Report Overview:
Total Clips (23)
Alumni (1)
Athletics (16)
Chemical Physics (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Crain's publisher Brian Tucker receives SPJ Distinguished Service Award 06/19/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Athletics (16)
Baseball team bringing national exposure to Kent State: College World Series Insider 06/19/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State Golden Flashes avoid College World Series elimination with tense 5-4 win over Florida Gators (Video) (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State notebook: Jason Bagoly battles despite personal loss (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State 5, Florida 4: Flashes knock off nation's top team (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Golden Flashes eliminate No. 1 Florida Gators, advance in College World Series (Video) (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

College World Series Notebook: Heavy-hearted Jason Bagoly delivers for Golden Flashes (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Golden Flashes run in College World Series brings bright future (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State 'shocks the world' and stays alive in Omaha (Videos) 06/19/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Kent State beats No. 1 seed Florida to remain in the College World Series 06/19/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

Next game will be Wednesday Underdog Kent State beat Florida this afternoon, a victory that sent the No. 1 seed in the College World Series home. The Golden Flashes won 5-4 in their...

Kent State keeps the dream alive (Video) (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 ESPN Text Attachment Email

Kent State stuns Florida in College World Series (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 USA Today Text Attachment Email

Kent State eliminates No. 1 Florida from College World Series (Videos) (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 ESPN Text Attachment Email

Kent State sends No. 1 Florida packing (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 MLB.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State, Arkansas big winners on Day 4 (Stricklin) 06/19/2012 MLB.com Text Attachment Email

Kent: CWS 'watch party' at Water Street Tavern (Video) 06/19/2012 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

Morning news headlines for June 19, 2012 06/19/2012 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email


Chemical Physics (1)
U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Ohio (June 15) 06/18/2012 OptoIQ Text Attachment Email

ALEXANDRIA, Va., June 15 -- The following federal patents were awarded to inventors in Ohio. Kent State University Assigned Patent Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, has been assigned a patent (8,199,286) developed by Deng-Ke Yang,...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing Program Awards Grants to 55 Schools of Nursing to Provide Scholarships for Students in Accelerated Degree Programs 06/18/2012 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...DePaul University Duke University Duquesne University Edgewood College Fairleigh Dickinson University Georgia Health Sciences University Kent State University Linfield College Medical University of South Carolina MidAmerica Nazarene University Montana State University ...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Hudson author Jacqueline Marino details CWRU medical school life in 'White Coats' (Marino) 06/19/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Bill Cosby to perform at Kent State University at Tuscarawas (Andrews) 06/19/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Bill Cosby will perform at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 24 at the Kent State University at Tuscawaras Performing Arts Center. "We are extremely pleased to bring someone of Bill Cosby's stature to our community,"...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
Battle over e-book pricing comes to a head between libraries and publishers (Boon) 06/18/2012 AlaskaDispatch.com Text Attachment Email

...price. "Everyone is trying to figure out what the actual business model is going to look like," says Belinda Boon, a collection development expert at Kent State University's library school in Kent, Ohio. "There have been a lot more efforts in recent months for libraries, vendors, and publishers...

E-book battle: Libraries, publishers square off on pricing (Boon) 06/18/2012 Christian Science Monitor Text Email

...price. "Everyone is trying to figure out what the actual business model is going to look like," says Belinda Boon, a collection development expert at Kent State University's library school in Kent, Ohio. "There have been a lot more efforts in recent months for libraries, vendors, and publishers...


News Headline: Crain's publisher Brian Tucker receives SPJ Distinguished Service Award | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Crain's publisher and editorial director Brian Tucker today received the Distinguished Service Award from the Cleveland chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists at a luncheon at the City Club of Cleveland.

Mr. Tucker, publisher at Crain's since 1988, came to the paper as editor in 1985 after serving as an assistant bureau chief at The Associated Press' Los Angeles bureau. Previously, he worked at The (Ashtabula) Star Beacon and The Conneaut News Herald, the latter in his hometown.

Mr. Tucker, a Kent State University graduate and former member of the school's board of trustees, extolled the virtues of the newspaper industry while also acknowledging the changes and challenges facing journalism.

“When young people tell me they don't read newspapers because they get all their information online, I tell them that what they don't understand is that without newspapers, you don't find that news anywhere,” Mr. Tucker said Wednesday.

“Now, (the challenges facing journalism) threaten what we are as a society.”

Mr. Tucker praised watchdog work done by papers such as The Plain Dealer, which because of its investigation into Cuyahoga County corruption permanently changed the way county government operates.

Peter Brown, the publisher of Automotive News a Crain's Cleveland sister publication based in Detroit, presented Mr. Tucker for the award. During his remarks, Mr. Brown talked of Mr. Tucker's actions in the late-1970s, when he and several colleagues — including Mr. Brown — resigned their reporting jobs at the daily Mining Journal in Michigan's Upper Peninsula after their publisher fired two editors when they refused to publish a biased and untrue article about then-President Jimmy Carter and his wife.

“He has built Crain's Cleveland Business into an important, trusted place to work,” Mr. Brown said. “Cleveland and Northeast Ohio are better for his having committed to this area.”

Also honored Wednesday were longtime Cleveland public relations executive Tony Kozlowski, who currently serves as a consultant to Eaton Corp., and Solon High School graduate Carolyn Crowcroft, to whom SPJ gave its Philip W. Porter Scholarship. Miss Crowcroft will attend Indiana University in the fall.

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News Headline: Baseball team bringing national exposure to Kent State: College World Series Insider | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Omaha, Neb. -- It's fair to say that what Kent State has reaped, in terms of branding and recognition from its NCAA College World Series appearance -- not to mention advertising value -- has been a plus for the university.

There's no doubt Kent baseball has received a lot of exposure. Certainly more than a college volleyball, soccer or hockey championship run made by other Mid-American Conference schools in recent years. But it apparently falls short of the exposure a school can get from playing in a high-quality football bowl game -- and may or may not be comparable to a Sweet 16 run in the NCAA basketball tournament.

"We haven't done a lot of work, to be honest, with the College World Series," said Eric Wright, president and executive director for research at Joyce Julius and Associates, by phone Monday. Joyce Julius is an independent sports and special-events program-evaluation firm in Ann Arbor, Mich., that has charted value received from TV viewership for advertisers and college sports teams since 1985.

"I don't really know what kind of viewership they are drawing for those games," Wright said. "But anytime you can get your school on prime time and there aren't any other schools stealing that limelight, that's pretty valuable, in terms of creating recognition for your brand -- Kent State being the brand."

Understand, Kent didn't get its first major TV exposure until reaching the super regional in Oregon. Unlike football and basketball, which have regular-season and conference championship games on ESPN, college baseball provides nationally televised appearances (three super regional games and now at least three in the CWS), which is huge.

"It certainly puts them on the map," Wright said.

Workhorse: Kent State pitcher Ryan Bores now stands 10-3 on the season after pitching six solid innings against Florida before exiting with a 5-1 lead and earning the victory. Several times, the Gators seemed to have Bores on the ropes, but double plays, pop flies, towering foul balls to catcher David Lyon and stellar defense by center fielder Evan Campbell bailed him out.

"I was trying to throw strikes and let them make plays behind me," Bores said. A case of jitters: Kent State pitcher Josh Pierce prides himself on his composure, but the yips certainly got to him in the ninth inning. He was called in to pitch with one runner on and two balls to the hitter at the plate. Two straight balls followed, then three straight to Florida's Cody Dent. After taking two strikes, Dent dropped a sacrifice bunt.

Then Pierce hit the next batter to load the bases and went 3-0 on the next. He then got a critical check-swing strikeout and a pop fly to end the game.

"To be honest, this was the first time I've ever been nervous pitching, even in the 21-inning game and that situation," Pierce said. "I never got nervous, but I did today. But I had to come out and clear my mind. It was fine. Nothing new." Mendoza Line: Going into Kent's elimination game against Florida, the Golden Flashes' batting averages underscored why there have been so many low-scoring, one-run games.

Granted, the numbers are a bit skewed due to the 21-inning game against Kentucky.

But after Jimmy Rider (.371) George Roberts (.324) and T.J. Sutton (.308), the bottom drops out for the Flashes. Next comes Derek Toadvine (.233), then a string of four Mendozas hitting from .207 (David Lyon) to .148 (Sawyer Polen).

Even Campbell (.152) is struggling, although his hits have been big ones and he is tied for the team lead in runs scored (seven); tied for second in walks (three); and is third in RBI (three). The player who has really struggled in the seven tournament games is DH Nick Hamilton (.172), who has struck out a team-high 11 times.

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News Headline: Kent State Golden Flashes avoid College World Series elimination with tense 5-4 win over Florida Gators (Video) (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. -- Florida's Taylor Gushue had a 3-0 count in his favor against Kent relief pitcher Josh Pierce. With the bases full of Gators and only one out in the ninth inning, Kent State's season looked to be over and out.

But the resilient Flashes found a way to hold on for a 5-4 win over Florida, knocking the Gators out of the College World Series while living to play another day.

"It's 3-0, bases loaded, one out, it doesn't look any worse than that," Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said.

Pierce then got two strikes. The next pitch was close enough for Gushue to start his swing and then attempt to hold up on a pitch that appeared to be ball four. Stricklin was sure Gushue went far enough to be called out.

"I jumped out of the dugout," Stricklin said.

