Report Overview:
Total Clips (26)
Alumni; Students (1)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (16)
Geography; Research (2)
Institutional Advancement (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Political Science (1)
Research (1)
Students (1)
Sustainability (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Students (1)
KSU ALUMS BRING VISION TO FILM 06/21/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Art, School of (1)
Art notes 06/21/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Athletics (16)
Storms wash out Kent State-South Carolina; game reset for Thursday at noon (Stricklin) 06/21/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State's Evan Campbell has been a hit with the glove: College World Series Insider (Video) (Stricklin) 06/21/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball notebook: Campbell provides spectacular plays for KSU (Stricklin) 06/21/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Chip on shoulder is serving Kent State well (Stricklin) 06/21/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Turning point not 'Pleasant' for Kent State Golden Flashes (Stricklin) 06/21/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

College World Series Notebook: Heavy storms postpone Kent State Golden Flashes-South Carolina Gamecocks game until noon today (Stricklin) 06/21/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball game postponed, will play at noon against South Carolina (with video) (Stricklin) 06/21/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Cheer on Hometown Athletes in the College World Series 06/21/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Rain Postpones Kent State, South Carolina College World Series Game (video) (Stricklin) 06/21/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State's stay in Omaha for College World Series gets extended by Mother Nature (Video) (Stricklin) 06/21/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

PICTURES: Kent State Spirit in Omaha! 06/21/2012 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

Kent State Golden Flashes to Face S. Carolina at Noon 06/21/2012 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

Kent State-South Carolina postponed (Stricklin) 06/21/2012 ESPN Text Attachment Email

College World Series 2012: Kent State Has Everything Needed to Be Surprise Champ 06/20/2012 BleacherReport.com Text Attachment Email

The Kent State Golden Flashes are a perfect Cinderella team that has all the ingredients needed to keep its carriage from turning into a pumpkin.  ...

Kent State game with Gamecocks postponed until Thursday 06/21/2012 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

Video 06/21/2012 WOIO-TV Text Attachment Email


Geography; Research (2)
As temperatures rise, so do concerns about violent crime (Sheridan) 06/20/2012 philly.com Text Attachment Email

...psychologist at Iowa State University. The correlation between increasing temperatures and crimes of aggression is remarkably clean, said Scott Sheridan, a Kent State University researcher who led a major study of crime in Cleveland. "You end up with an almost perfect line," he said. Based on an Inquirer...

As Heat Rises, So Does Potential for Violent Crime (Sheridan) 06/20/2012 Officer.com Text Attachment Email

...psychologist at Iowa State University. The correlation between increasing temperatures and crimes of aggression is remarkably clear, said Scott Sheridan, a Kent State University researcher who led a major study of crime in Cleveland. "You end up with an almost perfect line," he said. Based on an Inquirer...


Institutional Advancement (1)
Sheryl Crow to perform at Kent State despite recent brain tumor diagnosis (Vargo) 06/20/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...diagnosed with a benign brain tumor, but it won't affect her performance at Dix Stadium on Sept. 8, said Valoree Vargo, director of donor services at Kent State. "We've talked to the promoters and talked to the folks and everything is fine," Vargo said. "We're really excited about it. It's ...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
'Princess' story opens KSU Summer Stock 06/21/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

The children's theater production ''The Princess and the Pea'' opens Summer Stock 35 at Kent State University at Trumbull. Michelle L. Vacca wrote this adaptation of the fairy tale about a princess who must undergo an unusual test...


Political Science (1)
Egypt delays poll results (Stacher) 06/21/2012 Channel NewsAsia Text Attachment Email

...the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University. The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamist-dominated parliament after the country's constitutional...


Research (1)
Indio rescue mission part of grandparent study 06/21/2012 Desert Sun - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...a $35 compensation for grandmothers for each completed interview over the phone and face to face. The other universities involved in the study are Kent State University in Ohio, the University of North Texas in Denton and the University of Maryland in Baltimore.


Students (1)
Hiram poll: Young voters support president, but ... 06/21/2012 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email


Sustainability (1)
School Notes 06/20/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Kent State's fieldhouse gets 1,726 solar panels The installation of 1,726 solar panels on the roof of the Kent State Fieldhouse is nearing...


News Headline: KSU ALUMS BRING VISION TO FILM | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Movie filmed in
Northeastern Ohio
to be submitted
to 30 festivals

Former and current Kent State
University students worked and
brainstormed for months to
bring their vision to life, culminating
in “Rued January,” a feature-
length crime drama filmed,
cast and produced entirely in
Northeastern Ohio.
“Rued January” is the story of
a young man's struggle to free
himself from a cycle of debt and
extortion forced on him by a
ruthless crime boss. Produced,
written and directed by friends
and 2009 KSU alumni DC Evans
(advertising) and Andrew
Numbers (electronic media production),
the film is currently
nearing completion and is to be
submitted to 30 national and local
film festivals.
Evans and Numbers met while
rushing the national honors fraternity
Phi Sigma Pi. They bonded
over their mutual interest in
film, particularly comedic crime
stories. In 2008, Evans presented
Numbers with a one-scene
movie concept he had created,
a film that would eventually become
“Rued January.” The two
co-founded Reel Dandy Productions
as a label under which to
develop the film.
“I told (Evans) that with my
background, we could basically
turn this into a project and actually
shoot it,” Numbers said. “We
decided to turn it into a featurelength
script, expanding on dialogue
and depth of character.”
Pre-production and location
scouting began in 2010 and principle
filming started in January
2012.
“Our goal is to make a highquality
product with a next-tonothing
budget,” Numbers said.
“We were fortunate with the resources
we managed to pull together.”
Faced with a limited budget,
Numbers and Evans had to rely
on volunteer actors and borrowed
equipment, which saved
them greatly on expenses.
“Even in post-production, we'll
spend less than $1,000, so we were
really fortunate,” Evans said.
Zach Griffin, a communications
major at KSU, saw fliers
around campus calling for actors
and auditioned, eventually
landing the lead role.
“I've done one-off things with
friends, but it was so refreshing
to come into something that had
a full, hashed-out script,” Griffin
said. “It was a totally new experience
and it was really great to be
a part of. I met a lot of great people
in the process too, because
nobody had to be there. Everybody
was doing it for their own
enjoyment.”
Shooting took place on weekends
through January and February
2012. The cast and crew
bonded through 12- to 24-hour
work days and a shared lack of
monetary compensation.
“We had about 16 actors and a
handful of extras, none of them
paid,” Evans said. “As far as the
crew, it was essentially me and
(Numbers) and occasionally one
other person. We did our very
best to work well with (the actors)
and keep them as comfortable
as we could, because as volunteers,
they have every right to
walk away.”
Numbers said he was thankful
the cast stuck with the project
through the long, unpaid hours
in the heavy snow season.
“When you're scheduling
people like that, if you've got
them there, you have to get
the shots,” Numbers said. “If
you're already committed to
that scene, you can't just throw
half of it away because it's getting
late. We were very fortunate
that our actors were willing
to make that commitment
as well as we were.”
“I was physically tired, but I
felt like I was always mentally involved,”
Griffin added. “I felt engaged
the whole time.”
As “Rued January” nears completion
and Evans and Numbers
collect donations for high-definition
film materials and festival
submission fees, the next project
for Reel Dandy Productions
is already in the brainstorming
phase. Though they face several
budgetary and logistical concerns,
Evans and Numbers are
willing to continue their attempt
to break into the Northeastern
Ohio independent film scene.
“When we met with people and
told them what we wanted to do,
they basically said we're crazy,”
Numbers said. “Maybe we are,
maybe that's a good thing. But,
we're doing it and it's working.
We intend to follow it through.”

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News Headline: Art notes | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This year, the Akron Art Museum's popular summer concert series, Downtown@Dusk, returns for its 28th season, offering a showcase of great music with a lineup of eight great bands, not to mention the lively art talks and engaging children's activities organized by the museum.

Downtown@Dusk begins tonight and will be held 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays rain or shine through Aug. 9.

While the band takes a break, join museum staff, area artists and local experts for ArtTalks@Dusk. Presenters will offer a series of informal talks about the exhibitions on view as well as a variety of other art-related topics from 7:30 to 8 p.m. each Thursday in the museum's Charles and Jane Lehner Auditorium.

