Report Overview:
Total Clips (79)
African Community Theatre (1)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Athletics (7)
American Association University Professors (AAUP) (1)
Athletics (49)
Athletics; Institutional Advancement (2)
Blossom Music (1)
Chemical Physics; Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
Library and Information Science (SLIS); Students (1)
Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Political Science (1)
Safety (1)
Scholarships (1)
Students (1)
Students; Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Technology (1)
Town-Gown (1)
Tuition (1)
University Press (1)
WKSU (1)
Other (1)


Headline Date Outlet

African Community Theatre (1)
African Community Theatre 06/16/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Workshop aims to expand growth of African community; auditions today and Friday The African Community Theatre of Kent State University will be holding auditions for its fall production of Stagolee: A Black Folktale from 5 to 7 p.m. tonight and Friday. Auditions...


Alumni (1)
New Designer Joins Staff of Western Reserve Decorator Fabrics 06/15/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Ohio's largest retail showroom of home decor fabrics and trims, is announcing the hiring of Ann Ewart, as Senior Designer. A graduate of Ohio State and Kent State , her graphic and interior design background will make her accessible and knowledgeable to assist with all our client's decorating needs....


Alumni; Athletics (7)
Kent State baseball notebook: Aurora native realizing dream 06/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

(VIDEO) Josh Cribbs hosts bus trip to see Kent State game at College World Series 06/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Browns' Josh Cribbs sends off fans as they take bus to Omaha to root on Kent State baseball 06/18/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Team Cribbs Kent State Fan Bus Heads to CWS 06/18/2012 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

Josh Cribbs -- NFL Star Foots the Bill for Alma Mater's Big Trip 06/18/2012 TMZ.com Text Attachment Email

Josh Cribbs' "Flash Mob" bus riders cheer Kent State at CWS, make quick turnaround to go home 06/18/2012 Washington Post Text Attachment Email

GO FLASHES: A Busload of Kent State Fans 06/18/2012 WOIO-TV Text Attachment Email


American Association University Professors (AAUP) (1)
A Mostly Perplexed AAUP Accepts Pledge to Treat Its Staff Fairly (Garrison) 06/18/2012 Chronicle of Higher Education - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...the AAUP would be greatly diminished without competent and loyal national and field staff." George R. Garrison, a professor of pan-African studies at Kent State University, offered the resolution from the floor as the AAUP's leaders turned their attention to new business Saturday at the end of group's...


Athletics (49)
For Kent State, all bets are off: College World Series Insider (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball team's run to College World Series includes triumph, tragedy and trauma (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Northeast Ohio's college hoops coaches embracing Coaches vs. Cancer program 06/18/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Terry Pluto's Talkin'....about 06/18/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Transfers have provided a helpful boost to Kent State baseball's postseason run 06/18/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State's College World Series debut spoiled in 8-1 loss to Arkansas (Stricklin) 06/17/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State's Jimmy Rider (left) successfully recorded an out at second with this fourth-inning flip to Derek Toadvine, but not much else went well...

Kent State's classroom savvy 06/16/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

About Kent State baseball... Most fans know about Kent State's amazing run to the College World Series. But for the third year in a row,...

Kent State baseball: Bores to take hill in must-win game (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State in must-win situation (Stricklin) 06/17/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

BELLEVUE, Neb. _ Ryan Bores has already pitched what Kent State coach Scott Stricklin called the biggest game of the season. That was a 7-3 complete-game victory over Purdue in the Gary, Ind., regional,...

Kent State's Derek Toadvine playing for two (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball notebook: CWS trip earns new lights at Schoonover Stadium (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Arkansas 8, Kent State 1: Flashes starter David Starn struggles against patient batters, walks six (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Marla Ridenour: Pitcher David Starn keeps making Kent State look smart (Sricklin) 06/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Grandpa skips angioplasty to back Golden Flashes at College World Series (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Notebook: Stricklin doesn't plan to change Kent State's course after trip to College World Series (Nielsen, Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Loyal Kent State fans gather to cheer Golden Flashes in College World Series 06/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State President Lester Lefton announces new lights for Schoonover Stadium (Lefton, Stricklin, Nielsen) 06/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

College World Series Notebook: Golden Flashes play with heavy hearts as tragedy hits Kent State family (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

(VIDEO/GALLERY) Kent State baseball team falls to Arkansas in College World Series 06/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

(VIDEO) Kent State set for first College World Series game in program history today vs. Arkansas (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Golden Flashes making history at College World Series (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State falls to Arkansas 8-1 in College World Series 06/17/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter, Jake Wise homered for the first time since February and Arkansas defeated Kent State 8-1 on Saturday to spoil the Golden Flashes' first appearance in the College World Series. Baxendale didn't allow a hit until Sawyer...

Photo gallery: Kent State vs. Arkansas (College World Series) 06/16/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Photo gallery from Game 1 of the College World Series between Kent State and Arkansas.

Kent State fans 'flash' to Omaha for College Baseball World Series 06/18/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Kent State readies for number one ranked Florida in CWS elimination game 06/18/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Flashes holding a 2-1 series lead, all of the games being played in Gainesville five years ago. Junior, Ryan Bores of Strongsville gets the start for Kent State. Bores won the biggest game to date for the Golden Flashes when he beat Purdue the day after their 21 inning marathon win over Kentucky....

Golden Flashes Can't Pull Off Win in College World Series Debut 06/16/2012 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

OMAHA, Nebraska -- The Kent State Golden Flashes made their College World Series debut against Arkansas Saturday, falling to the Razerbacks 8-1. The Razerbacks began...

PHOTOS: Hogs beat CWS newcomer Kent State 8-1 06/16/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

... OMAHA, Neb. -- DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter, Jake Wise homered for the first time since February and Arkansas defeated Kent State 8-1 on Saturday to spoil the Golden Flashes' first appearance in the College World Series. Baxendale didn't allow a hit until Sawyer...

Kent State Falls In CWS Opener 06/17/2012 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State ran into a buzz saw in their College World Series opener. Arkansas swung the bats well off Golden Flashes starter David Starn and won the...

Stony Brook and Kent State Hoping the Clock Doesn't Strike Midnight (Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Yahoo! News Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Gators Look to Stay Afloat 06/18/2012 Scout.com Text Attachment Email

After falling 7-3 Saturday night to familiar foe South Carolina, the Florida Gators now stare down elimination, and a feisty Kent State squad Monday. Behind the arm of their ace, Hudson Randall, they look to avoid. FightinGators' Cody Jones explains plan of attack through...

Statement-maker for the Razorbacks 06/17/2012 Scout.com Text Attachment Email

Baxendale's gem and five late runs spark Arkansas to an 8-1 opening win against Kent State. The Razorbacks get a shot at ending red-hot South Carolina's streak on Monday.

Coach says Seawolves will be ready for CWS opener 06/15/2012 Sports Illustrated - Online Text Attachment Email

...Southeastern Conference games to make it back to Omaha. The Gamecocks have lost three of four to the Gators this season. Another first-time CWS team, Kent State, plays Saturday against Arkansas. The other game Saturday matches Arizona and Florida State.

Kent's Stricklin: College World Series appearance shows nation what cold-weather kids can do (Nielsen, Stricklin) 06/18/2012 Washington Post Text Attachment Email

CWS newcomer Kent State knows it's facing tall task to stay alive after 8-1 loss to Razorbacks 06/18/2012 Washington Post Text Attachment Email

Arkansas clobbers Kent St. (Stricklin) 06/17/2012 New York Post - Online Text Attachment Email

OMAHA, Neb. - Upstarts Stony Brook and Kent State may be providing intrigue to the College World Series, but the powerhouses still are prevailing. Arkansas starting pitcher DJ Baxendale...

Hogs beat CWS newcomer Kent State 8-1 on 4-hitter 06/16/2012 Star Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter, Jake Wise homered for the first time since February and Arkansas defeated Kent State 8-1 on Saturday to spoil the Golden Flashes' first appearance in the College World Series.

Kent St. knows survival in CWS will be tough task 06/18/2012 Seattle Times Text Attachment Email

Skies clear for CWS games 06/16/2012 Omaha World-Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...the rain had moved southeast of the metro area by early evening. It was in the mid-70s with some sunshine about the time the game kicked off between Kent State and Arkansas. Forecasters said tonight should be nice and dry. Rainshowers should not interrupt the College World Series games or any...

Notebook: NFL receiver takes 46 fans to ballgame 06/17/2012 Arizona Daily Star - Online Text Attachment Email

...Associated Press The Associated Press Arizona Daily Star OMAHA, Neb. - Josh Cribbs' road-weary "Flash Mob" mustered all the energy it could to cheer for Kent State at the College World Series on Saturday. The Cleveland Browns receiver and Kent State alumnus arranged for a bus to carry fans...

VIDEO: Golden Flashes Fans Watch Kent State Make History at College World Series 06/18/2012 Fox 8 Morning News Saturday - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

Kent State fans showing support for Flashes 06/18/2012 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

Indians broadcaster on joyride with Kent State 06/18/2012 KVAL-TV Text Attachment Email

Kent State Falls to Arkansas 06/17/2012 New York Times, The Text Email

DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter, and Jake Wise hit his first home run since February as Arkansas beat Kent State, 8-1, spoiling the Golden Flashes' first game in the College World Series in Omaha. The Flashes (46-19) were scoreless until Jimmy Rider...

College World Series 06/16/2012 College World Series - ESPN Text Email

...bracket. Florida state and stoney brook tomorrow at 9:00 in the first elimination game of the college world series. Arkansas won earlier today defeating kent state. The winner will play arkansas. The loser will play another elimination game against the golden flashes. Greg larson on in his second inning...

Channel 3 News at 11 06/16/2012 Channel 3 News at 11 PM - WKYC-TV Text Email

...3 at 11:00 with lynna lai quantico -- lynna lai. >> Alex -- al is joining me with the latest on the game, al? >> It's a double elimination fore matt, kent state facing the arkansas razorbacks quantico it didn't start off well for kent quantico bases loaded in the bottom of the first for arkansas...

2012 CWS: Arkansas Beats Kent State 8-1 In Opener 06/16/2012 Arkansas News Bureau - Online Text Attachment Email

...postseason, which was the lowest total of any team in Omaha. The Razorbacks will be one of the highest scoring teams in the CWS field after one game, beating Kent State 8-1 in TD Ameritrade Park on Saturday. Arkansas, led by catcher Jake Wise, scored early to take the lead then ran away with the game...

Cribs is helping fans cheer 06/15/2012 NewsChannel 5 at Noon - WEWS-TV Text Email

>>> Kent state graduate and browns wide receiver josh cribs is helping fans cheer on his alma alma mater. A bus filled with fans leaving to omaha. Cribs...

NBC 6 News at 6 06/15/2012 NBC 6 News 6 at 6 PM - KTAL-TV Text Email

Less then 24 hour from now, arkansas will take the diamond in omaha. The hogs set to open the college world series against kent state. It's a dream come true for all members of the program. They'll have a chance at reaching the ultimate goal, that of course to play for...

Cribbs shows support 06/17/2012 Times of Trenton, The Text Email

COLLEGE WORLD SERIES Josh Cribbs' road-weary "Flash Mob" mustered all the energy it could to cheer for Kent State at the College World Series yesterday. The Cleveland Browns receiver and Kent State alumnus arranged for a bus to carry fans from...


Athletics; Institutional Advancement (2)
BICYCLISTS TO RIDE CROSS COUNTRY FOR CHILDREN'S 06/15/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...service manager for FedEx Custom Critical from Akron. Matt Geis, 34, associate athletic director and executive director of athletic advancement for Kent State University, of Kent. Terry Horner, 34, an entrepreneur, formerly of Mentor, now from North Carolina. Brian Zupancic, 36, a territory...

Akron Children's Hospital 06/15/2012 Charity Vault Text Attachment Email

...service manager for FedEx Custom Critical from Akron. • Matt Geis, 34, associate athletic director and executive director of athletic advancement for Kent State University, of Kent. • Terry Horner, 34, an entrepreneur, formerly of Mentor, now from North Carolina. • Brian Zupancic, 36, a territory...


Blossom Music (1)
Kent/Blossom Music Festival program toasts 45 years 06/16/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent/Blossom Music Festival is an advanced training institute operated by Kent State University in cooperation with The Cleveland Orchestra and Blossom Music Center. This summer's intensive program presents public performances...


Chemical Physics; Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
US Patent Issued to Kent State University (Yang) 06/17/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

ALEXANDRIA, Va., June 17 -- United States Patent no.8,199,286, issued on June 12, was assigned to Kent State University (Kent, Ohio). "Polymer Stabilized Electrically Controlled Birefringence Transflective Lcd" was invented by Deng-Ke Yang (Hudson,...


KSU at Salem (1)
Car show benefits shelter 06/18/2012 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...the Christina Center and Christina House were also on hand, along with volunteers from a new chapter of The National Society of Leadership Success at Kent State University Salem campus. "We're trying to make a better community while helping everyone we can," group president Donna Beery said....


KSU at Stark (2)
Kent State University at Stark Offers a Scholarship Match Program for Incoming Freshmen 06/17/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Posted by North Canton Patch Contributor In an effort to assist more students in their pursuit of a college degree, Kent State University at Stark in Jackson Township has announced a Scholarship Match Program. The campus will match any outside scholarship that an...

Kent State Stark announces scholarship match program 06/18/2012 Review - Online, The Text Attachment Email

In an effort to assist more students in their pursuit of a college degree, Kent State University at Stark in Jackson Township has announced a scholarship match program. The campus will match any outside scholarship...


Library and Information Science (SLIS); Students (1)
NLM's Basheer Kareem Named 2012 ALA Spectrum Scholar (06/15/12) 06/15/2012 WomensHealth.gov Text Attachment Email

...Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR), has been selected as a 2012 ALA Spectrum Scholar. Basheer is currently enrolled in the MLIS program at Kent State University School of Library and Information Science, with a degree expected in 2014. The Spectrum Scholarship Program provides scholarships...


Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Cleveland Heights woman finalist in Canada's top poetry contest: Global Village (Trzeciak) 06/16/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...invigorated to see how poetry can draw such crowds," said Trzeciak, an associate professor in the department of modern and classical languages studies at Kent State University. "It was just electrifying to see such an attentive gracious audience." Unfortunately, she didn't win the top prize -- $65,000....


Political Science (1)
Egypt's Revolution Stalls in Divide-and-Conquer Politics (Stacher) 06/15/2012 Wall Street Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...Christian solidarity protest before Mr. Mubarak's ouster. "Everyone thought the military were idiots. They weren't," said Josh Stacher, a professor at Kent State University in Ohio who spent 15 years in Egypt studying the Mubarak regime's ruling tactics. "The revolutionaries didn't understand how...


Safety (1)
Police Combine Patrols near Kent State 06/18/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Scholarships (1)
Bolivar residents receive college scholarships 06/16/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...recipient of the Music Department Scholarship, $500 renewable and the Academic Scholarship, $1,000 renewable. She plans to major in music education at Kent State University. Matthew Gamber is the son of Stan and Sue Gamber. He received the Academic Scholarship from Kent State University,...


Students (1)
25 women will vie for Miss Ohio crown 06/15/2012 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...Hillsdale College. She is a vocalist. Her platform: "Shine On" through tissue and organ donation. » Miss Huron County: Allison Vance, Mount Gilead, Kent State University. She is a vocalist. Her platform: SPARK: Suicide Prevention Awareness Reaching Kids. » Miss Miami Valley: Heather Wells,...


Students; Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Akron celebrations -- June 17 06/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Technology (1)
Kent State to host 35 scholars from Iraq (Lefton, Nettey) 06/17/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...including visits to the Ohio Statehouse, the Ohio Board of Regents, local city council proceedings, local Rotary and Kiwanis Club meetings, Niagara Falls, Porthouse Theatre, an Indians-Yankees baseball gameandan Iftar dinner with KSU's Muslim Students Association and local host families. "This is...


Town-Gown (1)
Downtowns come back; planning, vision are important (Lefton) 06/16/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...traditional downtowns. Kent's downtown currently is benefiting from the generosity of Ron Burbick, the entrepreneur and philanthropist, and the commitment of Kent State University which, especially under President Lester Lefton, sees the possibilities and is willing to take the risks and bear the occasional...


Tuition (1)
Four Ohio universities among most expensive in America 06/15/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...most expensive with a net cost of over $22,000 per year. Ohio State, Ohio University, and the University of Cincinnati also made the list of top 15. Kent State ranked 31st most expensive public college in the country. The University of Akron was not ranked. The Cincinnati Enquirer reports Education...


University Press (1)
Rust Belt Resistance: How a Small Community Took on Big Oil and Won 06/17/2012 Truth Out Text Attachment Email

...will only add more fuel to the fire. In Rust Belt Resistance, Author Perry Bush, professor at nearby Bluffton University, tells a story published by Kent State University Press of how top BP officials in London headquarters exhorted workers at their Lima refinery to save their jobs by working "harder...


WKSU (1)
Kent City Council approves $10,000 grant for Kent State Folk Festival 06/18/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Other (1)
AUDIO: Looking back at The Cleveland Press 06/18/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email


News Headline: African Community Theatre | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Workshop aims to expand growth of African community; auditions today and Friday

The African Community Theatre of Kent State University will be holding auditions for its fall production of Stagolee: A Black Folktale from 5 to 7 p.m. tonight and Friday. Auditions will be held in Room 203 of Oscar Ritchie Hall, which is located at 225 Terrace Dr. on Kent State's main campus.  They are in need of 13 characters, six women and seven men ranging from 16 to 60 years old. The production will capture the folklore of African-Americans and present it with music, song and dance.  If you are interested in trying out, prepare a three- to five-minute monologue to recite or a song to sing.  Stagolee: A Black Folktale is based on the short story by Julius Lester, adapted for a play by Ed Smith and revised by Dr. Fran Dorsey, director …

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News Headline: New Designer Joins Staff of Western Reserve Decorator Fabrics | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Western Reserve Decorator Fabrics, Northeast Ohio's largest retail showroom of home decor fabrics and trims, is announcing the hiring of Ann Ewart, as Senior Designer.

A graduate of Ohio State and Kent State , her graphic and interior design background will make her accessible and knowledgeable to assist with all our client's decorating needs.

Western Reserve Decorator Fabrics is located in Tallmadge and also offers custom services for window treatments, slipcovers, reupholstery, bedding and soft accessories such as pillows, tableskirts and runners.

Stop in and meet Ann and see why "Your Way of Living Starts Here"

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News Headline: Kent State baseball notebook: Aurora native realizing dream | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, NEB.: For at least 10 years, attending the College World Series has been on David G. Edmonds' bucket list.

But when Edmonds, 77, learned his son Dave and girlfriend Martha Herron were headed to Omaha this year no matter who made the eight-team field, the elder Edmonds refused to go.

“He totally told us no,” Herron said.

“Until he knew Kent was going to play,” chimed in Dave Edmonds.

Participating in their first College World Series, the Golden Flashes (46-18) take on Arkansas (44-20) at 5 p.m. today in TD Ameritrade Park (ESPN). The double-elimination tournament could run through June 26.

A Missouri native who has lived in Aurora since 1971, David Edmonds hoped to see the College World Series before the closing of Rosenblatt Stadium in 2010. Opened in 1948, it is scheduled to be demolished the first week of July.

“I never dreamed I'd get to see Kent State here,” David Edmonds said. “I really wanted to get to Rosenblatt and didn't make it. That was a bucket-list event I just needed to do. We're just happy to be here.”

Dave Edmonds played third base for the Golden Flashes from 1976-80. Reconnecting with the program a couple years ago, FedEx's senior vice president of worldwide and corporate services attended the Mid-American Conference Tournament in Avon, Ohio, and the NCAA regional in Gary, Ind. Residents of Memphis, Tenn., Dave Edmonds and Herron usually travel by motorcoach.

“We've been following these kids since some of their first games down in Tennessee,” Dave Edmonds said.

“We know the kids, we know the families and we've really bonded with them,” Herron said. “One of the ironies of this is I'm totally into Kent, and I graduated from Arkansas. But I'm a Golden Flash this week.”

As they left KSU's hotel and set out to explore, David Edmonds wasn't sure what will be next on his bucket list.

“Australia maybe,” he said.

Reliving the past

Before their workout Friday, KSU coach Scott Stricklin took the Golden Flashes to Rosenblatt Stadium, which opened in 1948. The home of the College World Series from 1950-2010, it will be demolished the first week of July.

“It's pretty crazy how it's worn down like this after not being played here for two years,” said closer Casey Wilson, an Archbishop Hoban product. “It's pretty cool, I can feel the history on the field just standing here. This is definitely something I wanted to see while we were here.”

Stricklin and pitching coach Mike Birkbeck bought a souvenir engraved brick. Stricklin went to the CWS with Georgia Tech in 2002. Birkbeck hit the last home run of his professional career in Rosenblatt Stadium with the Class AAA Denver Zephyrs in 1990.

Caden Chaney, 4, of Gainesville, Fla., played catch with KSU players during their visit.

“It still gives you chills when you see the red and the yellow and the blue, the way the grandstand is,” Stricklin said. “It's the most unique place you've ever seen. I thought we'd be out there by ourselves. There were a few hundred people out there.

“It's a lot smaller than you remember. The kids said they wanted to do it, but once we got there I think they were really excited we were there.”

Notes

Ben Curtis, the 2003 British Open golf champion and former Kent State All-American, is scheduled to arrive in Omaha tonight. Browns receiver Josh Cribbs did not ride the bus he chartered, but plans to fly in today. … KSU was the only school of the eight qualifiers to sell its allotment of 700 tickets for its first game. At tonight's alumni function, 375 have committed. … To get over their awe of TD Ameritrade Park, Stricklin took the Golden Flashes there to look around Wednesday. They practiced in the 24,500-seat venue Thursday and attended Friday's games. … Stricklin stopped talking to three local media members to direct a lady with a walker and her friend to the hotel elevator, even holding the door for them

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News Headline: (VIDEO) Josh Cribbs hosts bus trip to see Kent State game at College World Series | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cleveland Browns superstar and Kent State University alumnus Josh Cribbs put up $10,000 of his own money to fund a fan road trip to the College World Series in Omaha.

Cribbs — who holds the NFL record with eight kickoff returns for touchdowns — was there when the bus hit the road Friday morning and plans to flying out Saturday after practice with the Browns to see the Golden Flashes play their first ever game in the CWS.

Cribb's cash went toward a charter bus, food, shirts, tickets to the games and hotel accommodations for 46 fans. Those who got a spot on the bus only had to pay an extra $150 each to cover the remainder of the bill.

The Flashes play the Arkansas Razorbacks at 5 p.m. Saturday. The game will be televised on ESPN.

Cribbs graduated with a degree in communication studies in 2010.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO: http://www.recordpub.com/news/article/5197305

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News Headline: Browns' Josh Cribbs sends off fans as they take bus to Omaha to root on Kent State baseball | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BROOKLYN, Ohio - A “Flash Mob” is on its way to Omaha.

Dozens of northeast Ohioans are on a bus chartered by the Browns' Josh Cribbs, taking the 14-hour road trip to support the Kent State baseball team at the College World Series.

They departed Friday morning from Brooklyn, greeted by Cribbs as they arrived to board the bus.

“We're going to be 50-deep in the stands cheering for our Golden Flashes and making sure we bring home a World Series championship,” Cribbs said.

It's a long way to Omaha, but the Kent State faithful are eager to watch the Flashes make history, appearing in the College World Series for the first time in school history.

“I decided to go because I love sports, specifically baseball, and I just graduated Kent in May so it was fun to see it all happen,” Michelle Martinez, a fan taking the bus, said.

Chris Meluch, a spring 2011 graduate, still follows his alum's sports and is pumped about the trip.

“It's amazing,” Meluch said. “There is so much Kent pride going on.”

Cribbs is a Kent State alum himself, setting records as the team's starting quarterback from 2001-2004. In 2005, Cribbs was signed by the Browns as an undrafted free agent.

“I was a fan just like they are now. The fans drive my motivation,” Cribbs said. “I feel like without them there would be no me.”

Cribbs and his site TeamCribbs.com put together the bus, opening a limited number of seats to the public. For $150, fans got a hotel room on Friday night, ticket, beverages and snacks on the bus.

They also got a shirt that says Flash Mob, Omaha 2012 on the front and Team Cribbs on the back.

"$150 for all that is included is unbeatable," fan Kyle Chaboudy said.

He said they've been partying since leaving Cleveland, while Martinez said they're playing games for Josh Cribbs autographed memorabilia through the ride.

Kent State, they're going to do it big. We're doing it big for them,” Cribbs said. “We're gonna be out there in numbers, in Omaha, Nebraska, and bringing home a winner.”

The Golden Flashes take on Arkansas in their first game Saturday at 5 p.m. A team gets eliminated after losing its second game in division play. The winners of each division play a best-of-three series for the College World Series title.

Read more: http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/cleveland_metro/browns-josh-cribbs-sends-off-fans-as-they-head-for-omaha-to-root-on-kent-state-baseball#ixzz1y9dt246w

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News Headline: VIDEO: Team Cribbs Kent State Fan Bus Heads to CWS | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One of Kent State's proudest alums came through in a big way to be sure the Golden Flashes baseball team would have plenty of support in the school's first ever College World Series appearance.

“This is one of the most exciting weekends I have been apart of,” said Joe Chaffin.

Kent State fans, with team colors and all, boarded a Precious Cargo bus on Friday morning bound for Omaha, Nebraska.

“I'm pumped, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity,” Corey Carney said.

“As students, especially seniors, this is a good way to go out,” Kent resident Michael Moses said.

The bus trip was planned by Kent State alum and Cleveland Browns wide receiver, Josh Cribbs.

“I love my sports teams, I love Kent State,” he said.

The bus trip was a last minute idea by the 2010 Kent State graduate.