"The reason I jumped out is I felt it should have been called from behind the plate," Stricklin said. "C'mon. I looked at third-base (umpire) and he made the strike call. That's when I thought 'We got a shot.'

"If that's ball four, it's tie ballgame and they're still swinging. In that situation, the longer the catcher waits (to ask the third-base umpire), the longer the home plate umpire waits to ask, the tougher it is for that third-base umpire to call a strike.

"But we got it, and I think they got the call right."

The next batter flied out as the Flashes held on for their first College World Series victory. Kent plays Wednesday at 8 p.m. against South Carolina, which lost to Arkansas late Monday.

But the Flashes will likely be without one of the stars of Monday's game. Playing in his first CWS game, DH Jason Bagoly went 2-for-3 with a double, sacrifice bunt and a run scored. But Bagoly, whose mother died last week, is expected to return home for the funeral.

Bagoly's presence helped ignite the Kent offense. One game after the Flashes had four hits against Arkansas, they produced 12 against the No. 1 team in the nation.

Stricklin said he struggled with putting Bagoly in the lineup over struggling DH Nick Hamilton. But impressive workouts in the batting cage recently had caught nearly everyone's eye.

"He was putting on a show," Kent's top hitter, Jimmy Rider said. "He was ready and he stepped up."

Bagoly's single to start the second triggered a three-run frame that gave Kent a 4-0 lead. A run in the fourth made it 5-1 Kent. But victory has never come easy for the Golden Flashes in their postseason run.

Florida got a pair of runs in the seventh to close within 5-4 as Gushue nursed a leadoff walk which was followed by two singles before a double-play and popup ended the inning.

In the bottom of the seventh it looked as if Bagoly was about to give Kent an insurance run when he boomed a long fly to left-center.

"Off the bat I hit it pretty good," Bagoly said. "I knew it was at least going to be a double."

That's all it was as the ball hit the wall. Bagoly was taken out for a pinch-runner after that, and greeted by his teammates collectively in the dugout, but Kent could not capitalize on the hit.

The score stayed 5-4 into the ninth. Suddenly Kent's relief corps could not find the plate as the Gators loaded the bases against Michael Clark and then Pierce. But Pierce managed to wriggle out of the jam and there was no complaint from the Gators when it was over.

"I thought the umpire did a great job the whole game," said Florida catcher Mike Zunino, a first-round pick of the Seattle Mariners in the recent MLB draft who was on second base in the ninth. "I thought they were good calls."

Florida (47-20), ranked No. 1 in the nation going into the CWS, goes home while the Cinderella Golden Flashes (47-19) move on.

"I've got to credit Kent State's hitters," Florida head coach Kevin O'Sullivan said. "They battled and separated themselves. It's an unfortunate way to end the season, but I think Kent State deserves a lot of credit for the way they played today. Hung in there and got a big strikeout at the end."

Box score
Video highlights

Beyond the Diamond:

The score Kent State 5, Florida 4.

Key play

Check-swing, third-strike call on Florida's Taylor Gushue. A walk would have tied the game, and with just one out, it would have put Florida in position to take the lead with a sacrifice fly.

Star of the game

Kent State junior Jason Bagoly, who hadn't played throughout the NCAA Tournament and was inserted as the DH against Florida. He went 2-for-3, with a sacrifice, double and a single in his first at-bat that triggered a three-run second inning.

Elton's take

Yet another one-run victory for Kent State. The road is still uphill to a CWS title, but unlike Cinderella Stony Brook, which was easily knocked out of the tournament, Cinderella KSU lives to play another day.

What's next

Elimination game, Wednesday, 8 p.m., against South Carolina, which lost to Arkansas on Monday night.

Please click on link for video:
http://www.ncaa.com/video/baseball/2012-06-18/kent-st-bounces-florida-earn-first-cws-win

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News Headline: Kent State notebook: Jason Bagoly battles despite personal loss (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb.: On Saturday night, Kent State baseball coach Scott Stricklin vowed to get junior catcher Jason Bagoly an at-bat in the College World Series Monday against Florida.

Bagoly's mother, Cheryl McHenry, died unexpectedly Thursday evening. The Austintown Fitch product elected to stay with the Golden Flashes during their first CWS appearance Saturday.

Facing elimination against the Gators, Stricklin inserted Bagoly into the starting lineup Monday at designated hitter, batting him seventh.

Bagoly responded with a leadoff single in the second inning and scored KSU's first run. In the seventh, Bagoly doubled to the base of the wall in left center and was lifted for a pinch runner. Bagoly went 2-for-3 as the Golden Flashes stunned top-ranked Florida 5-4 at TD Ameritrade Park.

With his mother's funeral today, Bagoly will fly home this morning, Stricklin said.

Stricklin had to pause, nearly tearing up, before answering a question about Bagoly after the game.

“This has been a very difficult few days for our program. I can't imagine what it's been like for Jason,” Stricklin said. “I was really disappointed in myself I didn't give him an at-bat on Saturday.

“We talked about it as a staff and went back and forth. You think about the ramifications if he has a bad game, if he goes out there and plays and things go wrong. That shows what kind of kid he is and how tough he is. That gave our team a lift, that first at-bat, to battle like he did. It was unbelievable. I think he needed that; I think his family needed that. I'm really proud that he's on our team.”

It marked Bagoly's first NCAA action in seven tournament games, including a 21-inning marathon victory over Kentucky. For the season, Bagoly came into the game batting .264 with eight doubles and three home runs in 33 games, 24 starts. He had struck out 21 times in 91 at-bats.

Bagoly replaced redshirt junior Nick Hamilton, who had struck out 11 times in 29 NCAA at-bats and was hitting .172.

“Jason is a fighter. He's a real strong kid and he knows our whole team is behind him,” catcher David Lyon said. “We're part of his family and he knows that.”

Heating up

The temperature at first pitch was 95 degrees with 39 percent humidity and a heat index of 98 degrees. It was the warmest CWS game since June 11, 2001. Wind from the southwest was measured at 17 mph, with gusts to 31.

Overheated

Florida starter Hudson Randall lasted just one inning, with trainers summoned to the mound before the inning ended. Florida coach Kevin O'Sullivan said Randall was “overheated,” and replaced him with Jonathan Crawford.

“He looked fine before the game,” O'Sullivan said. “[Randall] went out there and he obviously was having a little trouble breathing.

“After the inning, I asked him point blank in the dugout if he felt he could go back out there. He looked me in the eye and told me he wasn't ready to go back out.”

Stricklin said leadoff hitter Evan Campbell told him Randall wasn't throwing very hard after his first inning at-bat.

O'Sullivan said Randall's departure “changed the whole complexion of the game.”

Rider shines

Going into Monday's game, senior shortstop Jimmy Rider had been Kent State's NCAA star. Besides his sterling defense, Rider boasted a team-high .371 batting average in tournament play, including the game-winning hit in the super regional final against Oregon and a home run against Arkansas in the CWS.

Against the Gators Monday, Rider went 2-for-5 with an RBI and three runs scored. He's now batting .363.

Earlier this month, Rider was drafted in the 26th round by the Pittsburgh Pirates, which thrilled the resident of Venetia, Pa.

Asked why he wasn't drafted higher, Stricklin said, “He's 5-foot-9, 160. It's the eye test. But every scout I spoke to, I said, ‘If you draft this guy, at some point, your bosses are going to pay you a compliment.' Nobody recruited him. He's been overlooked a lot. I wouldn't be shocked if he's in the big leagues.”

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News Headline: Kent State 5, Florida 4: Flashes knock off nation's top team (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb.: Even during an NCAA run of close calls and heart-pounding endings, the Kent State Golden Flashes had never seen anything like this.

Facing elimination from the College World Series in a loser's bracket game Monday, they hung on to shock top-ranked Florida 5-4, although two relief pitchers barely got the ball over the plate in the ninth inning at TD Ameritrade Park.

With the bases loaded in the ninth on two walks and a hit batsman and one out, KSU pitcher Josh Pierce had a 3-1 count on No. 6 hitter Casey Turgeon. It appeared the Gators were going to tie the game, if not take the lead.

But Pierce got a gift strike-two call from home-plate umpire Phil Benson on a pitch that appeared outside on replay. Then Turgeon checked his swing and Benson hesitated — with KSU coach Scott Stricklin coming out of the dugout to appeal — before consulting third-base umpire Jeff Henrichs.

Henrichs ruled Turgeon had swung, giving Pierce the strikeout and earning a lifetime spot on Stricklin's Christmas card list.

Before anyone had taken a breath, Pierce induced Justin Shafer to fly out to left field on the first pitch to end the game.

In its first CWS appearance, Kent State (47-19) advanced to an 8 p.m. game Wednesday against South Carolina, which lost 2-1 to Arkansas in Monday's second game. The Gamecocks (46-18) are trying to win their third national title in a row.

Florida coach Kevin O'Sullivan refused to indict the umpires afterward, instead pointing to the Gators' miscues that staked the Golden Flashes to a 4-0 lead after two innings.

“The game was not decided by the umpires,” O'Sullivan said. “The game was decided by both teams. We made a couple errors in the first and second and they capitalized and got [three] runs in the bottom of the second. That was the difference. Simple as that. The umpires had nothing to do with it.”

Kent State used two pitchers against the top of the Gators' order in the ninth, but lifted Michael Clark with a 2-0 count on Mike Zunino. Sixteen of the first 19 pitches from Clark and Pierce were balls, including four-pitch walks to Preston Tucker and Zunino.