ArtCamps@Dusk will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. for children 7-12 years old to explore fun and wacky hands-on art making in the museum classroom. Cost is $5 per session, free for members. Register soon, as space is limited. To register, go to http://akronartmuseum.ticketleap.com/artcampdusk/#view=calendar.

This year's schedule:

• Tonight — The Wanda Hunt Band, old-school R&B. Art talk: Mitchell Kahan, director and CEO: Where Did We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?

• June 28 — Anne E. DeChant, pop, country. Art talk: Christy Gray of ZeroLandfill: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Dumpster.

• July 5 — Blue Lunch, Chicago Blues, jump and swing. Art talk: Kathleen Browne, Kent State University jewelry and metals professor, Magnificent Obsessions.

• July 12 — Lost State of Franklin, rock-a-billy. Art talk: Michelle Stitzlein, artist, Recycled Materials; Inspirations & Artwork.

• July 19 — Robin Stone, soul pop, intelligent groove, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Art talk: Fred Smith, Kent State art history professor, Contextualizing the Art of El Anatsui.

• July 26 — Speedbumps, variety. Art talk: Al Bright, abstract expressionist, Artist Talk.

• Aug. 2 — 15-60-75 The Numbers Band, abstract blues. Art talk: Ellen Rudolph, interim chief curator, Behind the Scenes with El Anatsui.

• Aug. 9 — Zydeco Kings, zydeco. Art talk: Arnold Tunstal, collections manager, 90 Years of Collecting.

Downtown@Dusk 2012 is made possible by the city of Akron. It is presented in cooperation with WKSU (89.7-FM).

ArtCamps@Dusk 2012 is made possible by a gift from the Harris-Stanton Gallery.

ArtTalks@Dusk 2012 is made possible by a gift from the Sam & Kathy Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Jewish Community Board of Akron.

Thursday

Opening — Kent State University's School of Art Galleries opens Painting in the Dark by Northeast Ohio painter and Kent State alumnus Patricia Zinsmeister Parker with a free 5-7 p.m., reception at the Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., Kent. The show remains on view through July 14. Kent State's Downtown Gallery is open from noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Information, http://dept.kent.edu/art.

Reception — Artists, Teachers, Lovers, featuring works by Carol Klingel, Fran and Tom Lenhart and John Smolko. Free artists reception 5-7 p.m. at Kent State University School of Art Gallery. Information, 330-676-1549 or www.galleries.kent.edu.

Friday

Watercolor Workshop — Bob Moyer teaches two sessions Friday and Saturday, (call for time) at the Cuyahoga Valley Art Center, 2131 Front St., Cuyahoga Falls. Information, 330-928-8092 or www.cvartcenter.org.

Saturday

Workshop — Collect! Compose! Click!: Compose photos with your cellphone or digital camera with Jane Rogers free from 1 to 3 p.m. at Summit Artspace, 140 E. Market St., Akron. Register at psargent@neo.rr.com. Information, 330-376-9185 or www.akronareaarts.org.

Artist's Reception — 1 p.m. at the Artists Archives of the Western Reserve, 1834 E. 123rd St., Cleveland, which is showing The Journey: A Retrospective Exhibition of the Art of Michelangelo Lovelace, Sr. through July 20. The Lovelace paintings are visual documentations of life in many of America's inner cities. His works, acrylic on textured canvas, use an animated, vibrant, childlike imagery reminiscent of primitive works of folk art and outsider art. A native of Cleveland, Lovelace has been a professional artist for 22 years. For information or to RSVP, call 216-721-9020 or email info@artistsarchives.org.

Tuesday

Museum Camp — The Canton Museum of Art, 1001 Market Ave. N., offers three summer art camp sessions for children, beginning June 26. Camp classes are taught by museum art instructors and use a wide variety of media and techniques to inspire young artists. Children also enjoy access to the museum galleries. Each session features six art classes, with age-appropriate themes. Cost per class is $75, including all materials. Details can be found at www.cantonart.org. Register online or call 330-453-7666.

Worth noting

Brader Day — The Canton Museum of Art has announced plans to create an exhibition and a publication dedicated to the historic drawings of the late 19th century folk artist Ferdinand Brader. The exhibit, scheduled to open December 2014, will be a retrospective of Brader's work in America and will include more than 40 examples. Based on knowledge of Brader's numbering and dating system, researchers assume that he made at least 980 drawings, of which only 156 have been catalogued. In an effort to identify “lost” works, the museum is planning a “Bring Your Brader Day” on July 14. Those who believe they have an original work may bring it for identification, free of charge, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Information, 330-453-7666.

CMA Library Restacked — Cleveland Museum of Art's Ingalls Library is the third largest art research library in the United States with over 465,000 volumes and is open to the public during normal business hours. In December 2011, library staff moved 100,000 items out of storage and has been reintegrating them into the stack areas through the end of this month. The library supports research and learning and provides assistance to anyone seeking information on art. Information, http://library.clevelandart.org/.

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News Headline: Storms wash out Kent State-South Carolina; game reset for Thursday at noon (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. -- Kent State's College World Series run took a pause Wednesday night as rain postponed its elimination game with South Carolina until noon Thursday. Should Kent win, the Golden Flashes will play again at 9 p.m. against Arkansas, the team that defeated KSU in its opening CWS game, 8-1.

"That's what happens when you get in the losers bracket," KSU head coach Scott Stricklin said. The game will be telecast on ESPN2.

After five days of sun and blue skies, thunder and lightning was followed by rain just as the teams took the field to warm up at TD Ameritrade Park. Short breaks in the rain prompted the teams to emerge from their locker rooms, but NCAA officials made their final decision 90 minutes after the scheduled 8 p.m. ET start.

Once the rains arrived, Stricklin said he began to prepare for Thursday.

"The guys were ready to go, but we were prepared for the possibility of playing two games," he said.

Wednesday's starter, Tyler Skulina (11-2, 3.63 ERA) will start the morning game. If the Flashes go again at night, Stricklin said he has several possibilities.

"David Starn (11-4, 2.48 ERA) is an option," Stricklin said. "Ryan Mace (2-3, 3.61) is an option. We're in good shape pitching-wise."

On the field, the Golden Flashes could also get a boost with the return of DH Jason Bagoly, the hitting star of Kent's 5-4 Monday win over Florida. Bagoly who spent Tuesday and Wednesday back in Austintown for the funeral of his mother, Cheryl McHenry, who died unexpectedly last Thursday.

"He's taking a flight out at 10 a.m.," Stricklin said. "He still has some family things to do [Thursday] morning. He wants to make sure. This is something we're very sensitive to, his needs and his family's needs. Leaving at 5 a.m. is not a good option for him. We talked about that. We gave him the option.

"He lands in Omaha about 1:20 p.m. We're going to get him here as soon as we possibly can, and see what happens. We feel very good about Nick Hamilton, he's been our DH for most of the year. But we need all of our troops here to win these games, and Jason's going to be here, we hope, for the end of it."

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News Headline: Kent State's Evan Campbell has been a hit with the glove: College World Series Insider (Video) (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. -- Evan Campbell's batting average of .316 is a sure indication the Kent State center fielder knows how to put the bat on the ball.

But in NCAA Tournament play, his hits have been few and far between. Going into Wednesday night's game against South Carolina, the junior was hitting a miserly .132 in eight NCAA Tournament games.

Yet he has had his moments. Campbell's game-deciding home run against Kentucky was one of his five hits. He has gotten on base enough to score seven of Kent's 35 runs in tournament play. He has been a highlight reel defensively in center.

"Usually, I'm a hitter and defense comes second," Campbell said. "But they always stress to us that you can make more of an impact with your glove than you can with your bat. Obviously, it's been no secret my bat's been asleep the last couple of games. So I'm trying to do as much as I can on defense."

The first memorable defensive play was the game-ending out in Kent's 7-6 Super Regional victory over Oregon. It was literally a game-saving play, as the bases were loaded with Ducks in the bottom of the ninth.

Evan Campbell's catch to stop Oregon in Game 1

Against Florida, Campbell dove at the last second to rob Brian Johnson in the sixth inning.

"That one, I think, was better than the Oregon one," KSU head coach Scott Stricklin said. "We kind of got on him about the Oregon one. I don't know if he needed to dive on that one. He made that a little more dramatic than he needed to. But that one [against Florida] was a great one. Just an unbelievable catch. A big momentum. He's on second base with nobody out if Evan doesn't make that catch."