“We didn't think we could get this job done, we thought the task would be too hard but with less than a day the bus filled up,” said Cribbs.

Most of the Kent State fans said they would not be going to Omaha, Nebraska if it wasn't for Josh Cribbs coming through with the bus.

“I want to thank Josh for doing this, this is absolutely fantastic for me because I never would have made it,” said Akron resident Lou Laurich.

“I think it's really awesome, so classy of him, it's super fun and I'm really excited that he would do something like that,” added Michelle Martinez of Valley View.

In all, 50 Kent State fans filled up the bus and began a 14-hour journey to watch Kent State make history.

“Very excited, baseball is one of my favorite things in the whole world and nothing better than going to see the Flashes play,” Lauren Barnum of Avon said.

“It's awesome because we never had the chance to see a team go this far,” said Moses.

All of the fans, including Josh Cribbs are predicting a Kent State victory on Saturday afternoon against Arkansas.

“It's going to show this time tomorrow 5:00 they are going to show Arkansas what it is to be a Golden Flash,” Cribbs said.

If Kent State wins, their is another bus trip plan in the works to watch Kent State play for a National Championship.

“If we win, that bus may not make it all the way back because people will just be too excited, the driver won't even be able to drive,” chuckled Laurich.

Kent State's team allotment for tickets to the College World Series sold out on Thursday. Kent State plays Arkansas at 5:00 on Saturday.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO: http://fox8.com/2012/06/15/team-cribbs-kent-state-fan-bus-heads-to-cws/

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News Headline: Josh Cribbs -- NFL Star Foots the Bill for Alma Mater's Big Trip | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: TMZ.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: View Video Here: http://www.tmz.com/videos/0_fy7qun7l

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News Headline: Josh Cribbs' "Flash Mob" bus riders cheer Kent State at CWS, make quick turnaround to go home | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Washington Post
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — Josh Cribbs' road-weary “Flash Mob” mustered all the energy it could to cheer for Kent State at the College World Series on Saturday.

The Cleveland Browns receiver and Kent State alumnus arranged for a bus to carry fans from Cleveland to Omaha for the Golden Flashes' first CWS appearance.

Cribbs was on hand to see off the bus at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, and 16 hours later it rolled into a motel in Fremont, Neb., about 25 miles northwest of Omaha.

Cribbs couldn't ride with the fans because he had to attend a Browns practice. He flew into Omaha shortly before first pitch and sat with his new friends.

The bus trip was open to the first 46 fans that signed up and paid $150. They sat in Section 202 at TD Ameritrade Park in their navy “Flash Mob” T-shirts.

The bus was to head back to Cleveland immediately after the game.

Mandy Grodin, 33, of Cleveland said the trip was long but fun. The fans passed time listening to music and enjoying food and beverage provided by Cribbs. There also were giveaways of pictures and shirts autographed by the NFL star.

“We're running on adrenaline right now,” Grodin said.

Grodin had attended only one Kent State baseball game before Saturday, but she said she couldn't pass up the chance to come to Omaha to see the Flashes make history. She traveled with her friend, Liz Sauer, 26, who works on Kent State's athletics grounds crew.

Sauer said Cribbs thanked the fans for filling up the bus and supporting the Flashes.

“It's very exciting. They can go all the way,” Sauer said.

___

STATUS QUO: No change in format for the 64-team NCAA baseball tournament is on the horizon.

Last year there was discussion of going from 16 to 32 regionals, adding an extra layer of super regionals and emphasizing best-of-three play all the way to the College World Series.

American Baseball Coaches Association executive director Dave Keilitz said feedback he's received from coaches indicates most are happy with the current structure of 16 regionals and eight super regionals prior to the CWS.

Dennis Poppe, NCAA vice president of football and baseball, said adding a week to the tournament would require taking away a week from the regular season. There were concerns last year that reducing the regular season by a week would be unfavorable to northern programs, which struggle to get in home games early in the season because of cold weather.

“The adage is if it ain't broke, don't fix it,” Poppe said. “We're kind of falling into that rut, if you will. I don't think in all my years in college baseball that I've seen a healthier sport at this point in time. The progress of the stadiums being built and the success of the teams from areas that have not normally had success... I think those are all good signs for college baseball.”

___

BATS GET THE OK: The toned-down bats of the past two seasons have won the approval of most coaches, according to an American Baseball Coaches Association survey.

The survey, according to executive director Dave Keilitz, asked coaches whether they like or found the new bat standards acceptable or whether they don't like the bats.

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News Headline: GO FLASHES: A Busload of Kent State Fans | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV
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News OCR Text: VIEW VIDEO HERE: http://www.woio.com/category/211979/video-landing-page?clipId=7405326&autostart=true

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News Headline: A Mostly Perplexed AAUP Accepts Pledge to Treat Its Staff Fairly (Garrison) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Chronicle of Higher Education - Online, The
Contact Name: Peter Schmidt
News OCR Text: The proposed resolution appeared to come out of nowhere and it responded to events that went unmentioned, as few members of the American Association of University Professors acknowledged knowing anything about them and those in the know remained silent.

In the end, however, the AAUP members gathered for the group's annual meeting here felt compelled to get behind the measure, given how steeped it was in their organization's core values. The resolution basically calls on the AAUP to give its own employees the same fair treatment that it expects colleges to give their faculty members.

Drafted by a committee of the AAUP Field Staff Association, a professional organization representing the staff members employed by the AAUP's larger chapters and state conferences, the resolution holds that the national organization and its affiliates "shall embody the same policies and principles as employer that it espouses are the benchmark for fairness and equity in its advocacy for faculty," and "shall not relate to staff in a way that conflicts with basic principles of fairness and equity."

In a preamble stating its rationale, the resolution argues that "the advocacy of fair treatment of faculty members by employers is a basic principle of the AAUP," that the organization's affiliate chapters and conferences employ staff to execute the policies and principles that the AAUP espouses, and that "the work of the AAUP would be greatly diminished without competent and loyal national and field staff."

George R. Garrison, a professor of pan-African studies at Kent State University, offered the resolution from the floor as the AAUP's leaders turned their attention to new business Saturday at the end of group's annual business meeting. He described it as a way to "announce our solidarity," but did not state exactly why the field-staff association had come up with it. In interviews after the meeting, both Mr. Garrison and Caryl Schiff Greatorex, chairwoman of the AAUP Field Staff Association and director of member services for the Connecticut State University AAUP, said the resolution was drafted in response to a specific incident that they were not at liberty to discuss.

The lack of details as to why they were being asked to approve the resolution prompted some AAUP members to question it at first.

"I don't see why we need a resolution for this," said Anne Friedman, a vice president of the Professional Staff Congress, an AAUP-affiliated union that represents faculty and staff of the City University of New York. "I would have to hear reasons why we need to pass this—what we have been doing wrong, and who has been mistreated."

But Charles J. Parrish, a professor of political science at Wayne State University who was about to take the at-large seat on the association's national council that he won in last spring's AAUP elections, said, "I don't see how anyone can vote against this," considering how it reiterates the association's basic principles.

The AAUP members on hand for Saturday's meeting ended up passing the resolution overwhelmingly, with no nays and two abstentions in a voice vote. Members of the AAUP's national staff—which has its own union, United Staff AAUP—denied any knowledge of what led to the drafting of the resolution but applauded its passage. The AAUP does not keep close track of how many staff members are employed by its affiliates but estimates that they number between 75 and 100.

The resolution's passage was a strange twist in what was otherwise a fairly uneventful annual meeting attended by nearly 350 of the association's members.

Howard Bunsis, the AAUP's treasurer, gave a summary of the association's financial picture in which he said it remained in the black in 2011, for a third year in a row, but continues to operate on "very thin margins." Last year it took in about $6.78-million in revenue, a 5.7 percent increase over the previous year, but spent all but about 2 percent of the money it took in. "We still are not where we want to be," Mr. Bunsis said. "We would like those margins to be in the 5- to 10-percent range."

Mr. Bunsis said he was especially concerned with the AAUP's excessive reliance on membership dues, which account for about $5.9-million, or well over 80 percent, of its revenues.

Rudy H. Fichtenbaum, a professor of economics at Wright State University who took over as the AAUP's next president on Sunday, gave a brief speech on Saturday arguing that the AAUP needs to expand, take in far more part-time faculty members and graduate students, strengthen its state chapters, and work more with organizations such as the New Faculty Majority if it is going to continue to be a key defender of faculty rights. His remarks echoed comments he made this month in interviews with The Chronicle.

Cary Nelson, who stepped down as AAUP president on Sunday, was not on hand for Saturday's proceedings. Wendy W. Roworth, a professor of art history at the University of Rhode Island who oversaw Saturday's meeting as the AAUP's vice president, said Mr. Nelson, an alumnus of Antioch College, was in Ohio accepting a lifetime achievement award from the Antioch College Alumni Association. The AAUP members on hand Saturday themselves passed a resolution commending him for his service.

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News Headline: For Kent State, all bets are off: College World Series Insider (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Omaha, Neb. — Not since the opening game of the NCAA Tournament, when Kent State faced Kentucky, have the odds against winning seemed as large for the Golden Flashes. But there is no doubt that facing the No. 1-ranked team in the nation in an elimination game of the College World Series counts as a monumental challenge.

That is what Kent will face against Florida at 5 p.m. today at TD Ameritrade Park. It's a small consolation that KSU, an 8-1 opening-game loser to Arkansas, dodged two-time defending national champion South Carolina, which defeated Florida, 7-3, in its opener.

“You'd like to be in the winners bracket, playing either one of those two teams,” Kent head coach Scott Stricklin said. “When you've got an elimination game, it's tough.”

Kent's run in the tournament has been so smooth that this will be only the second elimination game the Flashes have played. They worked through Kentucky (twice), Purdue and Oregon, losing once to Oregon in a super regional best-of-three series before advancing to Omaha on a walk-off Jimmy Rider RBI hit in the ninth inning of a 3-2 victory.

“We've just got to keep playing baseball,” first baseman George Roberts said. “Keep plugging away, keep trying to get better at-bats and score some runs early. We need to get ahead, because when we're ahead, we're tough to beat, just like anybody.”

To do that, Kent (46-19) will have to get some hits and nurse some walks against the Gators (47-19), who are making their second straight CWS appearance and seventh overall. The Flashes had just four hits against Arkansas, and for the second time in the tournament were no-hit into the fifth inning.

“We just need some timely hitting to come around,” outfielder Evan Campbell said. “I think we started slow, then started pressing a little bit. Just trying to do a little too much at the plate.”

Campbell said the pressure of being on the big stage for the first time in school history may have collectively caught up with him and the team as the game wore on against Arkansas.

“A little bit,” he admitted. “I feel like I'm trying to make adjustments. And obviously I'm not getting the results I want. So it's difficult.”

Sunday the team got in a little more rest, along with a short practice session. Campbell said the light work day was a blessing.

“Definitely, I think so,” he said. “It gives us some time to recover and to recuperate a little bit.”

On the mound: Kent State will send No. 2 pitcher Ryan Bores (9-3, 3.35 ERA) against Florida. Pitching coach Mike Birkbeck said there are no worries about him.

“He'll be ready to go,” Birkbeck said. “He had a great bullpen [session] the other day. He's just got to be himself. We have all the confidence in the world he will go out and throw us a big-time game.”

Birkbeck said that while today's elimination game is a no-holds-barred situation, it is unlikely that No. 3 starter Tyler Skulina will see action.

“It would have to be some unique circumstances,” Birkbeck said. “We've got a fully stocked bullpen with our go-to guys. The thing is, you don't want to find yourself going no holds barred, and [if] you do win, now you're sitting with Game 3 wondering where to go. So it's highly unlikely Tyler gets into that game . . . unless we go 21 innings.”

The Flashes went 21 innings in their first tournament game against Kentucky.

Singular moment: While many have celebrated Kent's run to the College World Series with family and friends, Derek Toadvine's mother, Heather, was alone when the Golden Flashes secured their trip to Omaha on a walk-off run in Oregon scored by her son last Monday night.

“I was in Dublin, Ohio, doing some new computer training for my job with R&M Materials Handling in Springfield, Ohio,” Heather Toadvine said. “I was in the bar, by myself. Everybody else was watching the hockey game.”

She asked the barmaid to switch one of the TVs to college baseball.

“When I told her that was my son playing, she said,‘You've got control of that TV for the rest of the night.' The moment Derek crossed home plate, I stood up in the middle of the bar. I started screaming. I started crying. Everybody thought I was crazy. It was the most surreal moment of my life. Unbelievable.

“I wouldn't miss this for anything in the world. My boss, Mark Arthur, said,‘Go, I'll see you when you get home, we'll be watching.' We're taking a journey that so many parents wish they could take. We have been blessed.”

He said it: “This is really not about the money. This is about having a quality program, with student-athletes who have achieved the highest GPA, who have been so recognized for it. It's about keeping the word ‘student' in student-athletes, and having a first-class team that clearly plays at a national level. We're going to continue to grow this program. These kinds of results show that we can get the job done.” — Kent State President Lester Lefton on future investment in Kent State baseball, starting with adding lights to Schoonover Stadium this fall.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball team's run to College World Series includes triumph, tragedy and trauma (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. -- Kent State's run to the College World Series has been a feel-good story from the outset, but it has not come without some bittersweet moments as well.

Cheryl McHenry, the mother of backup catcher Jason Bagoly, died unexpectedly Thursday. And the grandfather of second baseman Derek Toadvine has put his life on the edge to see his grandson play on college baseball's biggest stage.

The "CM" sticker worn by Kent State players on their caps and helmets is in memory of Bagoly's mother. Bagoly, a junior catcher from Austintown, elected to stay with the team because funeral arrangements have not been finalized.

"We all feel awful for Jason," head coach Scott Stricklin said after Kent's 8-1 setback to Arkansas on Saturday evening. "We gave him the option if he wanted to fly home, but most of his family's here and his second family, his team, is here."

That team bond is also what draws David Toadvine to continue being around the Golden Flashes, even if his health may be at risk.

"I wasn't going to miss this," David Toadvine, a resident of Springfield, Ohio, said before Kent's opening game. So the elder Toadvine has put off having a heart procedure, scheduled for Wednesday, until July.

This despite the fact he already has had one scare during Kent's run in winning the Mid-American Conference Tournament, then an NCAA regional in Gary, Ind., and a super regional in Oregon.

"I had an anxiety attack in Gary," David Toadvine said. "I passed out, and don't know what happened after that."

What happened was that a scramble ensued as his wife, Dorothy, and others started to revive him.

"It was a surreal moment, and everything culminated at that time," Dorothy Toadvine began. "He had just called Derek, told him that he loved him and told him he was proud of him. Then, he started getting chest pains. Then it escalated. He got excited. He wasn't breathing good.

"It was way too much. We had a hard time finding a hospital. So it was a scary situation."

Parents of other players helped carry David Toadvine to the car, and a search began for the nearest hospital in Gary, Ind. Luckily, the parents of Derek Toadvine's girlfriend, Jacqueline Furay, are doctors (Rick and Juliana Furay) and were in the traveling party.

"So they tried to intervene and went to the hospital with him," Dorothy Toadvine said.

By that point, Derek Toadvine had left the team bus and was at the hospital as well. The bond between the two is more akin to father and son. Derek shyly admits he's probably the favorite of all of David Toadvine's grandchildren. So he did not leave the hospital until told all was OK and that his grandfather was stable.

David Toadvine did not travel with the team to Oregon. But no matter what the doctors said, he was not going to miss the trip to Omaha.

"I think even if they did [say he should not come], he would still be here regardless," Derek said. "Who knows if we'll be back next year or the year after. He would never miss something like this.

"I'm not doing this for myself, I'm doing it for him," Derek Toadvine said. "I'm living his dream, too."

Before the first game, the coaches saw David Toadvine wishing the team luck, and asked him to spend a moment on the team bus before going to TD Ameritrade Park.

"They said, 'Look who's alive, fellas,' " he said. "They told me to stay upright."

Later, David sat amidst a loud party filled with KSU administrators, alums, parents and fans, soaking in the experience.

"We're going to handle it," he said. "I got my nitro, now, so my doctor said I should be fine until the procedure."

Still, Dorothy Toadvine also has a backup plan in place.

"I told Jacqueline's parents, please bring your medicine kit," she said.

Meanwhile, Jason Bagoly's medicine is to be with his team during this difficult time.

In the ninth inning Saturday, even in the midst of pending defeat against Arkansas, Stricklin had his backup catcher on deck to pinch hit. But the game ended on George Roberts' double-play grounder to short and T.J. Sutton's groundout.

"He's going to get an at-bat for sure [today]," Stricklin said. "He's been a great hitter for us. Our prayers are with his family and our thoughts are with him. He's gotten a lot of hugs from our kids the last couple days.

"We love him and he loves us back because he wants to stay with us."

UP NEXT FOR KSU: FLORIDA (47-19)
Coach: Kevin O'Sullivan (223-101, sixth season).

Road to Omaha: Won Gainesville Regional: beat Bethune-Cookman, 4-0, beat Georgia Tech, 6-2, and 15-3. Won Gainesville Super Regional: beat North Carolina State, 7-1, and 9-8 in 10 innings.

All-time record in CWS: 11-16 (eighth appearance).

Meet the Gators: C Mike Zunino (.320, 19 HRs, 65 RBI), 1B Vickash Ramjit (.273, 5, 20), 2B Casey Turgeon (.283, 4, 30), SS Nolan Fontana (.285, 9, 30), 3B Josh Tobias (.258, 0, 10), LF Justin Shafer (.280, 0, 26), CF Daniel Pigott (.319, 8, 41), RF Preston Tucker (.320, 16, 50), DH Brian Johnson (.308, 6, 41). Starting Pitchers: RHP Hudson Randall (9-2, 2.61 ERA), RHP Jonathon Crawford (6-2, 3.13), RHP Karsten Whitson (4-0, 3.51), LHP Brian Johnson (8-5, 3.90). Relievers: RHP Greg Larson (6-0, 1.39), LHP Steven Rodriguez (3-2, 2.18, 4 saves), RHP Austin Maddox (3-3, 2.50, 12 saves), RHP Johnny Magliozzi (4-3, 5.03).

All-Star Alumni: Al Rosen, David Eckstein, Robby Thompson, Brad Wilkerson, Mike Stanley, Mark Ellis, Josh Fogg, Matt LaPorta, Ryan Raburn, David Ross, Doug Corbett, Rob Murphy.

Short Hops: The Gators are in the CWS for a third year in a row, a first in program history. . . . Randall is 5-1 with 49 strikeouts and just eight walks in 57 2/3 innings in nine career NCAA Tournament starts. . . . Zunino was the No. 3 overall pick (Mariners) in the Major League Baseball Draft, the first of nine Florida players selected.

The Gators tied for second-highest total of players drafted. . . . Gators have hit a nation-leading 75 home runs. . . . Maddox needs one more save to tie the school single-season record of 13 owned by Danny Wheeler and Josh Fogg. . . . Tucker has 57 career homers, including a school-record 11 in the postseason. . . . The Gators are 5-1 in the postseason and have outscored their opponents, 44-21.

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News Headline: Northeast Ohio's college hoops coaches embracing Coaches vs. Cancer program | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Getting five Division I college basketball coaches together on the first day of the summer recruiting period is just about impossible.

But when St. Joseph's (Pa.) University coach Phil Martelli was willing to fly in from Philadelphia, Cleveland State's Gary Waters, Keith Dambrot from the University of Akron, Rob Senderoff of Kent State and Jerry Slocum from Youngstown State answered the call to meet the National Chairman for Coaches vs. Cancer.

They met late Friday afternoon, along with invited guests, at the American Cancer Society Hope Lodge in University Circle to announce the formation of Coaches vs. Cancer of Northeast Ohio. The inaugural event will be a Tip-Off Breakfast on Oct. 31 in Cuyahoga Falls.

After listening to Martelli's commitment to the cause by the National Association of Basketball Coaches, its Ohio brethren stated their own.

"I was at an event in Philadelphia 17 years ago and the NCAA News came out with the top 100 schools for Coaches vs. Cancer," said Martelli, in his 27th season with the Hawks. "I told Fran Dunphy of Penn there was not one Philly school. That was a disgrace.

"We started a golf tournament. Last year we raised $115,000."

Martelli said the Philadelphia chapter also hosts a breakfast the day after Selection Sunday, a black-tie gala and a summer cocktail party by the shore. It also has a school initiative program that enlists the help of 115 grade schools and high schools that raised $330,000.

"Besides coaching and recruiting, I truly believe you are responsible to help people in need," said Martelli.

The disease has touched so many lives and the coaches related their stories. Dambrot wore three rubber bracelets on his left wrist in support of cancer-stricken friends, two deceased. Senderoff lost his grandmother five years ago and told of a third-grade classmate of his daughter.

Slocum said his mother, 87, has been a 37-year cancer survivor.

"I remember as a teenager her being sick," said Slocum. "It knows no gender, rich or poor, black or white. That disease is going to get you."

Waters, who came to CSU six years ago after five years at Rutgers, said he was treated for prostate cancer when he arrived in Cleveland. "I was very fortunate and I'm in good health," he said. "We're going to push this forward. I want to get the university involved and reach a lot of people."

Dave Heck, the sports initiatives director for the ACS, said Coaches vs. Cancer formed a Southwest Ohio chapter one year ago. The Tip-Off Breakfast among Cincinnati, Xavier, Wright State, Dayton and Miami raised $160,000.

Martelli said coaches are not the heroes in this endeavor. The corporate sponsors and contributors deserve all the credit, along with all those afflicted. He advised coaches to bring their teams for a dinner at Hope Lodge, one of 31 free national residences for patients.

"That's where you will see real-life toughness," he said. "We have to fight this as hard as any opponent on your schedule."

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News Headline: Terry Pluto's Talkin'....about | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: About Kent State baseball...

Most fans know about Kent State's amazing run to the College World Series. But for the third year in a row, KSU was given the NCAA's Public Recognition Award, based on the most recent multi-year Academic Progress Rate.

The Flashes had a perfect 1000 multi-year APR. Only 16 teams have had the mark in each of the last three seasons -- and Kent State is the only public university on that list. Other schools include Harvard, Yale, Brown, Stanford and Georgetown.

"We received an award for having the highest GPA (3.09) of any of the (eight) teams in Omaha," said coach Scott Stricklin. "That means a lot to us, because we want to win the right way."

Stricklin said he's had not seen the All-Academic team selection for the MAC, but expects starters David Lyon, Jimmy Rider, Nick Hamilton and others to be considered. Junior Jason Bagoly (finance major from Austintown Fitch) was given the team's academic award for the highest GPA.

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News Headline: Transfers have provided a helpful boost to Kent State baseball's postseason run | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. -- There aren't any ruby slippers, but Kent State baseball coach Scott Stricklin may well tell his recruits to click their cleats three times and repeat, "there's no place like home."

Not only do the Golden Flashes sport a roster of 27 Ohio-bred baseball players, but five arrived after starting their college careers at other schools. Pitcher Ryan Bores initially signed with Ohio University. DH Nick Hamilton began his career at Xavier, catcher Troy Summers started out at Akron, pitcher Michael Clark first journeyed to North Carolina State and pitcher Tyler Skulina turned his heels after starting at Virginia.

Kent, 46-18, makes its first appearance in the College World Series Saturday having been aided greatly by Strongsville's Skulina (11-2, 3.84 ERA) and Avon Lake's Hamilton (.353 BA). But no player punched more tickets en route to KSU than Bores (9-3, 3.85 ERA), who will start the team's second game on Monday.

"I signed to play at Ohio University my freshman year, but I didn't like it too much, and wanted to be closer to home," said Bores, a product of Strongsville. "Then I went to Tri-C and was drafted by the Texas Rangers. But I decided to wait one more year. In the fall, I signed to go to Cleveland State. But around the first of May, I got a phone call saying the program had been terminated.

"Now, I had no scholarship offers. I scrambled, last second, and I pitched pretty good one game when about 20 [college] scouts were there. I kind of blew up overnight. I talked to coach Stricklin and coach [Mike] Birkbeck, and they convinced me to come to Kent State. Three schools in three years, but it's paid off. It's been a pretty good ride. Now I'm soaking it all in."

Hamilton, Clark, Skulina and Bores are all key contributors as Kent opens CWS play Saturday at 5 p.m. against Arkansas. Transfers are not uncommon in college sports. But the key, Stricklin said, is not to have many transfer away from your program while being open to those interested in arriving.

"It's just going to happen," he said. "When you've got 35 kids on the roster, not every kid is going to be happy. You've got a lot of things that come into play, like homesickness. A lot of things when you go away from home, 18 years old, for the first time. It happens everywhere. You think you're going into a perfect situation, but when you get there, you realize it is not.

"The grass isn't always greener. Kids have found out, when they come back to Kent State, kids feel like they belong. You don't see players transfer out of our program very often. We have a low turnover rate, and I think a lot of that is because we are local."

He used the recruiting of Bores as an example.

"We talked to him a little bit, but he chose to go to Cleveland State," he said. "When that program was discontinued, he gave us a call and asked if we were still interested. Coach Birkbeck and I jumped in the car, and went to Battle Creek, Mich., to watch him pitch on a Friday morning, and we had a game that afternoon at Bowling Green. He was very good, and we offered him a scholarship that night."

Bores said by that time he was getting offers from Kansas State and numerous southern teams. But he opted to stay closer to home.

"My folks really enjoy seeing me play, so Kent was the best fit," he said.

"You're not going to get every kid you want in the recruiting process," Stricklin said. "From time to time, kids are going to make decisions to go elsewhere, but it doesn't always work out.

"One thing we've always done a pretty good job of is, when a kid decides to go somewhere else, we congratulate him, wish him luck, because you never know what's going to happen. We've had a lot of kids come back, because they enjoyed the recruiting process the first time around, and wanted to take a second look."