“To be honest, this was the first time I've ever been nervous pitching,” said Pierce, a redshirt freshman from Avon. “I had to come out and clear my mind.”

Asked what he was thinking on the 3-2 pitch to Turgeon, Stricklin said: “Throw a strike. Throw a strike. I saw a full swing, and everyone else saw it, too, especially on the third-base side. I don't know if the home-plate umpire blinked. I was surprised he didn't call it, and it worried me. I jumped out there because he didn't react right away.

“The longer you wait on those calls, the longer that third-base umpire has to wait, the tougher it is for him to call a strike. I haven't seen the replay. I just saw it with my naked eye, but he swung in my opinion, so I reacted.”

In the dugout the Golden Flashes were sweating, and not from the 95-degree heat at game time.

“I was more mad and annoyed,” senior shortstop Jimmy Rider said.

“I was getting annoyed,” catcher David Lyon said. “Throwing high fastballs and hoping they were throwing it down the middle and wouldn't hit it over the fence.”

Zunino was on second base and had a good view of the called second strike to Turgeon and the check swing.

“Phil [Benson] was great back there the whole game. He made the right call,” Zunino said of strike two. “On the check swing, he didn't get to see it. My gut instinct was hoping it was going to be ball four. They appealed, and it wasn't. I thought they were good calls.”

After the elimination of Stony Brook on Sunday, the Golden Flashes are the tournament's only remaining Cinderella.

“It seemed that all of Omaha has adopted us and is rooting us on,” Lyon said.

“We definitely feel like we deserve to be here and hopefully we showed that out there today. After Saturday night, we probably left a lot of doubt in people's minds. We kind of used the Cinderella story to our advantage. [The Gators] got caught thinking about their next game. We had to jump on them early and kind of shock them.”

Stricklin acknowledged how excruciating the last inning was, even for those who love an underdog.

“I don't think many people gave us much of a chance today,” Stricklin said. “It wasn't the prettiest thing in the end. It was gut-wrenching. Even if you weren't rooting for anybody, that was tough to watch. But we found a way.”

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News Headline: Kent State Golden Flashes eliminate No. 1 Florida Gators, advance in College World Series (Video) (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. – Add the No. 1 team in the nation to the roadkill piling up in the breakdown lane of Kent State's thrill ride into unknown territory.

First Wildcats. Then Ducks. And now Gators.

The Golden Flashes stunned the college baseball world by becoming the first northern team to win a College World Series game since 2002 by upsetting the top-seeded University Florida in a 5-4 heart-stopper on Monday at TD Ameritrade Park in Omaha.

If Kent State was simply trying to prove itself worthy of playing on the amateur game's biggest stage after a substandard performance in a CWS-opening loss to Arkansas, it accomplished that goal and more.

After that first game, Razorbacks fans changed "SEC, SEC, SEC" over and over again, implying a bunch of northerners from the Mid-American Conference might not belong on the same field with a team from the powerful Southeastern Conference.

Two nights later, the Flashes handled the best the SEC and the nation have to offer. The Gators came to Omaha with realistic dreams of winning a championship.

"We heard the chants," said Kent State coach Scott Stricklin. "Well, we belong here. That's the most important thing we wanted as a team, as a program and as a university that we belonged here. We are not a fluke. We are a really good baseball team and that's the biggest win in school history."

The program-defining victory didn't come without a few harrowing moments. In fact, the Flashes needed to get the better of a few borderline calls at the end to pull the game out of what had become a raging fire in the ninth inning.

A crisis of confidence on the mound gave Florida the opportunity to do more than just erase Kent State's slim 5-4 lead. Michael Clark and Josh Pierce combined to walk the first two Gators batters of the inning on a total of just nine pitches. After a sacrifice bunt, one more walk by an obviously shaken Pierce loaded the bases.

"It was the first time I've ever been nervous pitching," said Pierce. "Even in the 21-inning game (in the NCAA Regional) I never got nervous."

Standing at his position at shortstop, Jimmy Rider, one of the heroes of an offense that built a 5-1 lead after five innings, was suffering through a different battle.

"I wasn't very nervous," said Rider, who was 2-for-5 with an RBI and three runs scored. "I was probably more mad and annoyed at our pitchers. But I knew they would find a way to get it done after making it interesting, which was all the better."

Behind the plate, catcher David Lyon was envisioning worst-case scenarios.

"I was getting a little annoyed they were throwing high fastballs, and I was hoping they wouldn't throw one right over the middle and (a Gator) would hit it right over the fence," admitted Lyon, who was another offensive hero, going 3-for-5 while tripling and driving in a run.

In the dugout, Stricklin could only repeat "just throw a strike."

He had been in the same position two innings earlier when Brian Clark's control problems led to two Florida runs that trimmed KSU's lead to 5-4 and threatened to unravel all of the work starter Ryan Bores (10-3) had accomplished while allowing just two runs in six solid innings.

"Trust me, our bullpen is really good," Stricklin said. "They weren't as good as we like them to be tonight. But the bottom line is … they found a way to get it done and we move on."

They found a little help, however, as home plate umpire Phil Benson called a strike on a 3-1 pitch to Florida's Daniel Pigott that appeared to be outside the strike zone. A ball would have meant a walk and a tied game. Instead, Piggot ended up striking out while trying to hold up on what would have been a certain ball four.

But even that didn't come easy. When Benson wasn't quick to ring up Pigott on an extremely close check-swing call, Stricklin stormed out of the home dugout to insist the umpire ask for help. Without hesitation, third-base umpire Jeff Henrichs punched Pigott out on the appeal.

"I saw a full swing, and everyone else saw it too, especially on the third-base side," said Stricklin. "I don't know if the home-plate umpire blinked. I was surprised he didn't call it and it worried me. I jumped out there because he didn't react right away. I had to yell.

"The longer you wait on those calls, the longer that third-base umpire has to wait, the tougher it is for him to call a strike … That's why I jumped out of the dugout."

One pitch later, Justin Shafer lined out to T.J. Sutton in right field to end the game.

The loss had to be a bitter pill for the Gators, who were more than just a popular pick to avenge a loss in last year's CWS Championship Series. The night started badly for Florida when starting pitcher Hudson Randall was forced to leave the game after one inning after suffering from on-field temperatures that reached 102 degrees.

And then after battling back to within a run, the Gators were forced to accept the controversial ending.
To his credit, Florida coach Kevin O'Sullivan refused to blame his team's fate on those final calls.

"The game was not decided by the umpires. The game was decided by both teams playing," said O'Sullivan, whose team finishes 47-20. "We made a couple errors in the first and second, and they capitalized … That was the difference in the ballgame. Simple as that. The umpires had nothing to do with it."

Kent State scored four unearned runs thanks to those Florida errors in the first two innings, putting early pressure on the Gators.

They found some key defensive plays to help the lead stand up, including a diving grab by centerfielder Evan Campbell in the sixth inning.

Offensively, six Flashes enjoyed multiple-hit days, including Mid-American Conference player of the year George Roberts, who singled twice to drive in runs in the first two innings, and designated hitter Jason Bagoly, who was 2-for-3 with a run scored and a sacrifice bunt in his first game action in the postseason.

The Flashes will play South Carolina in another elimination game Wednesday at 8 p.m. EDT.

Original:
Record-Courier Staff Report

Join the conversation on Twitter using #RCFlashesBaseball

The Kent State Golden Flashes defeated the Florida Gators 5-4 Monday night in the College World Series.

The Flashes move on to play either Arkansas or South Carolina. The No. 1 Gators were eliminated.

See an updated bracket on the College World Series website.

Check back for David Carducci's full game story. Follow him on Twitter @CarducciKSU.

Video courtesy of MAC Sports

Please click on link for video:
http://www.recordpub.com/news/slideshow/5197663

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News Headline: College World Series Notebook: Heavy-hearted Jason Bagoly delivers for Golden Flashes (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — Kent State coach Scott Stricklin was kicking himself late Saturday night after not getting Jason Bagoly an at-bat during the Golden Flashes College World Series-opening loss to Arkansas at TD Ameritrade Park.

It was as much an issue of “the right thing to do” in the wake of the unexpected death of Bagoly's mother, Cheryl McHenry, two days earlier as it was a hunch that the backup catcher could provide the Flashes' struggling offense with a little spark.

When Stricklin made up for the omission on Saturday by moving Bagoly into the starting lineup at designated hitter, it paid off in a big way in Kent State's 5-4 upset of No. 1 Florida.

Playing for the first time in the postseason, Bagoly ripped a double to left-centerfield as part of a 2-for-3 day that included a run scored and a sacrifice bunt to set up another score.

Bagoly had been ripping the ball in batting practice all week, prompting ESPN's Karl Ravech to ask “who is that No. 34” during Saturday's pregame. So, inserting the 6-foot-3, 235-pound junior into the lineup wasn't just some charitable move.

“This has been a difficult few days for our program,” said Stricklin. “I can't even imagine what it's been like for Jason. The last couple of nights I've really been wrestling with the decision. I was really disappointed in myself that I didn't get him in (on Saturday).

“We talked about it as a staff and we went back and forth. You think about the ramifications if he has a bad game, if he gets out there and plays and things go wrong.”

But with designated hitter Nick Hamilton struggling during of late, Monday was the right time to give Bagoly a chance. And he made the most of it. His double to left-center in the seventh inning looked like it might go for Kent State's second home run of the CWS.

