying the idea of privatizing maintenance and couldn't project how much money it might save.

Every year, Ohio spends $5,253 on maintenance for each mile of each lane of state, federal and interstate highway within its borders.

That amounts to $1.9 million on I-270 and more than $6.4 million for the Columbus-to-Cincinnati stretch of I-71.Private contractors would be considered to perform every maintenance job along the highways, including removing dead animals, painting lane markers, spreading road salt, laying new asphalt and performing minor repairs.

The state already hires private companies to do some of that work on a task-by-task basis, Riley said. If privatization moves forward, one company would get a contract to do it all --"fence to fence" in ODOT lingo --along one or more stretches of highway.

"We've got a lot of other stuff to do," Riley said. "We're in the business of roads and bridges."

The state is considering handing over more maintenance work to private contractors as part of future contracts to build a new Ohio River bridge in Cincinnati and a new highway bypass around Portsmouth in Scioto County. I-270 and I-71 are the only highways now being considered for privatized maintenance, Riley said.The new ODOT division also is considering commercial development at rest stops on state and federal highways, and it is exploring the idea of selling naming rights for roads, bridges and other highway features.

Privatization has been a controversial idea even when considered for government services not thought of as vital to public safety. For example, Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee's plan to lease a profitable campus parking operation for $375 million or more has been met with protests by some students and faculty members.

"There is this presumption that the private sector is always going to cost less, and that isn't the case," said Sally Meckling, spokeswoman for the Ohio Civil Service Employees Association, a union that represents workers at ODOT and other state agencies.

The transportation department already has discovered that the private sector can't always do better, Meckling said. ODOT backed away from a plan to privatize sign-making when it found out that the state wouldn't save money.

Riley said ODOT would set strict performance standards for privatized highway maintenance and wouldn't pay for shoddy work. He also said current state highway workers wouldn't lose their jobs. Payroll would be cut through attrition, he said.

Florida began outsourcing highway maintenance in 2000 as part of a pledge by then-Gov. Jeb Bush to reduce the number of state employees. About 80 percent of the work --$300 million worth --is performed today by private contractors, said Tim Lattner, maintenance-office director for the Florida Department of Transportation.

He said his state hasn't compared costs of outsourced vs. in-house work. Its maintenance budget was cut 12 percent this year, though, he said, because road conditions had far exceeded state standards.

Mark Cassell, a political-science professor at Kent State University who has studied privatization efforts, said governments don't shed responsibility when they contract out public services. He said they still must devote resources to oversight and management.

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News Headline: Muslim presidency hopeful doubts al Qaeda role in 9/11 (Stacher) | Email

News Date: 06/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Washington Times
Contact Name: Birnbaum, Ben
News OCR Text: Egypt's likely next president has long called for the U.S. to hold a "scientific conference" to determine the real culprits of the Sept. 11 attacks, having cast doubt on al Qaeda's role in 9/11 for years.

"The U.S. administration has never presented any evidences on the identity of those who committed that incident," longtime Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohamed Morsi is quoted as saying in a 2007 posting on Ikhwanweb, the Islamist group's official English website.

"The Muslim Brotherhood and others demanded a transparent trial with clear evidence and to have court rulings," he said after the sixth anniversary of the attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people. "We confirm that this isn't a defense to those who committed these actions, but we only seek the truth."

Mr. Morsi last week won the most votes in the first round of Egypt's presidential election, and he is heavily favored to win a runoff this month against secular former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafik.

He is not the only candidate to have floated conspiracy theories about the Sept. 11 attacks: Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh - a former Brotherhood figure who finished fourth in last week's race - said last year that he believed 9/11 was "part of a conspiracy."

Mr. Morsi's remarks underscore the challenges the U.S. likely will face in a Brotherhood-dominated Egypt. The group's Freedom and Justice Party won 47 percent of the seats in Egypt's parliamentary elections and is expected to play a dominant role in crafting a new constitution.

