Report Overview:
Total Clips (37)
Art, School of (1)
Art, School of; KSU at Geauga (1)
Athletics (16)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum; Music (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
May 4 (1)
Office of the University Architect; Town-Gown (1)
Police Services (1)
Political Science (6)
Psychology (1)
Recreational Services (1)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Theatre and Dance (2)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Art, School of (1)
MUSEUM'S SUMMER CONCERT SERIES STARTS TONIGHT: DOWNTOWN@DUSK ALSO FEATURES ART TALKS, 'CAMPS' FOR CHILDREN 06/21/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...of ZeroLandfill: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Dumpster. July 5 - Blue Lunch, Chicago Blues, jump and swing. Art talk: Kathleen Browne, Kent State University jewelry and metals professor, Magnificent Obsessions. July 12 - Lost State of Franklin, rock-a-billy. Art talk: Michelle...


Art, School of; KSU at Geauga (1)
Browsing the Arts for June 22-28, 2012 06/21/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Classrooms." Exhibition is the result of an ongoing study in four classrooms in the Akron Public School District conducted by Professor Walter S. Gershon of Kent State University. Closes Sunday. Exhibit: "String of Hearts: Photographs by Bea Nettles." Through Sunday, July 8. Cleveland Museum of Art....


Athletics (16)
Kent State notebook: Gamecocks' late-night replacement masters Flashes (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State season ends, now dealing with possible loss of Scott Stricklin to Michigan (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State coach Stricklin could be on University of Michigan's radar (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Curtain falls on Kent State baseball's dream season (with gallery) (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball team welcomed home from College World Series (with gallery) (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Falls to South Carolina, Ending College World Series Run 06/22/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Golden Flashes Return Home to Hero's Welcome (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

Kent: Golden Flashes baseball team receives warm welcome home (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Cinderella Story Ends (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Cinderella Kent loses to national champs 06/22/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State baseball team welcomed home from Omaha (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

South Carolina ends Kent State's Cinderella season in CWS (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 USA Today - Online Text Attachment Email

KSU's Scott Stricklin prepares to renew recruiting efforts with season over: College World Series Insider (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State eliminated from College World Series in 4-1 loss to two-time champion South Carolina (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

New KSU students gather to watch Golden Flashes in College World Series (Mansfield) 06/22/2012 NewsChannel 5 at 11 PM - WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

After loss, Flashes believe they'll be back at CWS (Stricklin) 06/22/2012 Fox News Channel Text Attachment Email


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing Program Awards Grants to 55 Schools of Nursing 06/21/2012 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...DePaul University Duke University Duquesne University Edgewood College Fairleigh Dickinson University Georgia Health Sciences University Kent State University Linfield College Medical University of South Carolina MidAmerica Nazarene University Montana State University ...


Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum; Music (1)
On With The Show 06/21/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...Cutie, evening, Jacobs Pavilion in Flats. July 5-8 -- Gratefulfest featuring Rusted Root and others, Nelson Ledges Quarry Park, Nelson. July 5 -- Kent State Communiversity Band, 7, Hometown Plaza, Main and Water streets in Kent. July 6 -- Fiona Apple, evening, Cain Park in Cleveland Heights....


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Ohio Cub pilots were never really lost (Murray) 06/21/2012 AOPA Pilot - Online Text Attachment Email

...counties—a trip they made in their 1946 Piper J-3 Cubs. The quest of Joe Murray, an assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University, and retired physician Ron Siwik has been documented on a website, Lost in Oscar Hotel. Murray, who plans to write a book...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Youngstown News,Today 06/21/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...Bluefish Cove,” 8 p.m., The Oakland Center for the Arts, 220 W. Boardman St., Youngstown; 330-746-0404. “Princess and the Pea” and magic show, 7 p.m., Kent State University Trumbull Campus, 4314 Mahoning Ave. NW, Warren; 330-847-0571. “Ship of Dreams,SDRq 6 p.m., First United Methodist Church-Sharon,...


May 4 (1)
Briefs 06/22/2012 Tech - Online Text Attachment Email

...the terrible 13 seconds are well established. They began late Wednesday night when about 1,000 people holding candles gathered on the Commons of the Kent State University. There the candlelight vigil continued until 12:24 p.m. Thursday. Then the "Victory Bell" in the Commons was rung again to...


Office of the University Architect; Town-Gown (1)
Birds-eye video shows 100 years of Kent State and downtown Kent growth in 3 minutes 06/22/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Ohio.com > News > Birds-eye video shows 100 years of Kent State and downtown Kent growth in 3 minutes By Paula Schleis Beacon Journal staff writer Published: June 22, 2012 - 01:01 AM Birds-eye...


Police Services (1)
Police Bust Prostitutes at Rutgers University Party (Peach) 06/21/2012 Tech - Online Text Attachment Email

...then asked her to perform a strip act and when Russell refused they held her and Cheresnovsky against their will. [The Collegiate Times, Oct. 7] Kent State protests hate speech A Student Anti-Racist Action and Lesbian Gay Bisexual Union rally began Tuesday morning with chants of "drop the...


Political Science (6)
Doctors try to revive Mubarak (Stacher) 06/21/2012 National Post Text Attachment Email

...the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio. The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamistdominated parliament after the country's...

Egypt delays poll results, ousted president in coma _ The Express Tribune (Stacher) 06/21/2012 Express Tribune Text Attachment Email

...the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University. The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamist-dominated parliament after the country's constitutional...

Doctors try to revive Mubarak; 'In a coma': source; Tensions in Egypt rise as election results delayed (Stacher) 06/21/2012 National Post Text Email

...the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative,' said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio. The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamistdominated parliament after the country's...

.:Middle East Online::Egypt delays presidential poll results:. (Stacher) 06/21/2012 Middle Easy Online Text Attachment Email

...the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University. The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamist-dominated parliament after the country's constitutional...

HaveeruOnline - Egypt delays poll results, ousted president in coma (Starcher) 06/21/2012 Haveeru Daily Online Text Attachment Email

...the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University. The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamist-dominated parliament after the country's constitutional...

Egypt junta delays results of elections | Kuwait Times (Stacher) 06/21/2012 www.kuwaittimes.net Text Attachment Email

...the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University. The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamist-dominated parliament after the country's constitutional...