“I think that shows you what kind of kid he is, and how tough he is,” said Stricklin. “It gave our team a lift. It really did … I think he needed that. I think his family needed that. I'm just really proud that he's on our team.”

Bagoly is scheduled to return to Ohio Tuesday for the funeral of his mother, Cheryl McHenry.

“Then we'll see him back here again,” said Stricklin. “I don't know when, but those are the plans for him”

HEAT INDEX

The game-time temperature of 95 degrees was the hottest recorded for the first pitch of a College World Series since 2001.

By the fifth inning, the temperature had reached 102 degrees.

THE HEAT AND THE FLORIDA STARTER

The heat was too much for Florida starting pitcher Hudson Randall, who had to leave after just one inning.

“We got thrown a curveball there with Hudson in the first,” said Florida coach Kevin O'Sullivan. “He kind of overheated … He looked fine before the game. I could tell he was laboring a little bit (during the game). I went out to give him a little breather to catch his breath. Then it was obvious he was having a little trouble breathing.”

Randall made it through the inning, but in the dugout afterwards O'Sullivan asked his pitcher to “be brutally honest with me.”

“He looked me in the eye, and I could tell he wasn't ready to go back out, so that's why I made the switch.”

UP NEXT

Kent State will play South Carolina in Wednesday's next elimination game.

The Flashes will send Tyler Skulina to the mound, and the transfer from Virginia has been dominant as a No. 3 starter for most of the season. Skulina is 11-2 with a 3.63 ERA on the season.

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News Headline: Kent State Golden Flashes run in College World Series brings bright future (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — For all the Kent State fans who sweated out the ninth inning of Monday's 5-4 elimination win over No. 1-ranked Florida and worried the Golden Flashes' run was finally over, take heart.

When this thrill ride into the College World Series ends either way, there will still be plenty of room on the bandwagon heading into the program's future.

Kent State baseball has been built to provide plenty of excitement for years to come.

“There is no question, the future is bright,” said KSU head coach Scott Stricklin.

Like all coaches, Stricklin keeps a “big board” in his office. It's basically a depth chart displaying what his team looks like at the moment along with what it should look like over the next few seasons.

“Coming into the season, the coaching staff in meetings was looking at the big board and the team we'll have next year,” Stricklin said. “We felt next year would be the year we'd make a (postseason) run.

“We are thrilled to death with what this team has accomplished. But we felt next year might be the year talent wise that we could make a go and try to get to a Super Regional and go to Omaha. These guys have defied the odds.”

While the Flashes will once again lose some valuable seniors, like shortstop Jimmy Rider, right-handed ace David Starn and catcher David Lyon, and possibly a couple of juniors who were drafted two weeks ago in Major League Baseball's First-Year Player Draft, there is still plenty of talent returning in 2013. Some recruits with immediate impact potential also are set to be added to the mix.

“I played over the summer with a kid in New Hampshire, and we became best friends,” said sophomore second baseman Derek Toadvine. “He started out at Washington State then went to junior college and next year he is coming to Kent. His name is Taylor Williams, he is a right-handed pitcher and he has touched up to 96-miles per hour. He could really help us losing Starn.”

Recruiting a player from the Pacific Northwest is the exception to the rule within Kent State's blueprint. Just because the Flashes are receiving national attention with their College World Series appearance “we are not going to start recruiting Texas, Florida and California,” Stricklin said.

“We are going to keep recruiting Northeast Ohio and Western Pennsylvania. We do have a kid coming from Michigan next year. We have (Williams) coming from the state of Washington next year. That's a fluke because he played summer ball with three of our guys, Toadvine, Lyon and (Tyler) Skulina. Sometimes flukes like that happen, but we aren't going to shy away from the formula.”

As usual, the Flashes added more top-tier talent from Northeast Ohio in next year's class with players like 6-foot-5 right-handed pitcher Tucker Linder of Tallmadge.

This year's postseason experience can only benefit youngsters who are returning like third baseman Sawyer Polen, who starts at third base in his freshman season, and Brian Clark, who was named to the 2012 Louisville Slugger Freshman All-American Team as the Flashes' closer.

“Obviously we want to make it back to Omaha,” said Clark. “There is no substitute for this kind of experience. Playing in the Super Regional in Omaha with that crowd rooting against us was a good experience as well. Even back to the (Mid-American Conference) Tournament. I made the last out when we won that championship and I felt on top of the world after that one.”

While the College World Series run has added some new fans to the Flashes' fan base, longtime supporters know KSU baseball has been teasing the idea of this breakthrough for years, winning four MAC championships in a row, then upsetting Texas on its home field in game one of last year's regional. Instead of taking the next step forward, this year's team took two or three giant leaps ahead of schedule.

But the years of success have bred a culture that should serve this team well into the future.

“Our older guys have shown us how to carry ourselves when we get into this situation,” said Clark. “They take us under their wings, they show us all of the ropes and the tricks, and really just how to conduct ourselves in every way. Personally, I like watching Starn and his work ethic. He carries himself very well and works very hard. Just his story, walking on as a freshman and to work his way all the way up to being our No. 1 pitcher makes me want to work harder. As I get older, it's my responsibility to do that for the next guys. That's what makes this team what it is.”

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News Headline: Kent State 'shocks the world' and stays alive in Omaha (Videos) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. - Kent State struck quickly against the top-ranked Florida Gators Monday night in Omaha scoring four runs in the first two innings and holding on to eliminate Florida 5-4 and live to play another day.

The win for Kent State is their first College World Series win in the school's history. It also guarantees they will live to play another day.

The Flashes jumped on Florida starter Hudson Randall for a run in the first inning. Randall would leave after just 16 pitches due to dehydration. Kent struck for three more runs in the second after consecutive singles by Jimmy Rider, David Lyon and George Roberts increased the Golden Flashes lead to 4-0.

Florida answered with a run in the third on an RBI single by Mike Zunino.

Jimmy Rider scored after back-to-back wild pitches in the fourth inning to give the Golden Flashes what proved to be the game-winning run and make a winner out of starter Ryan Bores of Strongsville.

Bores, who has earned the nickname, "Big Game," was big game again for Kent. Bores, in temperatures that reached 102 degrees on the field, gave the Flashes six solid innings, allowing two runs on six hits, striking out one and walking two.

Josh Pierce survived a rocky ninth inning, including a huge check swing third strike called by third base umpire Jeff Henrichs. Justin Shafer then flew out to end the game and Kent is moving on.

The Flashes will play Wednesday at 8 p.m. against two-time defending college world series champ South Carolina.

Follow Mike Cairns on Twitter: @MikeCairns5 for the most up to date information on the Golden Flashes in Omaha and watch Mike's reports on NewsChannel5 at 5, 6 and 11 p.m.

Please click on link for videos:
http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/sports/sports_blogs_local/kent-state-shocks-the-world-and-stays-alive-in-omaha

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News Headline: Kent State beats No. 1 seed Florida to remain in the College World Series | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Next game will be Wednesday

Underdog Kent State beat Florida this afternoon, a victory that sent the No. 1 seed in the College World Series home.

The Golden Flashes won 5-4 in their second game of the series in Omaha. Kent lost Saturday, and would have been eliminated had it dropped today's game.

Despite its No. 1 seed, Florida lost both of its first two games and is done.

Next up for Kent will be the winner of tonight's later game, defending champion South Carolina or Arkansas, which beat Kent Saturday.

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News Headline: Kent State keeps the dream alive (Video) (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: ESPN
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. -- Look who's sticking around at the College World Series.

Kent State, the Cinderella that no one wanted to notice, beat No. 1-seeded Florida 5-4 on a steamy Monday afternoon at TD Ameritrade Park.

And the Golden Flashes get to stay until at least Wednesday, when they face two-time defending national champion South Carolina -- a 2-1 loser Monday night to Arkansas -- in an elimination game.

"We're not a fluke," Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said. "We're a really good baseball team. This is the biggest win in school history."

Tell us how you really feel, coach.

Kent State is indeed a good baseball team, loaded with guts and touched by tragedy.

But you don't win 21 straight games in April, May and June -- including a 21-inning regional opener against Kentucky -- solely on guts.

You don't get to Omaha, winning the decisive super-regional game in walk-off fashion at Oregon, without a dugout full of moxie.

And you don't beat Florida, denying the Gators a game-tying run with one out and the bases loaded in the ninth inning, because of good fortune.

"Yeah, we definitely feel like we deserve to be here," Kent State catcher David Lyon said, "and hopefully, we showed that out there today. After Saturday night, we probably left a lot of doubt in people's minds."

The Golden Flashes lost 8-1 on Saturday to Arkansas. Combine that with Stony Brook's quick exit from Bracket 1 after two lopsided defeats, and this CWS looked bleak for first-time visitors.

But then Monday arrived. The intensity inside Kent State's third-base dugout skyrocketed with the temperature outside. Florida pitcher Hudson Randall succumbed to the heat, leaving after one inning, and KSU jumped on flame-throwing Jonathon Crawford out of the bullpen for three runs in the second inning.

Stricklin said his guys were loose.

"There was no tension," the eighth-year coach said. "Our kids were the aggressors. If you were watching that game and had never seen a college baseball game and didn't know any better, we looked awfully good out there.

"That's the most important thing that we wanted, as a team and as a program and as a university, to make a statement that we belong here."