All of this is being done by a first-time outfielder. Campbell was recruited to Kent as an infielder, and only this season made the switch.

"He's a great athlete," Stricklin said. "That's why we recruited him as a shortstop. We put him out in center and he's gotten progressively better every single day. He's a clutch player."

If Campbell can now get his bat going again, he can become even more of threat.

Back in stride: After getting four hits in its CWS loss to Arkansas, Kent State collected 12 hits against Florida to mark the 40th time this season the Flashes have tallied 10 or more hits. Senior catcher David Lyon led the way with a triple, two singles and an RBI.

Senior shortstop Jimmy Rider, the MAC's all-time hits leader with 353, added a double and two singles for his team-leading 32nd multi-hit game of the season. He also extended his single-season records for hits (106) and doubles (30). Junior first baseman and Louisville Slugger Second Team All-America pick George Roberts went 2-for-4 with two RBI with his 31st multi-hit game.

Did you know: Kent State's 5-4 victory over No. 1 Florida was the second time a MAC school has defeated a team ranked No. 1 in a primary fall (football), winter (basketball) or spring (baseball) sport in conference history. Both were done by Kent State baseball. On March 16, 2003, Kent defeated No. 1 and undefeated Georgia Tech on the road, 5-3.

But the MAC has had other chances in basketball. Ball State took No. 1 (AP) and eventual national champion UNLV to the final seconds before losing, 69-67 in the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament in 1990. Just over a decade later, Ball State led No. 1 Duke late in the Maui Invitational before 7-0 center Lonnie Jones, suffering asthma, went to the bench, paving the way for an 83-71 Duke win.

Please click on link for video:
http://www.cleveland.com/sports/college/index.ssf/2012/06/kent_states_evan_campbell_has.html

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News Headline: Kent State baseball notebook: Campbell provides spectacular plays for KSU (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb.: Last year Evan Campbell probably never would have dreamed his prowess in the center field would make ESPN SportsCenter's Top 10 plays.

Playing infield through his freshman year at Kent State, Campbell was sent into summer ball before his sophomore season with instructions from Golden Flashes coach Scott Stricklin to spend some time in the outfield.

When he returned, the product of West Branch High found himself starting in center.

“Last year it was a little bit rough at the beginning, reading balls and chasing them,” Campbell said after the Golden Flashes' practice Tuesday at the College World Series. “This year it felt pretty natural.”

That's been evident during Kent State's NCAA run. Making its first appearance in Omaha, KSU (47-19) was scheduled to face two-time defending champion South Carolina (46-18) in an elimination game Wednesday night at TD Ameritrade Park. The 8 p.m. start was delayed by heavy rain.

The biggest victory in Kent State baseball history, a 5-4 triumph over top-ranked Florida on Monday that sent the Gators home, included a spectacular play by Campbell that drew national recognition.

In the sixth inning, he ran down a ball off the bat of clean-up hitter Brian Johnson and made a diving catch. His effort was No. 2 on ESPN's list of top 10 plays.

“I just took off and I knew the wind was carrying it. I tried to get there. I laid out for it and got it,” Campbell said.

When Stricklin got back to the team hotel, he and his wife flipped on the television to watch ESPN.

“When it came on at No. 9, I'm like, ‘Here's Evan' and it was T.J.,” said Stricklin, referring to T.J. Sutton's game-ending catch in right field. “So we were counting it down; we were in the top five. ... The No. 2 play is not too bad.”

Campbell also made the top 10 on June 9 after an NCAA Super Regional game against Oregon. He saved a 7-6 victory despite a two-out, bases loaded jam with a turning, leaping catch in deep center.

After that one, Stricklin jokingly accused Campbell of hot-dogging.

“I don't know about that,” Campbell said. “I was a little worried. I was just glad to hold on to it. I knew if I drop it the game's over.”

When a member of the media suggested to Campbell that he's been on as many highlight lists as the Miami Heat's LeBron James, Campbell said: “That's fine with me. I'm not a LeBron fan. Used to be.”

The Golden Flashes might have come to expect an extraordinary defensive gem from Campbell every night.

“I wouldn't go that far,” he said. “This team is funny. Things always happen and it seems almost routine for something weird to happen like that. It's pretty awesome.”

Campbell has also been a big part of the Golden Flashes' offensive attack, ranking fourth on the team with a .316 batting average with seven home runs and 40 RBI. But in KSU's eight NCAA games, Campbell is hitting just .132.

Game plan for S.C.

Stricklin knew what the Golden Flashes had to do against South Carolina.

“You've got to try to score early and make them play from behind,” Stricklin said.

“Take the ball out of their bullpen's hands. If Matt Price gets the ball late in the game with the lead, it's pretty tough to beat South Carolina. He's been there for those last two national championship games.”

Price (4-4, 3.38 ERA), a junior right-hander, has 12 saves this season. He has 85 strikeouts in 72 innings; opponents are hitting .198 against him. In a victory Saturday against Florida, he recorded the 42nd save of his career, surpassing Georgia's Josh Fields (2005-08) for the Southeastern Conference record.

School spirit

One of the owners of the Lotus, a boutique at 1207 Howard St. in Omaha's Old Market district, is a Kent State graduate and was proudly wearing a Golden Flashes T-shirt on Wednesday.

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News Headline: Chip on shoulder is serving Kent State well (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Editors note: Wednesday night's game between Kent State and South Carolina was cancelled due to rain and rescheduled to noon today.

OMAHA, Neb.: Opposing coaches in the College World Series have had nothing but positive things to say about Kent State.

But the Golden Flashes refuse to let go of the chip on their shoulders that has carried them through an unprecedented run in the NCAA Tournament.

Even on Tuesday, senior shortstop Jimmy Rider hoped South Carolina would still be upset about its 2-1 loss Monday to Arkansas and overlook KSU.

“I hope they're looking to get that Arkansas rematch,” Rider said after practice at Bellevue East High School.

Kent State (47-19) was scheduled to take on two-time defending champion (46-18) South Carolina in an College World Series elimination game Wednesday night at TD Ameritrade Park. Due to heavy rain, the game was postponed and rescheduled for noon today. If Kent State wins, the Flashes will play again at 9 p.m. against Arkansas.

Kent State coach Scott Stricklin probably doesn't want to correct the Golden Flashes' perceived slight by college baseball's superpowers. Of the teams KSU has faced in Omaha, Arkansas was making its seventh trip to the CWS, Florida its eighth and South Carolina its 11th.

“It's tough for that team to play against us,” Kent State center fielder Evan Campbell said Tuesday, referring to South Carolina. “They're used to playing the Floridas and the Arkansases, they're not used to playing Kent State. We get really pumped up to play teams like that and they're kinda like, ‘Kent State?' ”

A Mid-American Conference team hadn't reached the College World Series since Eastern Michigan in 1976.

Since the NCAA Tournament began, Kent State has eliminated Kentucky (Southeastern Conference), Purdue (Big Ten) and Oregon (Pac-12), lost to Arkansas (SEC) and ousted Florida (SEC).

Kent State's next game will mark the Golden Flashes' second consecutive game against an SEC foe and fifth in nine NCAA games, including two against Kentucky in the Gary, Ind., regional. KSU will have faced four of the top six seeds in the SEC Tournament – the No. 2 Gamecocks, No. 3 Gators, No. 4 Wildcats and No. 6 Razorbacks. (LSU was No. 1.)

“They're a powerhouse conference,” Campbell said Tuesday of the SEC. “People underestimate the MAC a little bit, we get overshadowed by the Big Ten and schools like that. It shows the caliber of players we have.”

Before Stricklin's team left for a best-of-three super regional series in Eugene, Ore., he was playing up the ‘‘Nobody believes in us'' angle. The Golden Flashes were coming off a 7-6, 21-inning victory over Kentucky, a 7-3 triumph over Purdue and a 3-2 victory over UK in the Gary regional.

“Kentucky showed us nothing but respect, but they still kind of felt like big brother looking down at little brother,” Stricklin said after a practice at Kent State earlier this month. “Even if it wasn't there, our kids felt like that and wanted to make sure we're not going to get pushed around.

“Anyone who saw our games with Kentucky would tell you talent-wise it was the same. Both of those games could have gone either way. They played good; we played good.”

Stricklin got the same vibe against Purdue.