Psychology (1)
How to Solve Common Memory Problems 06/21/2012 MSN Health Text Attachment Email

...stress-hormone levels increase, which is toxic to your neurons," Dr. Fotuhi explains. The Rx: If you're overweight, losing weight should help: A 2011 Kent State University study, for example, found that people who underwent bariatric surgery improved their memory loss 12 weeks post-procedure. And...


Recreational Services (1)
5 Things: Tips to Beat the Heat 06/22/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Renovation at KSU (1)
TransPortage gets $15,000 Loan to Relocate Wells-Sherman House 06/21/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...to relocate the house from 250 E. Erie St. to a plot of greenspace on North Water Street between Scribbles Coffee and Standing Rock Cultural Arts. Kent State University has also promised to lend $40,000 to the effort to relocate the house. The house stands in the path of Kent State's Esplanade...


Theatre and Dance (2)
Porthouse opens season with ‘Damn Yankees’ 06/21/2012 Leader Publications - Online Text Attachment Email

6/21/2012 - West Side Leader Washington Senator ballplayer Rocky (Jack O'Brian), at center, reminds the team to think about the game in Porthouse Theatre's production of “Damn Yankees.” Photo: Matt Unger, courtesy of Kent State University CUYAHOGA FALLS — Porthouse Theatre...

'Damn Yankees' at Porthouse Theatre bedeviled by some pointed details 06/22/2012 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (1)
College Of Architecture & Environmental Design 06/22/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...Acorn Alley II. The owners of Kent's newest Acorn Alley II business – Tree City Coffee & Pastry – are excited to see city residents gathering alongside Kent State University residents in an environment designed to make everyone feel like part of one community. Co-owners Mike Beder, Evan Bailey and...


News Headline: MUSEUM'S SUMMER CONCERT SERIES STARTS TONIGHT: DOWNTOWN@DUSK ALSO FEATURES ART TALKS, 'CAMPS' FOR CHILDREN | Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Shinn, Dorothy
News OCR Text: This year, the Akron Art Museum's popular summer concert series, Downtown@Dusk, returns for its 28th season, offering a showcase of great music with a lineup of eight great bands, not to mention the lively art talks and engaging children's activities organized by the museum.

Downtown@Dusk begins tonight and will be held 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays rain or shine through Aug. 9.

While the band takes a break, join museum staff, area artists and local experts for ArtTalks@Dusk. Presenters will offer a series of informal talks about the exhibitions on view as well as a variety of other art-related topics from 7:30 to 8 p.m. each Thursday in the museum's Charles and Jane Lehner Auditorium.

ArtCamps@Dusk will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. for children 7-12 years old to explore fun and wacky hands-on art making in the museum classroom. Cost is $5 per session, free for members. Register soon, as space is limited. To register, go to http://akronartmuseum.ticketleap.com/artcampdusk/#view=calendar.

This year's schedule:

Tonight - The Wanda Hunt Band, old-school R&B. Art talk: Mitchell Kahan, director and CEO: Where Did We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?

June 28 - Anne E. DeChant, pop, country. Art talk: Christy Gray of ZeroLandfill: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Dumpster.

July 5 - Blue Lunch, Chicago Blues, jump and swing. Art talk: Kathleen Browne, Kent State University jewelry and metals professor, Magnificent Obsessions.

July 12 - Lost State of Franklin, rock-a-billy. Art talk: Michelle Stitzlein, artist, Recycled Materials; Inspirations & Artwork.

July 19 - Robin Stone, soul pop, intelligent groove, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Art talk: Fred Smith, Kent State art history professor, Contextualizing the Art of El Anatsui.

July 26 - Speedbumps, variety. Art talk: Al Bright, abstract expressionist, Artist Talk.

Aug. 2 - 15-60-75 The Numbers Band, abstract blues. Art talk: Ellen Rudolph, interim chief curator, Behind the Scenes with El Anatsui.

Aug. 9 - Zydeco Kings, zydeco. Art talk: Arnold Tunstal, collections manager, 90 Years of Collecting.

Downtown@Dusk 2012 is made possible by the city of Akron. It is presented in cooperation with WKSU (89.7-FM).

ArtCamps@Dusk 2012 is made possible by a gift from the Harris-Stanton Gallery.

ArtTalks@Dusk 2012 is made possible by a gift from the Sam & Kathy Salem Philanthropic Fund of the Jewish Community Board of Akron.

Thursday

Opening - Kent State University's School of Art Galleries opens Painting in the Dark by Northeast Ohio painter and Kent State alumnus Patricia Zinsmeister Parker with a free 5-7 p.m., reception at the Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., Kent. The show remains on view through July 14. Kent State's Downtown Gallery is open from noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Information, http://dept.kent.edu/art.

Reception - Artists, Teachers, Lovers, featuring works by Carol Klingel, Fran and Tom Lenhart and John Smolko. Free artists reception 5-7 p.m. at Kent State University School of Art Gallery. Information, 330-676-1549 or www.galleries.kent.edu.

Friday

Watercolor Workshop - Bob Moyer teaches two sessions Friday and Saturday, (call for time) at the Cuyahoga Valley Art Center, 2131 Front St., Cuyahoga Falls. Information, 330-928-8092 or www.cvartcenter.org.

Saturday

Workshop - Collect! Compose! Click!: Compose photos with your cellphone or digital camera with Jane Rogers free from 1 to 3 p.m. at Summit Artspace, 140 E. Market St., Akron. Register at psargent@neo.rr.com. Information, 330-376-9185 or www.akronareaarts.org.

Artist's Reception - 1 p.m. at the Artists Archives of the Western Reserve, 1834 E. 123rd St., Cleveland, which is showing The Journey: A Retrospective Exhibition of the Art of Michelangelo Lovelace, Sr. through July 20. The Lovelace paintings are visual documentations of life in many of America's inner cities. His works, acrylic on textured canvas, use an animated, vibrant, childlike imagery reminiscent of primitive works of folk art and outsider art. A native of Cleveland, Lovelace has been a professional artist for 22 years. For information or to RSVP, call 216-721-9020 or email info@artistsarchives.org.