Omaha noticed.

While Stony Brook received almost all the pre-CWS Cinderella hype, the crowd on Monday shifted noticeably in favor of the Golden Flashes.

"It seems that all of Omaha has adopted us and is rooting us on," Lyon said.

Kent State delivered the first CWS win for the Mid-American Conference since Eastern Michigan beat Maine in 1976.

No disrespect to Maine, which made the CWS five times in a six-year period in the 1980s when the NCAA stacked one regional with teams from the Northeast, but the Black Bears are not Florida.

These Gators have played in Omaha each of the past three years and lost in the championship series last June.

Even with its two wins over Kentucky in the regional, some doubts existed that Kent State could deny an SEC domination of Bracket 2. The Golden Flashes listened Friday as Arkansas fans chanted "S-E-C, S-E-C," late in the Hogs' win over Kent State.

"Kent State deserves a lot of credit for the way they played today," Florida coach Kevin O'Sullivan said.

There's an "It" factor about Kent State, which counts 21 of its 27 players on the CWS roster from Ohio. The other six are from Pennsylvania. In particular, Stricklin, a Kent State graduate, possesses the look of a rising star in the college game.

He has directed this program to the NCAA postseason in each of the past four seasons. Stricklin may want to stay in northeast Ohio, but programs from the power conferences are sure to covet him soon.

Regardless, his team earned its keep at the CWS.

The Golden Flashes did it during a difficult time for the program. On Thursday, Cheryl McHenry, the mother of backup catcher Jason Bagoly, died unexpectedly in Ohio. Bagoly, a junior, stayed with the team but did not play Saturday. He was on deck when the game ended.

Stricklin beat himself up over it. The coach said he should have played Bagoly early. Bagoly started at designated hitter on Monday. He finished 2-for-3 with a run scored and a sacrifice.

"I think that shows you what kind of kid he is and how tough he is," Stricklin said. "It gave our team a lift. It really did."

Bagoly plans to fly home Tuesday for his mother's funeral. His schedule for the rest of the week remains undetermined. If Bagoly makes it back to Omaha, he'll rejoin a team with support growing rapidly behind its dugout.

Please click on link for video:
http://espn.go.com/college-sports/story/_/id/8069648/kent-state-golden-flashes-eliminate-florida-gators-college-world-series

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News Headline: Kent State stuns Florida in College World Series (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: USA Today
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stony Brook couldn't make it past its first two games of the College World Series, but the event's other upstart, Kent State, is very much alive. The Golden Flashes knocked out No. 1 national seed Florida Monday, stunning the Gators 5-4 in Omaha in an elimination game.

The Gators failed to win a game in the CWS, also losing their opener to two-time defending champion South Carolina. It was only the second time in 13 years that the tournament's top overall seed didn't win a contest in Omaha.

Right-hander Ryan Bores (10-3) gave up two runs on six hits in six innings for the Flashes. The Gators then reached reliever Brian Clark for two runs on three hits in the seventh inning, but Casey Wilson induced a double-play grounder and a line out to end the inning.

Florida then put two runners on in the eighth but didn't score and had the bases loaded with one out in the ninth when Josh Pierce struck out Casey Turgeon and got Justin Shafer to fly out to right to end the game.

Pierce fought back from a 3-0 count to strike out Turgeon when Turgeon couldn't check his swing and got called out on an appeal to third-base umpire Jeff Henrichs.

"I don't think many people gave us much of a chance today," said Kent State coach Scott Stricklin. "But there are 27 players and five coaches and a lot of fans that believe we can win, and we felt that. We felt that we could win this game."

Catcher David Lyon went 3-for-5, keying a 12-hit attack for the Flashes, and shortstop Jimmy Rider scored three runs. Kent State will next play on Wednesday against South Carolina. The Gamecocks had their 22-game NCAA tournament winning streak ended Monday in a 2-1 loss to Arkansas.

"We definitely feel like we deserve to be here, and hopefully we showed that out there today," said Lyon. "We kind of used the Cinderella story to our advantage. We had to jump on them early and kind of shock them with that."

Kent State scored four unearned runs and another on a wild pitch in the first four innings as the Gators' defense betrayed them.

The Gators, who reached the CWS finals last year, committed five errors in the two games after coming to Omaha seventh in the nation in fielding.

Florida starter Hudson Randall (9-3) left the game after the first inning because of heat-related symptoms.

It was 95 degrees at the start of the game, making it the warmest first pitch at the CWS since June 11, 2001. Before Monday, Kent State hadn't played a game in weather warmer than 82 degrees all season.

"He looked fine before the game," coach Kevin O'Sullivan said of Randall. "I could tell he was laboring a little bit. I went out to give him a little breather to catch his breath. Then when I went out there, it was obvious he was having a little trouble breathing. So we brought the trainer out, and kind of slowed things down. Then I asked him in the dugout if he was okay to go back out.

"He looked me in the eye, and I could tell he wasn't ready to go."

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News Headline: Kent State eliminates No. 1 Florida from College World Series (Videos) (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: ESPN
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. -- Winning a game for the first time at the College World Series isn't supposed to be easy.

Just ask Kent State.

The Golden Flashes survived shaky relief pitching to protect a one-run lead in the ninth inning and beat Florida 5-4 on Monday. The loss eliminated the top-seeded Gators, who made it to the finals a year ago.

"It wasn't the prettiest thing in the end," Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said. "It was gut-wrenching no matter who you were rooting for. Even if you weren't rooting for anybody, that was tough to watch. But we found a way. That's what this team has done all year long, and we're still here."

The Flashes (47-19) bounced back from an 8-1 loss to Arkansas to post what Stricklin called the biggest win in program history.

"We belong here," he said. "That's the most important thing that we wanted as a team, as a program and as a university was to make a statement that we belong here. We're not a fluke. We're a really good baseball team."

Kent State scored four unearned runs and another on a wild pitch, then held on as Florida chipped away at the lead with a run in the sixth inning and two more in the seventh.

The Gators loaded the bases with one out in the ninth against Michael Clark and Josh Pierce.

Pierce fought back from a 3-0 count to strike out Casey Turgeon when Turgeon couldn't check his swing and got called out on an appeal to the third-base umpire. Justin Shafer flew out to right to end the game, with Pierce pumping his right fist once the ball landed in right fielder T.J. Sutton's glove.

"It's an unfortunate way to end the season, but I think Kent State deserves a lot of credit for the way they played today," Florida coach Kevin O'Sullivan said. "They hung in there, got a big strikeout at the end, and our guys hung in there right to the last out. So we have nothing to be ashamed of."

The Gators (47-20) committed five errors in two games after coming to Omaha seventh in the nation in fielding.

Their pitching plans were upset when Hudson Randall (9-3) left after the first inning because of heat-related symptoms.

It was 95 degrees at the start of the game, making it the warmest first pitch at the CWS since June 11, 2001. Before Monday, Kent State hadn't played a game in weather warmer than 82 degrees all season.

It was Randall who struggled, though. At one point O'Sullivan made a mound visit and athletic trainers brought water to Hudson, the best postseason pitcher in program history. Hudson finished the inning with one unearned run scored against him. O'Sullivan wouldn't let him come out for the second because it was apparent he was ill.

"He looked fine before the game," O'Sullivan said. "I could tell he was laboring a little bit."

Ryan Bores (10-3) pitched six straight innings for the win, and Pierce earned his third save.

Kent State had 12 hits against four pitchers, but it was Florida's continuing problems in the field that allowed the Flashes to build a 5-1 lead.

George Roberts drove in runs each of the first two innings after shortstop Nolan Fontana and third baseman Josh Tobias committed errors.

Kent State's emotions ran the gamut as Florida threatened in the ninth.

Three outs away from a pulling the upset, Clark walked Preston Tucker on four straight pitches. He was 2-0 against Mike Zunino when Stricklin called on Pierce, who also struggled with his control and put Zunino on.

After pinch hitter Cody Dent moved over the runners with a sacrifice, Pierce hit Daniel Pigott in the shoulder to load the bases.

"I don't think I was nervous. I was more mad and annoyed," shortstop Jimmy Rider said.

Catcher David Lyon said, "I was kind of on the same page as Jimmy -- getting annoyed. We were throwing high fastballs, and I was hoping they wouldn't hit it over the fence. We were struggling a little at the end and then found a way to get it done."

Pierce fell behind 3-0 to Turgeon before throwing a strike. It looked like Turgeon would walk -- TV replays indicated strike two was outside -- but he couldn't hold back on his check swing.

To Stricklin, it seemed like an eternity before third base umpire Jeff Henrichs made the call on appeal.

"I don't know if the home-plate umpire blinked. I was surprised he didn't call it, and it worried me," Stricklin said. "I knew David was going to ask. But the longer you wait on those calls, the longer that third base umpire has to wait, the tougher it is for him to call a strike."

Shafer put a good swing on Pierce's next pitch, but Sutton was able to chase down the fly to end the game.

"Trust me, our bullpen is really good," Stricklin said. "They weren't as good as we'd like them to be tonight. But bottom line ... the entire pitching staff found a way to get it done, and we move on."

Please click on link for videos:
http://scores.espn.go.com/ncaa/baseball/cws/recap?gameId=320618269&league=CWS

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News Headline: Kent State sends No. 1 Florida packing (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: MLB.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA -- The No. 1 team in the nation has been eliminated from the College World Series.