“Purdue won the Big Ten by a large margin,” Stricklin said that day at Kent State. “Everyone that saw that game, and it was on the Big Ten Network, saw that we were the better team. That was very satisfying, not only as a coaching staff, but for our players. We felt we were, but to go out there and do it and prove it, it felt really good.”

That afternoon, Rider was trumpeting the same.

“[Kentucky) definitely overlooked us a little bit, them and Purdue,” Rider said. “They felt, ‘They're a smaller, Mid-American school, we'll be
able to beat these kids easy.' We can kind of sneak up on some people. It works to our advantage.”

After falling to Arkansas, South Carolina coach Ray Tanner praised his next foe, Kent State.

“They're very good,” Tanner said. “I got a chance to watch them in the super regional against Oregon. I've known coach Stricklin for many years. I think his personality is very special.”

After the Golden Flashes eliminated Florida, Gators coach Kevin O'Sullivan was just as complimentary.

“I've got to credit Kent State hitters. They did a nice job ... with two strikes and two outs. They battled and separated themselves,” O'Sullivan said Monday. “It's an unfortunate way to end the season, but Kent State deserves a lot of credit for the way they played. We have nothing to be ashamed of, but Kent State just did a little bit more and deserved the win.”

The Golden Flashes might have paid no mind to those comments. At this point, they're sticking to the motivational tactic that works, even if it now requires a little embellishment.

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News Headline: Turning point not 'Pleasant' for Kent State Golden Flashes (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — Every championship season has its turning point.

It's that moment where the switch flips, turning a team with potential into a team willing to fight to fulfill its destiny.

Ask any Kent State player or coach to trace his way back to the turning point on their 2012 run to the College World Series and he will likely point to a frigid and miserable afternoon in Mount Pleasant, Mich. on April 20.

The high temperature during the game was 42, but the icy rain spitting down from dark skies made it feel even colder. Several Golden Flashes players admitted they had no interest in being on the field in those conditions, and it showed.

“It was freezing out there, we played sloppy, (starting pitcher) David Starn was the only guy who looked like he wanted to play that day,” said senior shortstop Jimmy Rider. “We pretty much sucked.”

In the 3-0 loss, the Flashes managed just four hits while striking out 13 times against Central Michigan ace Zach Cooper.

There is no shame in struggling against Cooper, who was selected by the Philadelphia Phillies in the 15th round of the Major League Baseball First-Year Player Draft earlier this month. But after watching a lackluster effort just one week after dropping 2-of-3 at Bowling Green, KSU head coach Scott Stricklin could feel his blood rising as he called his team to a meeting down the right-field line at Theunissen Stadium.

“He was pretty fired up,” associate head coach Mike Birkbeck remembered. “He was disappointed in the way our guys went about their business. That's the No. 1 thing. We didn't play with the normal energy or passion.”

Stricklin channeled his inner Sgt. Hulka as he spent the next 20 minutes to over an hour — it depends on who is telling the story — reading his players the riot act.

Post-game meetings down the line in right field are the norm on the road. But KSU play-by-play voice Ty Linder had a feeling this one was a little different as he wrapped up his post-game show. After signing off, Linder usually has to race for the team bus for fear of being left behind.

“This time, I remember being done with my postgame and looking down expecting another rush to the bus, but instead the players and coaches were all still down the line,” said Linder. “I could tell (Stricklin) was having a very animated and one-sided conversation.”

Linder glanced at Kent State's athletic communications assistant Mike Ashcraft and asked, “Are you going down there?”

“Not while that's going on,” Ashcraft answered quickly.

That's when Linder realized Stricklin's monologue was starting to draw an audience.

“There was more bad weather expected that night, and Central Michigan's players were trying to put down the tarp and do some other work to get the field ready for what was coming,” Linder remembered. “But they all stopped and stared down the line at what was going on. Their coach finally had to yell for them to quit gawking and get back to work.”

Two full months later, Stricklin had no idea the Central players had been watching wide-eyed behind him as he cut into his team.

“It doesn't surprise me, though,” Stricklin said. “I wasn't focused on anything but the guys in front of me. I wasn't shy about letting them know how I felt. Sometimes I wear my emotions on my sleeve and I'm very honest with them. I think that's a good relationship to have with your team, being honest. I told them what I saw. I told them I didn't like it and I challenged them not to like it, too.”

When players don't respect their coach, their ears tend to turn shouting into the muffled trombone sounds made by every adult in old Peanuts cartoons.

The Flashes, however, heard every word.

“Coach gave it to us and we deserved it,” said Rider. “It was like he was wondering, ‘Are you really going to show up to play like that with everything we have on the line?' ”

Stricklin said he was “as disappointed and as angry as I had ever been in any team I've ever had,” prior to that game. He's been as proud as he can be in a team ever since. And in the two months that have followed, he hasn't had to raise his voice even once.

“I can have my moments,” Stricklin admitted. “But in the last eight weeks the guys don't recognize me. I've been the nicest guy in the world the last seven weeks because we've played near perfect baseball. We've been so good the last seven weeks, it has been a lot of fun.”

After shout down, the Flashes' seniors held a team meeting to redefine what was expected of them as Kent State baseball players. Then they sat down with Stricklin to explain what they would like from him.

“I've stepped back, taken a breath, relaxed a little bit and let them play,” said Stricklin. “I give the seniors credit for that, too. They came and talked to me about let's all get together, let's have fun and not be so stressed. It takes a special relationship for your players to say that to you. Sometimes it is a shock to your pride and a shock to your ego, but I was able to take a step back and listen to what they said and then get on the same page with them.”

Neither coach nor players has revealed what was said in any of those meetings. Kent State's 26-3 record since April 20 speaks for itself. That stretch included a 21-game winning streak stretching from April 27-to-May 9.

“I thought the guys got (Stricklin's) message that day,” said Birkbeck. “Did I anticipate rattling off a 21-game winning streak? No. I don't know how many teams even do that. And now here we are in Omaha playing in the College World Series.”

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News Headline: College World Series Notebook: Heavy storms postpone Kent State Golden Flashes-South Carolina Gamecocks game until noon today (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. — Kent State's players spent almost two hours playing Hangman in the team clubhouse, hot potato in the dugout and hitting balls in the batting cages under TD Ameritrade Park.

They tried just about anything to pass the time during a rain delay that finally ended with the NCAA postponing Wednesday night's College World Series elimination game between KSU and South Carolina to today at 12 p.m. EDT.

“South Carolina looked like they tied up one of their freshmen up in the locker room,” KSU head coach Scott Stricklin said as the rest of the Golden Flashes packed to return to their team hotel. “Baseball players are interesting creatures and there's always something funny that comes out of a rain delay no matter where you are. I'm glad our guys weren't dancing out on the tarp.”

Today it's back to business for the Flashes with the potential of playing a day-night double header to keep their season alive. The winner of the KSU-South Carolina game will return later tonight to play Arkansas at 9 p.m. EDT. Win again and its back to the ballpark for a second consecutive 9 p.m. meeting with the Razorbacks to determine who will represent the CWS' “Bracket Two” in a three-game series to decide the national championship.

The good news from the postponement is it may give Monday's sentimental hero Jason Bagoly just enough time to return from attending his mother's funeral in Austintown and be in uniform for at least part of today's first game.

Bagoly was 2-for-3 in Monday's win over No. 1 Florida, then flew home to Northeast Ohio on Tuesday to attend services for his mother, Cheryl McHenry, who died unexpectedly last week.

“It's funny how things work out,” Stricklin said. “Bagoly just sent me a text that said ‘coach, hopefully I can get back with the team tomorrow.' He got his wish. It looks like he'll come rolling in around the eighth inning … That lifted our guys' spirits. They are disappointed we (didn't play), but getting their teammate back is a big deal for them.”

Bagoly will board a flight at 10 a.m. after attending to some family business earlier in the morning. His flight is supposed to land in Omaha one hour and 20 minutes after the first pitch.

According to Stricklin, KSU is looking into getting a police escort to get Bagoly to the airport as soon as possible.

“It's something we are talking about,” he said. “They've given us a police escort (to the stadium) from our hotel two blocks away every day, so it's something we'll absolutely look into.”

When Bagoly flew home he was accompanied by KSU associate athletic director Cathy O'Donnell, who was still in Ohio on Wednesday handling the plans for his return.