Tuesday

Museum Camp - The Canton Museum of Art, 1001 Market Ave. N., offers three summer art camp sessions for children, beginning June 26. Camp classes are taught by museum art instructors and use a wide variety of media and techniques to inspire young artists. Children also enjoy access to the museum galleries. Each session features six art classes, with age-appropriate themes. Cost per class is $75, including all materials. Details can be found at www.cantonart.org. Register online or call 330-453-7666.
WORTH NOTING

Brader Day - The Canton Museum of Art has announced plans to create an exhibition and a publication dedicated to the historic drawings of the late 19th century folk artist Ferdinand Brader. The exhibit, scheduled to open December 2014, will be a retrospective of Brader's work in America and will include more than 40 examples. Based on knowledge of Brader's numbering and dating system, researchers assume that he made at least 980 drawings, of which only 156 have been catalogued. In an effort to identify "lost" works, the museum is planning a "Bring Your Brader Day" on July 14. Those who believe they have an original work may bring it for identification, free of charge, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Information, 330-453-7666.

CMA Library Restacked - Cleveland Museum of Art's Ingalls Library is the third largest art research library in the United States with over 465,000 volumes and is open to the public during normal business hours. In December 2011, library staff moved 100,000 items out of storage and has been reintegrating them into the stack areas through the end of this month. The library supports research and learning and provides assistance to anyone seeking information on art. Information, http://library.clevelandart.org/.

Copyright © 2012 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Browsing the Arts for June 22-28, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: John Kappes
News OCR Text: ART -- MUSEUMS

Akron Art Museum. 1 S. High St. 330-376-9185 or akronartmuseum.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Thursday), and holidays. $7; $5, those 65 and older and students (with valid ID); free, children ages 12 and younger. Free admission the first Sunday of the month. Exhibit: "Making Sense of Science: The Sounds of Teaching and Studenting in Four Urban Classrooms." Exhibition is the result of an ongoing study in four classrooms in the Akron Public School District conducted by Professor Walter S. Gershon of Kent State University. Closes Sunday. Exhibit: "String of Hearts: Photographs by Bea Nettles." Through Sunday, July 8.

Cleveland Museum of Art. 11150 East Blvd. 216-421-7340 or clevelandart.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Wednesday and Friday). Closed major holidays. Free admission to the permanent collection. Admission may apply to touring exhibitions. Highlights Tours. Visit the information desk in the north lobby to find out the day’s tour topic and meeting place. 1:30 p.m. today-Sunday and Tuesday.

ART -- GALLERIES

Artseen Gallery. 5591 Liberty Ave., Vermilion. 440-963-0611 or theartseengallery.com. 4-8 p.m. Thursday, Friday; 2-8 p.m. Saturday; 2-4 p.m. Sunday; or by appointment. Exhibit: "A Cast of Thousands." Installation by Sherry Bradshaw; plus works by Jennifer Whitten and Jan Carver Young. Artists' reception: 6-9 p.m. Saturday. Through Monday, Sept. 3.

Ashtabula Arts Center Gallery. 2928 West 13th St. 440-964-3396 or ashartscenter.org. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday, Saturday; and during theater performances. Exhibit: "Great Lake." Karen Schneider, paintings. Artist's reception: 5-7 p.m. Wednesday. Through Thursday.

Kent State University. Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St. 330-676-1549 or galleries.kent.edu/. Noon-5 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Exhbit: "Painting in the Dark." Works by Patricia Zinsmeister Parker. Opens: today. Through Saturday, July 14.

Lake Erie Templar Auto Building. 13000 Athens Avenue, Lakewood. 216-496-0566. Event: The second annual One-Night Show, featuring works by 30 artists. Meet the Artists: 7-10 p.m. Saturday.

Log Cabin Gallery. 1671 Main St., Peninsula. 330-657-2670 or thelogcabingallery.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday-Sunday, or by appointment. Exhibit: "Nature's Way Summer Exhibit," featuring works by 22 local artists and artisans. Opens: today. Through Saturday, July 28.

William Busta Gallery. 2731 Prospect Ave., Cleveland. 216-298-9071 or williambustagallery.com. 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Exhibit: "Superposition." Works by Barbara Polster. Opening reception: 5-9 p.m. today. Through Tuesday, July 31.

BOOKS -- AUTHORS

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Parma-Ridge branch, 5850 Ridge Road, Parma. 440-888-4300 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Meet the Author: Edward Zawadzki, "Poles in the New World." 2 p.m. Saturday.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Beachwood branch, 25501 Shaker Blvd., Beachwood. 216-831-6868 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Free. Meet the Author/Discussion: Local author Erin O'Brien' s "The Irish Hungarian Guide to the Domestic Arts." 2 p.m. Saturday. Free, but registration requested.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Parma Heights branch, 6206 Pearl Road, Parma Heights. 440-884-2313 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Meet the Author: Lisa Abraham, "Famous Chefs & Fabulous Recipes: Lessons Learned at One of the Oldest Cooking Schools in America (Western Reserve School of Cooking)." 2-4 p.m. Saturday. Free, but registration requested.

Kent State University. Geauga Campus, 14111 Claridon-Troy Road, Burton. Meet the Author (Common Room): Linda Castillo, "Gone Missing." 7:30 p.m. Monday. Presented by Geauga Council for Arts & Culture. Details: call 440-537-3344 or email presidentgcac@gmail.com.

Learned Owl Book Shop. The Wine Bar at Solaire, 111 First St., Hudson. 330-653-2252 or learnedowl.com. Book Club in a Bar series: Craig Johnson's "The Cold Dish." 7 p.m. Thursday.

Little Polish Diner. 5772 Ridge Road, Parma. 440-842-8212. Meet the Author: Edward Zawadzki, "Poles in the New World." 5 p.m. Saturday.

Oberlin Public Library. 65 S. Main St. 440-775-4790 or oberlinpl.lib.oh.us. Meet the Author: Gayle Pritchard, "Uncommon Threads: Ohio's Art Quilt." 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.

St. John Cantius Church. 906 College Ave., Cleveland. 216-781-9095. Meet the Author: Edward Zawadzki, "Poles in the New World." Sunday in the church hall following the 9 and 11 a.m. masses.