A call for proof

While condemning the 9/11 attack "regardless of its doer," Mr. Morsi lambasted the U.S. response to them, calling the Bush administration "the world's terrorism leader" and accusing it of getting "in line with Israeli occupation forces in aggression, injustice, encroaching lands and raping women."

According to the Brotherhood website's characterization of his 9/11 remarks, Mr. Morsi said the U.S. invaded Afghanistan and Iraq "due to the U.S. administration claims that the doers of the 11 September attacks [were] Muslims, without proving such a thing until now."

In 2008, Mr. Morsi called on the U.S. to provide "scientific" proof for its account of events.

"We have officially demanded a fair trial for 9/11 suspects and the issuance of a detailed scientific report about the attacks, but the U.S. administration did not respond till now," Mr. Morsi told Ikhwanweb.

"This requires a huge scientific conference that is devoted to analyzing what caused the attack against a massive structure like the two WTC towers," he said, referring to the World Trade Center. "Should this happen, we will stand firmly against whoever committed this horrific crime against innocent civilians."

However, Osama bin Laden, the late al Qaeda leader, admitted his terror group's involvement in the Sept. 11 attacks in a videotaped message in October 2004.

Actions and rhetoric

Mr. Morsi, 60, has long been regarded as one of the Brotherhood's more conservative leaders. He was instrumental in sidelining Mr. Aboul Fotouh and other reformist voices within the group.

Mr. Aboul Fotouh had fought against a plank in the Brotherhood's 2007 platform saying that women and Christians should be barred from running for president. Mr. Morsi supported the exclusionary language.

In recent weeks, Mr. Morsi has sought to moderate his image, vowing not to impose the veil on women and saying he would appoint Christian presidential advisers. He also has promised to uphold Egypt's peace treaty with Israel, despite having called Israelis "vampires."

Joshua Stacher, a political science professor at Kent State University who has met Mr. Morsi several times, said it would be a mistake to extrapolate the Muslim Brotherhood's future behavior from its past statements.

"The Brotherhood is a disciplined organization," he said. "They're going to play ball with neo-liberal economics. They're going to play ball with Israel. Their actions don't match the rhetoric."

But the rhetoric could alienate members of Congress at a time when foreign aid is receiving increased scrutiny. The U.S. gives Egypt $1.3 billion in annual military aid - more than to any country but Israel.

U.S. support for Israel has long been a sore spot for Mr. Morsi. In a 2009 interview with Mr. Stacher published by the Middle East Research and Information Project, Mr. Morsi said that "American taxpayers are buying the hatred of other people."

"We will never forget in the future how to hate America because of all this running blood," he said. "Yes, the Zionists are doing it, but with the diplomatic support of the U.S. As long as they are doing this, the resistance will never stop."

Eric Trager, an Egypt expert at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said the test for Mr. Morsi is not what he says on the campaign circuit, but how he would react in a crisis.

"Given the upsurge in militant activity in the Sinai Peninsula, another attack on Israel from Egyptian territory - and an Israeli response - is practically inevitable," he said. "Can anyone have confidence in a President Morsi communicating with his Israeli and American counterparts to dial down the tension?"

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News Headline: KSU team studies accusation of "acting white' (Neal-Barnett) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Acting white” is an accusation faced by many black adolescents, and it is one of the most negative accusations a black adolescent can receive from another, according to a team of Kent State University researchers.

A recent study published in the Journal of Anxiety Disorders highlights the emotional implications of being on the receiving end of the accusation. KSU researchers who surveyed African-American adolescents in Northeastern Ohio found higher levels of anxiety among those who had been accused of acting white.

The research team was led by Marsheena Murray, Ph.D., a 2011 Kent State doctoral graduate, and supervised by Angela Neal-Barnett, Ph.D., a professor in KSU's Department of Psychology. Neal-Barnett is a top researcher in the study of anxiety disorders among African-Americans.