Beyond the chance of getting Bagoly back, Stricklin said postponing Wednesday's game “just the right thing to do” when considering the pitchers – sophomore right-hander Tyler Skulina (11-2, 3.63 ERA) for KSU and, in a late change, senior left-hander Michael Roth (8-1, 2.60 ERA) will start on the mound for the Gamecocks.

With so many rain cells surrounding Omaha, starting the game during an open window put those starters at risk of a quick shutdown with another rain delay, “and this late in the tournament, you need your starters to give you a quality start,” said Stricklin. “So the decision was made with everyone's best interest at heart.”

Should KSU survive to play again tonight, Stricklin said he could go with either ace David Starn (11-4, 2.48) or Ryan Mace (2-3, 3.61) against Arkansas. The Razorbacks have reportedly decided not to go with its own ace D.J. Baxendale tonight. Baxendale frustrated KSU's hitters in Arkansas' 8-1 win in the CWS opener on Saturday, allowing one run and three hits in 61/3 innings.

Playing a two elimination games in one day may be a daunting task, “but that's what happens when you get in the losers bracket,” Stricklin said. “Stay in the winners bracket and you don't have to do things like that … Certainly it's not going to be easy to beat two SEC teams in one day. We have to worry about South Carolina first. If we win that, we'll go home and take a nap, and then see if we can get back at Arkansas.”

Wednesday marked the fourth time since 2008 that a College World Series has been forced to deal with a June 20 rain delay.

MAC VS. NO. 1

Kent State's win over top-ranked Florida is the first win by a Mid-American Conference school against a No. 1-ranked team in a primary fall, winter or spring sport since the Golden Flashes upset Georgia Tech on March 16, 2003.

By “primary,” the MAC means a sport that has to be played to count towards the Reese or Jacoby Trophy.

Andy Sonnanstine was one of the stars of that 2003 team, throwing 42/3 innings of shutout relief to earn the win that snapped Georgia Tech's 17-game winning streak.

Other MAC teams have come close, with Ball State losing 69-67 to No. 1 UNLV in the 1990 in the NCAA Tournament and also 83-71 to Duke in the Maui Invitational.

The Indiana Hoosiers weren't quite No. 1 in 1976 when Toledo beat them in 1976 in the first game ever played at Savage Hall, but they were the defending national champs and riding a string of 33 consecutive wins.

LAST MEETING

The rain did its best to keep KSU and South Carolina from meeting for the first time since 1997, when the Gamecocks took 2-of-3 from the Golden Flashes in Columbia, S.C. South Carolina held a 5-2 lead in the series coming into the day.

NOT THE ONLY SHOW IN TOWN

In addition to the College World Series, Omaha is getting set to host USA Swimming's Olympic Trials.

Swimmers and swim fans from all over the country are already flooding into Omaha for the event, which starts on June 25. Barring postponements due to more bad weather, the final game of the College World Series is supposed to be played on June 26.

The swimming trials will take place in the CenturyLink Center, which sits just a few hundred yards beyond TD Ameritrade Park's centerfield fence. The arena was called the Qwest Center when KSU lost to UNLV there in the first round of the 2008 NCAA men's basketball tournament.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball game postponed, will play at noon against South Carolina (with video) (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State players wait in the dugout as heavy rain drenches pregame warmups before an NCAA College World Series elimination baseball game against South Carolina in Omaha, Neb., Wednesday.

The game has been rescheduled for Thursday at noon. If the Golden Flashes win, the team will play again at 9 p.m.

Please click on link for video:
http://www.recordpub.com/news/article/5198354

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News Headline: Cheer on Hometown Athletes in the College World Series | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State and its roster of local players competes against South Carolina at 8 p.m. on ESPN

UPDATE: Wednesday night's game was postponed for rain and was reschedued for Thursday at noon.

The Kent State University baseball team won its first game in the College World Series against Florida, the nation's top ranked team in the tournament. The 5-4 win Monday night kept the Golden Flashes in Omaha, NE, where they will play two-time defending national champion South Carolina.

But the cinderella story of a Mid-American Conference school isn't the only reason to watch the Golden Flashes tonight. Several of the players are from or near northeast Ohio Patch towns:

Nick Hamilton - Avon Lake
Josh Pierce - Avon
Ryan Bores - Strongsville
Michael Clark - Akron
Brian Clark - Munroe Falls
Tyler Skulina - Strongsville
Ryan Mace - Tallmadge
Tim Faix - Strongsville
David Starn - Hudson
Wednesday night's game should air on ESPN, but there was a weather delay. If the Flashes win, they will play Thursday. If the Flashes lose, they will be eliminated.

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News Headline: Rain Postpones Kent State, South Carolina College World Series Game (video) (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State game will start today at 12:08pm EDT

College World Series

Hopeful fans of the Kent State men's baseball team filled HomeTown Bank Plaza Wednesday, June 20, 2012, to watch the Kent State versus South Carolina College World Series game broadcast on a 30-foot screen. The game was postponed until Thursday due to rain.

What one person described as "buckets of rain" led to the postponement of Wednesday night's College World Series game between Kent State University and South Carolina.

The game is scheduled to be played today at 12:08 p.m. EDT as part of a triple-header in the College World Series.

The news came as a disappointment at about 10 p.m. Wednesday night for several dozen people who showed up in downtown Kent to watch the game broadcast on a 30-foot screen.

The official watch parties for Kent State's run in the series have been held at Water Street Tavern.

Find out how to watch the game and follow the series:

How to Watch, Cheer on and Follow Kent State in Omaha

Please click on link for video:
http://kent.patch.com/articles/rain-postpones-kent-state-south-carolina-college-world-series-game#youtube_video-10389115

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News Headline: Kent State's stay in Omaha for College World Series gets extended by Mother Nature (Video) (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. - Kent State lives to play another day in Omaha, thanks to Mother Nature. A severe weather front moved across Omaha at 5:30 p.m. central time, sending heavy rains and lightning with it. It forced the cancelation of Wednesday night's game.

Kent State head baseball coach Scott Stricklin said cancelling a game of this magnitude was "the right move."

He will come back with Wednesday's scheduled starter Tyler Skulina again Thursday morning. First pitch is scheduled for 11 a.m. central, noon eastern.

"Baseball players are an unusual group and made the most of the rain delay by staying loose by taking phantom batting practice swings and playing hangman in the lockeroom," Stricklin said.

This is just the fourth time Kent State has ever played South Carolina. The two teams met in South Carolina in 1997 with the Gamecocks taking two out of the three games.

Good news for the Golden Flashes as they will get designated hitter Jason Bagoly back. Bagoly, whose mom Cheryl died suddenly last week, has been home in Austintown the past two days for family services. Coach Stricklin said he hopes Bagoly will make it to Thursday's game by the eighth inning and will ask if possible to get "a police escort" for him.

Please click on link for video:
http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/sports/sports_blogs_local/Kent-States-stay-in-Omaha-for-College-World-Series-gets-extended-by-Mother-Nature

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News Headline: PICTURES: Kent State Spirit in Omaha! | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Nebraska — The Kent State Golden Flashes are trying to make history for the second time at the College World Series.

Fox 8′s own Allie LaForce spotted KSU spirit all over Omaha. Check out the above pictures, and add your own if you're at the CWS supporting the Golden Flashes!

Please click on link for photos:
http://fox8.com/2012/06/21/pictures-kent-state-spirit-in-omaha/

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News Headline: Kent State Golden Flashes to Face S. Carolina at Noon | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Nebraska — The Kent State Golden Flashes were delayed by rain in their history-making College World Series run, but were ready on Thursday to give it their all!

Game time is set for 12:08 p.m. EST.

The team was originally set to face South Carolina on Wednesday night in Omaha, but persistent rain forced officials to postpone the game.

***Fox 8′s Allie LaForce will be in Omaha for all the action! Watch Fox 8 News and visit FOX8.com for her reports!***

Fans were drenched from head-to-toe, and some of the fans even made their way down to the field for a little slip-and-slide action to try to make it fun. Unfortunately, some people's trip to Omaha had to end early without seeing a Kent State win.

“I'm really bummed, mostly because a lot of our family had to pick up and leave right now,” said one fan.

The team is already the first group of Golden Flashes to win a College World Series game, and now they could be the first to win two.

PICTURES: Kent State Spirit in Omaha!
KSU began the double elimination style tournament with a scare after falling to Arkansas Game One.