West Shore Unitarian Universalist Church. 20401 Hilliard Blvd., Rocky River. 440-333-2255. Workshop: "Mystery Writing Workshop for Kids 9-12." 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. today. $135. To register, contact Kelly Tooman at 440-759-2247 or email kellyt2300@yahoo.com.

BOOKS -- POETRY

Visible Voice Books. 1023 Kenilworth Ave., Cleveland. 216-961-0084 or visiblevoicebooks.com. Poetry reading: Gail Bellamy and Diane Vogel Ferri. 6-7:30 p.m. Saturday.

DANCE

Ballet at the Cleveland Cinemas. Cedar Lee Theatre, 2163 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. clevelandcinemas.com. Performance: Bolshoi Ballet's "Raymonda." 11 a.m. Sunday. Encore performance: 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 10. $20.

Dancing Wheels. Program "Dancing on a Dream" at the following locations through Thursday. Free. Details: go to dancingwheels.org. Dancing Wheels. Cuyahoga County Public Library. Warrensville branch, 22035 Clarkwood Parkway, Warrensville Heights. 10 a.m. today. Cuyahoga County Public Library. Gates Mills branch, 1491 Chagrin River Road, Gates Mills. 7 p.m. Monday. Cuyahoga County Public Library. Mayfield Regional branch, 6080 Wilson Mills Road, Mayfield. 7 p.m. Thursday.

Verb Ballets. Lone Tree Tavern, 33009 Lorain Road, North Ridgeville. verbballets.org. Event: Pig Roast to Benefit Verb Ballets. 1-3 p.m. Saturday. $35 ($20 tax deductible); $5, children 10 and under. Pay at door. Reservation: email kgnagy@verbbaleets.org.

MUSIC -- ORCHESTRAL, OPERA

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Chagrin Falls branch, 100 E. Orange St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-3556 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Preview of the 2012 Blossom Festival. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Free.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Gates Mills branch, 1491 Chagrin River Road, Gates Mills. 440-423-4808 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Preview of the 2012 Blossom Festival. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Thursday. Free.

Hillcrest Concert Band. Hope Lutheran Church, 2222 N. Taylor Road, Cleveland Heights. hillcrestconcertband.org. Concert: "Americana." Paul Lawrence, conductor. Features music from the Revolutionary War through early American pieces. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Free.

Hudson Library and Historical Society. 96 Library St. 330-653-6658 or hudsonlibrary.org. Preview of the Cleveland Orchestra's Blossom Music Center concerts. 7 p.m. Thursday. Free.

Kent/Blossom Music Festival. Kent State University's Music & Speech Building's Ludwig Recital Hall, 1325 Theatre Drive. 330-672-2613 or dept.kent.edu/blossom. Concert: "Magical Mozart!," featuring the Miami String Quartet with Jerry Wong. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. $15; $5, students with valid college ID or under 18.

Nightingale Opera Theatre. Akron Art Museum's Charles and Jane Lehner Auditorium, 1 S. High St., Akron. 330-414-6953. Opera: Kurt Weill's "Street Scene." 2 p.m. today and Sunday; 7 p.m. Saturday. Preview: $10 (today). Performances: $25; $15, seniors 55 and up; $10, students with ID.

North Coast Men's Chorus. PlayhouseSquare's Palace Theatre, 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or ncmchorus.org. Concert: The Men's Chorus performs with Brian Stokes Mitchell. 8 p.m. Saturday. $10-$55. $5 charge for tickets bought day of show.

Opera Circle. G.B. Pergolesi's 'La Serva Padrona" at the following locations through Sunday. Free, but donations accepted. Details: call 216-441-2822 or go to operacircle.org. G.B. Pergolesi's "La Serva Padrona." Polish American Cultural Center. 6501 Lansing Ave., Cleveland. 7 p.m. Sunday. St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 2747 Fairmount Blvd., Cleveland Heights. 7 p.m. today. Valley Lutheran Church. 87 E. Orange St., Chagrin Falls. 7 p.m. Saturday.

MUSIC -- RECITALS, COMMUNITY CONCERTS

Chagrin Valley Chamber Music Concert Series. The Chapel at Western Reserve Academy, College and Chapel streets, Hudson. 440-539-6376 or chagrinmusic.org. Faculty recital: Violinists Hristo Popov and Barton Samuel Rotberg, flutist Linda Miller, cellist Michael Gelfand, and pianist Eriko Izumida. Works by Anton Arensky, Astor Piazzolla, Thomas Janson and others. 7 p.m. Wednesday. Free.

Chamberfest Cleveland. Cleveland Institute of Music, 11021 East Blvd. 216-791-5000, ext. 411 or chamberfestcleveland.com. Concert (Mixon Hall): "Explosive Beginnings," featuring Julie Alberts, Noah Bendix-Balgley, Yehonatan Berick, Jacob Braun, Diana Cohen, Ralph Kirshbaum, Amy Schwartz Moretti, Dimitri Murrath, Eliesha Nelson, Mata Porat and Orion Weiss. Works by Mozart, Shostakovich, Porat, Lutoslawski and Mendelssohn. 8 p.m. Wednesday. $40; $25, under 35; $10, students with ID.

Chamberfest Cleveland. The Wine Spot, 2271 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-791-5000, ext. 411 or chamberfestcleveland.com. Concert: "Movie Night," featuring Matan Porat with Julie Alberts, Noah Bendix-Balgley, Yehonatan Berick, Jacob Braun, Diana Cohen, Amy Schwartz Moretti, Dimitri Murrath and Eliesha Nelson. Porat improvised score for Buster Keaton's 1924 silent film "Sherlock, Jr," plus short clips from other classic films, and Shostakovich's "Two Pieces for Octet." 7:30 p.m. Thursday. $40; $25, under 35; $10, students with ID.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Parma-Snow branch, 2121 Snow Road, Parma. 216-661-4240 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Concert: Cleveland Chinese Music Ensemble's "Year of the Dragon: A Concert of Traditional Chinese Music." The ensemble performs a selection of traditional Chinese melodies, including several pieces about dragons, in honor of the current Year of the Dragon. 2 p.m. Saturday. Free, but registration required.