One big plus, Bores said, is when recruits visit, he and his teammates who transferred to KSU can be a voice for them to hear.

"They'll ask our stories, and some of our experiences," Bores said. "We can share a lot with them."

Now, with the Omaha experience, the Golden Flashes will have even more stories to share.

Kent State transfers
Ohio players who transferred to Kent State after starting their college baseball careers elsewhere, with prior schools in parenthesis.

•Ryan Bores, Strongsville (Ohio/Tri-C/Cleveland State)
•Michael Clark, Akron (North Carolina State)
•Nick Hamilton, Avon Lake (Xavier)
•Tyler Skulina, Strongsville (Virginia)
•Troy Summers, Minerva (Akron)
College World Series schedule
TD Ameritrade Park, Omaha, Neb.

All times EDT / double elimination

•Friday: Game 1 — UCLA 9, Stony Brook 1; Game 2 — Arizona 4, Florida State 3
•Saturday: Game 3 — Kent State (46-18) vs. Arkansas (44-20), 5 p.m.; Game 4 — South Carolina (45-17) vs. Florida (47-18), 9 p.m.
•Sunday: Game 5 — Stony Brook vs. Florida State, 5 p.m.; Game 6 — UCLA vs. Arizona, 9 p.m.

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News Headline: Kent State's College World Series debut spoiled in 8-1 loss to Arkansas (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's Jimmy Rider (left) successfully recorded an out at second with this fourth-inning flip to Derek Toadvine, but not much else went well for the Golden Flashes in their College World Series debut. Rider's solo homer was the only KSU run in a 8-1 loss to Arkansas Saturday afternoon in Omaha, Neb.

Beyond the Diamond

Game 1: Arkansas 8, Kent State 1

Key play: Jake Wise's home run in the bottom of the second inning. When the No. 9 hitter squares up the team ace in his first at-bat, it is not a good omen.

Star of the game: Arkansas pitcher D.J. Baxendale had not pitched well in his last two playoff games, but had his 'A' staff Saturday.

Elton's take: For all the feel-good atmosphere, it was imperative to win the first game. Game 2 was going to be against either the No. 1-ranked Florida or the two-time champion South Carolina. This could be a very short stay.

Next: Elimination game, 5 p.m. Monday.

- Elton Alexander

OMAHA, Neb. -- Kent State's debut at the College World Series did not go well as ace lefty David Starn struggled into the sixth inning and Arkansas dominated with an 8-1 victory in a first-round game Saturday afternoon in TD Ameritrade Park.

A rainy morning led to overcast skies during batting practice, then sun for the game. But none of those rays seemed to favor the Flashes. KSU didn't have a hit until two were out in the fifth. The only run came on Jimmy Rider's homer to left in the sixth, one of just four hits Kent would get against Razorbacks starter D.J. Baxendale and reliever Brandon Moore.

"The better team won today," Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said. "[Baxendale] was the best guy on the field today."

Rider's blast cut Arkansas' lead to 3-1. But Arkansas countered quickly against Starn with Matt Vinson's two-run double in the bottom of the sixth, ending Starn's day.

"I kept him in too long," Stricklin admitted.

The Razorbacks scored three more runs in the eighth to end any suspense. Jake Wise's two-run single was the big hit, adding to Wise's solo homer in the second inning.

Kent (46-19) must win in Monday's 5 p.m. ET losers bracket game against either South Carolina or Florida to extend its season.

This journey was clearly going to be a tough one for the Flashes, with three SEC teams in their bracket -- Arkansas, two-time defending champion South Carolina and No. 1-ranked Florida. Now the Flashes will need Ryan Bores at his absolute best on Monday, and for their bats to awaken.

"Their talent is outstanding, and their experience is unmatched," Stricklin said of Florida and South Carolina. "But we're going to fight on Monday."

Kent State-Arkansas box score

Starn was not himself from the outset. "His arm speed just has not been there the last couple of outings," pitching coach Mike Birkbeck said.

Starn walked seven against Oregon in the Super Regional but Kent still won, 3-2. With one out in the first inning Saturday, Starn, who had only issued 38 walks on the season, walked three straight to load the bases. Brian Anderson's infield single opened the scoring before Starn got a double-play ball from Bo Bigham to get out of the inning.

Starn only threw four strikes in his first 20 pitches.

As Baxendale breezed, Starn gave up a second-inning homer to Wise -- "a two-seam fastball over the middle of the plate," Starn said.

The Flashes got their first hit on Sawyer Polen's single in the fifth, but the Hogs pushed the lead to 3-0 on Joe Serrano's RBI single in the fifth.

In the sixth, Rider broke up the shutout and extended his hitting streak to 17 games with a towering homer that just stayed fair down the left-field line.

"I was just looking for a fastball," Rider said. "That was probably the one pitch [Baxendale] left up all night."

Now Kent must find a way to win one more, or play no more this season.

"It will be a daunting task," Stricklin said.

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News Headline: Kent State's classroom savvy | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Terry Pluto, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: About Kent State baseball...

Most fans know about Kent State's amazing run to the College World Series. But for the third year in a row, KSU was given the NCAA's Public Recognition Award, based on the most recent multi-year Academic Progress Rate.

The Flashes had a perfect 1000 multi-year APR. Only 16 teams have had the mark in each of the last three seasons -- and Kent State is the only public university on that list. Other schools include Harvard, Yale, Brown, Stanford and Georgetown.

"We received an award for having the highest GPA (3.09) of any of the (eight) teams in Omaha," said coach Scott Stricklin. "That means a lot to us, because we want to win the right way."

Stricklin said he's had not seen the All-Academic team selection for the MAC, but expects starters David Lyon, Jimmy Rider, Nick Hamilton and others to be considered. Junior Jason Bagoly (finance major from Austintown Fitch) was given the team's academic award for the highest GPA.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball: Bores to take hill in must-win game (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BELLEVUE, Neb.: Ryan Bores has already pitched what Kent State coach Scott Stricklin called the biggest game of the season.

That was a 7-3 complete-game victory over Purdue in the Gary, Ind., regional, which followed a 7-6, 21- inning marathon triumph over Kentucky.

So Stricklin believes the junior right-hander from Strongsville High School can handle the daunting task tonight as the Golden Flashes (46-19) face elimination in the College World Series. They take on top-seeded Florida (47-19) at 5 p.m. in a loser's bracket game.

The temperature is forecast to hit 100 degrees.

Stricklin said Bores (9-3, 3.35 ERA) has been consistent since KSU's 10-4 loss at Pepperdine on March 18, when he gave up seven earned runs and 11 hits in four innings as his record dropped to 3-2. It is Bores' first season with the Golden Flashes after he transferred from Cuyahoga Community College. Bores spent his first year in college at Ohio University.

Stricklin allowed Bores and No. 1 starter David Starn to fly home early from California to rest for a three-game series against Northern Illinois. But before Bores left, Stricklin challenged him in front of the team.

“I don't think he was very happy with me, but he agreed with me,” Stricklin said Sunday after KSU's practice at Bellevue East High School. “He had a long flight back and about four days to think about it.

“When you're the new guy, you always want to do well and impress the people around you. Sometimes when it doesn't happen, you want everyone to realize you're upset about it. That's what I told Ryan, ‘Everyone knows you want to get it done. You don't need to show everybody.' Ever since then, he's been lights out.”

Drafted by the Texas Rangers in the 27th round this month and in the 26th round last year, Bores said he will rely on his two-seam fastball and hope to get the Gators to ground out.

“It's like a sinker for me,” he said. “I get a lot of ground balls and keep my pitch count down.”

He said the largest crowd he's pitched in front of was 7,000 for the Madison (Wis.) Mallards in the Northwoods League. For Saturday's 8-1 loss to Arkansas, 23,980 filled TD Ameritrade Park.

“I played about half the season there last summer,” Bores said. “My first game there I was pretty nervous, but after you do it once. … Whatever was there yesterday, that was insane.”

Notes

Stricklin said he would not hesitate to use No. 3 starter Tyler Skulina of Walsh Jesuit for an inning against Florida if necessary. “Anything and everything to try to win this game,” Stricklin said. … Stricklin's 8-year-old son Cale displayed his switch-hitting skills before practice. Stricklin said he convinced Cale to try hitting from the left side when he was 3 by telling him “Spiderman bats left-handed.” … Second baseman Derek Toadvine on the challenge of facing Florida: “We're the underdogs already. We don't really have too much to lose. We get to play loose.”

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News Headline: Kent State in must-win situation (Stricklin) | Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Ridenour, Marla
News OCR Text: BELLEVUE, Neb. _ Ryan Bores has already pitched what Kent State coach Scott Stricklin called the biggest game of the season.

That was a 7-3 complete-game victory over Purdue in the Gary, Ind., regional, which followed a 7-6, 21-inning marathon triumph over Kentucky.

So Stricklin believes the junior right-hander can handle the daunting task Monday night as the Golden Flashes (46-19) face elimination in the College World Series. They take on top-seeded Florida (47-19) at 5 p.m. in a loser's bracket game.

The temperature is forecast to hit 100 degrees.

Stricklin said Bores (9-3, 3.35 ERA) has been consistent since KSU's 10-4 loss at Pepperdine on March 18, when he gave up seven earned runs and 11 hits in four innings as his record dropped to 3-2. It is Bores' first season with the Golden Flashes after he transferred from Cuyahoga Community College. Bores spent his first year in college at Ohio University.

Stricklin allowed Bores and No. 1 starter David Starn to fly home early from California to rest for a three-game series against Northern Illinois. But before Bores left, Stricklin challenged him in front of the team.

"I don't think he was very happy with me, but he agreed with me," Stricklin said Sunday after KSU's practice at Bellevue East High School. "He had a long flight back and about four days to think about it.

"When you're the new guy, you always want to do well and impress the people around you. Sometimes when it doesn't happen, you want everyone to realize you're upset about it. That's what I told Ryan, 'Everyone knows you want to get it done. You don't need to show everybody.' Ever since then, he's been lights out."

Drafted by the Texas Rangers in the 27th round this month and in the 26th round last year, Bores said he will rely on his two-seam fastball and hope to get the Gators to ground out.

"It's like a sinker for me," he said. "I get a lot of ground balls and keep my pitch count down."

He said the largest crowd he's pitched in front of was 7,000 for the Madison (Wis.) Mallards in the Northwoods League. For Saturday's 8-1 loss to Arkansas, 23,980 filled TD Ameritrade Park.

"I played about half the season there last summer," Bores said. "My first game there I was pretty nervous, but after you do it once. . . . Whatever was there yesterday, that was insane."

Notes

Stricklin said he would not hesitate to use No. 3 starter Tyler Skulina of Walsh Jesuit for an inning against Florida if necessary. "Anything and everything to try to win this game," Stricklin said. . . . Stricklin's 8-year-old son Cale displayed his switch-hitting skills before practice. Stricklin said he convinced Cale to try hitting from the left side when he was 3 by telling him "Spiderman bats left-handed." . . . Second baseman Derek Toadvine on the challenge of facing Florida: "We're the underdogs already. We don't really have too much to lose. We get to play loose."

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News Headline: Kent State's Derek Toadvine playing for two (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BELLEVUE, Neb.: When Dave Toadvine arrived at a Kent State alumni reception Saturday before the Golden Flashes' College World Series debut, a murmur went through the crowd.

Most KSU baseball supporters thought they would never see the 62-year-old retired truck driver from Springfield again. The grandfather and surrogate father of sophomore second baseman Derek Toadvine had been rushed to the hospital by ambulance after the Golden Flashes captured the regional championship June 3 in Gary, Ind.

“We thought we'd lost him right there,” Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said Sunday.

“I know Dave with a baseball hat and glasses on. He looked so bad I didn't even recognize him.”

Already scheduled for angioplasty and warned to avoid stress, Dave Toadvine was making his way to the field from his seat as players and fans celebrated the 3-2 victory over Kentucky that sent KSU to its first NCAA super regional.

Then he felt a pain he still struggles to explain.

“It shot straight through my heart, like somebody had a knife they kept sticking in my chest,” he said. “I couldn't breathe.”

Heather Toadvine heard someone yell for water, but had no idea it was for her father.

“The kids were jumping all over; parents were coming down,” she said. “I don't know if all the anxiety and emotion took over. It was very crowded down there; it was hot.”

When the rescue squad arrived, Dave Toadvine said, he had to be carried up about 20 steps. He received oxygen, intravenous fluids, nitroglycerin and pain medication on the way to the hospital.

“When I got to the hospital, the pain started coming back,” he said. “Then the nitro kicked in.”

Derek went to the hospital as well. Amazingly, Dave Toadvine was released after a few hours. Derek was able to rejoin his teammates for their postgame celebration at a restaurant in Gary.

“It was kinda scary, but I'm still here,” Dave Toadvine said by phone Sunday.

Experience of a lifetime

To watch the grandson he introduced to the game of baseball, some might say Dave Toadvine is still flirting with death.

He needs surgery to have a stent inserted in his heart, but he pushed the date back until July 9 so he can be with Derek for the experience of a lifetime. Armed with his nitro prescription, he came to Omaha with his wife Dottie and daughter Heather, along with the parents of Derek's girlfriend, who are doctors.

“No money would stop me from doing it,” Dave Toadvine said. “Just the thrill of it.”

He watched Saturday's 8-1 loss to Arkansas at TD Ameritrade Park and, God willing, he will be in the stands tonight at 5 p.m. as the Golden Flashes (46-19) face elimination in a loser's bracket game against top-seeded Florida (47-19).

“We're all on the edge of our seats because he likes to wander around,” Heather Toadvine said by phone. “We say, ‘Don't go far.' ”

Derek said his grandfather is not defying doctor's orders, but he would if it had come to that.

“Even if they did, he would still be here, regardless,” Derek said Sunday after practice at Bellevue East High School. “He's stubborn. Who knows if we'll be back here next year or the year after that? He would never miss something like this.”

Dave Toadvine has three grandchildren, but Derek was his first.

“Grandparents shouldn't have favorites, but I'm definitely his favorite,” Derek said. “I'm like his pride and joy.

I'm the first person in my family to go to college. He's super proud of me.”

Growing up with baseball

When Derek was 5, Dave Toadvine started taking Derek out in the backyard to play catch. Heather and Derek lived on Morgan Street, a few houses away from Dave and Dottie. Derek's great-grandmother, Gladys Woodruff, lived on Morgan, too.

Dave Toadvine said his son had never enjoyed the game and he loved the fact that Derek did. Soon they were going to the batting cage.

“I would stay at his house five of the seven days of the week,” Derek said. “I spent all my time there, regardless of what I was doing, hanging out with friends.”

After the sixth grade, Derek said he convinced his mother to move into the county so he could attend Kenton Ridge High School with the friends he'd played Little League and travel baseball with since he was 6.

“My grandpa was 10 or 15 minutes away,” Derek said. “But it wasn't the same as walking up the street and spending the night over there.”

Now for Kent State home games, Derek said, Dave will drive three hours each way, then do it again the next day if necessary.

“He doesn't even stay in a hotel. It's not like money's an issue; he likes driving,” Derek said of his grandfather, who retired in 2006.

Dave Toadvine called Derek “an amazing baseball player,” proudly pointing out that he'll play summer ball in Cape Cod.

“Pro baseball is a long shot, but you never know,” Dave Toadvine said.

Regardless of what happens against Florida, Derek will not let the outcome affect his love for the game, a game he might not have taken seriously if not for those special days in the backyard with his grandfather.

“I'm not just doing this for myself. I'm doing it for him,” Derek said. “He's living his dream, too, just watching me succeed.”

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News Headline: Kent State baseball notebook: CWS trip earns new lights at Schoonover Stadium (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb.: This fall, Kent State's baseball team will see a tangible result of its first trip to the College World Series.

KSU president Lester Lefton said Saturday he's signed the paperwork for the installation of lights at Schoonover Stadium. Lefton estimated the expenditure at $500,000 to $1 million.

“It's something that's long been needed,” Lefton said during Kent State's opening 8-1 loss to Arkansas at TD Ameritrade Park. “It's the first of a series of installments of our investment in baseball. We're clearly showing we've got a national-caliber team, a national-caliber coach, and we need to have national-caliber facilities. We're part of the way there; we're going to go the rest of the way.”

Schoonover Stadium underwent $4 million in renovations between 2005 and 2007. As for what “the rest of the way” means, Lefton said Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen and baseball coach Scott Stricklin should come up with “a series of strategic things we should be doing for us to continue to come back here every year.”

“He called me when we were on the field celebrating at Oregon,” Stricklin said. “When the president calls, you pick it up.

“We've got some things to do at Kent State, some things to build. That's what we've talked about from Day One that I've been here. It's been eight years. We want to continue to build and get bigger and better. Just because we're here doesn't mean we're going to stop.”

Nielsen said schools do not get a share of revenue like in the NCAA basketball tournament. But the university will receive some money from merchandise sales.

“I'm real curious to see next quarter's report,” Nielsen said. “The guys on the radio were doing a snapshot of these tents and they said the two biggest sellers were Stony Brook and Kent State.”

Lefton said lights should help Stricklin in recruiting and scheduling.

“We've got some very strong supporters of baseball, of coach Stricklin and our team and I'm going to try to reprioritize some internal resources to get this done as a vote of confidence and a thank you to make it easier for the coach to recruit,” Lefton said. “Win, lose or draw today, getting here is very important. It shows we've got the stuff to compete at a national level.”

Bagoly's mother dies

The “CM” sticker worn by Kent State players on their caps and helmets was in memory of Jason Bagoly's mother Cheryl McHenry, who passed away unexpectedly Thursday night. A junior catcher from Austintown Fitch, Bagoly elected to stay with the team because funeral arrangements have not been finalized.

“We all feel awful for Jason,” Stricklin said. “We gave him the option if he wanted to fly home, but most of his family's here and his second family, his team, is here.”

Bagoly was on deck to bat in the ninth inning when the game ended on George Roberts' double-play grounder to short and T.J. Sutton's groundout.

“He's going to get an at-bat for sure on Monday. He's been a great hitter for us,” Stricklin said of Bagoly, hitting .264. “Our prayers are with his family and our thoughts are with him. He's gotten a lot of hugs from our kids the last couple days. We love him to death and he loves us back because he wants to stay with us.”

Toasting Cribbs

Lisa Skulina didn't think she could afford a trip to the College World Series. A 49-year-old single working mother, she wanted to follow her son Tyler, a Walsh Jesuit product who pitches third in Kent State's starting rotation. Then about 10:45 p.m. Thursday, she got a call from Josh Cribbs' assistant. Two spots on the bus chartered by the Browns receiver had become available, the $150 price tag also covering a hotel room and game ticket. Lisa Skulina and her 24-year-old daughter Amanda had to be ready to board the bus at 7:30 Friday morning.

Lisa and Amanda Skulina were among a crowd of more than 400 KSU fans that packed the second floor of the Old Mattress Factory Bar and Grille for an alumni reception before Saturday's game. Many wore “Flash Mob” T-shirts with “Team Cribbs” on the back, given to those on the bus. Cribbs didn't make the journey, which took 16 hours, including two food stops, but climbed aboard to give a pre-trip speech and shook everyone's hands before it left. The former KSU quarterback flew in Saturday evening. Also in attendance was Ben Curtis, the 2003 British Open champion from Stow.

Joe Chaffin, 19, and Cory Carney, 19, both of Creston and Norwayne High School, were among those who survived the bus ride, arriving at 11:30 p.m. Friday.

“It was rowdy times 10,” Carney said.

“I slept in 20-minute naps,” Chaffin said. “There weren't very many dull moments.”

Chaffin has been amazed at the television cameras following them, including ESPN.

“Everyone comes up and says, ‘Were you on the Cribbs' bus? We're famous,” Chaffin said.

KSU graduates Liz Sauer, 26, and her friend Mandy Grodin, 33, thought about driving from Cleveland before buying tickets on the bus. Sauer is one of four members of the athletic department grounds crew.

“It was a party,” Grodin said. “Iowa was very long.”

'92 reunion

Several members of the 1992 Golden Flashes baseball team were among those at the reception. They played with Stricklin, an All-Mid-American Conference catcher in 1992 and '93.

“We all knew Scott was building the program the last couple years, especially last year beating Texas,” said Sean Freeman, a former KSU first baseman from Ashtabula, in reference to the 2011 NCAA Tournament. “I'm happy and exhilarated. But surprised? Not really.”

Kevin Zellers, a former third baseman from Cleveland who now lives in Dallas, has been paying close attention to KSU's NCAA games on television.

“It's almost like you're there with Scott,” Zellers said. “You fully understand what's going on. When a guy was picked off first base, I knew that was coming.”

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News Headline: Arkansas 8, Kent State 1: Flashes starter David Starn struggles against patient batters, walks six (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb.: The two darlings of the College World Series could be going home quickly.

On Saturday, Kent State's first trip to Omaha was spoiled with an 8-1 opening-game loss to Arkansas.

On Monday at 5 p.m., the Golden Flashes (46-19) will face either top-seeded Florida or two-time defending champion South Carolina. Those two, who squared off in Saturday's second game, have a combined 19 trips to Omaha.

“Experience is one thing, but the talent's the other,” KSU coach Scott Stricklin said of his two possible foes. “Those teams are loaded. You can't wish for one or the other.”

On Friday, national underdog and fellow CWS rookie Stony Brook was summarily dispatched, drubbed 9-1 by 2011 runner-up UCLA. Today, the Long Island school takes on Florida State, making its 21st appearance in Omaha.

KSU starter David Starn (11-4), a senior from Walsh Jesuit, struggled for the second consecutive start. After walking a career-high seven in a victory over Oregon in the super regional, Starn issued six free passes against Arkansas. In the first inning, when he walked three of the first four batters, eight of his first 11 pitches were balls.

“His arm speed has not been there the last couple outings,” KSU pitching coach Mike Birkbeck said of Starn, recently drafted in the seventh round by the Atlanta Braves.

“It was basically just a flaw in my mechanics. I wasn't really finishing my pitches. It's just running away from me a little bit,” Starn said, echoing what he'd said Friday about his outing against Oregon. “I wasn't really nervous coming into the game. Coach Birkbeck came in after the first inning and we talked about it. I thought I got it a little bit under control as the game went on. Arkansas is a great hitting team and they took advantage of a couple mistakes.”

Starn escaped the shaky first by allowing just one run, with senior shortstop Jimmy Rider minimizing the damage with an inning-ending double play. The Razorbacks also touched Starn for a run in the second, with No. 9 hitter Jake Wise rapping his second home run of the season to left field, and one in the fifth on an RBI single to right by designated hitter Joe Serrano.

For the Golden Flashes, the turning point came after Rider put KSU on the board with a solo home run down the left-field line in the top of the sixth.

Starn retired the first two batters, then gave up a double over the third-base bag to second baseman Bo Bigham and walked left fielder Derrick Bleeker. To the plate came center fielder Matt Vinson, whom Starn had struck out his previous two times up.

“That was his last hitter,” Stricklin said. “Coach Birkbeck was ready to bring him out, bring in Ryan Mace, right on right, and I told him, ‘This guy hadn't had a good look on David all night. Let's keep him in there.' ”

Vinson responded with a two-run double to the left-field corner, giving Arkansas a 5-1 lead.

“I take credit for that 5-1,” Stricklin said. “That's on me.”

Stricklin also credited Arkansas for its patience at the plate against Starn.

“David faced 26 hitters and only two of them swung at the first pitch,” Stricklin said. “I think that was the key.

“They got ahead in the count. They had the plan to stay patient. David gets a lot of swings and misses on first pitches that are balls. They had a good scouting report.”

Kent State mustered only three hits off Arkansas starter D.J. Baxendale, who had allowed a total of nine runs in his two previous starts. Going 6⅓ innings, Baxendale (8-5) walked one and struck out five.

“He threw a lot of first-pitch strikes,” Rider said. “On that [home run] swing, I was looking for a fastball and that was probably the one pitch he left up all night.”

Stricklin coached Baxendale last summer on USA Baseball's Collegiate National Team.

“D.J. Baxendale was outstanding,” Stricklin said. “He kept us off-balance. His fastball was sharp and he threw the breaking ball behind in the count. Knowing him from the summer we told our guys, ‘He's really going to compete,' and he was on, too.”

After Rider's homer, Kent State's best threat came in the seventh, when T.J. Sutton singled and Nick Hamilton walked. Sawyer Polen advanced the runners with a groundout to short, but Alex Miklos flew out to center to end the inning.

Stricklin wants the Golden Flashes to enjoy the trip to Omaha, but looks for a more determined effort Monday.

“We've got to make sure that we're not just happy to be here,” Stricklin said. “We want to compete and get some wins and make a run at it. It's still possible. We're still here. But playing [one] of those two teams, lots of talent, lots of experience, it's going to be a tough task.”

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News Headline: Marla Ridenour: Pitcher David Starn keeps making Kent State look smart (Sricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, NEB.: When he first watched David Starn pitch, Kent State coach Scott Stricklin was so unimpressed that he asked a 7-year-old what he thought.

The 7-year-old didn't like Starn, either.

When Stricklin told that story Thursday during a new conference at the College World Series, it was more of an indictment of himself and his reliance on the radar gun. He had no idea the left-hander from Hudson would become KSU's most decorated pitcher, drawing the start today in the biggest game in school history.

But that day on the mound for Walsh Jesuit High School, Starn hit only 79 to 81 mph on the radar gun. Stricklin said every time he came to see Starn his senior year, the reading never varied.

It was time to decide whether he should offer Starn a scholarship, so Stricklin scrutinized Starn alongside then-University of Akron assistant Brian Donohew and his son.