More than 100 low-income adolescents from predominantly black high schools completed questionnaires measuring anxiety.

The accusation of acting white was experienced both directly and indirectly by half of the respondents. Only four participants reported not experiencing any aspect of the accusation either directly or indirectly.

“It appears that being accused of acting white is very common for black adolescents,” Murray said.

The research found that black adolescents who experienced both indirect and direct accusations of acting white evidenced higher levels of anxiety than those who heard it indirectly only. “

At times, teens hear the accusation directly, such as ‘You act like a white girl,'” Neal-Barnett said. “Other times, they hear it in an indirect way, such as ‘Why you listening to white boy music?'”

High anxiety also was associated with hearing the accusation on numerous occasions.

“The accusation is viewed as a judgment against the core of who they are,” Neal-Barnett said. “I think that people may be surprised by these findings because people don't often talk about the emotional impact of the accusation.”

The study's findings build on the research team's previous work on the topic and pave the way for intervention studies.

“We are committed to developing interventions for black adolescents,” Neal-Barnett said. “Not everybody copes ineffectively with the accusation of acting white, but we want to develop interventions to teach adolescents who receive the accusation how to cope more effectively so they don't experience these higher levels of anxiety or stress. In addition, our team is beginning to look at teens that make the accusation.”

The results are published in the article “The Acting White Accusation, Racial Identity, and Anxiety Among African American Adolescents,” published in the May issue of the Journal of Anxiety Disorders.

It is available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2012.02.006.

For more information about Kent State's Department of Psychology, visit www.kent.edu/cas/psychology.

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News Headline: New Schizophrenia Study Results from Kent State University Described | Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Mental Health Weekly Digest
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Mental Health Weekly Digest -- New research on Schizophrenia is the subject of a report. According to news reporting from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx journalists, researchers stated "Psychotic symptoms are exacerbated by social stressors in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder patients as a group. More specifically, critical attitudes toward patients on the part of family members and others have been associated with a higher risk of relapse in the patients."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research by the authors from Kent State University, "Some patients appear to be especially vulnerable in this regard. One variable that could affect the degree of sensitivity to a social stressor such as criticism is the individual's level of anxiety. The present longitudinal study assessed 27 relatively stable outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and the single 'most influential other' (MIO) person for each patient. As hypothesized, (1) patients with high critical MIOs showed increases in psychotic symptoms over time, compared with patients with low critical MIOs; (2) patients high in anxiety at the baseline assessment showed increases in psychotic symptoms at follow-up, compared with patients low in anxiety, and (3) patients with high levels of anxiety at baseline and high critical MIOs showed the greatest exacerbation of psychotic symptoms over time."

According to the news reporters, the researchers concluded: "Objectively measured levels of criticism were more predictive than patient-rated levels of criticism."

For more information on this research see: Anxiety interacts with expressed emotion criticism in the prediction of psychotic symptom exacerbation. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 2011;37(3):611-8. Schizophrenia Bulletin can be contacted at: Oxford Univ Press, Great Clarendon St, Oxford OX2 6DP, England. (Oxford University Press - www.oup.com/; Schizophrenia Bulletin - schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting N.M. Docherty, Dept. of Psychology, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, United States (see also ).

Publisher contact information for the journal Schizophrenia Bulletin is: Oxford Univ Press, Great Clarendon St, Oxford OX2 6DP, England.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, Psychiatry, United States, Schizophrenia, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

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News Headline: Kent State Rec Center Best Place for Child's Birthday | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University rec center picked by Kent Patch readers as best birthday party venue

The best place to have your child's birthday part in Kent is at the Kent State University Recreation and Wellness Center.

That's according to you.

This week, Kent Patch readers voted the rec center as the best birthday party locale over several other places in the city.