Lakewood Public Library. 15425 Detroit Ave. 216-226-8275 or lkwdpl.org. Concert: Lakewood Guitar Consort's "Folk Songs Around the World." Features songs from England, Italy, Korea, Norway, Russia, Serbia, South Africa and Wales. Details: call 216-398-1401 or email elkkit@aol.com. 3 p.m. Saturday. Free.

Lakewood United Methodist Church. 15700 Detroit Ave. 216-226-8644. Concert: "Springtime of Music," featuring soprano Diane Menges, flutist Virginia Steiger, and pianist/harpsicordist Betty Meyers. Works by Mozart, Schnmidt, Delibes, Handel, Quantz, and Cleveland Institute of Music's Mark Kohn. 2 p.m. Sunday. Offering.

Legacy Singers. Olympia Ice Cream, 11608 Pearl Road, Strongsville. 440-846-0973. Event: The second annual Open Mic and Ice Cream Social. 4-6 p.m. Sunday.

Mandel Jewish Community Center. Stonehill Auditorium, 26001 S. Woodland Road, Beachwood. 216-593-6249 or mandeljcc.org. Concert: The 34th annual Workmen's Circle Yiddish Concert with Workmen's Circle Klezmer Orchestra, Margot Leverett, and the Klezmer Mountain Boys with Eleanor Reissa. 7 p.m. Sunday. $7.

Trinity Lutheran Church. 2031 West 30th St., Cleveland. 216-321-1393 or clevelandbeckerath.org. Brownbag Concert: "Chasing Fugues." Robert Myers, organ. 12:15 p.m. Wednesday. Free.

THEATER -- PROFESSIONAL

Actors' Summit Theater. Greystone Hall, 6th Floor, 103 S. High St., Akron. 330-374-7568 or actorssummit.org. Roger Bean's "Route 66." 8 p.m. today and Thursday; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Throgh Sunday, July 22. No performances July 5-8. $19-$30; $9, full-time students with ID.

Beck Center for the Arts. Studio Theatre, 17801 Detroit Ave., Lakewood. 216-521-2540 or beckcenter.org. $28, adults; $25, seniors; $17, students with ID; $10, children ages 12 and under. An additional $3 service fee per ticket at time of purchase. Alex Timbers and Michael Friedman's "Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 7 p.m. Sunday. Extended through Sunday, July 22. $28; $25, senior citizens; $17, students with valid ID. An additional $3 service fee per ticket at time of purchase.

Cain Park. Alma Theater, Lee and Superior roads, Cleveland Heights. 216-371-3000 or cainpark.com. "Avenue Q." 7 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 1. $18.70-$26.

Cleveland Shakespeare Festival. The 15th season presents in repertory at various outdoor locations through Sunday, Aug. 4: William Shakespeare's "Henry VIII" and "As You Like It." All performances start at 7 p.m. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets. Rain spaces have been secured for every venue except Wade Oval. For complete schedule, go to cleveshakes.org. Notre Dame College. 4545 College Road, South Euclid. "As You Like It." 7 p.m. today-Saturday.

Great Lakes Theater. Hanna Theatre, 2067 East 14th St., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or greatlakestheater.org. "Sondheim on Sondheim." 7:30 p.m. today, Tuesday-Thursday; 4 and 8:30 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 8. $10-$60.

Interplay Jewish Theatre. Ensemble Theatre in Coventry School, 2843 Washington Blvd., Cleveland Heights. 216-210-3150 or fayesplays.com. Staged reading of Todd Logan's "Defamation." 2 p.m. Sunday; 7 p.m. Monday. Free, but accepting donations. Reservation recommended. Call 216-210-3150 or email interplayjewishtheatre@gmail.com.

Ohio Light Opera. College of Wooster's Freedlander Theatre, 329 E. University St., Wooster. 330-263-2345 or ohiolightopera.org. In repertory through Saturday, Aug. 11: "Blossom Time," "Chocolate Soldier," "Connecticut Yankee," "Guys and Dolls," "The Mikado," "Miss Springtime" and "Utopia Limited." Free performance talk at 6:30 p.m. prior to Friday and Saturday evening performances. Tickets: $48; $20, students; $10, child. Check for availability. "A Connecticut Yankee." 2 p.m. Saturday. "Guys and Dolls." 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Tuesday. Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado." 2 p.m. Thursday.

Pickwick & Frolic Restaurant and Club. Frolic Cabaret, 2035 East Fourth St., Cleveland. 216-241-7425 or pickwickandfrolic.com. Michael Rogaliner's murder mystery dinner theater with three endings: "Murder at the Oasis." 7:15 p.m. today-Saturday. Through Saturday, Aug. 25. $45.95, choice of five entrees.

Porthouse Theatre. Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. 330-672-3884 or porthousetheatre.com. The picnic grounds open 90 minutes prior to curtain. "Damn Yankees." 8 p.m. today-Saturday, Tuesday-Thursday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Saturday, June 30. $25-$33, adults and senior citizens; $17-$20, students.

THEATER -- COMMUNITY

Brecksville Little Theatre. Brecksville Old Town Hall, Ohio 21 and 82. 440-526-4477 or brecksvillelittletheatre.org. Ernest Thompson's "On Golden Pond." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. $10.

Canal Fulton Players. Salt Box Ministries, 408 W. Market St. 330-494-1022 or 330-854-4387. Meredith Willson's "The Music Man." 7:30 p.m. today-Sunday. $8-$10.

Cassidy Theatre. 6200 Pearl Road, Parma Heights. 440-842-4600 or cassidytheatre.com. Arthur Laurents, Jule Styne and Stephen Sondheim's "Gypsy." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. $20; $15, senior citizens and students.

Chagrin Valley Little Theatre. 40 River St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-8955 or cvlt.org. Robin Hawdon's "A Night in Provence." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. $16; $12, senior citizens and students.

Huntington Playhouse. 28601 Lake Road, Bay Village. 440-871-8333 or huntingtonplayhouse.com. "Play On." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. Through Sunday, July 1. $20; discounts available for senior citizens and students.