“I looked at the 7-year-old and said, ‘Do you like that pitcher?' ” Stricklin recalled. “He looked me in the eye and he goes, ‘No.' And I said, ‘You know what? I agree with you.' ”

There would be no scholarship, from Kent State or anyone else, even after Walsh Jesuit captured the state championship. But fortunately for Stricklin, Starn wanted to stay close to home. Driving back from a visit to Marietta, Starn called KSU pitching coach Mike Birkbeck and said, “I'd like to come to Kent State if you still want me.”

The Golden Flashes wanted him — as a walk-on.

“That's the best decision we ever made and actually he made the decision,” Stricklin said. “That's like the Patriots taking credit for Tom Brady. They drafted him in the sixth round, they passed him up five times. We passed up David, too, like everybody else.

“He's made us look smart for four years.”

Starn's walk-on status lasted only one year. As a freshman, Starn earned a save in the NCAA Tournament against Cal-Poly. Pitching well in the offseason program, he earned a spot in the starting rotation as a sophomore.

Since then, Starn has never feared the big stage, even last year against Texas in the NCAA Tournament. That bravado will be tested today (5 p.m., ESPN) as Kent State opens its first College World Series against Arkansas with Starn on the mound.

The 2012 Mid-American Conference Pitcher of the Year and a Louisville Slugger second-team All-American, Starn has set Kent State career records in pitching victories (29), strikeouts (343) and innings pitched (335⅓). This season, he's 11-3 with a 2.21 ERA with 123 strikeouts in 114 innings. During a 21-game winning streak that was snapped last weekend against Oregon, Starn went 7-0 with a 2.19 ERA and 48 strikeouts.

On April 6 when he became KSU's strikeout king, Starn struck out a career-high 12 against Buffalo, including nine of the first 16 batters. He surpassed the total of 274 career strikeouts by Dirk Hayhurst (2000-03).

Totally unaware of the story Stricklin told Thursday until afterward, Starn wasn't the least bit embarrassed.

“Absolutely not,” he said. “I'm here where I am today, so I have nothing to be ashamed about.”

Neither is he self-conscious about his radar gun readings, even though he said he's hit 88 twice this season. Stricklin said he's usually between 82-85 mph.

“I don't feel like anything's changed in my pitching,” Starn said. “I still don't throw that hard.”

The Atlanta Braves don't seem to care, selecting him in the seventh round earlier this month.

“They told me they don't scout with the gun, they just look at how you pitch,” Starn said. “So I think it's a good fit.”

Now when Stricklin looks at Starn, he sees Jamie Moyer. A sixth-round pick in 1984, Moyer pitched in the majors until he was 49, cut last month by Colorado Rockies.

“The radar's never gotten anybody out. We say that all the time, but we still take it with us,” Stricklin said. “If a guy throws 80 mph, it's ‘Oh, geez.' David is not going to throw it by you, he can just pitch.

“The big-league equivalent to him is Jamie Moyer. David has the same kind of stuff.”

Stricklin might have been wondering where that stuff was during Starn's last outing. Starn walked a career-high seven against Oregon, but still picked up the victory as KSU hung on for a 7-6 triumph in the three-game NCAA Super Regional series opener in Eugene.

Stricklin attributed Starn's walks to a problem adjusting to the mound. Birkbeck said Starn was not finishing his pitches, a minor mechanical glitch that Birkbeck said was straightened out earlier this week.

“That's about as bad as he can pitch and we still beat the No. 5 team in the country on the road,” Stricklin said. “He still won the game.

“That is the greatest story about David Starn. When he's bad, he's better than most. When he's good, he's better than anybody.”

Starn's success shows scouts — and not just those in baseball — that it's not all about the measurables. Radar gun readings may draw oohs and aahs at major-league ballparks. But if miles per hour were everything, Starn, Stricklin and the Golden Flashes might not have reached their mecca

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News Headline: Grandpa skips angioplasty to back Golden Flashes at College World Series (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — Kent State's baseball team has never been alone during its drive to the College World Series.

A special group of road warriors have travelled almost every mile with the Golden Flashes, from the season's start in Georgia, to early-season stops in California and New Mexico, through the outposts that make up the Mid-American Conference, and finally through this thrilling postseason stretch that reached Omaha.

“We've always had a really good following,” said Kent State head coach Scott Stricklin. “Our parents have always been really good, but obviously it's gotten even better as we progressed. I'm speechless about the following we have now.”

That large following includes Richard Clark, the father of Kent State freshman closer Brian Clark, who has been in the stands for all but four games during his son's freshman season.

“So far I've put 32,000 miles on my car, and that's not including flights to places like California and Oregon,” said Clark, who lives in Munroe Falls “The only games I've missed were the trip to New Mexico.”

At least one member of third baseman Sawyer Polen's family has been to every game, again with the exception of the series at New Mexico, during his first year with the Flashes.

“We aren't big travelers, so I had to tell my son thanks for this ride,” said Bruce Polen, of Wooster. “I never would have gone to California, or to Oregon. I never even knew what was in Oregon. I may never get there again. But for three days last week (during the NCAA Super Regional) we were important there.

“And until now, I never knew where Omaha was, even though I always wanted to go to a College World Series game. Now to be here with a son on the team? I can use all of the adjectives in the world. Phenomenal. Fantastic. Wonderful. The ride of a lifetime. But those are just words. It's so much more than that.”

The story that has all of Kent State's extended family talking this week is David Toadvine, the grandfather of sophomore second baseman Derek Toadvine. Two weeks ago, David suffered a heart attack in Gary, Ind. as the Flashes celebrated their NCAA Regional championship-clinching victory over Kentucky.

“I guess I had a little anxiety attack and passed out,” said the 64-year-old Toadvine. “When I came around, they told me I had a heart attack.”

Now he is in Omaha after postponing an angioplasty procedure that had been scheduled for June 20.

“Dave put a scare into us,” said Stricklin. “We had just finished celebrating the win over Kentucky and we were all elated.”

But then Stricklin noticed a Kent State fan sitting in a wheelchair.

“I didn't recognize him he looked so bad,” Stricklin said. “I found out later who it was and it broke my heart. We thought we lost him right there.”

Fortunately, Dr. Richard and Juliana Furay are among the road warriors who make up this team's extended family. The parents of Toadvine's girlfriend happen to be surgeons from the Toadvines' hometown of Springfield. Both were in the stands in Gary to help David, and they are in Omaha this week.

“Just in case, I have the nitroglycerin tablets,” said Dorothy Toadvine, David's wife. “Even if the doctors had said David couldn't come to Omaha, I know he would have come anyway.”

It was David who introduced his grandson to the game of baseball when Derek was age five. Since then, he has rarely missed any of Derek's games or even a practice during a career that included three all-conference seasons at Kenton Ridge High School and a starting job at second base in his first two seasons in Kent.

“Grandparents shouldn't have favorites, but I'm definitely his favorite,” said Derek, the oldest of David's three grandchildren.

“I'm like his pride and joy … I'm the first person in our family to go to college. I know he is really proud of that.

“I'm really happy he is here. And I'm not surprised. Who knows if we'll be back next year or the year after. He would never miss something like this.”

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News Headline: Kent State Notebook: Stricklin doesn't plan to change Kent State's course after trip to College World Series (Nielsen, Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — Kent State coach Scott Stricklin loves the exposure the Golden Flashes are getting at the College World Series, yet he doesn't expect to capitalize on it going forward.

The players he likes to recruit already know about his program. Of the 27 players on the CWS roster, 21 are homegrown Ohioans. The rest are from next door in Pennsylvania.

Like other teams in the North, Kent State doesn't practice outdoors much, or at all, until March. The Flashes share an indoor practice facility with the football team and play on a field with artificial turf.

This year the Flashes played their first 18 games on the road before their March 23 home opener. Twelve-hour bus rides to the South are common early in the season.

Stricklin said he looks for kids who have a toughness and competitiveness about them.

Shortstop Jimmy Rider of Venetia, Pa., who homered for Kent State's only run against Arkansas on Saturday, embodies the team's personality, athletic director Joel Nielsen said.

“We were his only Division I offer,” Nielsen said. “Now he's the all-time hits leader at Kent State and in the MAC. He's still a size-7 (shoe) and 160 pounds soaking wet.”

Nielsen signed Stricklin to a six-year contract last July that pays him a base salary of $145,000.

“He's got a great reputation in (northeast Ohio) and he has a method and a program that just works for us and for this area,” Nielsen said.

Kent State (46-19) will play No. 1 national seed Florida (47-19) in an elimination game Monday.

To be matched against a Southeastern Conference power and the 2011 national runner-up in mid-June means Kent State has gotten the most out of the mere $720,000 a year it spends on baseball.

“We're already known as a regional power in the Midwest,” Stricklin said. “What this does is it puts us more on the national radar, a little more awareness of what we've been able to accomplish.”

SHARING A RIDE

Pac-12 co-champions Arizona and UCLA were opponents Sunday night after being travel partners last week.

The teams shared a charter flight to Omaha.

Everyone got a long fine. But Arizona coach Andy Lopez said he had to rein in his wife, who attended UCLA and spent a lot of time reminiscing with UCLA folks about her college days.

“I said, ‘Hey, we're getting paid by Arizona. What are you doing?' “ Lopez said.

HOT HOG ARMS AND BATS

Arkansas pitchers have allowed just one earned run on nine hits over 19 innings spanning the super regional-clinching win over Baylor and Saturday's 8-1 victory over Kent State.

The game against Kent State marked a big improvement offensively for the Razorbacks, who had been held to one run or less in five of eight games since the Southeastern Conference tournament.

No one is hotter than freshman Joe Serrano, who is batting .588 in the NCAA tournament after going 3 for 3 with a sacrifice against Kent State. Serrano entered regionals batting .262. He's now at .356.

“It's a big part of us being here,” coach Dave Van Horn said.

South Carolina believes it will be facing an Arkansas team that's peaking on Monday night.

“Arkansas is a great team. We saw that when we went to Fayetteville,” center fielder Evan Marzilli said. “They have a bunch of guys out of the pen that throw hard and some really good hitters. Just like every other SEC game that we have, it's going to be a tough one. So we'll be ready.”

ONE AT A TIME

Don't bother asking Florida coach Kevin O'Sullivan how he figures to get the Gators back to the best-of-three finals. After losing 7-3 to South Carolina on Saturday, the Gators must win four games, starting Monday against Kent State. Hudson Randall (9-2) will start.

“I'm not going to look too far ahead,” O'Sullivan said. “We've got a game on Monday. That's all I'm concerned about. We got Hudson and we got a lot of our pen left. And then we'll take it one game at a time. Once you're in the loser's bracket you can't look too far ahead.”

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News Headline: Loyal Kent State fans gather to cheer Golden Flashes in College World Series | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The crowd at the Waterstreet Tavern in Kent cheered when Jimmy Rider, shortstop for the Kent State Golden Flashes, got a home run.

A few minutes later the cheers turned to groans as the Arkansas Razorbacks got two runs on a long hit up the third base line.

While the Golden Flashes lost their first game in the College World Series Saturday, it wasn't for lack of emotional support.

More than a hundred Kent State fans of all ages and from all around crowded the Water Street Tavern downtown Saturday to cheer on the Flashes' first appearance in the series.

Mike Cohen, class of ‘70, said he drove in from his home in Bath for the game.

“I figured this was the place to come and watch the game, right?” he said.

Alum Handy Lampley of Hudson watched the televisions above the bar.

“I'd rather be out there, really,” he said, keeping his eye on the play.

Cathy and John Sopko of Kent watched from a corner booth. Cathy is a self-described “townie.”

“We've been waiting to see friends (on television) who went to the game.”

Cathy Sopko was among the cheering crowd when Rider hit his homer.

“We've been waiting for them to come alive,” she said.

Down at the other end of the bar, Molly Headley of Canton watched with her son, Greg, and daughter-in-law Kerie, who are both Class of ‘01.

In lulls in the action on TV, there was the usual barroom chatter: talk about summer activities, past athletic wins and loses.

Over by Cajun Dave's Matt and Nate Wilson had their backs to the room, watching the televised game intently. Nate just graduated in May while Matt said he's a grad school graduate, class of ‘04. They drove in from out of town just to experience the game at the tavern.

“We're happy to be cheering for the team,” said Nate, who's been following KSU baseball for the last couple years.

The appearance in the series “is great for Kent,” Matt said.

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News Headline: Kent State President Lester Lefton announces new lights for Schoonover Stadium (Lefton, Stricklin, Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — The first of the spoils for Kent State's dream 2012 baseball season will be realized in the form of new lights at Schoonover Stadium.

Reaching the College World Series for the first time has inspired the university to make the first of what KSU president Lester Lefton said will be several major investments in the Golden Flashes' baseball program.

“To acknowledge and celebrate the achievement of coach (Scott) Stricklin and his team, I called him last week and told him I just signed the pieces of paper to put in a new lighting system at our stadium that will go in the fall,” Lefton said. “It's something that has long been needed. I see this as the first of a series of installments in our investment in baseball.

“We are clearly showing we have a national caliber team, a national caliber coach, and we need to have national-caliber facilities. We are part of the way there, but we are going to go the rest of the way.”

Lefton could not guess at what it would cost to add lights to Schoonover, but preliminary estimates range between $500,000 and $1 million.

“We have some various strong (financial) supporters of baseball, of coach Stricklin and our team,” Lefton said. “And I'm going to try and reprioritize some internal resources to get this done as a vote of confidence, thank you, and to make it easier for the coach to continue to recruit students from throughout Ohio or where he decides to recruit.

“We have some great kids that are local talent, from Hudson, from Hoban. I think it's unbelievable the kind of talent he has been able to bring out of the local community and bring us to the College World Series.”

Stricklin received Lefton's call on the field at Oregon's PK Park as the Flashes were celebrating their Super Regional victory.

“My phone rang and it was the president,” said Stricklin. “When the president calls, you pick it up. He said congratulations and we are putting up lights for you.

“We've got some things to do at Kent State. Some things to build. That's what we talked about from day one since I've been here. It's been eight years and we want to continue to build and get bigger and better. Just because we are (in Omaha) doesn't mean we are going to stop. We are going to keep getting great players to come to Kent State. Hopefully we can play on television a few more times and let those players in Northeast Ohio and Western Pennsylvania watch us a little bit more.”

Olga Mural Field at Schoonover Stadium opened in 2005 and has several additions over the years. Including recent additions, the stadium at its current form cost over $4 million.

“President Lefton approved a facilities master plan (for athletics) when I arrived,” said KSU athletic director Joel Nielsen. “We recently completed the (plan) and there have always been strategic elements for baseball.”

The Flashes success on the diamond in 2012 has encouraged KSU to move up its plans with baseball.

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News Headline: College World Series Notebook: Golden Flashes play with heavy hearts as tragedy hits Kent State family (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — Kent State played its first College World Series game with a heavy heart after learning the mother of junior catcher Jason Bagoly had died unexpectedly late Thursday evening.

The Golden Flashes' players wore white stickers on their hats with the initials “CM” printed in purple to remember the life of Cheryl McHenry on Saturday at TD Ameritrade Park in Omaha.

Bagoly, of Austintown, was in uniform during the Flashes' 8-1 loss to Arkansas.

“We all feel awful for Jason,” said KSU coach Scott Stricklin. “We gave Jason the option to do whatever he wanted to do, if he wanted to fly home. But the fact is most of his family is here. And then his second family, his team, is here. He made the decision that there was nothing he could do if he went home. Arrangements are still being made and he'd end up wishing he was back here with his teammates.”

Bagoly, who high school ball at Austintown Fitch, is hitting .264 this season in 91 at-bats spread over 33 games, including 24 starts.

He was on deck waiting to pinch-hit in the ninth inning when a double play ended the game.

“We really wanted to get him an at-bat today,” Stricklin said after the game. “He is definitely going to get an at-bat on Monday.”

The Flashes will play either Florida or South Carolina in an elimination game at 5 p.m. EDT on Monday.

“Our prayers are with Jason's family and our thoughts are with him,” said Stricklin. “He has gotten a lot of hugs from our kids the last couple days. We love him to death and he loves us back because he wants to stay with us.”

FACES IN THE CROWD

The blue-and-gold Kent State T-shirts started pouring into the Old Mattress Bar and Grill a little more than two hours before the first pitch of the Golden Flashes' first College World Series game.

More than 400 KSU alums and fans mingled with the families of the Flashes' players on the second floor of the famous bar and grill located just one block south of TD Ameritrade Park.

The official pregame party hosted by the university gave old friends, former teammates and classmates the chance to reconnect and celebrate Kent State's historic season before making their way down 13th street to the ballpark gates.

In one corner of the bar, 1980-81 KSU baseball co-captain Jeff Kurtz shared a hug with Melanie Spiroff, a 2012 Kent State grad and the daughter of Kurtz' classmate and co-captain George Spiroff.

“George was a catcher and the first All-American for Kent State after Thurman Munson, but most of all he was a great teammate and a fantastic guy,” said Kurtz, who is the longtime public-address voice of the Flashes at both the M.A.C. Center and Dix Stadium. “He passed away unexpectedly about four years ago. When I saw Melanie walk in the bar, we just hugged and cried and talked about how much her dad would have loved to be here.”

Melanie Spiroff made the snap decision to make the trip to Omaha on the bus organized by KSU alum and Cleveland Browns wide receiver Joshua Cribbs.

“It will be four years in August since my dad died, and I can't imagine spending this weekend any other way,” said Spiroff, who lives in Kent but will be attending medical school at the University of Texas. “I feel blessed to get this gift the same year I graduated.

“The program meant so much to my father. I grew up around the program. I started crying when I saw Jeff, and I know if my dad was here with us, he'd be crying right next to us seeing the team he loved in the College World Series.”

GET OFF THE BUS

When the “Flash Mob” from the @TeamCribbs bus arrived from its 16-hour tour, some of the 46 passengers who disembarked found their way to “the Blatt.” From TD Ameritrade Park's home plate, the bar is about a 450-foot shot straight down the right-field line.

Former and current KSU students Keith Potoczak, Jay Bell and Ryan Orr of Cleveland; Britton Miller and Billy Hostetler of Wooster; and Michelle Martinez of Valley View were part of that mob scene.

For alums Potoczak and Bell, celebrating a Cinderella Kent State story is not a new experience. They were KSU students when the Flashes' men's basketball team made it to the Elite Eight in 2002.

“This feels a lot like that Elite Eight run,” said Potoczak. “That was a pretty good party. We watched the first game against Pittsburgh at the (Phi Sigma Kappa) fraternity, and then the next game we were on spring break. But this, being able to come down here and cheer on the baseball team is an awesome experience.

“College basketball is a little more mainstream with so many games on television. But now with people getting on the bandwagon, it's cool to see so many people enjoying this.”

Orr said they “tossed around” the idea of going to Omaha when KSU won the Super Regional on Monday. When they saw the bus deal offered by Cribbs on Twitter, “it was a done deal.”

“We called and within five minutes we were signed up and ready to go,” said Orr. “The ride was a lot of fun.”

All 46 passengers were scheduled to re-board the bus for the return trip after the game.

FUN EXPERIMENT FOR CRIBBS

Cribbs flew to Omaha from Las Vegas, arriving at TD Ameritrade Park around the fourth inning and immediately joining the crew from the bus to cheer on his alma mater.

“It's a good showing,” he said. “This is a once in a lifetime thing and I'm glad it came together to help people get out here. I actually was offered some seats up in a suite but that's not me. I'm cheering them on from here.

“(KSU baseball) Has been so good for so long, finally making it here now, I knew I didn't want to miss it. I'm glad this whole thing kind of came together.”

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News Headline: (VIDEO/GALLERY) Kent State baseball team falls to Arkansas in College World Series | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. – Cinderella took another sucker punch to the gut at the College World Series as Kent State suffered through a painful 8-1 loss to Arkansas on Saturday at TD Ameritrade Park.

Kent State and Stony Brook became the feel good story of college baseball's postseason as mid-major teams from the north crashing the party in Omaha.

But one day after Stony Brook was brought back to earth in a 9-1 first-round loss to UCLA, the Golden Flashes and their ace David Starn absorbed knockout blows from the bottom of the order of what had been a struggling Razorbacks' offense.

And with Arkansas starter D.J. Baxendale almost un-hittable in 6 1/3 innings, the Flashes looked completely overmatched.

"Obviously it was disappointing we didn't feel we played our best baseball game," said Stricklin. "That's no disrespect to Arkansas. D.J. Baxendale was outstanding. He kept us off balance … He was the reason why we struggled, no question about it."

Baxendale made just one mistake, leaving a fastball up in the strike zone for Kent State shortstop Jimmy Rider to crack out of the park, a little more than 335 feet down the leftfield line. Even with that home run, the Razorbacks' junior righthander allowed just three hits in 6 1/3 inning while improving to 8-5 on the season.

Kent State didn't record its first hit against Baxendale until the fifth inning when Sawyer Polen singled with two out.

"(Baxendale) just threw strikes, and a lot of first-pitch strikes," said Rider, whose homer was his sixth of the season. "We had a good scouting report on him, but we couldn't execute on some of the pitches he made."

Brandon Moore was just as good in his 2 2/3 innings of shutout relief, allowing just one hit.

Meanwhile, the last two hitters in the Arkansas order had no trouble getting to Starn.

In the second inning, No. 9 hitter Jake Wise crushed a home run some 375 feet over the wall beyond the normally unreachable power alley in left-centerfield. Four frames later, No. 8 hitter Matt Vinson ripped a two-run double that chased Starn from the game.

For Wise, who was 2-for-3 with three RBI, the home run was just the second of his season. As for Vinson, he came into the day batting just .200 on the year.

Arkansas' hitters did just as much damage when they chose not to swing the bat. With just four of Starn's first 20 pitches going for strikes, the Razorbacks managed to load the bases in the first inning on walks to three of their first four batters. The lone "swing" by an Arkansas player during that stretch was a sacrifice bunt designated hitter Joe Serrano following Tim Carver's leadoff walk.

The early jam led to just one Razorbacks' run thanks in large part to the first of three double plays involving Rider, who was one of the few Flashes to enjoy a good day both at the plate and in the field.

Starn said his problems were due mostly to a flaw in his mechanics in the early innings. KSU associate head coach added that Starn had some "issues with his arm speed for the second game in a row."

Starn (11-4) walked seven in 6 1/3 innings but still managed to earn the win in his last start June 9 in Oregon. On Saturday, he finished with a line that included five earned runs and six walks in 5 2/3 Innings.

Stricklin said Starn's struggles were mostly due to the approach of the Arkansas' hitters.

"They hit in some pretty positive counts," said Stricklin. "What David is really good at is getting ahead and working ahead."

Instead, Starn threw just two first-pitch strikes to the 26 batters he faced.

After watching Starn struggle against Oregon, the Razorbacks came into the game with the plan of taking any pitch that was down in the strike zone.

"They had a good scouting report," said Stricklin. "They were going to make sure David threw a strike on the first pitch … His action is usually down, so any pitch that was low in the zone, they were taking."
While Starn didn't have his best stuff, Stricklin took responsibility for the last two runs charged to his ace on the Vinson double.

"Coach Birkbeck was ready to bring (Starn) out, but I told him this guy hadn't had a good look on David all night," said Stricklin, remembering Vinson's two earlier strikeouts against Starn. "Unfortunately he hit that double and made it 5-1 … We felt like we had a shot down 3-to-1, and I take (responsiblitiy for that 5-1.
"I know David wanted to stay in the game, and he battled his rear end off, gave us a chance like he has done for four years."

Now Kent State has to find a gameplan to battle back through the losers bracket, and that won't be easy with either Florida or South Carolina as the opponent in a 5 p.m. elimination game on Monday. Florida is the No. 1 team in the nation and South Carolina is the College World Series' two-time defending champions.

"I told our guys to look around," said Stricklin. "We're in Omaha. That's the positive. This team has battled so hard and no one expected us to be here … I know our guys are disappointed that we had a lot of people watching, a lot of people came out here and we want to play well for those people.

"It's disappointing, but we've got another crack at somebody on Monday."

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News Headline: (VIDEO) Kent State set for first College World Series game in program history today vs. Arkansas (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — A little over four years ago even the seven-year-old son of a University of Akron assistant coach thought Kent State should take a pass on David Starn.

Since then, Starn has gone from walk-on with the Golden Flashes, to the school's most decorated pitcher and a draft pick of the Atlanta Braves in the recent Major League First-Year Player Draft.

But before he reports to his new professional team, the Hudson native and Walsh Jesuit grad still has one more chapter to write in his amateur career when he leads the university that gave him a chance onto college baseball's biggest stage.

Today is Kent State debut in the College Baseball World Series and Starn is set to make the most important start of his career at 5 p.m. when the No. 8 Golden Flashes battle No. 6 Arkansas.

As of Friday night, Starn still didn't have a scouting report on the Razorbacks. The Flashes coaches were busy gathering some more last-minute information on their opponent from the Southeast Conference.

“We'll get the scouting report after breakfast,” he said. “I know they are going to be a good team. I've talked to the coaches and they say basically they rely on their defense and their pitching, and that in the SEC they struggled a little bit with their hitting.”

Starn didn't suffer through many of his own struggles on the mound in 2012, going 11-3 with a 2.21 ERA and earning the Mid-American Conference's pitcher of the year award. He accomplished all of that despite clocking in regularly at between 82-and-85 miles per hour with his fastball.

That would have been considered blazing for Starn when KSU head coach Scott Stricklin watched him pitch for Walsh during his senior year.

“He won the state championship in high school, but he was throwing 79-to-81,” said Stricklin. “I went to go watch him during his senior year and I was standing there with the assistant coach at the University of Akron and his seven-year-old son.”

Starn did not have a good day. In fact, it was so bad that Stricklin turned to the seven-year old and asked “do you like that pitcher?”

“He looked at me in the eye and said no,” Stricklin remembered. “And I said, you know what, I agree with you.

“David wasn't very good that day. We were there to see if we were going to offer him a scholarship. From what I saw that day, we couldn't.”