The other nominees were:

Plum Creek Park
Fred Fuller Park
Heavenly Cupcakes
Pool at Theodore Roosevelt High School
Acorn Alley

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News Headline: Too much new student housing could lead to abandoned neighborhoods, Kent official warns (Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Could all the new off-campus student housing in the pipeline lead to abandoned rental properties and blight in residential neighborhoods?
City Manager Dave Ruller said the city and Kent State University need to make sure that doesn't happen.
“It's been brewing in our collective minds for quite some time,” Ruller said.
Downtown is in the midst of a $100 million makeover, KSU has plans for a $170 million overhaul and private developers have been building an apartment complex off Summit Street, renovating the former Silver Oaks retirement complex into a student enclave, and proposing a new student community near the football stadium.
A total of 1,600 new off-campus beds for students should be in place by this fall.
But if too much new student housing causes individual rental properties to be abandoned, neighborhoods could pay a price for the building boom.
“Part of what we're wrestling with is what exactly is the right investment” for new student housing, Ruller said. “How do we make sure we're not creating more problems? The market seems pretty active, but if all projects in the pipeline get built, is that going to have a collateral impact? Let's start talking about that.”
Hiring a consultant could help answer some of the questions.
“In my opinion, what we don't have is hard data,” he said.
One thing the city and KSU hope to do this summer is to at least get a consultant to look at the area near the esplanade — the walking corridor KSU is building to connect the campus to downtown.
“We'd direct him to College Street and other streets next to the esplanade. There is good investment in this corridor and we want things to go well,” Ruller said. “It's a good starting point.”
Beyond that, the city has some control over how much student housing is built.
“In each of the [proposed developments] that have come up in last six months, all had to go through a variance process,” Ruller said. “Density is the biggest issue [for developers] to meet because they want to put as many bodies and beds in as tight a space as possible.”
On the surface, it's not a bad thing for students to be concentrated in their own apartment complexes.
“What we've learned is that the creep of rental properties into traditional neighborhoods is problematic. Mixing population segments with different hours and lifestyles doesn't always work great next to each other,” Ruller said.
The city has little control, however, over what happens if residential rental property is abandoned.
“In a perfect world, they would go back to single-family housing,” Ruller said.
But that would be up to property owners, and there might be little motivation for them to renovate their rentals and sell them to families.
Ruller said his staff has discussed some incentives — for example, a tax abatement on property improvement if a rental is sold to a single family. The city also has general neighborhood grant programs available, offering up to $4,000 for renovating homes in targeted areas.
“We've tried to put some carrots out there,” Ruller said. “We've also put sticks out there by increasing enforcement of maintenance [laws] so there are tools that compel people to take pride in their property.”
“But so far it has been a more passive approach. Where we're headed with our discussion is what can we do proactively, between the city and the university.”
Ruller said projects are coming at the city almost daily.
“There's an enormous amount of development interest — a combination of the growing university, positive investment downtown and the general uptick in the economy. ... We're trying to manage our way through it, but we're being more reactive than I prefer.”
Gregg Floyd, KSU's senior vice president for finance, was unavailable for extended comment on the topic. But he offered this statement:
“We are pleased by the overall magnitude of construction activity in the Kent community. While city and university leadership share concerns regarding potential impacts upon the community associated with an oversupply of student-oriented housing, the optimism reflected by these developer investments is confirming of the positive things under way in Kent.”

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News Headline: Wind group against energy provision | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Springfield News-Sun - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Bill would let UC, Kent energy systems count as renewable. Proponents say concerns unfounded.

URBANA - A wind advocacy group believes a provision in a state bill could hurt Champaign County's Buckeye Wind Project and other wind farms.

The provision in Ohio Senate Bill 315, which will likely be signed into law, would allow combined heat and power technology systems in use at the University of Cincinnati and Kent State University to count as renewable energy.

But Daina Baird, a spokeswoman for the American Wind Energy Association, said the legislation could create instability in the renewable energy market by expanding the size of the market and reducing incentives to invest in wind power. In the long run, that could possibly damage a proposed $55 million, 100-plus turbine project in Champaign County and other wind farms, she said.