Lantern Theatre. The Gleeson Barn at Canal Corners Farm and Market, 7243 Canal Road, Valley View. 216-401-5131. Eric Schmiedl's "Singin' on the Ohio." 1 and 3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Through Sunday, Sept. 16. $10.

Lighthouse Theatre of Fairport Harbor. Fairport Harding High School, 329 Vine St. 330-317-2163 or lighthousetheatre2012@gmail.com. Agatha Christie's "And Then There Were None." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, July 1. $10-$12.

Mercury Summer Stock at Notre Dame College. 4545 College Road, South Euclid. 216-771-5862 or mercurysummerstock.com. Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Cats." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Saturday, June 30. $15-$18.

New World Performance Laboratory Studio 2 Production. Balch Street Theatre, 220 S. Balch St., Akron. 330-867-3299 or nwplab.org. Benjamin Paloff's translation of Dorota Maslowska's "A Couple of Poor, Polish-Speaking Romanians." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. For mature audiences. $10.

Ohio City Theatre Project. Market Square Park, West 25th Street and Lorain Avenue, Cleveland. ohiocitytheatreproject.com. Matt Larsen's "Kid Mystery." 11:30 a.m. Saturday. A family-friendly comedy in one act. Repeats 2 p.m. Saturday, June 30. Free.

Rabbit Run Barn Theater. 5648 Chapel Road, Madison. 440-428-5913 or rabbitrunonline.com. "Oliver, the Musical." 8 p.m. today-Sunday and Thursday. Through Saturday, June 30. $17-$19.

Straw Hat Theatre. Ashtabula Arts Center, 2928 West 13th St., Ashtabula. 440-964-3396 or ashartscenter.org. Allan Knee, Jason Howland and Mindi Dickstein's "Little Women, the Broadway Musical." 8 p.m. today-Sunday. Through Saturday, July 7. $12-$14.

Weathervane Playhouse. 1301 Weathervane Lane, Akron. 330-836-2626 or weathervaneplayhouse.com. "The Drowsy Chaperone." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday; 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Through Sunday, July 8. $24; $21, senior citizens Thursday and Sunday; $5, children ages 17 and under.

Workshop Players Theatre-in-the-Round. 44820 Middle Ridge Road, Amherst. 440-988-5613 or workshopplayers.com. John R. Powers, James Quinn and Alaric Jans' "Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up?" 8 p.m. Thursday. Through Sunday, July 15. $14.

AUDITIONS

For the region's most comprehensive look at auditions at theaters and other arts organizations, go to cleveland.com/auditions.

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News Headline: Kent State notebook: Gamecocks' late-night replacement masters Flashes (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Marla Ridenour
Beacon Journal sports columnist

(PHOTO) Kent State's Sawyer Polen (24) is forced out at second base as South Carolina second baseman Chase Vergason throws to first for a double play in the second inning of an NCAA College World Series elimination baseball game in Omaha, Neb., Thursday. Kent State's Nick Hamilton was also out on the play. (AP Photo/Dave Weaver)

OMAHA, Neb.: His cell phone would go dead just before the start of Thursday's game against two-time defending champion South Carolina in the College World Series.

But Kent State coach Scott Stricklin might have wished it had happened a little sooner. He might have known the Golden Flashes' chances of staving off elimination became much tougher when he learned the Gamecocks were throwing their ace, senior left-hander Michael Roth.

Freshman Jordan Montgomery had been slated to start Wednesday night, but heavy rain forced the game's postponement. The extra day's rest made Roth available for the Gamecocks.

“I was at dinner when I got the text message he was pitching and I raised my eyebrows a little bit,” Stricklin said. “Once I talked to Coach (Ray) Tanner this morning, when your senior goes to you and says, ‘I want the ball, Coach,' what are you going to say? Give him the ball.”

Roth allowed only two hits, walked none and retired the final 22 Kent State batters after Sawyer Polen's RBI single to left in the second. Roth improved his record in the NCAA Tournament to 8-0 over three seasons. He has started South Carolina's two previous championship-game victories, beating Florida 5-2 in 2011 and getting a no-decision in a 2-1 triumph over UCLA in 2010.

“I was able to hit the strike zone with pretty much every pitch I threw,” said Roth, drafted in the ninth round by the Anaheim Angels earlier this month. “I didn't have any walks. When there aren't baserunners, you can stay on that roll, which I really haven't been able to get into this season much.”

Tossing a complete game, Roth (9-1, 2.49 ERA) struck out eight. When he fanned KSU second baseman Derek Toadvine in the second inning, Roth set the CWS record with 53⅔ innings pitched, surpassing Steve Arlin of Ohio State (1965-66) and Greg Swindell of Texas (1984-85).

“He just kept pumping the strikes,” Kent State first baseman George Roberts said of Roth.

“Michael Roth, he's the best pitcher in college baseball,” Stricklin said. “I've loved watching him on TV for the last three years, but I absolutely hated watching him today. He carved our guys up.”

Tanner said when he pondered the decision to switch from Montgomery, his only concern was if Roth was 100 percent.

“He said, ‘I'm 100 percent' and that's good enough for me,” Tanner said. “He's our best guy.”

Bagoly too late

KSU officials believed junior Jason Bagoly's plane would land in Omaha in time to make it to the game as the Austintown Fitch product returned from his mother Cheryl McHenry's funeral Wednesday. But the game lasted just two hours and seven minutes, the shortest in the CWS since Rice vs. Mississippi State on June 14, 2003. Bagoly apparently joined the team at its hotel for a charter flight to Ohio.

About that homer

KSU starter Tyler Skulina (11-3, 3.77) of Walsh Jesuit on LB Dantzler's two-run homer over the right field bullpen in the third inning: “It's supposed to be a fastball cut out of my hand. It went a little too far in and he dropped his barrel on it. It just happened to be in the wrong spot at the wrong time.”

Tough trip

KSU's 7-8-9-1 hitters – designated hitter Nick Hamilton, left fielder Alex Miklos, Toadvine and center fielder Evan Campbell – did not get a hit in Omaha. Bagoly replaced Hamilton in the victory over Florida.

Parting speech

Stricklin said it took him 30 seconds to compose himself before addressing the team in right field after the game.