But the team got its first game jitters out and snuck past No. 1 seed Florida 5-4 to continue. Four of Kent State's runs were unearned and the other was off of a wild pitch against Florida.

KSU capitalized off of their mistakes and the team plans to use the same strategy again against South Carolina.

“We watched them play,” starting pitcher Tyler Skulina said. “They didn't make many mistakes.”

That's because South Carolina has been there, done that.

In fact, the two-time defending champions have practically owned Omaha.

The Gamecocks know what it's like to finish at the top and even entered the CWS with a record 21-game winning streak.

“It's going to be a dog fight,” Skulina said.

Skulina was the No. 1 recruit in the nation in high school and chose to sign with University of Virginia, but the Strongsville native decided to return to Ohio and take his chances with the Golden Flashes.

It's a good thing he did. The starter clinched Kent's win against Oregon to advance to Omaha.

Skulina will take the mound on Thursday for the team's third CWS game. His 12 wins on the year are a single season high for Kent State.

Watch below for Fox 8′s coverage from Omaha!

Please click on link for videos:
http://fox8.com/2012/06/20/fox-8-joins-the-golden-flashes-in-omaha/

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News Headline: Kent State-South Carolina postponed (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: ESPN
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. -- Kent State and two-time defending national champion South Carolina will meet Thursday morning after rain postponed their College World Series elimination game Wednesday night.

The winner will have to play a second game Thursday night against well-rested Arkansas.

"Well, that's what happens when you get in the losers' bracket," Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said. "That's why you always say you should stay in the winners' bracket, so you don't have to worry about things like that.

"It's not going to be easy certainly to beat two SEC teams in one day. That's a great story if it happens. We have to worry about South Carolina first. If we win, we'll go home, take a nap and see if we can get back at Arkansas."

A line of showers moved into the Omaha area about an hour before Wednesday's game was scheduled to start. Radar indicated squalls would move through the area until late in the evening.

It probably would have been 10:30 local time before the game could have started. NCAA officials believed it would have been unfair to have Kent State (47-19) and South Carolina (46-18) start so late and then have the winner come back to play again Thursday night.

First pitch Thursday will be at 12:08 p.m. EDT.

Arizona (45-17) against Florida State (50-16) will follow at 5:08 p.m., with the Wildcats advancing to the championship round if they win. An FSU win would force another game Friday between teams to determine which one goes to the best-of-three finals.

Thursday's third game is scheduled for 9:08 p.m.

Kent State's pitching plans won't change. Tyler Skulina (11-2) will start against South Carolina. If the Golden Flashes win, David Starn (11-4) or Ryan Mace (2-3) would be available against Arkansas (46-20).

South Carolina coach Ray Tanner said the rainout gives him the option of starting ace Michael Roth (8-1) against the Flashes. No. 3 pitcher Jordan Montgomery (5-1) was the scheduled starter Wednesday.

"We'll go back and talk it over," Tanner said. "If we're going to stay here and advance, Montgomery has to pitch (sometime)."

If the South Carolina-Kent State winner beats Arkansas, the teams would play again Friday for a spot in the finals that start Sunday.

Officials decided to postpone Wednesday's game about 90 minutes after its scheduled starting time. Both coaches agreed the decision was correct.

"Playing at midnight is not a very good option," Stricklin said. "Starting at 10:30, getting done at 1:30 and going back to the hotel, what are you going to eat and how are they going to sleep? Then the winner has to come back. We always talk about student-athlete welfare. The NCAA guys wanted to make sure our guys were in the best scenario possible."

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News Headline: College World Series 2012: Kent State Has Everything Needed to Be Surprise Champ | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: BleacherReport.com
Contact Name: Richard Langford
News OCR Text: The Kent State Golden Flashes are a perfect Cinderella team that has all the ingredients needed to keep its carriage from turning into a pumpkin. 

Just a couple of weeks ago, Kent State wasn't on anyone's radar to win the 2012 College World Series, yet here they are, fresh off of eliminating tournament favorite Florida and ready to make a push to take the whole thing. 

Their tournament run got off to a rough start, with an 8-1 loss to Arkansas sending them quickly to the loser's bracket, but isn't the loser's bracket the perfect way for a Cinderella to progress through the tournament? 

At the time of the loss, it seemed to spell doom for the Golden Flashes as powerhouse Florida awaited, but this is where Kent State showed the world they had the magic to contend. 

They beat Florida 5-4. Four of their runs were unearned, and the fifth came on a wild pitch. They then allowed Florida to load the bases with just one out, and the batter at the plate had a 3-0 count.

It seemed inevitable that the experienced Gators would pull out a dramatic win, but it was not meant to be. Josh Pierce battled back to get the strikeout, and the next batter flew out to end the game.

This is the exact kind of special ending to give this magical team momentum to make a deep run, but it isn't all about magic and needing help. This is a talented team.  

Stud right-hander David Starn can matchup with any pitcher. They also have great leadership and talent where they need it most. Catcher David Lyon is a fabulous backstop, and he teams with shortstop Jimmy Rider to give this team nice defense up the middle. 

So while few people expected Kent State to make it to this point, it is quickly becoming clear why they have. They are a well-rounded and tough-minded team that plays together. 

If they do fall short, it will undoubtedly be due to some shaky relief pitching, but as they proved against Florida, this pen has the guts to pull out of even the most dire of situations.

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News Headline: Kent State game with Gamecocks postponed until Thursday | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA -- The Kent State Golden Flashes will now face the South Carolina Gamecocks at noon Thursday for the chance to stay alive in the College World Series.

Heavy rains in Omaha forced the CWS game to be postponed until Thursday.

The Gamecocks have won back-to-back national championships.

Please click on link for video:
http://www.wkyc.com/sports/article/249204/4/Kent-State-game-with-Gamecocks-postponed-until-Thursday

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News Headline: Video | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Please click on link for video:

http://www.woio.com/category/211979/video-landing-page?clipId=7421388&autostart=true

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News Headline: As temperatures rise, so do concerns about violent crime (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: philly.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The violence was shocking, even for a community as crime-jaded as Chester: four fatal shootings in eight days, one of the victims a 2-year-old boy.

Delaware County's only city declared a monthlong state of emergency. Just hours after it was lifted, yet another man was shot to death.

That was two years ago, during the area's hottest summer on record. "We don't want that going on again," said Chester resident Jonathan King, president of the antiviolence activist group Brothers of Concern.

The heat is back, and so are concerns about violent crime in the region's urban neighborhoods.

From the minute it arrives officially at 7:09 p.m. Wednesday, summer will be cooking - flaring up with record-threatening heat the next few days, maybe making a run at 100 on Thursday.

Summer may be vacation time for most people, but for police in high-crime areas, it's the hot time.

Research in recent years has affirmed that the connection between heat and violent crime is more than lore. Even screening out other factors such as economic conditions, age, and education levels, heat, in itself, has been shown to be a significant contributor to explosive behavior.

In the tinderbox neighborhoods of Philadelphia, Camden, and Chester, where the summer sun soaks into the streets and sidewalks - and the human body - intense heat can be the match that lights the fuse.

At least one study warns that the trend toward hotter summers could brew trouble in the nation's urban areas.

"The discomfort caused by the heat is the best explanation for summer increases in violence," said Craig A. Anderson, psychologist at Iowa State University.

The correlation between increasing temperatures and crimes of aggression is remarkably clean, said Scott Sheridan, a Kent State University researcher who led a major study of crime in Cleveland. "You end up with an almost perfect line," he said.

Based on an Inquirer analysis of national FBI Uniform Crime Statistics, summer is the busiest season for violent crimes, with rates almost 20 percent higher than in winter.

All the urban rioting of the 1960s, including in Philadelphia, occurred in summer.

Nationwide in 2004 (the most recent year for which statistics are available), 547 more people were murdered in August than in February - 1,554 compared with 1,107. As for aggravated assaults, July's total exceeded February's by more than 20,000 - 80,362 compared with 59,844.

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News Headline: As Heat Rises, So Does Potential for Violent Crime (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Officer.com
Contact Name: Anthony R. Wood
News OCR Text: Research has affirmed the connection between heat and violent crime, and the trend toward hotter summers could brew trouble in the nation's urban areas.

June 20--The violence was shocking, even for a community as crime-jaded as Chester: four fatal shootings in eight days, one of the victims a 2-year-old boy.

Delaware County's only city declared a month long state of emergency. Just hours after it was lifted, yet another man was shot to death.