Florida stood at the plate as Kent State nearly unraveled in a wild top of the ninth, loading the bases before losing, 5-4, to the Golden Flashes on Monday at TD Ameritrade Park.

"It wasn't the prettiest thing in the end. It was gut-wrenching no matter who you were rooting for," Kent State head coach Scott Stricklin said. "But we've found a way. That's what this team has done all year long, and we're still here. We're still in Omaha and proud to be here."

took Kent State two pitchers and 11 pitches to throw a strike in the ninth inning. After a Florida sacrifice bunt, right-hander Josh Pierce hit Daniel Pigott to load the bases.

Pierce once again fell behind, 3-0, to Casey Turgeon, who watched two called strikes on the outside corner before trying unsuccessfully to check his swing.

Justin Shafer flied out to right to end the game, as the Golden Flashes rushed onto the field.

"I don't think I was nervous. More mad and annoyed [at pitchers]," Kent State shortstop Jimmy Rider said of any ninth-inning nerves.

Kent State, which opened the tournament as a No. 3 seed, improves to 47-19 and now faces No. 8 South Carolina at 7 p.m. CT on Wednesday.

The Gamecocks lost, 2-1, to Arkansas in Monday's nightcap.

Florida (47-20) becomes only the second No. 1 national seed to advance to the College World Series and go 0-2, joining Arizona State in 2010.

"It's an unfortunate way to end the season, but I think Kent State deserves a lot of credit," Florida head coach Kevin Sullivan said. "Hung in there, got a big strikeout at the end, and our guys hung in there right to the last out."

Kent State was led by its four stars, three of whom were chosen in the 2012 First-Year Player Draft.

Catcher David Lyon (34th round, Rangers) went 3-for-5, right-hander Ryan Bores (27th round, Rangers) held Florida to two runs in six innings and Rider (26th round, Pirates) had two hits.

First baseman George Roberts went 2-for-4 with two RBIs.

Kent State scored once in the first off Florida starter Hudson Randall, the Tigers' seventh-round Draft pick.

Trainers were called to the mound for Randall in the first, but he finished the inning before leaving because of heat-related issues.

Game-time temperature was 95 degrees, the highest at the College World Series since June 11, 2001.

Florida right-hander Jonathan Crawford started the second and allowed a leadoff single to Jason Bagoly before an error on a sacrifice bunt by third baseman Josh Tobias put two on. After another sac bunt and a strikeout, the Golden Flashes rattled off three straight two-out singles go ahead, 4-0.

"The key was to get runs off Randall, because that bullpen is so good," Stricklin said. "We knew we needed to get some runs."

Florida catcher Mike Zunino -- the No. 3 overall pick by the Mariners -- and Shafer began the comeback by driving in the Gators' first two runs in the third and sixth, respectively.

Florida added two in the seventh off Kent State reliever Brian Clark, who issued a leadoff walk before allowing three straight singles, including an RBI knock by Zunino.

The loss caps another good yet disappointing season for a Florida team that featured nine Draft picks -- eight of whom went in the first 10 rounds -- and spent most of the season as the No. 1 team in the country. It was also Florida's third straight trip to Omaha, none of which have ended with a championship.

"I've been able to make it out here three times, and all three times I've been just as disappointed," Zunino said. "It's one of those things where you don't want it to end. It's going to take a while to hit me. I'm sure it hit the other people. But it's disappointing at the time. I'm sure it will hit harder later."

Monday's scores
Kent State 5, Florida 4
Arkansas 2, No. 8 South Carolina 1

Tuesday's game
No. 2 UCLA (48-15) vs. No. 3 Florida State (49-16), 7 p.m. CT

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News Headline: Kent State, Arkansas big winners on Day 4 (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: MLB.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA -- Maybe now Kent State will start getting noticed.

The Golden Flashes, who began the tournament as a No. 3 seed, started the College World Series playing second fiddle to the Stony Brook Seawolves as Cinderella.

Now Stony Brook has gone home, and thanks to Kent State, No. 1 Florida is headed out of Omaha after the Golden Flashes eliminated the Gators in a 5-4 win on Monday at TD Ameritrade Park.

Kent State head coach Steve Stricklin, whose team lost, 8-1, to Arkansas on Saturday, is most proud about his players getting revenge for that disappointing loss.

"That's the most important thing that we wanted as a team and as a program and as a university, was to make a statement that we belong here," Stricklin said. "We're not a fluke. We're a really good baseball team. That is the biggest win in school history."

Kent State (47-19) now faces No. 8 South Carolina (46-18) at 7 p.m. CT on Wednesday in an elimination game.

South Carolina fell to Arkansas (46-20), 2-1, in Monday's nightcap. Florida (47-20) becomes only the second No. 1 national seed to advance to the College World Series and go winless in Omaha, joining the 2010 Arizona State squad.

"It's an unfortunate way to end the season, but I think Kent State deserves a lot of credit," Florida head coach Kevin O'Sullivan said.

Arkansas right-handers Ryne Stanek and Barrett Astin combined to four-hit South Carolina in the day's second game to advance in the winner's bracket. The win also snapped South Carolina's 22-game winning streak in the tournament and 12-game College World Series mark, both NCAA records.

"It's one of those things that you don't know if it could happen, or if it will ever happen again," South Carolina head coach Ray Tanner said of the streak. "It's been a pretty good run. I'm proud of what these guys did and how they battled."

Stanek received an early lead when shortstop Tim Carver -- the Phillies' 19th-round pick in the 2012 First-Year Player Draft -- led off the game with a single and came around on first baseman Dominic Ficociello's double.

The Razorbacks added a run in the fourth when Brian Anderson drew a leadoff walk, used a delayed steal to take second and scored on a single by center fielder Matt Vinson that knocked South Carolina starter Colby Holmes out of the game.

"It's always big when we score runs early. We know we're working with a cushion, and we can relax, and throw our game and keep attacking the zone," Stanek said. "I was able to throw my fastball for a strike and mix early, and continue to mix and throw everything for a strike throughout the game."

An RBI triple in the fifth inning by South Carolina center fielder Evan Marzilli (eighth round, D-backs) scored the Gamecocks' only run. Other than the fifth, the only inning in which South Carolina put more than one runner on was the first.

Stanek allowed three hits and struck out three in six innings of one-run ball, and Astin held South Carolina to one hit in three innings of relief to earn the save.

Gamecocks left-handed reliever Tyler Webb allowed only two hits in 5 1/3 innings, but his offense couldn't touch Stanek and Astin.

"I thought our guys battled hard up there, but their stuff was very special," Tanner said. "At least from my vantage point, I thought they were very, very good."

Arkansas' victory followed a nail-biting ending in the opener, as Kent State almost cracked in the ninth inning.

The Gators scored two runs in the seventh -- one on an RBI single by catcher Mike Zunino (third overall, Mariners) -- and trailed by one with their No. 2 hitter leading off the ninth.

It took Kent State two pitchers and 11 pitches to throw a ninth-inning strike, and after a sacrifice bunt, right-hander Josh Pierce hit Florida's Daniel Pigott to load the bases.

Pierce once again fell behind, 3-0, to Casey Turgeon, who watched two called strikes on the outside corner before trying unsuccessfully to check his swing.

Justin Shafer flied out to right to end the game.

Right-hander Ryan Bores (27th round, Rangers) earned the win while holding Florida to two runs in six innings, catcher David Lyon (34th round, Rangers) went 3-for-5 and shortstop Jimmy Rider (26th round, Pirates) had two hits to lead the Golden Flashes.

Florida starter Hudson Randall (seventh round, Tigers) left after only one inning because of heat-related symptoms. The first-pitch temperature of 95 degrees was the highest at the College World Series since June 11, 2001.

Randall was replaced by right-hander Jonathan Crawford, who was tagged for four runs in the second en route to the victory.

"We definitely feel like we deserve to be here, and hopefully we showed that out there today," Lyon said. "After Saturday night, we probably left a lot of doubt in people's minds. We kind of used the Cinderella story to our advantage -- just caught [them] thinking about their next game. We had to jump on them early and kind of shock them with that."

Monday's scores
Kent State 5, Florida 4
Arkansas 2, No. 8 South Carolina 1

Tuesday's game
No. 2 UCLA (48-15) vs. No. 3 Florida State (49-16), 7 p.m. CT

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News Headline: Kent: CWS 'watch party' at Water Street Tavern (Video) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT -- Kent State students, fans watch the Kent State baseball team in the College World Series game against Florida.

Please click on link for video:
http://www.wkyc.com/rss/article/248912/6/Kent-CWS-watch-party-at-Water-Street-Tavern

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News Headline: Morning news headlines for June 19, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State advances

Kent State's run in the College World Series will continue. The Flashes held off top-seeded Florida 5-4 in an elimination game last night. There were some nervous moments at the end of the game, when Kent State pitcher Josh Pierce worked himself out of a one-out, bases loaded jam. Kent State next faces two-time defending World Series champs South Carolina Wednesday night. The game will be broadcast on ESPN at 7pm.

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News Headline: U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Ohio (June 15) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: OptoIQ
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ALEXANDRIA, Va., June 15 -- The following federal patents were awarded to inventors in Ohio.

Kent State University Assigned Patent

Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, has been assigned a patent (8,199,286) developed by Deng-Ke Yang, Hudson, Ohio, and Fushan Zhou, Kent, Ohio, for a "polymer stabilized electrically controlled birefringence transflective LCD."