Officials at UC and Kent State said those concerns are unwarranted.

Joe Harrell, executive director of utilities at UC, said the technology is renewable because it makes producing energy at the campuses more efficient and cost effective.

The combined heat technology, which is most commonly used at hospitals, universities and manufacturing facilities, generally involves a power plant that runs on natural gas or other fuel sources. As electricity is produced, excess heat is captured, recycled and reused.

At UC and Kent State, the additional energy is used to produce hot water and heat dorms, among other uses.

Wind energy companies often sell renewable energy credits to utility companies to help them meet state requirements for using renewable energy. The legislation would allow the two universities to also sell those credits.

Combined heat and power projects use fossil fuels to produce their energy initially, so, Baird said, they shouldn't qualify to help meet the state's renewable energy goals.

"It created a whole bunch of market uncertainty," Baird said.

Tom Euclide, Kent State assistant vice president for facilities planning and operations, said he understands the wind association's complaint. But he said the amount of competition the universities would create for the energy credits is minimal compared to an industrial wind operation.

Harrell said wind companies get large amounts of federal and state tax credits for the energy they produce, but universities weren't allowed to do the same because they are public entities.

The bill has passed both the House and Senate and is awaiting the governor's signature.

If he signs it, Baird said, Ohio will be the only state to consider combined heat technology as renewable. She also said there is a concern other universities might pressure the legislature to allow additional similar projects.

"It opens the door for future expansion down the road," Baird said.

Unlike wind projects, which require much money to construct, builders of the combined heat units do little to invest in the state, she said.

State Sen. Bill Coley, R-Liberty Twp., helped draft the legislation and countered that the state should examine a wide range of options to produce renewable energy to see what makes the most sense.

"The best way to decide what's best is let the consumers decide," Coley said.

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News Headline: Ohio AP Broadcasters choose Schultze as president-elect | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters voted M.L. Schultze as president-elect today at the group's annual awards luncheon.

Tom Moore, anchor at WTAM-AM in Cleveland, will serve as the board's president through June 2013. Schultze is news director of WKSU-FM in Kent.

Other board members are Jo Ingles, reporter for Ohio Public Radio and TV in Columbus; Tony Geftos, anchor at WTVG-TV in Toledo; Jennifer Clark, news director at WJER-AM in Dover, and Jason Michaels, host and anchor at WHIO-AM in Dayton.

Board members help guide the group's events, including the annual contest, awards luncheon, scholarship competition and workshops.

Also Sunday, Ohio broadcasters Jeff Fitzgerald of WLIO-TV in Lima and Fred Griffith of WEWS-TV and WKYC-TV in Cleveland were inducted into the OAPB Hall of Fame. McKenzie Kuehnlein, a student at the University of Toledo, was awarded the group's $1,000 scholarship.

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News Headline: Ohio AP Broadcasters choose Schultze as president-elect | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: abc 6 News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) -- The Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters voted M.L. Schultze as president-elect today at the group's annual awards luncheon.

Tom Moore, anchor at WTAM-AM in Cleveland, will serve as the board's president through June 2013. Schultze is news director of WKSU-FM in Kent.

Other board members are Jo Ingles, reporter for Ohio Public Radio and TV in Columbus; Tony Geftos, anchor at WTVG-TV in Toledo; Jennifer Clark, news director at WJER-AM in Dover, and Jason Michaels, host and anchor at WHIO-AM in Dayton.

Board members help guide the group's events, including the annual contest, awards luncheon, scholarship competition and workshops.

Also Sunday, Ohio broadcasters Jeff Fitzgerald of WLIO-TV in Lima and Fred Griffith of WEWS-TV and WKYC-TV in Cleveland were inducted into the OAPB Hall of Fame. McKenzie Kuehnlein, a student at the University of Toledo, was awarded the group's $1,000 scholarship.

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