That was two years ago, during the area's hottest summer on record. "We don't want that going on again," said Chester resident Jonathan King, president of the antiviolence activist group Brothers of Concern.

The heat is back, and so are concerns about violent crime in the region's urban neighborhoods.

From the minute it arrives officially at 7:09 p.m. Wednesday, summer will be cooking -- flaring up with record-threatening heat the next few days, maybe making a run at 100 on Thursday.

Summer may be vacation time for most people, but for police in high-crime areas, it's the hot time.

Research in recent years has affirmed that the connection between heat and violent crime is more than lore. Even screening out other factors such as economic conditions, age, and education levels, heat in itself has been shown to be a significant contributor to explosive behavior.

In the tinderbox neighborhoods of Philadelphia, Camden, and Chester, where the summer sun soaks into the streets and sidewalks -- and the human body -- intense heat can be the match that lights the fuse.

At least one study warns the trend toward hotter summers could brew trouble in the nation's urban areas.

"The discomfort caused by the heat is the best explanation for summer increases in violence," said Craig A. Anderson, a psychologist at Iowa State University.

The correlation between increasing temperatures and crimes of aggression is remarkably clear, said Scott Sheridan, a Kent State University researcher who led a major study of crime in Cleveland. "You end up with an almost perfect line," he said.

Based on an Inquirer analysis of national FBI Uniform Crime Statistics, summer is the busiest season for violent crimes, with rates almost 20 percent higher than in winter.

All the urban rioting of the 1960s, including in Philadelphia, occurred in summer.

Nationwide in 2004 (the most recent year for which statistics are available), 547 more people were slain in August than in February -- 1,554 compared with 1,107. As for aggravated assaults, July's total exceeded February's by more than 20,000 -- 80,362 compared with 59,844.

What is it about extreme heat that can induce violent behavior in some human beings, while leading others to explore new dimensions of lethargy?

The body is a marvel of thermoregulatory engineering. As heat increases, the hypothalamus, a tiny region of the brain that regulates body temperature, increases the rate of sweating. Sweat droplets give off a cooling effect as they evaporate. Think of the way the air cools in advance of a thunderstorm as water droplets evaporate in drier air.

When it's too hot or muggy, sweat can't vaporize. It simply adds to the discomfort, making a mockery of the body's hard work.

"As temperatures go up, you'll get more irritable," said Kenneth J. Neuburger of Thomas Jefferson University's emergency-medicine department.

How heat affects the mind isn't as well understood. But once the body temperature reaches about 101, "your brain function decreases," said Neuburger. And, yes, you might make decisions you regret.

One study documented that major-league pitchers are more likely to hit batters with pitches on hot days.

Scientific inquiries into the heat-violence relationship date to the 1700s, Anderson said. Some of the earlier laboratory studies involved the use of kerosene heaters.

"The heat hypothesis has been repeatedly confirmed," Anderson wrote in a paper published last year.

In Upper Darby Township, on the border with West Philadelphia, Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood said he didn't need research to know that summer can bring trouble. He's ready, he said, thanks in part to $25,000 in federal grant money.

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News Headline: Sheryl Crow to perform at Kent State despite recent brain tumor diagnosis (Vargo) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sheryl Crow was recently diagnosed with a benign brain tumor, but it won't affect her performance at Dix Stadium on Sept. 8, said Valoree Vargo, director of donor services at Kent State.

"We've talked to the promoters and talked to the folks and everything is fine," Vargo said. "We're really excited about it. It's the first time in many, many years that we've had an event like this at Dix Stadium."

Tickets are on sale now through Ticketmaster. Students can buy tickets for $20 and $30 to be on the stadium floor. General admission is $35 for a seat in the stands and $50 to be on the standing room floor.

There will also be a tailgate party for the concert from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. outside the stadium on the day of the concert.

Vargo said Kent State is expecting between 15,000 and 17,000 people to attend the show.

Sheryl Crow will perform with Los Lonely Boys and another band that can't be announced until the end of July, Vargo said.

"But I promise it will be a very exciting band for students," she said.

More information on Sheryl Crow and the "Centennial Campaign" concert at Kent State can be found here .

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News Headline: 'Princess' story opens KSU Summer Stock | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The children's theater production ''The Princess and the Pea'' opens Summer Stock 35 at Kent State University at Trumbull.

Michelle L. Vacca wrote this adaptation of the fairy tale about a princess who must undergo an unusual test to prove her worthiness to marry a prince.

Patricia M. Fagan directs a cast featuring Michelle Bayma, Joey Jaros, Starr E. McClure, Mackenzie Stafford, Michael S. Vince, Donald Van Horn, Ethan Montoya, Izobella Bailey, Cynthia Porter, Haley Heckathorn, Briana Dent, Ethan Deemer, Gina DeSimone, Claire Killian, Emelia Sherin, Tiffany Nigrin, Jeffre Greathouse, Makennah Eastman Earl and Hannah Boyle.

Performances are scheduled at 7 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m. Monday through June 28 and 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. June 29 in Lecture Hall A of the Classroom Administration Building at Kent-Trumbull, 4314 Mahoning Ave. N.W., Champion. Each performance will be preceded by a magic show by Gary Morton.

Tickets are $8 for adults and $6 for senior citizens, students and children. For reservations or more information, call 330-675-8887.

''The Princess and the Pea'' is the first of three productions featured in Summer Stock's 35th season. The touring production ''Three by Three'' will be staged at libraries throughout Trumbull and Portage counties in July, and the musical ''Little Shop of Horrors'' opens July 13 for a three-weekend run.

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News Headline: Egypt delays poll results (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Channel NewsAsia
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CAIRO: Egypt's election commission delayed the announcement of presidential results scheduled for Thursday, as tension spiked over who will succeed ailing ousted president Hosni Mubarak after moves by the ruling military to extend powers.

"Egypt's election commission, headed by Judge Faruq Sultan... has decided to delay the announcement of the presidential election run-off," the official MENA news agency said late on Wednesday, without giving a new date.

The run-off, which took place on June 16 and 17 pitted Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi against Mubarak's last prime minister Ahmed Shafiq, with both candidates claiming victory.

The election commission said it was looking into appeals from lawyers of both candidates into alleged campaign violations and disputed vote counting.

The commission said it would "continue examining the appeals... which will require more time before the final results are announced."

The announcement came amid uncertainty over the health of Mubarak, following a flurry of reports about his condition.

Mubarak "is not clinically dead," a medical source told AFP. "He is in a coma and the doctors are trying to revive him."

"He has been placed on an artificial respirator," the source added, in an account confirmed by a member of Egypt's ruling military council, who spoke to AFP on condition of anonymity.

Egypt's state television carried a ticker item saying Mubarak was in "a coma and is not clinically dead."

State news agency MENA had earlier said the ousted strongman, 84, had been declared clinically dead after suffering a stroke in prison and being transferred to hospital.

"Hosni Mubarak is clinically dead," the report said. "Medical sources told MENA his heart had stopped beating and did not respond to defibrillation."

News of Mubarak's failing condition came amid a backdrop of legal and political chaos.

The Brotherhood appeared set on a confrontation path with the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) which which issued a new constitutional declaration granting itself sweeping powers.

The state-owned daily Al-Ahram summed up the mood saying Egypt was facing "the most critical 48 hours in its history."

Early Monday the Brotherhood said their candidate had won the runoff, and on Tuesday provided what they said were certified copies of ballot tallies to bolster their claims.

But Morsi's rival Shafiq also claimed a victory, with his campaign accusing the Brotherhood of issuing false figures.

A group of independent judges -- headed by the ex-head of the Judges Union, Zakaria Abdel Aziz -- who monitored the voting process confirmed in a news conference that Morsi had won, according to their tally.

The new president, irrespective of the result, will not wield the near-absolute authority Mubarak enjoyed for three decades, after SCAF issued a constitutional declaration on Sunday claiming sweeping powers.

Mubarak's successor will also inherit a struggling economy, increased insecurity and the challenge of uniting a nation divided by the uprising and its deadly aftermath.

Should Mursi win, it will be a real test for the Brotherhood's ability to deal with problems on the ground.

The new dynamics will mean that "SCAF will command the national security of Egypt and leave domestic issues to the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University.

The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamist-dominated parliament after the country's constitutional court ordered, last week, the body dissolved.