Arkansas hitters may look at Starn's mid-80s fastball and think it might be a cure for what has ailed a team that ranked just seventh in the 12-team SEC in hitting with a .273 team batting average.

“Unfortunately in baseball, players and coaches use that radar gun,” said Stricklin. “The radar gone has never gotten anyone else. (Starn) isn't going to throw it by you, but he can just pitch.”

Starn will face a Razorbacks lineup that is led by third-team All-American third baseman Matt Reynolds, who hit .338 with seven home runs and is one of just full-time starters in Arkansas' 2012 lineup to hit over .300 — the others are shortstop Tim Carver (.304) and first baseman Dominic Ficociello (.301).

“All we can do from a pitching end is make our pitches and stay true to what we are,” said KSU pitching coach and associate head coach Mike Birkbeck. “We'll see if they can adjust to what David is going to be doing. The key for him is command of the strike zone.”

Starn struggled through his last start, walking seven and allowing four earned runs in 6 1/3 innings of the Super Regional opener at Oregon. Starn still managed to leave with the lead, and the Flashes eked out a 7-6 win.

“Even when David is at his worst, he is usually good enough to give us a chance to win,” said Birkbeck. “It's been my experience that really high-level pitchers have a day when they are not as good as usual, but they tend to bounce back and put together a string of really outstanding outings.”

If Starn does bounce back as expected, look for KSU and Arkansas to find themselves locked in a low-scoring battle.

Pitching and defense are the staples of an Arkansas team that comes in with a 44-20 record and finished in second place in the SEC's West Division at 16-14 in league play. Razorbacks' junior D.J. Baxendale (7-5, 3.18 ERA) will face a KSU lineup that boasts four every-day starters hitting better than .327 — first baseman and MAC player of the year and George Roberts (.368), shortstop Jimmy Rider (.364), designated hitter Nick Hamilton (.347), and centerfielder Evan Campbell (.327). The Flashes also have T.J. Sutton at .305.

The KSU lineup has struggled of late, but still managed to take early leads in all three Super Regional meetings with Oregon.

FAMILIAR FOES

Today marks the first meeting between KSU and Arkansas on the baseball diamond, but that doesn't mean Stricklin and Arkansas coach Dave Van Horn are coming in blind for their World Series opener.

Stricklin and Von Horn served together as assistant coaches under Tim Jamieson of Missouri on the 2011 USA Baseball Collegiate National Team last summer. That team included KSU catcher David Lyon along with Baxendale, Reynolds, Ficociello of Arkansas.

“I truly believe by being around Scott this past summer, I learned a lot about him and his personality, and his make-up and the way he runs his ballclub,” said Von Horn. “It's not like Kent State came out of nowhere. They've been pretty good for a long time, and Scott's taken them to another level. He's just taken it through the roof. So we all knew about them.

“We kind of know what we are up against. And we know we're up against one of the best eight teams in the country at this time of year.”

NOT AFRAID

Arkansas is one of three SEC teams on the four-team side of the bracket that includes Kent State.

The SEC may be the best league in college baseball, but after beating fellow SEC member Kentucky in the regionals, should ease the Flashes minds about whether or not they belong in the company of Arkansas, No. 1-ranked Florida, two-time defending College World Series champion South Carolina.

“Kentucky beat Arkansas this year,” Stricklin pointed out. “And Kentucky swept South Carolina.”

And on the other side of the bracket that includes UCLA, Arizona, Stony Brook and Florida State?

“Oregon beat UCLA and Arizona,” Stricklin continued. “So, the teams we have already beaten have beaten the teams that are here. That doesn't mean anything except it means we belong here. Now that we are here, let's play for a national championship.”

FACES IN THE CROWD

Several of Kent State's most prominent alumni have made the trip to Omaha to see the Golden Flashes play in their first College World Series game.

The list includes 2003 British Open champion Ben Curtis, Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Matt Guerrier, former Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher John Van Benschoten, and Cleveland Browns wide receiver Joshua Cribbs.

Cribbs organized a bus trip for 53 KSU fans to come to Omaha from Kent.

Included in the crowd from the Cribbs bus is Tim Beech and his mother Pam Beech, both of Stow, who are the nephew and sister-in-law of Record-Courier Assistant Sports Editor Tom Hardesty. Tim Beech played high school baseball at Archbishop Hoban against KSU pitcher Tyler Skulina, when Skulina pitched for Walsh Jesuit. Tim now attends Capital University, while his mother Pam is a Streetsboro High School graduate who now works for Streetsboro City Schools.

KSU FINDS RADIO HOME FOR CWS

Kent State has struck a deal with radio station WHLO 640 AM out of Akron to broadcast games one and two of the College World Series.

The station will also stream audio of the game over mobile phones using the iHeart Radio App

Ty Linder will call all of the action.

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News Headline: Kent State Golden Flashes making history at College World Series (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — The last day of rest before a historic first appearance in a College World Series offered Kent State University's baseball team a little time to experience the history behind the amateur game's biggest event.

In a trip back through time, the Golden Flashes spent Friday morning touring Omaha's historic Rosenblatt Stadium.

Its red, yellow and royal blue grandstands are in a state of disrepair now. Weeds sprout from the dirt that once nurtured an emerald infield. And at some point in the not-too-distant future, the Omaha Zoo will spend $3 million to demolish the ballpark that served as home to several minor-league clubs since 1948 and the College World Series from 1950 to 2010.

Two years ago, the College World Series moved 2 1/2 miles away to the new 24,505-seat TD Ameritrade Park.

But for at least a little while longer, Rosenblatt is open to baseball pilgrims eager to visit the site where so many of the sports biggest names battled for the national championship.

KSU's players said they were interested in paying their respects to the 64-year-old stadium when head coach Scott Stricklin offered up the opportunity earlier in the week. But he wasn't sure how interested they really were until he saw their eyes as they arrived.

“Once they got in there, I think they really were excited,” said Stricklin, who coached in Rosenblatt in 2002 as an assistant for Georgia Tech. “It still gives you chills when you see the yellow and the red and the blue. It's the most unique place you've ever seen.”

Stricklin and associate head coach Mike Birkbeck spent $35 each on a brick with the dates of the stadium's opening and its planned demolition printed on it in white paint.

Birkbeck pitched in Rosenblatt when he played for the Milwaukee Brewers' AAA Denver affiliate some 25 years ago.

“I still have fond memories of the place,” Birkbeck said. “Times change. They certainly upgraded to a beautiful facility in TD Ameritrade Park. But Rosenblatt, the old place was just neat. I think the visit was great for our kids because they would have grown up watching the College World Series when it was played at that venue. Then to go out actually on the field and hear some of the ghosts speaking to them, I'm sure is something that they'll remember for a long time. History and legacy is very important to our sport. We always remember there was someone here before us.”

Senior pitcher David Starn gazed out at stands that used to be filled with seats and imagined what they might have looked like filled with fans during the stadium's heyday. It was just a little more than 24 hours before he is scheduled to take the mound at TD Ameritrade Park as the Flashes' starting pitcher for their 5 p.m. opener against Arkansas,

“It was awesome,” said Starn, who is a Hudson native and Walsh Jesuit High School alumnus. “You could tell that all of the history there. But it was pretty ripped up. They had all of the seats taken out and going for sale. The grass on the infield and outfield was (gone).”

Starn talked to some Omaha natives who said they wished the College World Series would have stayed in its old home.

“They loved (Rosenblatt) more than the new one,” Starn said. “They said it was a more family friendly environment and now (the College World Series) has gone kind of corporate. They miss the old place.”

Stricklin understood the sentiment, but he is of the opinion that it was time for something new in Omaha.

“I love old places like Fenway Park and I love Wrigley Field, but I also love Progressive Field (in Cleveland) and the other new parks as well,” Stricklin said. “It was time for a change, time for an upgrade. And TD Ameritrade Park, you can't do it any better than they did. It is amazing.”

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News Headline: Kent State falls to Arkansas 8-1 in College World Series | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter, Jake Wise homered for the first time since February and Arkansas defeated Kent State 8-1 on Saturday to spoil the Golden Flashes' first appearance in the College World Series.

Baxendale didn't allow a hit until Sawyer Polen's infield single with two out in the fifth. He held the Flashes (46-19) scoreless until Jimmy Rider homered in the sixth.

Arkansas (45-20) broke open the game on Matt Vinson's two-run double that made it 5-1 in the bottom of the sixth.

Baxendale (8-5) allowed just three hits, giving way to Moore with one out in the seventh. He struck out five and walked one.

Kent State starter David Starn (11-4) walked three of the first four batters he faced and left after Vinson's two-out double.

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News Headline: Photo gallery: Kent State vs. Arkansas (College World Series) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Photo gallery from Game 1 of the College World Series between Kent State and Arkansas.

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News Headline: Kent State fans 'flash' to Omaha for College Baseball World Series | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. - By plane, by car, by RV and by bus, fans of Kent State University came to Omaha to support their Golden Flashes in the NCAA College World Series.

A bus chartered by KSU alum Josh Cribbs spent 15 hours crossing the Midwest to arrive here in Nebraska for the Saturday afternoon game.

A sign of how enthusiastic support of the Kent baseball team has been can be seen in ticket sales. Kent State was the only school of the eight in the playoffs to sell all 700 tickets they were allotted.

One fan said visiting the college world series had been on his"bucket list" for years by having his Kent State team in the world series was the perfect Father's Day gift for him.

Another fan used the trip as a present for his girlfriend.

"It's been an unreal experience and I'd do it again in a heartbeat," said Ryan Orr.

Orr brought his girlfriend Michelle Martinez to the game for her birthday.

"It's so much fun, I love baseball. I'm so excited for Kent, I really hope they win," Martinez said.

The setting of the game and aura surrounding the college world series amazed Billy Hostetler of Wooster.

"It's more than I could ever dream of, it's ridiculous."

I'm in Omaha, with NewsChannel 5 Sports Reporter Mike Cairns, to cover Kent State's run through the College World Series. We'll have reports and updates throughout the weekend, here on newsnet5.com

Read more: http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/cleveland_metro/kent-state-fans-storm-omaha#ixzz1y9vX8kkd

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News Headline: Kent State readies for number one ranked Florida in CWS elimination game | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Mike Cairns
News OCR Text: Omaha,Nebraska - Standing in the Golden Flashes way of an extended stay in Omaha is number one ranked Florida. Monday's matchup will be just the fourth time the two teams have ever played with the Flashes holding a 2-1 series lead, all of the games being played in Gainesville five years ago.

Junior, Ryan Bores of Strongsville gets the start for Kent State. Bores won the biggest game to date for the Golden Flashes when he beat Purdue the day after their 21 inning marathon win over Kentucky. Bores comes into Monday's game with a 9-3 record and a 3.35 era. Head coach Steve Stricklin refers to Bores as his "big game pitcher". Stricklin went on top say "if he(Bores) gives us a start like the last one then we are capable of going out and shocking some people".

Florida will counter with junior Hudson Randall who is arguably the schools most accomplished postseason pitcher in school history. In 15 starts this season, the right-hander is 9-2 with a 2.61 era. Randall has permitted two runs or less in 11 of his 15 starts.

Kent State sophmore outfielder T.J. Sutton of Canton Glen Oak high school says he likes that teams overlook the flashes and he "hopes the Gators will continue to let Kent State fly under the radar and the team will use the motivation to their advantage"

The Elimination game will be the first one played at TD Ameritrade Park on Monday. First pitch at 5 pm eastern/4 pm central time.

Follow Mike Cairns on twitter for all the play by action and the latest Kent State news from Omaha @MikeCairns5

Mike Cairns will be live with the latest from Omaha Monday at 5,6 and 11pm on Newschannel 5.

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News Headline: Golden Flashes Can't Pull Off Win in College World Series Debut | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Bliss Davis
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Nebraska -- The Kent State Golden Flashes made their College World Series debut against Arkansas Saturday, falling to the Razerbacks 8-1.

The Razerbacks began earning runs early in the game, with Kent State starter Davis Starn walking Tim Carver with the bases loaded. In the next inning, the Razerbacks score another run bringing their lead to 2-0. In all, Starn gives up five runs in five and two thirds innings in the Golden Flashes' debut.

The Flashes scored their only run of the game on Jimmy Rider's solo homer over the left wall at the bottom of the fifth inning.

The Razerbacks go on to score two more runs at the bottom of the eighth inning to bring the match-up to 8-1.

Kent State still has a chance to redeem themselves. On Monday they will face the loser of the South Carolina -  Florida match-up in an elimination game.

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News Headline: PHOTOS: Hogs beat CWS newcomer Kent State 8-1 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Written by Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. -- DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter, Jake Wise homered for the first time since February and Arkansas defeated Kent State 8-1 on Saturday to spoil the Golden Flashes' first appearance in the College World Series.

Baxendale didn't allow a hit until Sawyer Polen's infield single with two out in the fifth. He held the Flashes (46-19) scoreless until Jimmy Rider homered in the sixth.

Arkansas (45-20) broke open the game on Matt Vinson's two-run double that made it 5-1 in the bottom of the sixth.

Baxendale (8-5) allowed just three hits, giving way to Moore with one out in the seventh. He struck out five and walked one.

Kent State starter David Starn (11-4) walked three of the first four batters he faced and left after Vinson's two-out double.

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News Headline: Kent State Falls In CWS Opener | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State ran into a buzz saw in their College World Series opener. Arkansas swung the bats well off Golden Flashes starter David Starn and won the game 8-1. Starn surrendered five runs off six hits and six walks in less than six innings of work.

Jake Wise paced the Razorback offense with two hits and three RBI's, he slugged a second inning home run.

Arkansas starter D. J. Baxendale was outstanding, he worked into the seventh inning, allowing only three hits and a run.

The first round of the College World Series is double elimination. One more loss and Kent State will head home.

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News Headline: Stony Brook and Kent State Hoping the Clock Doesn't Strike Midnight (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two Cinderella stories. Two tales. One hope -- that their stories won't end any time soon.

The relatively unknown Stony Brook Seawolves went on a remarkable run during the NCAA tournament, winning once in Miami and twice in LSU to advance to the 2012 College World Series. Vendors in Omaha had a hard time meeting the demand for Stony Brook baseball caps as fans embraced the team as its own.

Stony Brook head coach Matt Senk sensed the support of fans in Omaha from the time his team arrived.

"Today was amazing," Senk said in the pre-series press conference. "The autograph session was just blowing our minds. And the people of Omaha, since we've been here have been absolutely incredible. But our attention will be turning back to baseball. And they feel very good about what they've accomplished to this point. I think they don't want to disappoint. More than anything, they don't want to disappoint each other, and not go out there and play their very best."

But fans had little to cheer for in Stony Brook's first game. The UCLA Bruins jumped all over Stony Brook starter Tyler Johnson for five runs in the first inning and cruised to 9-1 win.

The Kent State Golden Flashes made their own improbable run, defeating the Oregon Ducks in the best of three series in their super regional to advance to Omaha for the first time in school history. If it weren't for the Seawolves, the Golden Flashes would be the talk of Omaha. But like Stony Brook, they lost big, 8-1 to the Arkansas Razorbacks in their first game of the CWS on Saturday, June 16.

After that loss, Kent State head coach Scott Stricklin was asked what positives his team can take away from that game and his answer showed how much he believes in the magic of the CWS atmosphere in Omaha.

"Well, I told the guys to look around," Stricklin said. "We're in Omaha. That's the positive. This team has battled so hard and no one expected us to be here.

"I mean, we hoped to be here. But I don't think one guy would, before the season, have said we're going to be here. And so I think that's the positive, that we're in Omaha. We have an opportunity to show the world we're a really good baseball team."

The next time both teams take the field, they will face the possibility of elimination. Stony Brook plays the Florida State Seminoles on Sunday, June 17. Kent State plays the loser of Game 4, between the South Carolina Gamecocks and Florida Gators, on Monday, June 18.

Both teams know they have their work cut out for them.

"As far as coming back on Sunday, we've been in this position before in the regional, the super regional," said Stony Brook catcher Pat Cantwell in the postgame press conference on Friday, June 15. "It's like that. We have to fight back from the bottom. So the team's got a lot of heart, and we'll come out on Sunday ready to play and we'll give it everything we've got."

"I told the guys in right field [after the loss to Arkansas], we either play the number one team in the country [Florida] or the two-time defending national champion [South Carolina]," Stricklin said. "So we've got a tough task ahead of us."

After Kent State's loss, I had a chance to talk to Stricklin one-on-one and I mentioned that Omaha normally gets behind the Cinderella team, but this year there are two Cinderella teams, and unfortunately, in his case, the fans are all in with the Seawolves. I wondered if Kent State felt the support of Omaha, even with Stony Brook getting so much attention.

"I think people appreciate what we've done," Stricklin told me. "But yeah, it's great for Stony Brook. They deserve to be here. They won 50-plus games. After watching them play LSU on TV, they were really, really good. I know they are disappointed like we are in the way they played against UCLA. They ran into a buzzsaw and UCLA beat them.

"They deserve to be here. We deserve to be here. And I'm glad we're in different brackets. We can get some attention on this side, and that's ok."

"We were a little bit more under the radar in Gary, Indiana and Eugene, Oregon [where they played their regional and super regional games, respectively]" Stricklin added. "But we still deserve to be here too. We'll take all the support that we can get from the fans in Omaha."

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News Headline: VIDEO: Gators Look to Stay Afloat | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Scout.com
Contact Name: Jones/Hartigan
News OCR Text: After falling 7-3 Saturday night to familiar foe South Carolina, the Florida Gators now stare down elimination, and a feisty Kent State squad Monday. Behind the arm of their ace, Hudson Randall, they look to avoid. FightinGators' Cody Jones explains plan of attack through the bracket.

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News Headline: Statement-maker for the Razorbacks | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Scout.com
Contact Name: Randy Rosetta
News OCR Text: Baxendale's gem and five late runs spark Arkansas to an 8-1 opening win against Kent State. The Razorbacks get a shot at ending red-hot South Carolina's streak on Monday.

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News Headline: Coach says Seawolves will be ready for CWS opener | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Sports Illustrated - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. (AP) - The College World Series opens Friday with upstart Stony Brook facing No. 2 national seed UCLA in the opener and two-time defending national champion South Carolina playing 2011 runner-up Florida at night.

Stony Brook's players have been getting the rock-star treatment since their stunning super-regional victory at LSU. They'll undoubtedly be the fan favorites.

Stony Brook coach Matt Senk has told his players to enjoy their new celebrity - and then be ready to show up and play ball.

South Carolina overcame losses in five of its first six Southeastern Conference games to make it back to Omaha. The Gamecocks have lost three of four to the Gators this season.

Another first-time CWS team, Kent State, plays Saturday against Arkansas. The other game Saturday matches Arizona and Florida State.

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News Headline: Kent's Stricklin: College World Series appearance shows nation what cold-weather kids can do (Nielsen, Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Washington Post
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — Kent State coach Scott Stricklin loves the exposure the Golden Flashes are getting at the College World Series, yet he doesn't expect to capitalize on it going forward.

The players he likes to recruit already know about his program. Of the 27 players on the CWS roster, 21 are homegrown Ohioans. The rest are from next door in Pennsylvania.

Like other teams in the North, Kent State doesn't practice outdoors much, or at all, until March. The Flashes share an indoor practice facility with the football team and play on a field with artificial turf.

This year the Flashes played their first 18 games on the road before their March 23 home opener. Twelve-hour bus rides to the South are common early in the season.

Stricklin said he looks for kids who have a toughness and competitiveness about them.

Shortstop Jimmy Rider of Venetia, Pa., who homered for Kent State's only run against Arkansas on Saturday, embodies the team's personality, athletic director Joel Nielsen said.

“We were his only Division I offer,” Nielsen said. “Now he's the all-time hits leader at Kent State and in the MAC. He's still a size-7 (shoe) and 160 pounds soaking wet.”

Nielsen signed Stricklin to a six-year contract last July that pays him a base salary of $145,000.

“He's got a great reputation in (northeast Ohio) and he has a method and a program that just works for us and for this area,” Nielsen said.

Kent State (46-19) will play No. 1 national seed Florida (47-19) in an elimination game Monday.

To be matched against a Southeastern Conference power and the 2011 national runner-up in mid-June means Kent State has gotten the most out of the mere $720,000 a year it spends on baseball.

“We're already known as a regional power in the Midwest,” Stricklin said. “What this does is it puts us more on the national radar, a little more awareness of what we've been able to accomplish.”

___

SHARING A RIDE: Pac-12 co-champions Arizona and UCLA were opponents Sunday night after being travel partners last week.

The teams shared a charter flight to Omaha.

Everyone got a long fine. But Arizona coach Andy Lopez said he had to rein in his wife, who attended UCLA and spent a lot of time reminiscing with UCLA folks about her college days.

“I said, ‘Hey, we're getting paid by Arizona. What are you doing?' ” Lopez said.

___

HOT HOG ARMS AND BATS: Arkansas pitchers have allowed just one earned run on nine hits over 19 innings spanning the super regional-clinching win over Baylor and Saturday's 8-1 victory over Kent State.

The game against Kent State marked a big improvement offensively for the Razorbacks, who had been held to one run or less in five of eight games since the Southeastern Conference tournament.

No one is hotter than freshman Joe Serrano, who is batting .588 in the NCAA tournament after going 3 for 3 with a sacrifice against Kent State. Serrano entered regionals batting .262. He's now at .356.

“It's a big part of us being here,” coach Dave Van Horn said.

South Carolina believes it will be facing an Arkansas team that's peaking on Monday night.

“Arkansas is a great team. We saw that when we went to Fayetteville,” center fielder Evan Marzilli said. “They have a bunch of guys out of the pen that throw hard and some really good hitters. Just like every other SEC game that we have, it's going to be a tough one. So we'll be ready.”

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News Headline: CWS newcomer Kent State knows it's facing tall task to stay alive after 8-1 loss to Razorbacks | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Washington Post
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — Kent State knows it faces a daunting task to make its first appearance in the College World Series last much longer.

An 8-1 loss to Arkansas on Saturday leaves the Golden Flashes fighting for survival in a bracket that includes two-time defending national champion South Carolina, No. 1 national seed Florida and a Razorbacks team that just beat them.

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Weigh InCorrections?Recommend Tweet Personal Post .Kent State coach Scott Stricklin offered a simple message to his players after DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter against them Saturday.

“Get it out of your mind. Get ready to play on Monday night again in Omaha, Neb.,” Stricklin said. “Our kids are thrilled to be here. But that's thing we've got to make sure that we're not just happy to be here. We want to compete and get some wins and make a run at it. It's still possible.”

Baxendale didn't allow a hit until Sawyer Polen's infield single with two out in the fifth. He held the Flashes (46-19) scoreless until Jimmy Rider homered in the sixth.

Arkansas (45-20) broke open the game on Matt Vinson's two-run double that made it 5-1 in the bottom of the sixth.

Baxendale (8-5) allowed just three hits, giving way to Moore with one out in the seventh. He struck out five and walked one.

“DJ Baxendale was outstanding,” Stricklin said. “He kept us off balance. His fastball was sharp and he throws the breaking ball when he's behind in the count. He really competes.”

Kent State starter David Starn (11-4) walked three of the first four batters he faced and left after Vinson's two-out double in the sixth.

Starn threw 24 pitches in the first inning, just eight for strikes, and walked the bases loaded before Brian Anderson's hard liner up the middle knocked off the pitcher's glove and brought home the first run. An inning-ending double play let Starn escape further damage.

“It was basically just a flaw in my mechanics,” Starn said. “I wasn't really finishing my pitches. And I was leaving them arm-side, and that's basically what happened with the control issues and everything.”

Kent State is the first team from the Mid-American Conference to make it to the CWS since Eastern Michigan in 1976.

Wearing their old-school gray uniforms with high socks, the Flashes struggled early against a Razorbacks team that was last in Omaha in 2009.

Arkansas was up 2-0 by the time the Flashes had their first hit. Rider's homer down the left-field line cut the Hogs' lead to 3-1 in the sixth.

The Flashes looked like they could draw closer in the seventh after Baxendale walked Nick Hamilton to put runners on first and second with one out. Moore came on to get a groundout and flyout to end the threat. Moore worked the last 2 2-3 innings for his third save.

Arkansas made it a four-run game in the bottom of the sixth on Vinson's two-out, two-run double, and Wise drove in two more runs in the eighth with a two-out single off Ryan Mace.

Starn threw 24 pitches in the first inning, just eight for strikes, and walked the bases loaded before Brian Anderson's hard liner up the middle knocked off the pitcher's glove and brought home the first run. An inning-ending double play let Starn escape further damage.

Wise, the No. 9 batter, made it 2-0 in the second when he went deep to left center for his second homer of the season, and first since the second game of the season on Feb. 19. It was the Razorbacks' first homer since May 19, the last day of the regular season.

Baxendale retired 14 of the first 15 batters he faced before Polen ripped a hard grounder up the middle for a base hit. Second baseman Bo Bigham made a great stop, but his throw to first was wide and late.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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News Headline: Arkansas clobbers Kent St. (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: New York Post - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. - Upstarts Stony Brook and Kent State may be providing intrigue to the College World Series, but the powerhouses still are prevailing.

Arkansas starting pitcher DJ Baxendale ruined the Golden Flashes' first-ever game in the College World Series, allowing one run over 6 1/3 innings while leading the No. 2 seed Razorbacks to an 8-1 win yesterday at TD Ameritrade Park.

Baxendale (8-5) did not allow a hit until there were two outs in the fifth, the deepest a pitcher has taken a no-hitter at the College World Series in nearly six years, and recorded five strikeouts while allowing three hits and one walk.

"I thought DJ was incredible," Arkansas coach Dave Van Horn said. "I knew after the first inning he had it because he threw every fastball right where he wanted it, and that's a tell tale sign for him. Been watching him pitch for three years. It's been a big pleasure. And hopefully we'll get him out there again before this is over with."