The abstract of the patent published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office states: "A transreflective display in which the thickness of the liquid crystal layer is the same for both transmissive and reflective modes. The transmissive and reflective pixels are stabilized in two different liquid crystal configurations with different birefringences. The light retardation effect of one path in the transmissive pixels is close to or equals the retardation effect of two paths in the reflective pixels, resulting in synchronization of the two modes."

The patent application was filed on July 29, 2005 (11/193,717). The full-text of the patent can be found at http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=8,199,286&OS=8,199,286&RS=8,199,286

Written by Satyaban Rath; edited by Hemanta Panigrahi.

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News Headline: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing Program Awards Grants to 55 Schools of Nursing to Provide Scholarships for Students in Accelerated Degree Programs | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name: SOURCE Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
News OCR Text: Scholarships, program support will aid second career nurses from groups underrepresented in nursing who are enrolled in accelerated degree programs.

PRINCETON, N.J., /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) today announced the schools of nursing that have been selected to participate in RWJF's prestigious New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN). During the 2012-2013 academic year, the schools will receive grants to support students in their accelerated baccalaureate and master's degree nursing programs, who are traditionally underrepresented in the field of nursing and are pursuing a second career in nursing. The NCIN Scholarship Program was launched in 2008 by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to expand enrollment in accelerated degree programs in schools of nursing while increasing diversity in the nursing workforce.

"We need a well-educated, diverse nursing workforce to provide quality care for our changing patient population," said David Krol, MD, MPH, FAAP, program officer for NCIN, RWJF senior program officer and team director of the RWJF Human Capital portfolio. "NCIN is strengthening nursing education and helping to fill the pipeline with capable, culturally-competent nurses."

Schools receiving grants through NCIN provide scholarships directly to students from groups underrepresented in nursing or from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Students who receive the NCIN scholarships-in the amount of $10,000 each-have already earned a bachelor's degree in another field, and are making a career switch to nursing through accelerated nursing degree programs. These programs prepare students to pass the licensure exam required for all registered nurses in as little as 12-18 months and provide quicker routes to workforce eligibility than traditional programs.

Since 2008, the NCIN program has distributed 2,717 scholarships to students at more than 100 unique schools of nursing. This year, funding for 400 scholarships was granted to 55 schools of nursing.

Students also receive other supports to help them meet the demands of an accelerated degree program. All NCIN grantee schools are required to maintain a mentoring program for their scholars, and many offer a pre-entry immersion program to help scholars learn study, test-taking and other skills that will aid them in managing the challenges of the program.

"AACN is proud to collaborate with RWJF on this unique effort. NCIN scholars bring life experience that makes them exceptional, mature nursing candidates, and they represent the diverse, culturally-competent nursing workforce our nation needs," said AACN President Jane Kirschling, DNS, RN, FAAN. "NCIN provides the scholarship and support these students need to succeed in school, and thrive in the workforce."

In this fifth year of the program, the following schools were awarded grants:

Allen College

Ashland University

Bellarmine University

Boston College

California State University-Northridge

College of Mount St. Joseph

College of St. Scholastica

Columbia University

Coppin State University

Creighton University

DePaul University

Duke University

Duquesne University

Edgewood College

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Georgia Health Sciences University

Kent State University

Linfield College

Medical University of South Carolina

MidAmerica Nazarene University

Montana State University

Mount St. Mary's College

Nebraska Methodist College of Nursing and Allied Health

New Mexico State University

New York University

Norfolk State University

Oregon Health & Science University

Quinnipiac University

Rush University Medical Center

Saint Louis University

Samuel Merritt University

Southern Connecticut State University

Stony Brook University

SUNY Downstate

The George Washington University

The University of Tennessee-Knoxville

The University of Texas at El Paso

Thomas Jefferson University

University of California-UCLA

University of Delaware

University of Hawaii

University of Maryland, Baltimore

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

University of Miami

University of Michigan-Flint

University of Mississippi Medical Center

University of Missouri-Columbia

University of Nebraska Medical Center

University of Pennsylvania

University of Rochester School of Nursing

University of Tennessee Health Science Center

University of Wyoming

West Virginia University

Winston-Salem State University

Yale University

The 2010 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, recommends increasing the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree or higher, and increasing the diversity of students to create a workforce prepared to meet the demands of diverse populations across the lifespan. The mission of the NCIN program is helping to advance those recommendations, enabling schools to expand student capacity in higher education, and encouraging more diversity.

By bringing more nurses into the profession at the baccalaureate and master's degree levels, the NCIN program also helps to address the nation's nurse faculty shortage. Data from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration show that nurses entering the profession via baccalaureate programs are four times more likely than other nurses to pursue a graduate degree in nursing. This trend is reflected in the NCIN scholars, as 91 percent of the students receiving funding in the first three years of the program indicate a desire to advance their education to the master's and doctoral levels.

To find learn more about the NCIN program, visit www.newcareersinnursing.org.

About NCIN

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) joined with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to create New Careers in Nursing: an RWJF Scholarship Program to help alleviate the nursing shortage and increase the diversity of nursing professionals. Through annual grants to schools of nursing, NCIN provides $10,000 scholarships to college graduates with degrees in other fields who wish to transition into nursing through an accelerated baccalaureate or master's nursing program. For more information, visit www.newcareersinnursing.org.

About RWJF

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country. As the nation's largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, measurable and timely change. For 40 years, the Foundation has brought experience, commitment and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves. When it comes to helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need, the Foundation expects to make a difference in your lifetime. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org.

About AACN

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing is the national voice for baccalaureate and graduate programs in nursing. Representing more than 700 member schools of nursing at public and private institutions nationwide, AACN's educational, research, governmental advocacy, data collection, publications and other programs work to establish quality standards for bachelor's and graduate degree nursing education, assist deans and directors to implement those standards, influence the nursing profession to improve health care, and promote public support of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education, research and practice. For more information, visit www.aacn.nche.edu.

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News Headline: Hudson author Jacqueline Marino details CWRU medical school life in 'White Coats' (Marino) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Every doctor has gone through it -- the stamina-testing, information-overload experience that is medical school.

It's a trial by fire for students who up until then have had an easy time with academics but who quickly face physical and intellectual demands so intense they have been known to trigger depression, or worse, in some students.

A new book by Hudson author Jacqueline Marino gives an insider's look at what getting through medical school really takes – in this case, by creating a portrait of students at Case Western Reserve University Medical School.

"You have to be a brainiac, and hard-working, and even then it's very difficult," says Marino, 39, an assistant professor of journalism at Kent State University. "It's a huge commitment and sacrifice, and I wanted to see what that was like."

So she followed three students at Case's medical school over their four-year sojourn. Marino takes readers through nights of students cramming for daunting bio-chemistry exams, days when they first faced the cadavers they'd dissect, and hours caring for patients -- checking pulses, performing CPR on a dying woman, assisting in a birth.

"White Coats: Three Journeys Through An American Medical School," started as a single magazine story by Marino, then a Cleveland magazine staffer, in 2005. Based on reader reaction to that story, and her own interest in the student's challenges, Marino decided to follow the three students beyond the day they received the short white coats bestowed upon medical students, through their years of school and training.

The students she chose -- based on their candor and willingness to open their lives to her examination -- were wildly different in background, and in their views toward medical school:

• Mike Norton, a Mormon from Utah whose wife was pregnant during his first year of med school and whose father would face a dire diagnosis;

• Marleny Franco, born in the Dominican Republic and motivated to be a doctor by the health care disparities she'd seen that were based on language, race and culture;

• Millie Gentry, a statuesque half-Taiwanese young woman, who entered medical school with determination to simultaneously have a balanced life that involved part-time modeling, shopping, cooking and friends outside school.

Marino says she was drawn to the doctors for several reasons: years of watching "M*A*S*H," "E.R.," "Scrubs" and "Grey's Anatomy," and from a trip to Belgrade with a team of doctors on a medical mission just after the Bosnian War ended. The doctors awed the young journalist with their focus, skill and investment of time and emotion. She is also a fan of immersion journalism, as practiced by Tom Wolfe who followed astronauts for years to write "The Right Stuff," and Richard Ben Cramer, who took a deep-dive look at the 1988 presidential candidates in "What It Takes."

"I wanted to do something big that took time and investment, and I picked medical school," Marino says, a place she herself never hungered to attend "because I don't have that in me."

The first year of medical school brings plenty of drama: besides the dreaded bio-chem classes, students learn that while they may grasp concepts quickly, to succeed, they must study diligently and daily.

"That's a wake-up call," she says. They realize quickly, in a way they haven't before, that they, too, have limits.

It wouldn't be possible for medical students to ever learn, or retain, everything that is thrown at them in medical school, and they are bombarded, says Marino. Plus, medicine is always changing, with new research bringing new protocols.

But as the dean of the Case medical school, Dr. Pamela Davis, told Marino, "We teach students how to think like a doctor."

"That's a huge deal," says Mariono. "It doesn't matter what the research is, or what they taught you in medical school -- what matters is how to get the answers you are looking for, by thinking as a doctor does."

Another thing the students told Marino was the powerful effect that being exposed to varied cultures and socioeconomic environments had on them.

"It's common for students in medical school to have families who are in medicine too, so many of them are very privileged," the author says. "When they meet a 16-year-old mother who has already lost her baby's father to violence, they are stunned. It's devastating to them when they first see how different some people's lives are."