“It was tough. I always promise myself when the year's over I'm not going to choke up,” Stricklin said as the Flashes finished 47-20. “I said, ‘Only one team gets to win their last game and we were one of five left standing.' No one expected it. When no one expects you to do anything and you do it and you overachieve, it's such a satisfying feeling.”

Notes

In nine NCAA Tournament games, KSU outscored its foes 24-12 in innings 1-4, but was outscored 25-10 in innings 5-9. From the fifth inning on in the CWS it was outscored 9-1. … Stricklin lauded rival University of Akron fans for their supportive e-mails. “That's amazing,” he said. “Those fans have embraced us because it's Northeast Ohio and we're in this together.” … Stricklin didn't know what was wrong with his phone. “I'm going to have a lot of people wondering why I'm not getting back to them,” he said.

Marla Ridenour can be reached at mridenour@thebeaconjournal.com. Read her blog at http://www.ohio.com/marla. Follow her on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/MRidenourABJ and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/sports.abj.

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News Headline: Kent State season ends, now dealing with possible loss of Scott Stricklin to Michigan (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Marla Ridenour
Beacon Journal sports columnist

OMAHA, Neb. -- In the world of college sports, a team is only as good as its recruits. Which means Kent State baseball has to get back to work, immediately.

"We're behind in recruiting right now," head coach Scott Stricklin said after Thursday's elimination from the College World Series. "We'll be on the road very quickly to catch up.

"We're not able to see recruits because we're out here, but recruits have been able to see us. That's the biggest key to coming out here, you're in the limelight, you're on the national stage. And the kids you've been in contact with for the last year have gotten to see us play."

Stricklin said he will be focusing on the pitcher's mound.

"Pitching is the key to success in college baseball, so we're always looking for arms," he said. "We're going to sign three or four arms. We're looking for 2013 grads. We've got a couple infielders already committed to us. We need to get an outfielder, we need to get a catcher, we need to get a few pitchers. A little bit of everything.

"We'll sign eight guys like we always do. We're not going to sign 15 or 20 and run guys off."

Final words: Stricklin had his team surround him in right field following the loss to South Carolina, but said his comments were hard to come by.

"It was tough," he said. "I always promise myself when the year's over I'm not going to choke up, I'm going to get through this. It took me about 30 seconds before I could say something.

"I said, 'Only one team gets to win their last game and we were one of five left standing. No one expected it. Just really proud of what our guys accomplished. When no one expects you to do anything and you do it and you overachieve, it's such a satisfying feeling. I think our kids did prove on the national stage we belonged here.

"We earned a lot of respect along the way. Every place we've been, when we leave I think people understand we're a great program, our kids play the right way, you don't see kids throwing their helmets and doing things they shouldn't be doing.

"We've got the highest GPA here, our APR is in the top in the country. We're doing things the right way with homegrown kids. We you do things the right way it usually pays off."

This n' that: During the postseason, Kent outscored its opponents, 24-12, in the first four innings, but was outscored, 25-10, in the final five. ... While much of Kent's lineup struggled at the plate here, shortstop Jimmy Rider was stellar. He was 15-for-43 (.349) with four doubles, 10 runs scored and nine RBI throughout the NCAA run, including a double, homer, two RBI and four runs scored in three CWS games. ...

Kent State's two hits vs. South Carolina matched its season low against Akron on May 19. ... South Carolina pitcher Michael Roth is 8-0 in CWS games after defeating Kent and has never allowed more than three runs in any CWS game.

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News Headline: Kent State coach Stricklin could be on University of Michigan's radar (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By David Carducci | Staff Writer

OMAHA, Neb. — The Golden Flashes' run in the College World Series ended on Thursday, and now the next order of business for Kent State is to make sure head coach Scott Stricklin remains in place as the leader of the school's surging baseball program.

Kent State athletic director Joel Nielsen confirmed schools have already contacted him regarding Stricklin.

“We've had some conversations with people,” said Nielsen. “But Scott wanted to concentrate on the College World Series and I appreciate that about him. We've got a great relationship. We talk openly about opportunities when they come, when we're hearing rumors and that sort of thing.”

The one school with a coaching vacancy that could make sense for Stricklin is the University of Michigan.

Stricklin's name has been mentioned as a possible candidate for the Wolverines' job ever since the Big Ten school announced Rich Maloney would not return for his 11th season back on May 22.

But after Stricklin proved he can compete for a national championship at Kent State, the Michigan job might not look quite as attractive.

On Thursday, Stricklin sounded like a coach who wanted to take the exposure his team received in its first College World Series appearance out for a spin on the recruiting trail.

“One part of my recruiting speech is, ‘This is the best time to ever be at Kent State,' ” said Stricklin. “When we first got here, we built Schoonover Stadium. Now with all of the renovations in downtown, the new hotel, all that's going on campus, it's never been a better time to be at Kent State.”

Part of the speech has also always included the idea of competing for a national championship, “but it didn't really mean much,” Stricklin admitted. “We were competing for (Mid-American Conference) championships and going to play in regionals. But now we can say, ‘We're competing for a national championship' and look 'em square in the eye and mean it.”

At the same time, Stricklin didn't exactly quash the idea that he is willing to look at other opportunities.

“I'm at my alma mater,” Stricklin said. “I met my wife here. We've raised a family here. We love Kent State. I love Kent State University. You never know what's going to happen. You never say never.”

The right opportunity just may not be out there for Stricklin this season.

Michigan is a good job, but it may not be better than the one Stricklin has at Kent State right now.

The Wolverines play in a beautiful college ballpark that received a facelift in 2008 as part of a $9 million renovation to the Wilpon Baseball and Softball Complex.

But KSU appears to be ready to make some major upgrades to Schoonover Stadium. On Saturday, Kent State president Lester Lefton said the school will install lights at the stadium by the fall. That could cost between $500,000 and $1 million, and it's just the first stage of a major investment in baseball, according to Lefton.

In terms of money, the Michigan job may not pay significantly more than Kent State.

Maloney's base salary during his final season at Michigan was reportedly $190,000.

Stricklin earned $145,000 in base salary this season, but with incentives reached during this year's postseason run, he should make closer to $200,000. Stricklin's base salary alone would put him close to the middle of the pack on the Big Ten's salary scale for baseball coaches.