Southpaw David Starn (11-4) started for No. 3 seed Kent State and battled with control from the first at-bat, walking three batters in a one-run first inning and six in the game.

Arkansas catcher Jake Wise, the No. 9 hitter, gave the Hogs a 2-0 lead in the second inning with a solo home run, the first allowed by Starn in 70 innings.

Kent State shortstop Jimmy Rider stuck back in the sixth inning with a solo shot off of Baxendale to cut the deficit to 3-1, but the Golden Flashes (46-19) would never get closer.

"If they play like that, they have a chance to win a national championship," said Kent State coach Scott Stricklin. "No question about it. If they have that offensive approach and play clean defense with that pitching, they have a chance to win it all."

Arkansas (45-20) will play an SEC foe tomorrow night, the winner of last night's battle between overall No. 1 seed Florida and two-time defending national champion South Carolina. Kent State will face the loser in an elimination game at 5 p.m. tomorrow.

howard.kussoy@nypost.com

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News Headline: Hogs beat CWS newcomer Kent State 8-1 on 4-hitter | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Star Tribune - Online
Contact Name: ERIC OLSON
News OCR Text: DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter, Jake Wise homered for the first time since February and Arkansas defeated Kent State 8-1 on Saturday to spoil the Golden Flashes' first appearance in the College World Series.

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News Headline: Kent St. knows survival in CWS will be tough task | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Seattle Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State knows it faces a daunting task to make its first appearance in the College World Series last much longer.

OMAHA, Neb. —
Kent State knows it faces a daunting task to make its first appearance in the College World Series last much longer.

An 8-1 loss to Arkansas on Saturday leaves the Golden Flashes fighting for survival in a bracket that includes two-time defending national champion South Carolina, No. 1 national seed Florida and a Razorbacks team that just beat them.

Kent State coach Scott Stricklin offered a simple message to his players after DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter against them Saturday.

"Get it out of your mind. Get ready to play on Monday night again in Omaha, Neb.," Stricklin said. "Our kids are thrilled to be here. But that's thing we've got to make sure that we're not just happy to be here. We want to compete and get some wins and make a run at it. It's still possible."

Baxendale didn't allow a hit until Sawyer Polen's infield single with two out in the fifth. He held the Flashes (46-19) scoreless until Jimmy Rider homered in the sixth.

Arkansas (45-20) broke open the game on Matt Vinson's two-run double that made it 5-1 in the bottom of the sixth.

Baxendale (8-5) allowed just three hits, giving way to Moore with one out in the seventh. He struck out five and walked one.

"DJ Baxendale was outstanding," Stricklin said. "He kept us off balance. His fastball was sharp and he throws the breaking ball when he's behind in the count. He really competes."

Kent State starter David Starn (11-4) walked three of the first four batters he faced and left after Vinson's two-out double in the sixth.

Starn threw 24 pitches in the first inning, just eight for strikes, and walked the bases loaded before Brian Anderson's hard liner up the middle knocked off the pitcher's glove and brought home the first run. An inning-ending double play let Starn escape further damage.

"It was basically just a flaw in my mechanics," Starn said. "I wasn't really finishing my pitches. And I was leaving them arm-side, and that's basically what happened with the control issues and everything."

Kent State is the first team from the Mid-American Conference to make it to the CWS since Eastern Michigan in 1976.

Wearing their old-school gray uniforms with high socks, the Flashes struggled early against a Razorbacks team that was last in Omaha in 2009.

Arkansas was up 2-0 by the time the Flashes had their first hit. Rider's homer down the left-field line cut the Hogs' lead to 3-1 in the sixth.

The Flashes looked like they could draw closer in the seventh after Baxendale walked Nick Hamilton to put runners on first and second with one out. Moore came on to get a groundout and flyout to end the threat. Moore worked the last 2 2-3 innings for his third save.

Arkansas made it a four-run game in the bottom of the sixth on Vinson's two-out, two-run double, and Wise drove in two more runs in the eighth with a two-out single off Ryan Mace.

Starn threw 24 pitches in the first inning, just eight for strikes, and walked the bases loaded before Brian Anderson's hard liner up the middle knocked off the pitcher's glove and brought home the first run. An inning-ending double play let Starn escape further damage.

Wise, the No. 9 batter, made it 2-0 in the second when he went deep to left center for his second homer of the season, and first since the second game of the season on Feb. 19. It was the Razorbacks' first homer since May 19, the last day of the regular season.

Baxendale retired 14 of the first 15 batters he faced before Polen ripped a hard grounder up the middle for a base hit. Second baseman Bo Bigham made a great stop, but his throw to first was wide and late.

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News Headline: Skies clear for CWS games | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Omaha World-Herald - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A midmorning thunderstorm rained out the Juneteenth parade in north Omaha today, but the rain had moved southeast of the metro area by early evening.

It was in the mid-70s with some sunshine about the time the game kicked off between Kent State and Arkansas. Forecasters said tonight should be nice and dry.

Rainshowers should not interrupt the College World Series games or any other activities scheduled, according to the National Weather Service office in Valley, Neb.

Copyright 2012 Omaha World-Herald®. All rights reserved.

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News Headline: Notebook: NFL receiver takes 46 fans to ballgame | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Arizona Daily Star - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Notebook: NFL receiver takes 46 fans to ballgame

2012-06-17T00:00:00Z Notebook: NFL receiver takes 46 fans to ballgame The Associated Press The Associated Press

Arizona Daily Star

OMAHA, Neb. - Josh Cribbs' road-weary "Flash Mob" mustered all the energy it could to cheer for Kent State at the College World Series on Saturday.

The Cleveland Browns receiver and Kent State alumnus arranged for a bus to carry fans from Cleveland to Omaha for the Golden Flashes' first CWS appearance.

Cribbs was on hand to see off the bus at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, and 16 hours later it rolled into a motel in Fremont, Neb., about 25 miles northwest of Omaha.

Cribbs couldn't ride with the fans because he had to attend a Browns practice. He flew into Omaha shortly before first pitch and sat with his new friends.

The bus trip was open to the first 46 fans that signed up and paid $150.

The bus was to head back to Cleveland immediately after the game.

Status quo

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News Headline: VIDEO: Golden Flashes Fans Watch Kent State Make History at College World Series | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News Saturday - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND — The Kent State University baseball team competed for the first time ever in the College World Series Saturday in Omaha, Nebraska.

TO VIEW VIDEO, CLICK HERE: http://fox8.com/2012/06/16/watch-kent-state-baseball-make-history-at-the-college-world-series/

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News Headline: Kent State fans showing support for Flashes | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT-- Kent State flashes may have lost their first game in the College World Series, but fans aren't giving up on the team.

At Water Street Tavern, all eyes were on the game as history played itself out. Their show of support for the Kent State Flashes was heightened, even by college town standards.

"I mean it's the college world series it's the pinnacle of college baseball," said alum Matt Wilson. That pinnacle drew quite the crowd of alum along with other flash fans, who were happy to see their team, for the first time within reach of a championship win. "It's exciting it's another win for the flashes," said Paige Patton.

As exciting as it was, the game got off to a slow start keeping fans on the edge of his seat. The flashes played hard, but in the end were defeated by Arkansas, 8-1.

The spirit of Kent State fans was anything but defeated. "We're still in this thing until you've eliminated you're in the tournament," Wilson.

Fans took comfort knowing that there's still one more game to go. Also taking a lot of pride in knowing that out of all the teams that played, they were one of the 8 that made it.

"I'm happy that we even got there in the first place for a MAC team that's never been before," said Rick Myers who firmly believes "there's always a chance."

Kent State plays again on Monday at 5 p.m. against either South Carolina or Florida. If Kent State wins, they will progress in the series. If they lose, they will be eliminated. Either way, they will have made history said fans.

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News Headline: Indians broadcaster on joyride with Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: KVAL-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND (AP) — Tom Hamilton's unmistakable voice, the one that has given Cleveland fans so much joy for 23 seasons on the radio, choked with emotion.

On Saturday, Tom's oldest son, Nick, will play in the College World Series for an underdog Kent State team that has defied the odds during an improbable NCAA tournament run.

"For them to do that," Hamilton said, straining for the proper words, his eyes filling with tears.

Hamilton was speaking about his three brothers, one living in Dallas, one in Chicago and the other from his home state of Wisconsin, who will meet him in Omaha, Neb., for a family reunion and Father's Day weekend getaway to watch his son.

"It's just been an incredible ride," Hamilton said before Friday night's home game at Progressive Field against the Pittsburgh Pirates. "Surreal is the only thing I can come up with. My wife Wendy and I look at each other at night and go, 'How long can this fairytale continue?'"

With a slew of one-run wins, the Golden Flashes have battled their way to Omaha, where they'll get to take their swings against some of baseball's big boys in a double-elimination tournament format. Kent State (46-18), which upset Oregon last week on the road, will play its opener Saturday against Arkansas.

And Hamilton will be there to cheer on Nick, who was recently drafted by the Indians — a team he idolized as a kid.

"We've been so blessed," Hamilton said, "and we feel like we don't want it to end. You're on such an emotional high. We know how fortunate we are and are just trying to soak in everything."

Hamilton missed a few broadcasts last weekend to see Nick play in Eugene, Ore., and the Indians told him to take time off to see Kent State's primary designated hitter play in the World Series.

"The Indians just said 'go,'" Hamilton said, his score sheet sprawled in front of him on a round table in back of the radio booth. "They've been unbelievable, just incredible. I'm going to stay there as long as they win."

Unbelievable and incredible would describe this Kent State journey as well.

The Golden Flashes, with 27 Ohio natives on their roster, are the state's first school to make the World Series since 1970 and first Mid-American Conference program to get there since Eastern Michigan in 1976. On the way to Omaha, Kent State beat Kentucky before traveling to Oregon, where the Flashes played the Ducks on their home field.

"Can you imagine being in the Final Four for basketball and you've got to beat Duke at Cameron?" Hamilton. "For teams that aren't the home team, what Stony Brook did at LSU and what Kent did at Oregon is absolutely incredible."

So, too, was Kent State's 21-inning victory over Kentucky a week earlier.

"Greatest game I've ever seen," Hamilton said without hesitation before providing a quick recap of the ceaseless drama. "You really thought after winning that game, anything is possible."

Finding game tickets for the entire family in Omaha was quite the challenge for Hamilton, who had to rely on some of his baseball connections to secure a few.

On Friday, Hamilton's wife Wendy loaded up the car and drove with the couple's three other children, Brad, Kelsey and Katie to watch Nick compete in the final games of his college career.

Shortly before Friday's game, Hamilton got an update from the road.

"Brad called and said, 'Hey, Dad, we just passed a sign that says Bob Feller museum, is he from Iowa?" Hamilton said, laughing. "I said, 'Yes, he's from Iowa."

Tom's brother, Rob, is also bringing his family — and a little karma — with him to Nebraska. On Thursday, Rob Hamilton coached Sun Prairie to a baseball state championship.

In Omaha, Tom Hamilton, who has called countless baseball games in major and minor league parks across the country, will take seat in the stands and not the press box. He'll watch as his oldest son lives out a dream that began as a kid when his dad would bring him around the Indians clubhouse to meet stars like Kenny Lofton and Jim Thome.

Hamilton is powered by adrenaline these days, the exhaustion overwhelmed by exhilaration.

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News Headline: Kent State Falls to Arkansas | Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: New York Times, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter, and Jake Wise hit his first home run since February as Arkansas beat Kent State, 8-1, spoiling the Golden Flashes' first game in the College World Series in Omaha. The Flashes (46-19) were scoreless until Jimmy Rider homered in the sixth. Arkansas (45-20) took a 5-1 lead on Matt Vinson's two-run double in the sixth. Kent State could be eliminated Monday.

Copyright © 2012 The New York Times Company

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News Headline: College World Series | Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: College World Series - ESPN
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: [ Male Announcer ] only gives you hydration and custom power. Water-activated gel hydrates throughout each shave. And comfort control lets you choose the vibration setting. Customize our best shave for your skin. New schick hydro power select. Free your skin. [ ] >> Mike: crazy town, jason alldean. Look at the brackets, ucla and arizona in the winner's portion of that bracket. Florida state and stoney brook tomorrow at 9:00 in the first elimination game of the college world series. Arkansas won earlier today defeating kent state. The winner will play arkansas. The loser will play another elimination game against the golden flashes. Greg larson on in his second inning of work in relief. His club down 5-3 and joey pankake the lead-off man will lead off the inning in the sixth. >> Nomar: larson already ahead in the count on joey pankake. This will help the florida ballclub. They come back and get one run but if they can have a quick inning it would help them and it's joey pankake's job to make sure that doesn't happen and start another rally. >> Mike: lined into left center and another bullet and he's in way single. The bat. >> Nomar: watching them swing look at the averages as team and you go well, there's some guys under .300, a couple guys over .300. They swing the bat well. They use the gaps. Wow. Making some nice swings. Obviously you knew they can hit. They can't succeed in the sec let alone be here in omaha without hitting but they put a couple hits on the ball. >> Mike: last couple innings they've just crushed it. Marzilli showing bunt. >> Nomar: he's think of squaring around and marzilli already has two doubles. >> Mike: back to back. >> Nomar: yeah. >> Mike: and kevin o'sullivan wants to come out and talk a little strategy. >> Nomar: marzilli has two lead-off doubles maybe because he's not leading off the inning. They're playing for the runs. They know they have a good team over there in florida. >> Mike: going to make a pitching change and we'll check out the new hur [ Male Announcer ] to the man who coached me... Yelled at me... Supported me... To the man who cheered me on... Slapped me on the back... Stood by me... To the man who made me... The man I am today. Gillette. The best a man can get. >> Mike: welcome back to omaha.

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News Headline: Channel 3 News at 11 | Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Channel 3 News at 11 PM - WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Day one of the college world series is in the books quantico al is in with how the golden flashes finished quantico. >>> Plus, the U.S. marines storm cleveland, the highlight of marine week draws sangs at burke lakefront airport. >>> And plus, your full forecast is just minutes away. >>> And now, channel 3 at 11:00 with lynna lai quantico -- lynna lai. >> Alex -- al is joining me with the latest on the game, al? >> It's a double elimination fore matt, kent state facing the arkansas razorbacks quantico it didn't start off well for kent quantico bases loaded in the bottom of the first for arkansas quantico the radorbacks had a 1-0 lead quantico jimmy00 the razorbacks win it 4. 1 quantico monday is a must win quantico. >>> The show of support was very evident. >> It's the college world series. >> And that drew quite a fan of alum along with flash fans quantico. >> It's exciting, it's another win for the kent state flashes. >> As exciting as it was, the game got off to a slow start keeping fans like matt wilson on the edge of his seat. >> If kent state won the championship, it would be the biggest thing to happen to kent. >> They were defeated by the arkansas razorbacks 10-1. >> We're still in this thing quantico until you're -- this flashes will play again on monday quantico that game is still being plaited right now and either way I think we can see whole lot more support from fans. >> That's right, it's not over until it's over.if you know someone who is headed to omaha to support the golden flashes, send us a message on twitter or facebook.

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News Headline: 2012 CWS: Arkansas Beats Kent State 8-1 In Opener | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Arkansas News Bureau - Online
Contact Name: rneiswanger
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — Arkansas entered the College World Series averaging three runs in the postseason, which was the lowest total of any team in Omaha.

The Razorbacks will be one of the highest scoring teams in the CWS field after one game, beating Kent State 8-1 in TD Ameritrade Park on Saturday.

Arkansas, led by catcher Jake Wise, scored early to take the lead then ran away with the game in the late innings in TD Ameritrade Park.

Wise — who had the series-winning hit at Baylor — went 3-for-4 with a solo home run and three RBIs. Designated hitter Joe Serrano went 3-for-4 with an RBI and outfielder Matt Vinson hit a two-run double in the sixth inning as part of a 10-hit performance.

Arkansas' previous postseason high for runs scored was five, which it accomplished three times. The eight run scored was the highest since an 8-2 win against Tennessee in the regular season finale.

But the offense wasn't the only big performance of the day. Arkansas also got a strong start on the mound from pitcher DJ Baxendale (8-5), who recovered from his struggles in last week's Baylor loss.

The junior held Kent State (46-19) hitless through 4 2/3 innings and scoreless until the seventh in his CWS debut. He turned the game over to reliever Brandon Moore, who threw the final 2 2/3 innings.

“DJ Baxendale was outstanding,” Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said. “He was the reason why we struggled a little bit. No question about it.”

The combination helped the Hogs (45-20) moved into the winner's bracket in the double-elimination tournament. Arkansas will play tonight's South Carolina-Florida game at 8 p.m. Monday.

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News Headline: Cribs is helping fans cheer | Email

News Date: 06/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: NewsChannel 5 at Noon - WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >>> Kent state graduate and browns wide receiver josh cribs is helping fans cheer on his alma alma mater. A bus filled with fans leaving to omaha. Cribs paid for the bus. Josh cribs told us why all this was important to him. >> Well, knowing where you came from. I was a fan like they are now. The fans drive my motivation. Without them, there will be no me. My success is deattendant upon them -- dependant upon them. >> Cribs will join the team cribs fans tomorrow in omaha. Mike cairns will be there as well covering the game. You can catch reports on newschannel5 and newsnet5.com. >>>

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News Headline: NBC 6 News at 6 | Email

News Date: 06/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: NBC 6 News 6 at 6 PM - KTAL-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Less then 24 hour from now, arkansas will take the diamond in omaha. The hogs set to open the college world series against kent state. It's a dream come true for all members of the program. They'll have a chance at reaching the ultimate goal, that of course to play for a national title. That's the reason most, if not all signed with dave van horn. "............" the college world series underway the college world the college world series underway for stony brook and ucla. The two battling in omaha with the bruins scoring 5 in the 1st, as they lead, 8-1 in the 6th.

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News Headline: Cribbs shows support | Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times of Trenton, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLLEGE WORLD SERIES Josh Cribbs' road-weary "Flash Mob" mustered all the energy it could to cheer for Kent State at the College World Series yesterday.

The Cleveland Browns receiver and Kent State alumnus arranged for a bus to carry fans from Cleveland to Omaha for the Golden Flashes' first CWS appearance.

Cribbs was on hand to see off the bus at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, and 16 hours later it rolled into a motel in Fremont, Neb., about 25 miles northwest of Omaha.

Cribbs couldn't ride with the fans because he had to attend a Browns practice.

He flew into Omaha shortly before first pitch.

The bus trip was open to the first 46 fans that signed up and paid $150. They sat in Section 202 at TD Ameritrade Park in their navy "Flash Mob" T-shirts.

The bus was to head back to Cleveland immediately after the game.

Mandy Grodin, 33, of Cleveland said the trip was long but fun. The fans passed time listening to music and enjoying food and beverage provided by Cribbs.

Last night's Thunder-Harrisburg game ended too late for this edition.

Copyright © 2012 The Times, Trenton N.J. All Rights Reserved.

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News Headline: BICYCLISTS TO RIDE CROSS COUNTRY FOR CHILDREN'S | Email

News Date: 06/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Carney, Jim
News OCR Text: As a way to thank the medical staff at Akron Children's Hospital, Brian Ray and seven friends will bike across America.

Ray, 39, of Akron, said he knew he had to give back after doctors removed a benign cyst from his son, Aidan, five years ago.

And so Ray and his teammates will leave Oceanside, Calif., on Saturday as part of a relay team in the Race Across America. They hope to reach Annapolis, Md., covering 3,000 miles and passing through 12 states, in 6 1/2 days.

Akronite Cassie Schumacher, 40, took off Tuesday morning in the solo women's Race Across America. As of Thursday morning, she had traveled 441 miles.

Ray, senior vice president of PNC Bank, said Aidan first displayed symptoms that something was wrong when he occasionally would lie on the ground in a fetal position and scream in pain.

Soon, Ray said, he felt something in his 5-year-old's belly. Doctors found and immediately removed the cyst. Aidan's health has been fine since the surgery.

On the day the group begins its race, Aidan turns 10 years old.

Ray said the relay team has raised about $80,000 in pledges toward its goal of $100,000. He hopes to give the hospital $50,000 after expenses.

Each rider contributed about $3,000 toward the cost of the race, Ray said.

Other cyclists on the team are:

Shawn Aker, 30, a physical therapist from Columbus and formerly of Akron.

Jody Demaline, 32, a nuclear medicine account representative from North Olmsted.

Michael Feichter, 38, a property claims adjuster from Cuyahoga Falls.

Scott Garchar, 38, a division service manager for FedEx Custom Critical from Akron.

Matt Geis, 34, associate athletic director and executive director of athletic advancement for Kent State University, of Kent.

Terry Horner, 34, an entrepreneur, formerly of Mentor, now from North Carolina.

Brian Zupancic, 36, a territory sales manager, from Medina.

To help the team accomplish its goal, nine crew members, including Ray's parents, Bob and Carol Ray of Fairlawn, will ride or drive in three support vehicles. The caravan will include a recreational vehicle, where cyclists will sleep and eat, and two minivans that will follow the cyclists or seek out supplies for the group, Ray said.

Two doctors are part of the crew: Troy Smurawa from Akron Children's Hospital and Jeremy Riehm, from Indiana.

Ray said his group will ride in pairs for safety purposes, so that both riders attempt to ride at the same pace.

Many in the group, including Ray, have performed triathlons - a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike ride and 26.2-mile (marathon) run.

The lead sponsor for the relay is FedEx Custom Critical, which is supplying a husband and wife cross-country team that took the bikes and supplies to California. That team is part of the support crew during the race.

Ray said the point of the race is to give back to Akron Children's Hospital. He said fundraising will continue through the summer with hopes of presenting a check to the hospital in September.

For more on the team go and to donate, go to www.ohiocycleworkscharities.org. For more on the race, go to www.raceacrossamerica.org.

Copyright © 2012 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Akron Children's Hospital | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Charity Vault
Contact Name: Jim Carney
News OCR Text: AKRON, OHIO (Akron Beacon Journal) - As a way to thank the medical staff at Akron Children's Hospital, Brian Ray and seven friends will bike across America.

Ray, 39, of Akron, said he knew he had to give back after doctors removed a benign cyst from his son, Aidan, five years ago.

And so Ray and his teammates will leave Oceanside, Calif., on Saturday as part of a relay team in the Race Across America. They hope to reach Annapolis, Md., covering 3,000 miles and passing through 12 states, in 6½ days.

Akronite Cassie Schumacher, 40, took off Tuesday morning in the solo women's Race Across America. As of Thursday morning, she had traveled 441 miles.

Ray, senior vice president of PNC Bank, said Aidan first displayed symptoms that something was wrong when he occasionally would lie on the ground in a fetal position and scream in pain.

Soon, Ray said, he felt something in his 5-year-old's belly. Doctors found and immediately removed the cyst. Aidan's health has been fine since the surgery.

On the day the group begins its race, Aidan turns 10 years old.

Ray said the relay team has raised about $80,000 in pledges toward its goal of $100,000. He hopes to give the hospital $50,000 after expenses.

Each rider contributed about $3,000 toward the cost of the race, Ray said.

Other cyclists on the team are:

• Shawn Aker, 30, a physical therapist from Columbus and formerly of Akron.

• Jody Demaline, 32, a nuclear medicine account representative from North Olmsted.

• Michael Feichter, 38, a property claims adjuster from Cuyahoga Falls.

• Scott Garchar, 38, a division service manager for FedEx Custom Critical from Akron.

• Matt Geis, 34, associate athletic director and executive director of athletic advancement for Kent State University, of Kent.

• Terry Horner, 34, an entrepreneur, formerly of Mentor, now from North Carolina.

• Brian Zupancic, 36, a territory sales manager, from Medina.

To help the team accomplish its goal, nine crew members, including Ray's parents, Bob and Carol Ray of Fairlawn, will ride or drive in three support vehicles. The caravan will include a recreational vehicle, where cyclists will sleep and eat, and two minivans that will follow the cyclists or seek out supplies for the group, Ray said.

Two doctors are part of the crew: Troy Smurawa from Akron Children's Hospital and Jeremy Riehm, from Indiana.

Ray said his group will ride in pairs for safety purposes, so that both riders attempt to ride at the same pace.

Many in the group, including Ray, have performed triathlons — a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike ride and 26.2-mile (marathon) run.

The lead sponsor for the relay is FedEx Custom Critical, which is supplying a husband and wife cross-country team that took the bikes and supplies to California. That team is part of the support crew during the race.

Ray said the point of the race is to give back to Akron Children's Hospital. He said fundraising will continue through the summer with hopes of presenting a check to the hospital in September.

Copyright 2012 Akron Beacon Journal (Copyright Terms)

Updated 52 mins ago Article ID# 1651635

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News Headline: Kent/Blossom Music Festival program toasts 45 years | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent/Blossom Music Festival is an advanced training institute operated by Kent State University in cooperation with The Cleveland Orchestra and Blossom Music Center.

This summer's intensive program presents public performances by distinguished artist faculty and young musicians.

The festival is under the direction of Kent State faculty members and musicians Danna Sundet (oboe) and Keith Robinson (cello).

Celebrating its 45th year, the program enjoys an international reputation that began in the hands of legendary figures such as George Szell, Aaron Copland, Louis Lane, William Steinberg, Rudolph Firkusny, Rafael Druian, Lynn Harrell, Maurice Sharp, John Mack, Robert Marcellus, Myron Bloom and many others.

The program primarily draws college-age students eager to work with the highly regarded staff made up of current members of The Cleveland Orchestra, faculty members from Kent State's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music and other acclaimed musicians.

This year, nearly 150 audition tapes were submitted for the 43 available slots.

Students develop professional skills through personal study and classes with visiting master artists, members of The Cleveland Orchestra and Kent State faculty. Participants also attend open rehearsals and concerts of The Cleveland Orchestra.