As tough as she thought medical school would be for students, Marino found out it was even worse. "The physical stamina you have to have to get through these insane schedules is incredible," she says. "At 2 a.m., the lights are still on at the med school, because people are always studying, alone or in groups; lectures are videotaped and students watch them over and over. And yet they can't learn it all, because you couldn't, not even in ten years."

Not to mention an additional pressure: most medical students face debt of $100,000 or more upon graduation -- as well as years more of residency and specialized training.

But the other thing Marino found was that the most potent lessons, and the time when students were most passionate, was when they were with patients, shadowing doctors, being present at surgery -- even holding surgical retractors for 6 hours as a surgeon cut and cauterized.

"When students found doctors who were good teachers, that's when they were most excited," Marino said. "When a doctor took the time to explain stuff to them, that's when they really learned – when it was hands-on."

The three students she followed each ended up facing crises of their own: severe depression, failures and negative evaluations, major family illness, all mixed with victorious moments.

Having seen medical school close up, Marino says it has affected the way she views doctors when she is a patient.

"I question them a lot more," she says. "Doctors are supposed to examine you and get your feedback -- and that's great if you have something like a hernia or strep throat. But medical training isn't that great in terms of picking up unusual illnesses. I know I have to be engaged in my own care.

"But I also think of doctors more as human beings, with their own families, their own health issues. I see them as more fallible -- because everyone has their personal struggles. "

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News Headline: Bill Cosby to perform at Kent State University at Tuscarawas (Andrews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Bill Cosby will perform at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 24 at the Kent State University at Tuscawaras Performing Arts Center.

"We are extremely pleased to bring someone of Bill Cosby's stature to our community," Gregg L. Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer at Kent State Tuscarawas, said in a press release. "Bill Cosby is one of the most iconic popular stand-up comedians. His performance here will showcase his wit and humorous, down-to-earth observations that have made him so successful throughout his entire career."

Cosby's career includes work on shows such as "The Electric Company," "Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids," "Little Bill" and "The Cosby Show." He is the recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor and the Marian Anderson Award. He released his latest book in November 2011.

Tickets cost $49-$79 and can be purchased online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac, by calling 330-308-6400 or by visiting the Performing Arts Center box office.

The Kent State Tuscawaras Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia. For more information, visit www.tusc.kent.edu/pac.

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News Headline: Battle over e-book pricing comes to a head between libraries and publishers (Boon) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: AlaskaDispatch.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In the hushed atmosphere and among the staid bookshelves of your public library, a battle is brewing over digital content.

On one side are librarians, stretched thin by lean budgets, who are eager to get more electronic books into the hands of readers and satisfy a growing need in their communities. On the other side are publishers, jittery about slim profits, who are making it harder for libraries to get electronic content. Some publishers have raised e-book prices by up to 700 percent for libraries. Others are imposing new lending restrictions. Several major publishing houses aren't selling new e-books to libraries at any price.

"Everyone is trying to figure out what the actual business model is going to look like," says Belinda Boon, a collection development expert at Kent State University's library school in Kent, Ohio. "There have been a lot more efforts in recent months for libraries, vendors, and publishers to try to come to some kinds of agreements."

The standoff is hurting both sides.

For libraries, the tougher purchasing environment is hampering efforts to add electronic holdings, which libraries effectively lease through licensing agreements with distributors. The Tuscaloosa (Ala.) Public Library, for instance, says it paid $12 last fall for an e-book edition of Random House's fantasy novel "A Game of Thrones." Now the price has leapt to $105, according to Director of Collection Development Amy Patton – a 700 percent increase. (Random House declined to say how much libraries pay for individual titles.)

With so much uncertainty, libraries nationwide are thinking twice about building electronic collections. Thirty-nine percent of America's 9,225 public libraries have no digital lending program, according to a 2011 survey from the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies. Many would like to add more e-books, librarians say, but they're waiting to see if publishers back down.

"With so many question marks lingering over the digital world, you have libraries who won't fully embrace [e-books] because they don't know what the impact of that decision is going to be," says Lisa Rice, president-elect of the Kentucky Library Association.

Publishers have said little about their specific fears or strategies as they experiment in the library marketplace. They acknowledge libraries serve a public good, but insist they can't simply sell e-books in accordance with old models.

"The library e-book and the lending privileges it allows enable many more readers to enjoy that copy than a typical consumer copy," says Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum in an e-mail. "Therefore, Random House believes it has greater value, and should be priced accordingly."

Random House raised e-book prices for libraries on March 1 and has since dropped prices on select titles.

Last year, HarperCollins sparked an outcry and inspired a boycott of its books when it announced that e-books sold to libraries would expire after being loaned out 26 times. E-books from Simon & Schuster have become unavailable to libraries. Penguin offers only its backlist, not new releases, of e-books to libraries. Hachette Book Group plans to start piloting an e-book program for libraries but didn't share details.

Of course, libraries have always given readers free access to books that publishers would like to sell, so the dynamics aren't entirely new. Distributors program e-books to be read by just one patron at a time and expire two or three weeks after the checkout date. Hence patrons who don't want to wait might still have an incentive to buy a copy. "Some libraries have a 'buy it now' button for people who don't want to wait," says Molly Raphael, president of the American Library Association (ALA). "So we're doing a whole lot, frankly, to drive people to buy."

But publishers worry that libraries might disrupt sales on new releases, just as publishers are trying desperately to adjust and stay profitable while protecting e-books from piracy.

"Some publishers are not seeing a lot of results in sales of e-books to make up for their huge investments" in digital publishing, says Sue Polanka, head of reference and instruction for Wright State University libraries and editor of "No Shelf Required: E-Books in Libraries." "They are very nervous and uncertain about what the future might bring, and so they're being very cautious."

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News Headline: E-book battle: Libraries, publishers square off on pricing (Boon) | Email

News Date: 06/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Christian Science Monitor
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In the hushed atmosphere and among the staid bookshelves of your public library, a battle is brewing over digital content.

On one side are librarians, stretched thin by lean budgets, who are eager to get more electronic books into the hands of readers and satisfy a growing need in their communities. On the other side are publishers, jittery about slim profits, who are making it harder for libraries to get electronic content. Some publishers have raised e-book prices by up to 700 percent for libraries. Others are imposing new lending restrictions. Several major publishing houses aren't selling new e-books to libraries at any price.

"Everyone is trying to figure out what the actual business model is going to look like," says Belinda Boon, a collection development expert at Kent State University's library school in Kent, Ohio. "There have been a lot more efforts in recent months for libraries, vendors, and publishers to try to come to some kinds of agreements."

The standoff is hurting both sides.

For libraries, the tougher purchasing environment is hampering efforts to add electronic holdings, which libraries effectively lease through licensing agreements with distributors. The Tuscaloosa (Ala.) Public Library, for instance, says it paid $12 last fall for an e-book edition of Random House's fantasy novel "A Game of Thrones." Now the price has leapt to $105, according to Director of Collection Development Amy Patton – a 700 percent increase. (Random House declined to say how much libraries pay for individual titles.)

With so much uncertainty, libraries nationwide are thinking twice about building electronic collections. Thirty-nine percent of America's 9,225 public libraries have no digital lending program, according to a 2011 survey from the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies. Many would like to add more e-books, librarians say, but they're waiting to see if publishers back down.

"With so many question marks lingering over the digital world, you have libraries who won't fully embrace [e-books] because they don't know what the impact of that decision is going to be," says Lisa Rice, president-elect of the Kentucky Library Association.

Publishers have said little about their specific fears or strategies as they experiment in the library marketplace. They acknowledge libraries serve a public good, but insist they can't simply sell e-books in accordance with old models.

"The library e-book and the lending privileges it allows enable many more readers to enjoy that copy than a typical consumer copy," says Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum in an e-mail. "Therefore, Random House believes it has greater value, and should be priced accordingly."

Random House raised e-book prices for libraries on March 1 and has since dropped prices on select titles.

Last year, HarperCollins sparked an outcry and inspired a boycott of its books when it announced that e-books sold to libraries would expire after being loaned out 26 times. E-books from Simon & Schuster have become unavailable to libraries. Penguin offers only its backlist, not new releases, of e-books to libraries. Hachette Book Group plans to start piloting an e-book program for libraries but didn't share details.

Of course, libraries have always given readers free access to books that publishers would like to sell, so the dynamics aren't entirely new. Distributors program e-books to be read by just one patron at a time and expire two or three weeks after the checkout date. Hence patrons who don't want to wait might still have an incentive to buy a copy. "Some libraries have a 'buy it now' button for people who don't want to wait," says Molly Raphael, president of the American Library Association (ALA). "So we're doing a whole lot, frankly, to drive people to buy."

But publishers worry that libraries might disrupt sales on new releases, just as publishers are trying desperately to adjust and stay profitable while protecting e-books from piracy.

"Some publishers are not seeing a lot of results in sales of e-books to make up for their huge investments" in digital publishing, says Sue Polanka, head of reference and instruction for Wright State University libraries and editor of "No Shelf Required: E-Books in Libraries." "They are very nervous and uncertain about what the future might bring, and so they're being very cautious."

Libraries' acquisitions accounted for 4.8 percent of all book sales in 2009, based on the latest available figures from the Book Industry Study Group and the ALA. E-book receipts grew from less than 4 percent of all book sales in 2009 to nearly 6 percent in 2010.

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