And it grants the military council veto power over the drafting of a permanent constitution, angering activists who denounced the declaration and an earlier order giving the army power to arrest civilians, as a "coup."

The Brotherhood insists the parliament retains legislative power and has pledged to counter the SCAF decisions with "popular activities."

On Tuesday night, the Brotherhood joined a mass demonstration in Cairo's Tahrir square, which attracted over 15,000 protesters, some celebrating Morsi's win as much as denouncing the military move.

The demonstrators were still in the square as the conflicting details of Mubarak's condition filtered in.

"It's divine retribution," said Saber Amr, a teacher. "God doesn't forgive those who do wrong to their people. God doesn't forgive those who kill innocents."

Nearby, Abdel Mottaleb, a Brotherhood supporter, offered a more conciliatory tone, saying "God will judge him."

Mubarak was taken to a Cairo prison on June 2, after a court handed down a life sentence against him over his involvement in the deaths of protesters during the 2011 uprising that pushed him from power.

His health deteriorated after the transfer, with doctors defibrillating him twice earlier this month, and reports saying he was suffering from bouts of depression, high blood pressure and shortness of breath.

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News Headline: Indio rescue mission part of grandparent study | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Desert Sun - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For information, call Caring for Others as a Positive Experience at (855) 537-5580 or email cope@csusb.edu.

Indio — Cal State San Bernardino will conduct part of a study on how to foster the well-being of grandparents who are raising their grandchildren at the Coachella Valley Rescue Mission in Indio.

The university, which will receive $340,552 for the study, is one of four to get a share of a $2.5 million federal grant for Project C.O.P.E.

About 500 families will be involved in the four-year study funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research.

CSUSB will be recruiting grandmothers from diverse racial, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds.

“Our goal is to enhance the grandmothers' skills by teaching them how to reduce stress, communicate with their grandchildren and access local services,” said Julian Montoro-Rodriguez, study administrator and professor of sociology at CSUSB.

Study organizers are looking for grandmothers who provide full-time care to at least one grandchild between the ages of 4 and 12 with no help from the grandchildren's birth parents; who consider their custody as a long-term care situation; and who have the ability to get to a group meeting on a weekly basis.

The group sessions will be made up of eight to 10 grandmothers, who will attend two-hour meetings over a 10-week period. Trained childcare providers will be available during these meetings. Each meeting will include a light meal for grandmothers and their grandchildren.

Other benefits for participants include a $35 compensation for grandmothers for each completed interview over the phone and face to face.

The other universities involved in the study are Kent State University in Ohio, the University of North Texas in Denton and the University of Maryland in Baltimore.

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News Headline: Hiram poll: Young voters support president, but ... | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 57 percent says he's met or exceeded expectations; 38 percent say he fell below, but young voters remain optimists

Young voters are patient and optimistic and, for now, still on President Obama's side. WKSU's M.L. Schultze reports that's what's indicated on a new poll on 18- to- 29-year old voters.

Thirty-eight percent of the young voters responding the Hiram College survey say President Obama has performed below their expectations.

But that leaves nearly six-in-10 saying he's performing at or above their expectations. And when you talk to young voters like 26-year-old Kent Sate nursing student Danielle Seeman, many of them are calling for more time for Mr. Obama.

“He promised a lot and it's slowly happening. But, … he's the president, he's not a dictator. He can't just click his fingers and make things happen.”

Reservations
But not all the calls for patience are necessarily a hearty endorsement of Mr. Obama.

This November will be a first national election for 18-year-old Noor Ramahi. She's a life sciences major who has enough credits to already qualify as a junior.

“People are disappointed (in Mr. Obama) because they really aren't hearing everything, they don't really know exactly what's going on. I think he's been really busy with the healthcare bill and all that. I guess, in a way, he made some promises that he did not keep. But I think for him to fulfill those promises, he needs to stay in office for four more years.”

Still, Ramahi says Mr. Obama is her second choice. If she had her druthers, she'd pick Ron Paul.

Boring
The survey is of registered voters, so it leaves out people like Pete Araps and Tushar Patel – nursing students at Kent.

“I wish I was more informed. I wish I would be willing to pay attention to it more,” says Araps. “(But) it's just not something that has come about in my life yet.”

“It's, in a way, hard I guess to just sit there and watch the politics over and over,” adds Patel. “Should I pay attention? Probably, because being in the health care industry, … they're always talking about healthcare and how they can improve or affect us. … But, it gets boring.”

Still, for the survey respondents, even if politics is boring, it's relevant.

The young voters think Democrats are more likely to create entry-level jobs, make education more affordable and to keep Social Security and Medicare around for Generation Y. Republicans are more likely to help America compete globally and bring down the deficit.

And the Hiram College survey shows they're optimistic about the future of the country and the benefits of a college degree.

Here's a summary of the June results provided by Hiram College:
1. President Obama leads Mitt Romney by 13 points among registered voters surveyed (and by 14 points among likely voters). While Obama is doing better among young voters than he is among voters nationally (an average of nationwide surveys now give Obama a 1-2 point lead), his advantage over Romney is much smaller than his Election Day performance in 2008, when he defeated John McCain by 33% among voters under 30.
These data provide strong evidence that Obama has important work to do to shore up his support among younger voters––this is especially true among white voters under 30, a constituency Obama now loses by 6 points.

2. The Democratic Party is now viewed favorably by 56% of voters under 30, the same as it was in the January survey.
It should be noted that 50% of independents view the Democratic Party favorably.

3. The Republican Party is now viewed favorably by 42% of young voters, that's down 3 points since January.
It should be noted that 33 percent of independents view the Republican Party favorably.

4. A majority of voters surveyed, 57%, say Obama has met or exceeded their expectations as President while 38% say he's fallen below expectations.

5. The Democratic Party is clearly seen as the party that best understands the problems of people under 30.
The Democratic Party is also clearly seen as the party that will make education more affordable; the party that will make sure Social Security and Medicare will be available for Generation Y; and the party that has the best plans to create jobs for young people entering the work force.
On which party has the best policies to improve the economy, however, Democrats have a narrow 3-point lead over Republicans.
Republicans are seen as the party that will best protect America's ability to compete with other countries around the world and as the party that will bring down the federal budget deficit.

6. Voters surveyed are consistently split on who has the ability to strengthen the economy and create jobs:
Obama and Romney tie, as do the two parties.
A slightly greater amount of young voters (+4 percent) say small businesses over large businesses and 6% more say government over private business.

7. Voters under 30 are much more optimistic about nation's future than pessimistic, although the level of optimism (now 63%) is down a little from January, when it was 68%.
Democrats are more optimistic (73%) than Republicans (52%) and independents (59%).

8. Respondents were a little less optimistic about the future of the economy than the future of the country in general (58% vs. 63%).

9. 87% of voters under 30 believe a college degree gives people a better chance to make more money –– although only 45% said a “much” better chance while 42% said a “little” better chance. Only 11% said it would not give them a better chance.

10. 85% of voters under 30 believe a college degree gives people a better chance of having a meaningful career that uses their best talents ––50% said a “much” better chance while 35percent said a “little” better chance.

11. 72% of voters under 30 believe that by the time they retire it is likely that the Social Security system won't be able to pay full retirement benefits––43% said “very” likely while 29% said “fairly” likely.

12. A majority of voters surveyed (57%) oppose universal public service while 36%, especially blacks, Democrats, and respondents in the South, support it.

Please click on link for audio:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/32123

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News Headline: School Notes | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's fieldhouse gets 1,726 solar panels

The installation of 1,726 solar panels on the roof of the Kent State Fieldhouse is nearing completion.

It is the first renewable energy project for Kent State University and is projected to eliminate carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to 70 cars per year. The project is expected to be done in early July.

"Kent State University has been making a very broad effort in sustainability. They've been undertaking many projects to lessen their carbon footprint, to make the campus and community more energy neutral and sustainable," said Gerald Kelly, communications director for Third Sun Solar, the Athens-based firm installing the solar panels.

"We're very proud of them for going with renewable energy for the fieldhouse and stadium."

The solar panels cover nearly an acre of roof space atop the fieldhouse. They will generate about 500,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity per year and will eliminate an average of 779,000 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions per year.

Kelly said the solar system is designed for possible future expansion.

The cost of the solar array is about $1.5 million, with no cost to bear by the university, which will purchase the energy at a reduced rate and has the option to purchase the system after seven years.

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