The festival culminates with the “Side-by-Side” concert where the students perform at the Blossom Music Center with The Cleveland Orchestra.

This year, the concert takes place at 8 p.m July 28 with a 7 p.m. pre-concert featuring the Kent Blossom Chamber Orchestra. It will be led by James Feddeck.

For tickets to this concert, visit www.clevelandorchestra.com.

The public is invited to enjoy free concerts presented by the student ensembles known as the Chamber Players' Concerts.

These concerts are in Ludwig Recital Hall in the Music and Speech Center at 1325 Theatre Drive on campus.

The Chamber Players' concerts are free and open to the public.

Series I will be at 7:30 p.m. July 6, 2:30 p.m. July 7 and 2:30 p.m. July 8. Series II is at 7:30 p.m. July 20 and July 22 and 2:30 p.m. July 21 and July 22.

The Kent/Blossom Music Festival also highlights its faculty members by offering a professional concert series known as the Faculty Concert Series, which includes five concerts, from June 27 to July 25, and features performances by high-profile musicians from The Cleveland Orchestra and faculty from the Kent State University Hugh A. Glauser School of Music.

All faculty concerts take place in the Ludwig Recital Hall. Parking is free. General seating tickets are available online.

New this year are the five- concert and three-concert season subscriptions, which are currently available online at www.kent.edu/blossom.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

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News Headline: US Patent Issued to Kent State University (Yang) | Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ALEXANDRIA, Va., June 17 -- United States Patent no.8,199,286, issued on June 12, was assigned to Kent State University (Kent, Ohio).

"Polymer Stabilized Electrically Controlled Birefringence Transflective Lcd" was invented by Deng-Ke Yang (Hudson, Ohio) and Fushan Zhou (Kent, Ohio).

According to the abstract released by the U.S.Patent & Trademark Office: "A transreflective display in which the thickness of the liquid crystal layer is the same for both transmissive and reflective modes.The transmissive and reflective pixels are stabilized in two different liquid crystal configurations with different birefringences.The light retardation effect of one path in the transmissive pixels is close to or equals the retardation effect of two paths in the reflective pixels, resulting in synchronization of the two modes."

The patent was filed on July 29, 2005, under Application No.11/193,717.

For further information please visit: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=8199286&OS=8199286&RS=8199286

For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Car show benefits shelter | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM - Two days ago, a Cigarette World customer asked for the number of the Christina House, reminding store manager Jackie Spencer why she keeps organizing fundraisers to help the battered women'shelter.

"If we can just pass that on to one person to help, (it) makes it all worthwhile," she said Sunday during Cruzin' for a Cauze.

The car show in the Cigarette World parking lot off of Cunningham Road was her latest fundraiser to support the shelter and Christina Center services, which are operated through the Catholic Charities Regional Agency in Lisbon.

A domestic violence survivor herself, Spencer decided last year to hold a fundraiser for the shelter after a woman came into the store with a black eye, a victim of violence. She received support from Cigarette World owners Sylvia Moresky and David Newman and his wife, Karie, to sell tickets for a patio set and she and her staff raised $537.

This year, Spencer planned an even bigger fundraiser with multiple prize raffles and the car show held on Father's Day. Both she and her assistant clerk, Corey Bowers, have been in the shoes of the victims helped by the Christina Center.

"I do it because it hits so close to home. The bumps and bruises go away, but the mental aspect of it stays forever," Spencer said, noting her experience occurred in Florida. "They were there for me and now I want to be there for them. God only knows what would have happened to me if I had not had a safe place to go."

The car show survived some rain to soldier on, with prizes awarded to first, second and third place and kids' choice, a category she created for children 12 and under to choose their favorite.

Herb Beehler, a Salem resident Spencer met during another car cruise, brought his 1957 GMC truck which is painted up to look like Tow Mater, the popular pickup from the movie "Cars." He thought it would be great to be involved and said it's a good cause.

Besides music, food, trivia prizes, raffle prizes and cars, the event featured some clowning around and balloon twisting by the Aut Mori Grotto clowns. Representatives of the Christina Center and Christina House were also on hand, along with volunteers from a new chapter of The National Society of Leadership Success at Kent State University Salem campus.

"We're trying to make a better community while helping everyone we can," group president Donna Beery said.

Formed in March, the chapter has been partnering with the Christina House and the Salem Rotary and lending volunteers where they're needed.

"We want the community to know that we're here," she said, adding the group can be contacted through its Facebook page uner NSLS Kent Salem.

Christina House Program Manager Beth Schmitt said it's nice to have someone like Jackie Spencer who wants to have something like this for the shelter.

"A lot of survivors, they don't make it known. We need more advocates like Jackie, stepping up and working for us," she said.

She acknowledged the Christina House receives a lot of support from area churches and community groups, sororities and the Columbiana BPW, but they've never had something like this done for them before.

Last year, the Christina House program helped 412 people, with the majority of those seeking help for protection orders. At least 65 of the 412 stayed at the shelter, both women and children. Funding isn't available to expand programming, so Schmitt said they try to maintain what they have.

During Domestic Violence Awareness Month this fall, she said they're hosting their annual balloon launch with a breakfast and speakers and offering continuing education units for the first time. The event is planned for Oct. 4 at St. George in Lisbon.

She said they're hoping for a good turnout, with advocacy the topic of the program, to "show anybody can be an advocate for victims of domestic violence."

Spencer offered special thanks to all who donated for the car show and helped in any way, including the store owners who permitted them once again to hold a fundraiser.

"I support the cause," David Newman said.

Mary Ann Greier can be reached at mgreiersalemnews.net

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News Headline: Kent State University at Stark Offers a Scholarship Match Program for Incoming Freshmen | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Posted by North Canton Patch Contributor

In an effort to assist more students in their pursuit of a college degree, Kent State University at Stark in Jackson Township has announced a Scholarship Match Program. The campus will match any outside scholarship that an incoming freshman brings to Kent State Stark for the 2012 fall semester, up to a total of $1,000.

To be eligible for this award, the applicant must meet the following criteria:

•     Be admitted to Kent State Stark for the fall 2012 semester as a new incoming freshman.

•     Be enrolled in a bachelor's degree program. Students may choose one of the Stark Campus' 16 bachelor's degrees or any of Kent State University's 218 undergraduate choices of study.

•     Be registered for a minimum of 12 credit hours each semester that are designated as Stark Campus courses. Students who are registered at the Kent Campus or registered in any of Kent State University's other regional campus's courses (even if they meet on the Stark Campus) are not eligible for this scholarship matching program.

•     The student's outside scholarship must be designated to be awarded in the fall 2012 semester or the 2012/13 academic year.

The maximum amount that a student can receive in the Kent State Stark Scholarship Match Program is $1,000. If a student receives more than $1,000 in outside scholarships, the matching funds will not exceed $1,000. The award will be divided between the fall 2012 and spring 2013 semesters, even if the outside scholarship award is only for the fall semester. This award is not renewable.

This award is applicable only to tuition charges. If a combination of this award and any other tuition scholarship exceeds the cost of tuition at Kent State Stark, the award may be reduced or canceled. All external scholarships reported on the application form are considered as part of your total financial aid package for the 2012-13 academic year and may result in changes to your current financial aid package.

To apply for the Kent State Stark Scholarship Match Program, visit www.stark.kent.edu/admissions/cost/scholarships/match.cfm, print and complete the Scholarship Match Application and return it by November 1, 2012 to:

Student Financial Aid Office

Kent State University at Stark

6000 Frank Avenue NW

North Canton OH 44720

The completed application may also be faxed to the Student Financial Aid Office at 330-499-0301.

For more information about the Scholarship Match Program, contact Kent State Stark's Financial Aid Office at 330-244-3251.

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News Headline: Kent State Stark announces scholarship match program | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Review - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In an effort to assist more students in their pursuit of a college degree, Kent State University at Stark in Jackson Township has announced a scholarship match program. The campus will match any outside scholarship...

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News Headline: NLM's Basheer Kareem Named 2012 ALA Spectrum Scholar (06/15/12) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: WomensHealth.gov
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The World's Largest Medical Library

NLM's Basheer Kareem Named 2012 American Library Association Spectrum Scholar

The American Library Association (ALA) Office for Diversity has awarded a new round of 50 Spectrum Scholarships. Basheer Kareem, a library technician in the National Library of Medicine's National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR), has been selected as a 2012 ALA Spectrum Scholar. Basheer is currently enrolled in the MLIS program at Kent State University School of Library and Information Science, with a degree expected in 2014.

The Spectrum Scholarship Program provides scholarships to American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander students pursuing graduate degrees in library and information studies. Its mission is to improve service at the local level through the development of a representative workforce that reflects the communities served by all libraries. Since 1997, the ALA has awarded more than 800 Spectrum Scholarships. NLM, in partnership with the Medical Library Association, has provided funding for 19 of these scholarships since 2000.

Crystal Smith, a reference librarian in the Rare Books and Early Manuscripts section of NLM's History of Medicine Division, was a 2001 Spectrum Scholar and earned her Master of Library Science degree from the University of Maryland at College Park in 2003.

Yani Yancey, an outreach librarian in the NLM Office of Communications and Public Liaison and former NLM Associate Fellow, was a 2008 Spectrum Scholar and earned her Master of Library Science degree from the University of Maryland at College Park in 2009.

Former NLM Associate Fellows Shannon Jones and Brenda Linares, now at the Tompkins-McCaw Library of the Virginia Commonwealth University and the Louis Calder Memorial Library of the University of Miami, respectively, were also Spectrum Scholarship recipients.

More on the 2012 Spectrum Scholarship winners:

http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/news/ala/2012-spectrum-scholarship-winners-announced

The National Library of Medicine (www.nlm.nih.gov), the world's largest medical library, is a component of the National Institutes of Health.

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News Headline: Cleveland Heights woman finalist in Canada's top poetry contest: Global Village (Trzeciak) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Michael O'Malley
News OCR Text: Joanna Trzeciak, a native of Poland who lives in Cleveland Heights, is one of seven entrants who made the short list this year for Canada's annual Griffin Poetry Prize.

The contest, which accepts both writing and translation of poetry from other languages, recognizes works in two categories: Canadian and international.

The works of Trzeciak and the six others were selected from 481 books of poetry. Trzeciak was one of four finalists in the international category. Her work was a translation of a book of poems by the 90-year-old Polish poet Tadeusz Rozewicz.

At the final rounds of the contest two weeks ago, Trzeciak read excerpts of her translation to more than 1,000 people in a concert hall in Toronto.

"I was so surprised and so invigorated to see how poetry can draw such crowds," said Trzeciak, an associate professor in the department of modern and classical languages studies at Kent State University. "It was just electrifying to see such an attentive gracious audience."

Unfortunately, she didn't win the top prize -- $65,000. That went to British poet David Harsent.

But Trzeciak received $10,000 for getting into the final four. And, more importantly, she said, Rozewicz's poetry got some international exposure.

"His poetry is very powerful," she said, noting that Irish poet and Nobel Prize winner Seamus Heaney, who attended the Toronto event, described Rozewicz as "one of the greatest European poets of the 20th century."

Rozewicz couldn't make the event, but Trzeciak phoned him afterward with the details.

"He was very happy," she said. "It was so heartening for him to hear that his poetry had reached so many people."

So what will Trzeciak do with the $10,000?

"We need a new roof on our house," she said.

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News Headline: Egypt's Revolution Stalls in Divide-and-Conquer Politics (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wall Street Journal - Online
Contact Name: Levinson, Charles
News OCR Text: CAIRO—Early Friday, 16 months after ousting former President Hosni Mubarak from power, Egypt's young revolutionaries huddled with leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood, once close allies, and pleaded for help to save the revolution.

A pair of Supreme Court rulings a day earlier had dissolved the Parliament—which had been filled this year through free elections—and returned legislative powers to the Egyptian military. The rulings came a day after the declaration of martial law, which those at the meeting agree had amounted to a military coup.
Race to Lead Egypt

Ahmed Shafiq, left, prime minister under ousted President Hosni Mubarak, and Mohammed Morsi, a Muslim Brotherhood leader, entered a June 16-17 runoff. Thirteen candidates were on the ballot.

View Interactive
Egypt's Uprising

See events in Egypt's regime change.

View Interactive
Photos

Egyptians vote in a two-day presidential runoff.

View Slideshow
[SB10001424052702303734204577470311264334838]
Zuma Press

A woman showed her finger after voting in Cairo Saturday.

More photos and interactive graphics

The revolutionaries urged the Brotherhood to withdraw their presidential candidate, Mohammed Morsi, from this weekend's election and instead join street protests, according to three people who attended the meeting at the Muslim Brotherhood's Cairo headquarters.

The Brotherhood representatives refused. "It's the end of our relationship, they've made catastrophic choices," said Rabab El-Mahdi, a Marxist political science professor and activist who had mediated between the Brotherhood and the revolutionaries.

Egypt's Arab Spring revolution, which toppled Mr. Mubarak in 18 days, has stalled in a quagmire of divide-and-conquer politics, leaving the country's revolutionaries splintered and disillusioned.

On Friday, there was little visible reaction to the court rulings. A small evening protest drew no more than a few hundred people.

The unity between Egypt's secular and Islamist forces drove the uprising. But growing rifts between the conservative, religious Brotherhood and the largely liberal, secular revolutionaries now appears one of the most damaging cracks in Egypt's revolution.

The Muslim Brotherhood had long preferred backroom deals with the regime over street protests. Egypt's secular opposition, meanwhile, grew suspicious of the Brotherhood's political ambitions and Islamist agenda.

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Laura El-Tantawy / VII Mentor Program for The Wall Street Journal

Ahmed Maher (center), the founder of Egypt's April 6 opposition movement, learns that his name is amongst the 100 people selected on the Constitutional Committee tasked to draw Egypt's post-revolution constitution.

The generals who have ruled Egypt since Mr. Mubarak relinquished power on Feb. 11, 2011, the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, were initially dismissed as bumbling neophytes struggling for a grasp on national politics. They now appear as master tacticians who shrewdly derailed a movement that had seemed unstoppable.

Egypt's 2011 revolt had coalesced around a group of about 15 young political activists who represented a broad swath of political ideologies. Calling themselves the Revolutionary Youth Coalition, they were instrumental in plotting the demonstrations that unraveled the regime. Their ability to bridge deep political divides—uniting Islamists and secularists, in particular—led to the ouster of Mr. Murbarak who held power for 30 years.

The generals who took over Egypt hosted the young activists at the military's marbled intelligence headquarters in Cairo's leafy Heliopolis neighborhood two days after Mr. Mubarak stepped down.

"They said, 'You are our children, you are so very brave,'" recalled Ahmed Maher, a member of the Revolutionary Youth Coalition whose April 6 Movement was instrumental in organizing the protests.

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Laura El-Tantawy for The Wall Street Journal

Mohammed Morsi was endorsed earlier this month by Ahmed Maher, above, the founder of the 6th of April opposition movement after secular revolutionary candidates lost in the primary vote.

"We were so stupid," said Shadi Ghazali Harb, another member of the coalition. "We thought, 'Oh swell, they're really good people, they'll help us.' "

Mssrs. Ghazali Harb and Maher and their fellow revolutionaries demanded sweeping democratic changes that reached Egypt's privileged military class.

"They smiled and told us, 'We'll discuss the details at our next meeting," said Mr. Maher. That never happened.

The unraveling of Egypt's revolution began soon after Mr. Mubarak quit, with the Muslim Brotherhood seeking greater accommodation with the new rulers.
More

Before Vote, Egypt Opposition Hunkers Down

The military in February 2011 set up a committee of legal scholars to draft constitutional amendments—the pivotal first-step in shaping post-Mubarak Egypt. It was stacked with Brotherhood sympathizers, not revolutionaries.

"They knew how to play the game," Mr. Ghazali Harb said of the Brotherhood. "They were cutting deals, while we were banging our fists on the table."

The Muslim Brotherhood supported amendments that called for holding elections first. The victors would lead Egypt's democratic transition, including the drafting of a new constitution. The Brotherhood said the amendments, which also set term limits and reformed election laws, would provide the quickest exit from military rule.

The young revolutionaries were opposed. They wanted to draft a constitution first, arguing it was better to design the rules of Egypt's nascent democracy before getting bogged down in divisive electoral politics.

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Laura El-Tantawy for The Wall Street Journal

Khaled El-Sayed, a member of the Revolutionary Youth Coalition, speaks to people outside the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo.

The rival campaigns on the proposed amendments turned into a religious struggle, opening the first rift in the revolution's Islamist-secular unity.

The Revolutionary Youth Coalition, which included members of both camps, urged their respective leaders to find common ground. The efforts failed. "This was the moment it all went wrong," said Mr. Ghazali Harb.

The amendments won 77% of the vote in the March 2011 referendum, setting up a tumultuous transition that left the military in complete charge.

At the end of July, Islamist parties flexed their new political muscle with a call for a demonstration dubbed "Sharia Friday." Egypt's revolutionaries scrambled to respond, knowing such a demonstration would tug further on the coalition's fraying unity.

Islamists and revolutionary leaders spent three days negotiating principles they could all support at a coming Friday demonstration in Cairo's Tahrir Square. They reached agreement and the revolution seemed back on track.

"It was the perfect moment," said Ms. Mahdi, "a huge achievement."

But hours before the demonstration, hard-line Salafi Islamists began adorning the square with the black-and-white flags of jihad and banners calling for the implementation of Islamic law. Ms. Mahdi made frantic calls to Brotherhood leaders, who told her there was little they could do.

Egypt's non-Islamist opposition pulled out of the demonstration. Instead of heralding the revolution's recaptured unity, the day was dubbed Kandahar Friday, a reference to the Taliban's Afghan stronghold.

As the Islamists grew more menacing, the secular revolutionaries began to splinter, with growing tensions between Islamist and Christian members.

Prominent revolutionaries, such as Google executive Wael Ghonim, disappeared from public view. Mr. Ghonim, whose account of his arrest by security forces during the revolution won the support of millions of Egyptians, has recently returned to politics but kept a low profile.

Fresh whiffs of old regime tactics appeared in the summer of 2011. New coalitions sprouted with military-friendly positions: the Revolutionary Youth Assembly, a Revolutionary Coalition of Youth, and the Revolutionary Youth Union, which is supporting presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq, an ex-Air Force Commander and Mr. Mubarak's last prime minister.

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Laura El-Tantawy / VII Mentor Program for The Wall Street Journal

Mohamed Qassas, one of the founding members of Al-Tayar Al-Masry (The Egyptian Stream) political party, poses for a portrait at his party's headquarters in Cairo on June 12.

The April 6 movement, one of the most powerful grass roots activist movements within the coalition, suddenly splintered in June when a faction turned against the group's leadership.

Longtime opposition activists said the emergence of regime-friendly revolutionary parties and the splintering of influential opposition groups recalled Mubarak-era political tricks.

"Suddenly, the military started saying, 'You're not the only voice speaking for the revolution,' " said Mr. Maher.

In late July, the military started to go after the revolutionary leaders they once praised. They issued Decree #69, accusing the April 6 movement of sowing discord. State media branded movement leaders as foreign-funded agents. April 6 activist Asmaa Mahfouz was charged with assaulting a state employee. She was acquitted last month. Another coalition member, leftist labor activist Mustapha Shawqi was sentenced to two years in prison for joining in a Christian solidarity protest before Mr. Mubarak's ouster.

"Everyone thought the military were idiots. They weren't," said Josh Stacher, a professor at Kent State University in Ohio who spent 15 years in Egypt studying the Mubarak regime's ruling tactics. "The revolutionaries didn't understand how the system works and they miscalculated again and again."

In November, on the eve of parliamentary elections, the military-backed cabinet issued suggested principles for a new constitution. It included provisions that would guarantee secular governance, as well as protections of military privilege. The document infuriated the Muslim Brotherhood and split the secular opposition, drawing support from revolutionaries angry with the Islamists.

"If your goal is to splinter the opposition, you couldn't draft a more perfect document," said Mohammad al-Qassas, a former member of the Muslim Brotherhood and member of the Revolutionary Youth Coalition.

The Brothers, after refusing protests for months, returned to the streets for one day in November and were joined by young revolutionaries. But the Brothers went home that night. Security forces attacked the protesters who stayed.

Dozens died in the week of clashes that followed. The Brotherhood refused to come to the revolutionaries' defense or support their demands that the military relinquish its grip. Parliamentary elections were days away and the Brotherhood was poised to dominate the races.

"I screamed at them, 'Why are you selling us out and running to the military, don't you realize they will eat you alive in the end?'" Ms. Mahdi said.

The Brotherhood won control of Egypt's 508-seat Parliament in free elections that ended in January.

The two Revolutionary Youth Coalition members who won seats accused Brotherhood lawmakers of siding with the military against them. One, Basem Kamel, pushed a bill banning military trials for civilians and requiring independent prison monitors to prevent torture. The legislation was stalled by Brotherhood lawmakers, raising accusations they were burying bills to appease the ruling generals

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Laura El-Tantawy / VII Mentor Program for The Wall Street Journal

Shady al-Ghazaly Harb, a member of the Revolutionary Youth Coalition, discusses the current situation in Egypt at Cafe Riche in Cairo.

In early February, days after Parliament was seated, the military next went after nongovernment organizations, arresting 43 senior NGO workers, including 16 Americans. The targeted NGOs gave legal support for activists, pushed voter education and provided more than 25,000 election monitors during the Parliament elections.

The Americans were allowed to leave the country, but the Egyptians' criminal trials are continuing. The arrests had a chilling effect and dried up funding, the groups said.

Egyptian NGOs have mustered just one-third of the vote monitors for this weekend's presidential elections that they employed in the Parliament elections. All but three international monitoring groups are staying out of the presidential vote.

As Egypt headed into presidential primary elections earlier this year, the Muslim Brotherhood rallied behind Mr. Morsi.

Egypt's revolutionaries were split between moderate Islamist Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh and opposition activist Hamdeen Sabahy. Both men had solid revolutionary credentials. The Revolutionary Youth Coalition preached unity but failed to persuade them to unite on one ticket.

Both candidates lost. Together, their vote totals would have given them an easy victory.

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Laura El-Tantawy / VII Mentor Program for The Wall Street Journal

Dr. Rabab El-Mahdi poses for a portrait at the Sawy Culture Wheel in central Cairo on June 13.

"They both thought they could win without the other," said Moaz Abdel Kareem, a member of the Revolutionary Youth Coalition and former member of the Muslim Brotherhood. "It was a bad decision."

Mssrs. Morsi and Shafiq, the two candidates least supportive of the revolution, made the presidential runoff, which begins Saturday.

The Revolutionary Youth Coalition kept trying.

On June 4, they attended a meeting of Mssrs. Morsi, Aboul Fotouh, and Sabahi at a five-star hotel along the Nile River in Cairo to broker a deal. They wanted Mr. Morsi to appoint non-Islamists to prominent government positions, as well as equal representation on the committee to draft the new constitution, in exchange for the support of Mssrs. Aboul Fotouh and Sabahi.

Mr. Morsi wasn't eager to compromise, according to several people who attended.

"He seemed confident that he could win without them," said Essam Shibl, a member of the centrist Islamist Wasat Party who mediated the meeting.

One activist, Nawara Nagm, stormed out in protest. "All of you just negotiate for days and then no one ever agrees in the end," she shouted as she left, according to those present.

The Brotherhood didn't offer the guarantees. Mr. Aboul Fotouh agreed to endorse him anyway. Mr. Sabahy refused.

Following the rulings by the high court this week, the Brotherhood's strategy of cooperation with the military seems failed.

Some Brotherhood leaders now acknowledge miscalculations.

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Laura El-Tantawy for The Wall Street Journal

Protesters take cover from the sun under an Egyptian flag as tens of demonstrators stood outside the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo on June 14 demanding the removal of presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq from the second round of elections because of his ties to the former regime.

Mohammed al-Baltagi, a leading Brotherhood lawmaker, called "the Brotherhood's preoccupation with politics as opposed to revolution…a strategic failure."

Egypt's revolutionaries made a last-ditch effort overnight. Four members of the Revolutionary Youth Coalition huddled with three senior Brotherhood leaders from 1 a.m. until 3 a.m. early Friday in Cairo. Pull out of the election and rejoin the secular revolutionary forces, they told the Brotherhood representatives.

But the Brothers said they were convinced Mr. Morsi would win the presidency. Their national polling showed Mr. Morsi with a two-to-one advantage over Mr. Shafiq, they told the revolutionaries, according to Mssrs. Abdel Hamid and Ghazali Harb, who were at the meeting.

If Mr. Shafiq won, they said, it could only be through fraud and they would then rally their forces, according to those present.

"I told them, 'Let's assume Morsi wins, what kind of power will he have?' The military has the keys to the whole process," said Mr. Abdel Hamid.

The revolutionaries argued: If you lose and mobilize after the vote, the regime will portray you as sore losers, and it won't work.

No deal was struck.

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News Headline: Police Combine Patrols near Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mutual aid agreement creates shared jurisdiction for city, university police

This summer and fall, residents can expect to see more police cars in certain neighborhoods near Kent State University.

City and university officials are signing off on a mutual aid agreement between the Kent Police Department and the Kent State Police that would create joint areas of jurisdiction in neighborhoods around campus.

Kent Police Chief Michelle Lee said the agreement defines two primary areas near campus where officers from both departments will have jurisdiction to act in various circumstances.

"It's going to help us," Lee said. "It will certainly help us with saturating the area with more officers."

The two areas where both departments will have authority to act are defined by street boundaries and are defined as follows:

•Southwest of campus, this area boundary extends from: East Main Street, to South Lincoln Street to Summit Street; and then from Summit Street to South DePeyster Street; from South DePeyster north to Haymaker Parkway; then Haymaker Parkway back to East Main Street; and then from East Main Street to South Lincoln Street.
•Northwest of campus, this area boundary extends from: North Lincoln Street to Crain Avenue; then from Crain Avenue east to Wilson Avenue; south on Wilson Avenue to East Main Street and then back over to South Lincoln Street.
Lee said a large portion of the area southwest of campus is owned by the university, and now city cops will have the ability to enforce laws there. Likewise, the area north of campus is largely private property where city police have jurisdiction, but now university cops will be able to enforce state and local laws in that neighborhood.

"It benefits the university in that the university officers can now patrol both of those areas where they generally didn't before, and they have the freedom to go ahead and act within those areas on, of course, not only state code but city code," she said. "Their officers may be requesting our officers now because I see them patrolling that area more."

Historically, other college towns in Ohio have shared jurisdictions. Though it's called a mutual aid agreement neither department needs to call the other to act now in those areas, Lee said.

Both departments have been helpful in the past to each other, Lee said, and this agreement simply erases some gray areas for jurisdictional lines to ease confusion among officers on a day-to-day basis.

For now, officers from the separate departments will be patrolling in their own cars, but eventually the agreement allows for joint patrols where officers from both departments operate out of the same car. It will be several months if and when that happens, Lee said.

And though this agreement more carefully defines cooperation among the two departments there is no talk of combining them.

"We have separate issues, we have separate entities," Lee said. "We have very different philosophies as far as enforcement goes. But we recognize there are times when both departments have to work together. And that's what the mutual aid agreement is for."

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News Headline: Bolivar residents receive college scholarships | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BOLIVAR -

Nineteen Bolivar students have received college scholarships.

Emily Amos, daughter of Shon Amos, received the renewable $2,000 Rocket Award. She plans to major in nursing at the University of Toledo.

Rachel Beach, daughter of William and Kerry Beach, is the recipient of the Trojan Foundation Jack Sundheimer Memorial Scholarship, $750; the University of Mount Union Music Proficiency Scholarship, $4,000 renewable; and the University of Mount Union Heritage Award, $7,000 renewable. She plans to major in elementary education at the University of Mount Union.

Jamie Cochran, daughter of Lisa Cochran, received the ASU Scholarship, $3,000 renewable and the Rotary Scholarship, $500. She plans to major in broadcasting and journalism at Arizona State University.

Elaina Cush, daughter of Matt and Wendy Cush, received the College Club of Tuscarawas County scholarship, $1,000; the American Legion Scholarship, $500; the Trojan Foundation Academic Scholarship, $500; and the The Ohio State University Academic Scholarship, $1,800 renewable. She will major in biology and pre-med at The Ohio State University.

Sarah DiGirolamo, daughter of Larry and Melissa DiGirolamo, is the recipient of the Music Department Scholarship, $500 renewable and the Academic Scholarship, $1,000 renewable. She plans to major in music education at Kent State University.

Matthew Gamber is the son of Stan and Sue Gamber. He received the Academic Scholarship from Kent State University, $5,500 renewable. He plans to major in actuarial mathematics at Kent State University.

Nicholas Gamber, son of Stan and Sue Gamber, received the Academic Scholarship for $5,000 renewable and the Akron Honors Scholarship for $3,000 renewable. He plans to major in bioengineering at the University of Akron.

Dean Goodnight is the son of Tim and Jane Goodnight. He received the Aultman Blood Center Scholarship for $500 and plans to major in psychology at Kent State University-Stark.

Danelle Haney, daughter of Roger and Tracy Haney, received the Stark State Scholarship for $5,000 and plans to major in physical therapy at Stark State College of Technology.

Bryan Kane, son Daniel and Roxanne Kane, is the recipient of the Ruritans Scholarship, $500; the Richard Ronald Memorial Scholarship, $250; the Tuscarawas County Community Foundation Scholarship, $1,000; the Trojan Foundation Alumni Scholarship, $500; and the The Ohio State University Trustee Scholarship, $1,800 renewable. He plans to major in business at The Ohio State University.

Robert Leedy is the son of Gary and Cathy Leedy. He received the Blue and Gold Scholarship for $7,524 renewable and plans to major in pharmacy at Toledo University.

Zachary Lynch, son of Shawn and Valorie Lynch, received of the Scott Graham Memorial Scholarship for $1,000. He will attend EMT school at Buckeye Career Center.

Nineteen Bolivar students have received college scholarships.

Emily Amos, daughter of Shon Amos, received the renewable $2,000 Rocket Award. She plans to major in nursing at the University of Toledo.

Rachel Beach, daughter of William and Kerry Beach, is the recipient of the Trojan Foundation Jack Sundheimer Memorial Scholarship, $750; the University of Mount Union Music Proficiency Scholarship, $4,000 renewable; and the University of Mount Union Heritage Award, $7,000 renewable. She plans to major in elementary education at the University of Mount Union.

Jamie Cochran, daughter of Lisa Cochran, received the ASU Scholarship, $3,000 renewable and the Rotary Scholarship, $500. She plans to major in broadcasting and journalism at Arizona State University.

Elaina Cush, daughter of Matt and Wendy Cush, received the College Club of Tuscarawas County scholarship, $1,000; the American Legion Scholarship, $500; the Trojan Foundation Academic Scholarship, $500; and the The Ohio State University Academic Scholarship, $1,800 renewable. She will major in biology and pre-med at The Ohio State University.

Sarah DiGirolamo, daughter of Larry and Melissa DiGirolamo, is the recipient of the Music Department Scholarship, $500 renewable and the Academic Scholarship, $1,000 renewable. She plans to major in music education at Kent State University.

Matthew Gamber is the son of Stan and Sue Gamber. He received the Academic Scholarship from Kent State University, $5,500 renewable. He plans to major in actuarial mathematics at Kent State University.

Nicholas Gamber, son of Stan and Sue Gamber, received the Academic Scholarship for $5,000 renewable and the Akron Honors Scholarship for $3,000 renewable. He plans to major in bioengineering at the University of Akron.

Dean Goodnight is the son of Tim and Jane Goodnight. He received the Aultman Blood Center Scholarship for $500 and plans to major in psychology at Kent State University-Stark.

Danelle Haney, daughter of Roger and Tracy Haney, received the Stark State Scholarship for $5,000 and plans to major in physical therapy at Stark State College of Technology.

Bryan Kane, son Daniel and Roxanne Kane, is the recipient of the Ruritans Scholarship, $500; the Richard Ronald Memorial Scholarship, $250; the Tuscarawas County Community Foundation Scholarship, $1,000; the Trojan Foundation Alumni Scholarship, $500; and the The Ohio State University Trustee Scholarship, $1,800 renewable. He plans to major in business at The Ohio State University.

Robert Leedy is the son of Gary and Cathy Leedy. He received the Blue and Gold Scholarship for $7,524 renewable and plans to major in pharmacy at Toledo University.

Zachary Lynch, son of Shawn and Valorie Lynch, received of the Scott Graham Memorial Scholarship for $1,000. He will attend EMT school at Buckeye Career Center.

Maggie Mann is the daughter of Howard and Barb Mann. She received the Walsh University Honors Scholarship for $8,000 renewable and plans to major in biology and minor in psychology at Walsh University.

Rachel Pettay, daughter of Duane and Pam Pettay, is the recipient of the University of Akron Academic Scholarship, $3,000 renewable; the University of Akron Honors College Scholarship, $1,500; the Ruritan Scholarship, $500; and the Rotary Scholarship, $500. She plans to major in electrical engineering at the University of Akron.

Shanna Skirtch is the daughter of John and Janine Skirtich. She received the Kent State Trustee Scholarship for $1,000 renewable and plans to major in psychology at Kent State University.

Layla Spore, daughter of Thomas and Bonnie Spore, is the recipient of the Kent State Trustee Scholarship for $3,000 renewable. She plans to major in accounting at Kent State University.

Dayne Thomas, son of Dayne and Angela Thomas, is the recipient of the Gateway Scholarship for $1,000 renewable. He plans to major in chemical engineering at Ohio University.

Kayla Tsantis is the daughter of Jim Tsantis and Jeff and Lisa Aul. She is the recipient of the Stark State College of Technology scholarship, full tuition, $5,000 renewable; the Ruritan Scholarship, $550; the Bolivar American Legion Scholarship, $500; and the Community Business Association Scholarship, $500. She plans to major in respiratory therapy care at Stark State College of Technology.

Tyler West, son of Kevin and Vicki West, is the recipient of the Choose Ohio First S.T.E.M. scholarship for $5,000 renewable and plans to major in mechanical engineering technology at the University of Akron.

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News Headline: 25 women will vie for Miss Ohio crown | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MANSFIELD -- Twenty-five contestants will compete for the title of Miss Ohio this year.

Here is a closer look at each candidate:

» Miss Clayland: Ashley Warholic, Mansfield, Baldwin Wallace College. She is a dancer. Her platform: Creating strong leaders for tomorrow.

» Miss Ohio River: Chelsi Howman, Ashland, Ashland University. She plays the banjo. Her platform: Stop bullying now: take a stand, lend a hand!

» Miss North Central Ohio: Jenna Fowls, Warsaw, Malone University. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Dating violence.

» Miss Maple City: Kristen Free, Frankfort, The Ohio State University. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Living as a light to the future generations.

» Miss Mohican Valley: Veronica Wende, Lima, Hillsdale College. She is a vocalist. Her platform: "Shine On" through tissue and organ donation.

» Miss Huron County: Allison Vance, Mount Gilead, Kent State University. She is a vocalist. Her platform: SPARK: Suicide Prevention Awareness Reaching Kids.

» Miss Miami Valley: Heather Wells, Warren, Kent State University. She is a dancer. Her platform: Divorce recovery for youth.

» Miss Mansfield: Cayla Hellwarth, of Celina, The Ohio State University. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Give life, give blood -- The American Red Cross.

» Miss Willard: Kara Wagner, Wheelersburg, Northern Kentucky University. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Animal rescue -- "Adoption is the Option."

» Miss Fallen Timbers: Nina Haaskivi, Shaker Heights, Bowling Green State University. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Children's Miracle Network Hospitals.

» Miss Buckeye State: April O'Brien, Columbus, Bethany College. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Netsmartz: Internet safety.

» Miss Central Ohio: Gabrielle Bailey, Dover, Dover High School. She is a dancer. Her platform: S.A.V.E -- Stand Against Violent Environments.

» Miss Greater Butler County: Anjelica Francisco, Cincinnati, Eastern Michigan University. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Women's healthcare: Be your own advocate.

» Miss Lake Festival: Jena Sweigart, Celina, St. Mary's College. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Take it to the bank -- feeding America.

» Miss Northwestern Ohio: Samantha Hartings, Coldwater, Ohio Northern University. She is a dancer. Her platform: Books for P.L.A.Y: Promoting Literacy at Youth.

» Miss Cuyahoga County: Allison Goodwin, Broadview Heights, Ohio University. She is a dancer. Her platform: Live healthy America.

» Miss Heart of Ohio: Erin O'Brien, Columbus, DePauw University. She is a vocalist/ukulele performer. Her platform: Say Y.E.S.: Youth Education in Safety.

» Miss Vacationland: Layne Schneider, Beavercreek, Ohio Northern University. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Anger to Arts: Targeting middle childhood for success.

» Miss All American City: Mahogany Fleming, Cincinnati, the University of Toledo. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Keeping the arts alive in school.

» Miss Greater Cleveland: Tera Coleman, South Point, The Ohio State University. She is a vocalist. Her platform: Beat the odds: Access to higher education for disadvantaged students.

» Miss North Coast: Jessica Nelson, Toledo, The University of Toledo. She is a dancer. Her platform: P.E.T.S. -- Promoting Education, Training and Safety of pets.

» Miss Montgomery County: Alissa Brumbaugh, North Canton, The University of Akron. She is a vocalist. Her platform: FCS for Success: Promoting family and consumer sciences in schools.

» Miss Maumee Valley: Chelsea Aiello, Norwalk, Lourdes University. She is a vocalist. Her platform is: Donate life.

» Miss Crystal Lake: Devon Stansbury, Rockford, The University of Cincinnati. She is a dancer. Her platform: Angels for Animals: "Be Their W.I.N.G.S."

» Miss West Central Ohio: Elissa McCracken, Waynesburg, Pa., Ohio Northern University. She is a pianist. Her platform: Stop cyber bullying.

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News Headline: Akron celebrations -- June 17 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stephen Mitchell, a sport pedagogy professor at Kent State, is the new president-elect of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education. He also is president and advocacy committee chairman for the Ohio Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance.

Six area college students will receive $3,000 scholarships in memory of longtime Akron Beacon Journal editor John S. Knight and public relations professional Ludel Sauvageot. They included Kent State student Kathryn Coduto of North Canton, who is studying electronic media management.

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News Headline: Kent State to host 35 scholars from Iraq (Lefton, Nettey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is one of five institutions selected to host the 2012 Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program for Iraq this summer.

The program is sponsored by the Council for International Exchange of Scholars and supported by the U.S. Department of State's Educational and Cultural Affairs Bureau and the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.

Now in its third year, the program will host 35 Iraqi scholars in five discipline-based groups at five selected U.S. institutions from July 7 through Sept. 15. KSU will host the science and technology scholars from Iraq. The other institutions will host scholars in agricultural science, engineering, teaching English as a foreign language/linguistics and environmental science.

"This selection reflects our commitment to building global bridges, from increasing the number of international students on our campuses to creating more academic and cultural opportunities through partnerships with the world's leading universities," KSU President Lester Lefton said.

Mentoring the Fulbright Iraq scholars will be a team of 13 KSU experts in science and technology

In addition to scholarly work in science and technology with their assigned mentors, the Fulbright Iraq scholars will engage in cultural and civic activities, including visits to the Ohio Statehouse, the Ohio Board of Regents, local city council proceedings, local Rotary and Kiwanis Club meetings, Niagara Falls, Porthouse Theatre, an Indians-Yankees baseball gameandan Iftar dinner with KSU's Muslim Students Association and local host families.

"This is a wonderful honor and opportunity for Kent State," Nettey said. "Hosting the Fulbright program is a major step in meeting President Lefton's goal of increasing the international focus of the university, and we are looking forward to working with these esteemed Iraqi scholars."

For more information on the Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program for Iraq, visit www.cies.org/fulbright/Iraq .

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News Headline: Downtowns come back; planning, vision are important (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Downtowns, undervalued and unappreciated as Americans left their central cities in the decades since World War II, may be making a comeback, especially when the major players in communities wake up to the potential that exists.

The University of Akron Wednesday approved an updated master plan that could lead to $400 million in new construction and a much improved campus. It has become a major player in the resurgence of Akron's downtown.

Cleveland's downtown is improving because of the Horseshoe Casino and the Medical Mart, but also because of efforts that began under former President Michael Schwartz to improve the urban campus of Cleveland State University. Youngstown State is beginning to have a similar effect on downtown Youngstown.

Here in Portage County, the two cities with traditional downtowns are Kent and Ravenna. The villages of Mantua and Garrettsville also have traditional downtowns.

Kent's downtown currently is benefiting from the generosity of Ron Burbick, the entrepreneur and philanthropist, and the commitment of Kent State University which, especially under President Lester Lefton, sees the possibilities and is willing to take the risks and bear the occasional insults to achieve on behalf of both the community and the university.

Lefton keeps challenging the community with, "Where do we go from here?" More power to him, we say. Although it will have achieved a great deal with the current round of building and changes, there is more to be done. The community can reach higher. It needs to identify new goals. Planning sponsored by KSU a dozen years ago helped the community visualize its future. Maybe it's time to update the plan.

Ravenna is beginning to stir too. A decision by Parker Hannifin to locate a $17 million research center adjacent to its plant at the intersection of S.R. 14 and S.R. 88 is a good sign. It will bring 34 jobs with it, many of them involving highly paid, highly skilled, and well-educated persons.

It would be extremely helpful if the two biggest players in Ravenna, the county and Robinson Memorial Hospital, would become more involved in Ravenna's rejuvenation. Together, they represent potential not all that different from what Kent State University brings to Kent.

Both have a big stake in Ravenna's future. Robinson Memorials's main campus, valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars, is in Ravenna. A healthy, thriving and attractive community reflects well on the hospital. Its big brother affiliate, Summa, is making major commitments to the improvement of downtown Akron because its leadership sees the possibilities as well as the perils of not helping out.

The government of Portage County is personified as much as anything by the city of Ravenna, so much so, that sometimes it is difficult to keep track of where one begins and the other leaves off. A beautiful, thriving Ravenna uplifts Portage County.

Working with the city, these two players could be helpful in charting the future of the county seat and creating a vision and setting goals. The University of Akron, for instance, employs the Boston firm of Sasaki Associates to help it plan for the future. That may be too pricey, but certainly it would be worth the three parties teaming up to hire a reputable planning firm to help create a vision of what Ravenna can be and begin identifying achievable goals.

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News Headline: Four Ohio universities among most expensive in America | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Four of Ohio's public universities are in the top 15 of a new list of the most expensive public colleges in the country. The US Department of Education ranks Miami University as the second most expensive with a net cost of over $22,000 per year. Ohio State, Ohio University, and the University of Cincinnati also made the list of top 15. Kent State ranked 31st most expensive public college in the country. The University of Akron was not ranked. The Cincinnati Enquirer reports Education Secretary Arne Duncan blames cuts in state subsidies as the main driving force behind the high cost of education. Ohio's per-student subsidy dropped 18 percent between 2006 and 2011. The University of Guam was named the most expensive public university in America, costing nearly $26,000 per year.

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News Headline: Rust Belt Resistance: How a Small Community Took on Big Oil and Won | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Truth Out
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: It was only a short time ago on April 24, the two-year anniversary of the 2010 catastrophic explosion on the British Petroleum (BP) Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico, that the government made their first arrest of a BP engineer.

Justice Department charges noted that the greasy, toxic discharge was far more disastrous than reported by the company.

No surprise for the good citizens of Lima, Ohio. The small community of 40,000 learned firsthand in the mid-1990s how the world's fourth largest company in the world specializes in lies and deception as much as it does in oil and gas.

So, be forewarned, if you didn't much like BP to begin with, this book will only add more fuel to the fire.

In Rust Belt Resistance, Author Perry Bush, professor at nearby Bluffton University, tells a story published by Kent State University Press of how top BP officials in London headquarters exhorted workers at their Lima refinery to save their jobs by working "harder and smarter."

All the while, these same executives were actually planning to close the plant with the ready-made excuse that workers failed to turn the unproductive and unprofitable aging plant around.

But, to the surprise, and embarrassment, of these corporate big wigs, workers made numerous operating innovations that resulted in an astounding turnaround. Both production and profits were dramatically increased in the century-old refinery.

Even the local refinery manager took BP officials at their word and worked earnestly to encourage workplace ingenuity. But all was for naught. BP executives pushed aside the well-intentioned plant manager, dodged all the political pleadings of the persistent mayor and even brushed off several serious buyout offers.

Corporate governance was undeterred. The refinery was to be closed, period.

Overproduction on the world market resulted in a temporary drop in prices during the mid-1990s so the BP boardroom privately decided to reduce refining capacity in order to further invest in more profitable U.S. exploration.

A prime example of cutting domestic production amid duplicitous allegations that more oil production in this country is needed, even in protected wetlands and offshore sanctuaries.

In another self-serving "profit versus public" moment, the company was unwilling to sell the Lima refinery to competitors, thus leaving hundreds of families in the lurch.

Of course, this is considered normal business in some quarters as described by Bush. The late free-market apostle and Nobel Prize-winning ultra-conservative economist Milton Friedman is quoted as bluntly stating that "the one and only...social responsibility of business" is to "increase profits."

Corporations Dominate the American Experience

The history professor and author does a very good job tracking similar business decisions that conflicted with communities dating back to the 19th century rail and steel tycoons.

These sections should greatly interest the reader.

One such noteworthy reference is the Supreme Court Santa Clara decision of 1886 which Bush describes as recognizing that corporations "were real persons, deserving of every protection as natural beings under the Fourteenth Amendment. Corporate lawyers quickly used the Santa Clara ruling to induce courts to strike down hundreds of laws regulating corporations and in other ways restricting their autonomy as real persons."

As an aside, Bush mentions a 1938 observation by liberal Supreme Court justice Hugo Black that 50 percent of cases invoking the Fourteenth Amendment, originally intended to define citizenship for freed slaves, actually expanded rights of corporations while only less than half of one percent involved issues of racial justice.

These documented historical references are woven throughout the book and very much helps readers better understand current events.

For example, the extremely controversial Jan. 21, 2010 U.S. Supreme Court Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission viewing "corporations as people" and allowing unlimited corporate contributions to Super PACs can be traced back to the Santa Clara decision.

Resistance of the Few

Ultimately, the Lima refinery was saved and still operates today.

But this success did not come from a broad-based labor or community campaign which I first assumed when eyeing the title of the book. In fact, much like experiences during the original "Rust Belt" layoffs of the 1970s, the mid-1990's threat to Lima was not met by a mobilized and socially conscious movement of thousands.

In fact, relatively muted responses to unmitigated and unloosed corporate greed were the same in both periods – largely, an utter failure by the labor movement and the political establishment to challenge corporate decisions that savaged communities and families.

Along with efforts of the indefatigable Lima mayor, it was ultimately a notable international investor that bailed out the Lima refinery after making BP a very profitable offer.

But there seems to be no end to BP's duplicity in this story. There is another twist that exposes the betrayal that runs deep in the corporate world.

This occurred when BP seriously undercut the new owners of the Lima refinery by keeping secret for a few more days BP's merger with Amoco.

"It was imperative that the Amoco deal remain super-secret until after it had closed its sale of the Lima refinery," Bush reports. The Lima refinery investors assumed that BP would be a major customer. With the Amoco deal, BP had all the refined oil it needed, placing the new Lima refinery owners in dire straits.

"Oh well!" we might have heard Milton Friedman sigh.

But the failure of unions and the community to massively challenge the corporations in the "Rust Belt" period is the larger story. And it had consequences. Lima itself, in the end, was not saved. Today, the former booming, proud industrial little giant in America's heartland stands a different city.

The author points out that the U.S. Census estimated the poverty rate in 2003 was at nearly 23 percent. Another report only a few years earlier estimated another 20 per cent living below that bare minimum.

No More Limas

The book effectively tells a story of greed and corruption in one small town that actually had also swept like a hurricane through hundreds of other communities in the previous two decades. And, it will again unless we learn from our past as documented very well by Professor Bush.

As a country and as a people, we have to ultimately decide upon issues raised by the experience in America's "Rust Belt."

First, and most obviously, we have to definitively reject any notion that cold, calculating corporations have warm blood running through their veins.

Second, and more controversially, we have to seriously consider organizing our natural resources to serve the public interest just as we do with our publically owned national parks. Removing slick speculators and privateers from ownership and control of our treasured oil and gas reserves would mean the common interests of Lima refinery workers and the community would finally be prioritized and valued.

Haven't we seen enough damage done to our communities by oil companies and, I would add, banks? Why is nationalization of these mammoth institutions of narrow, personal self interest not even worthy of discussion in Washington?

Thankfully, these issues are now being raised by Occupy Movements all over this country and all over this world. Nationalizing major industries that have been looted to enrich a handful of selfish and gluttonous owners, for example, is currently a major demand of the freedom and justice movement in Egypt.

If broad discussion of radical solutions and more resolute resistance to corporate greed had been present in Lima, perhaps the city's fortunes would have turned out better.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license.

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News Headline: Kent City Council approves $10,000 grant for Kent State Folk Festival | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State Folk Festival was the big winner of the annual Celebrate Kent! grant program, which awards city funds to organizations that host events in downtown Kent.

Kent City Council approved $30,000 in grant funding recently that will go toward reimbursing groups that host programs downtown, with $10,000 going toward the Kent State Folk Festival. Local groups requested $36,730 in funding from the city grant program.

“The KSU Folk Festival was moved to September (and) was very successful last year,” said Dan Smith, economic development director for the city of Kent.

The annual folk festival, which will bring performances and workshops to KSU's campus and downtown Kent, opens its 46th year on Sept. 20 with a performance by modern folk musicians Tracy Grammer and John Gorka at the Kent Stage.

Standing Rock Cultural Arts also received $10,000 in funding, $5,000 for the annual Who's Your Mama? Earth Day block party and film festival and $5,000 for its Downtown Innovative Community Events, which include the Cider Festival, Sidewalk Cinema and the “Make Mine With Ice” ice carving exhibition.

Kent City Council also approved:

•$2,500 for the Haymaker Parkway overpass mural at the Haymaker Farmers' Market.
•$1,700 for the Crooked River Fine Arts Council's Kent Blues Festival.
•$1,500 for the Kent Historical Society's “Made in Kent” lecture series.
•$1,000 for the Haymaker Farmers' Market's live music series.
•$1,000 for All Together Now Inc.'s Kent Community Dinners
•$800 for the Kent Jaycees' Grill for Good charity fundraiser.
•$700 for the Western Reserve Folk Arts Ghost Walk.

The grant funding goes toward advertising, clean-up and other “hard costs” at downtown events and much be matched by the organizations hosting the events. The grants cannot be used to pay staff.

Smith said that although the Haymaker mural was not an event, the city's administration recommended funding because Celebrate Kent! grant funding had been used for a similar project, the “Healing Hearts” mural currently mounted on Townhall II's North Water Street building, last year.

“We did kind of set a precedent with the Townhall II mural,” Smith said.

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News Headline: AUDIO: Looking back at The Cleveland Press | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The death watch for print newspapers gained steam this week as Advance Publications laid off 600 workers at papers in New Orleans and Alabama. The news comes on the eve of the 30th anniversary of the folding of The Cleveland Press. WKSU's Kabir Bhatia reports on what it means to a city -- journalistically and otherwise -- when newspapers fade to black.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/32070

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