In his two years as athletic director, Nielsen has completed “more than one revision” on Stricklin's contract in attempts to both make the job more attractive and help ward off potential suitors.

“We'll continue to have conversations, probably not long after we land back in Kent,” Nielsen said.

The Flashes' plane landed in Northeast Ohio on Thursday night, and Stricklin seemed more interested in catching up in recruiting than on relaxing in the wake of a long postseason.

“We're behind in recruiting right now,” Stricklin said. “We'll be on the road very quickly to catch up. We haven't been able to see recruits because we've (been in Omaha). But recruits have been able to see us.

“That's the biggest key to coming to (the College World Series). You are in the limelight. You are on the national stage. And the kids you've been in contact with for the last year have gotten the chance to see us play.”

BAGOLY'S TRAVELS

Jason Bagoly did his best to make it back to Omaha in time to play in one more College World Series game.

The backup catcher was one of the heroes in Kent State's upset of No. 1 Florida on Monday, when he went 2-for-3 as a designated hitter in his first game action of the postseason. He then flew home to Ohio on Tuesday to attend the funeral of his mother, Cheryl McHenry, on Wednesday in Austintown.

Bagoly's flight back to Omaha on Thursday landed at 1:20 p.m. Central time — just three minutes after the final out of Kent State's 4-1 loss to South Carolina.

Bagoly was on the team's charter flight back to Ohio on Thursday night.

THE WORLD SERIES PAYDAY?

The chance to play in the College World Series does not bring with it a payday similar to what athletic departments can see after getting a team into the NCAA men's basketball tournament.

Kent State won't see a share of television money. But it does expect to make some money on licensing.

Tents are set up all around TD Ameritrade Park selling hundreds of T-shirts with the logos of the eight teams that qualified for the CWS.

The school can also put a value to the exposure it received playing on national television and having the story of its 2012 season told and retold in the local and national media.

“There is a tangible number we plan to seek out in terms of exposure. Television exposure, media exposure,” Nielsen said. “We intend to see what the total value was with this run. Outside of that, you're talking merchandising and the energy we've seen throughout Northeast Ohio and Ohio in general for this team ... the outreach.”

FEELING THE LOVE

During their stays in Eugene, Ore. and Omaha, the Golden Flashes have heard about the excitement their postseason run has generated back home in Northeast Ohio.

Stricklin admitted the distance has kept them from really understanding the level of excitement.

“I've gotten a lot of text messages and emails with videos of people having parties at their house and at the restaurants downtown in Kent,” said Stricklin. “I keep hearing, ‘You're not going to believe it when you see it.' It's really special.”

Stricklin said he's even received emails from University of Akron fans saying they were rooting for Kent State.

“That's amazing,” he said. “It's a great rivalry. We love to hate each other and it's good for college sports. But those fans have embraced us because it's Northeast Ohio and we're in this together.”

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News Headline: Curtain falls on Kent State baseball's dream season (with gallery) (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By David Carducci | Staff Writer

OMAHA, Neb. — It took the two-time defending national champions and one of the most dominant starting pitchers in NCAA postseason history to finally bring down the curtain on Kent State's thrilling 2012 season.

South Carolina chose to start Michael Roth in a late-night decision following a Wednesday rainout, then rode a two-hitter by the senior ace to a 4-1 victory over the Golden Flashes in Thursday's make-up of a College World Series elimination game at TD Ameritrade Park.

Freshman Jordan Montgomery would have started for the Gamecocks if the game had been played on Wednesday night as planned. Instead, waiting out a string of summer thunderstorms gave head coach Ray Tanner enough time to rethink that choice.

South Carolina wasn't going to overlook the surprise team from a mid-major conference way up north. To prove it, Tanner was sending out the same ace who started the deciding games of the last two College World Series.

Scott Stricklin was eating dinner late Wednesday night when his phone buzzed with the news. The Kent State coach read Roth's name on the text, his eyebrows raised and he thought just one thing.

“They really want to win,” said Stricklin. “Nothing against Montgomery. He is very good. But you could argue Michael Roth is the best pitcher in the country.

“I talked to coach Tanner before the game and Roth was campaigning to pitch last night. He told (Roth), ‘You don't have enough rest.' He said after the game was canceled Roth came up to him and said, ‘You can't hold me out now.' I don't blame coach Tanner. When your senior says give me the ball, you have to give it to him.”

Roth proved the decision was a no-brainer. Four days after pitching the Gamecocks to a 2-1 win over Florida in a rematch of last year's championship-series finale, the crafty left-hander set a pair of College World Series records by earning his fourth career victory in Omaha and becoming the pitcher with the most innings ever logged in college baseball's biggest event.

After spotting Kent State a 1-0 lead in the second inning, Roth retired the final 22 batters he faced by pounding the strike zone.

“I just try to go out there and give the team a chance to win,” said Roth, who threw 106 pitches and 70 of them for strikes. “It's nice. I'm glad we have the opportunity to keep playing. It (was) the best command that I've had in a long time.”

The Flashes touched Roth for their lone run in the second inning when George Roberts singled then came home on a base hit by Sawyer Polen.

“Once we scored, it's almost like we made him mad,” said Stricklin. “I've loved watching Roth on TV for the last three years, but I absolutely hated watching him today. He just carved us up. After that first run ... we didn't have much of a chance. He was that good. That guy is going to pitch in the big leagues.”

Roth was selected in the ninth round by the Los Angeles Angels back on June 5. According to Stricklin, he should have been picked earlier, but most scouts are looking for pitchers with blazing fastballs. Roth throws in the mid-80s, but wins with command of all of his pitches.

Kent State found its own quality outing from starter Tyler Skulina, who struck out nine Gamecocks in 52/3 innings. The only real struggle for the hard-throwing sophomore came while trying to get the final outs in both the second and third innings.

South Carolina took the lead for good with two, two-out runs in the second inning. Grayson Greiner drove home the first with a hard grounder down the left-field line that tipped off the glove of Polen at third base and trickled into foul territory, giving Adam Matthews enough time to race home from second. Chase Vergason followed with an RBI single.

Both of the Gamecocks' third-inning runs also arrived with two outs, courtesy of L.B. Dantzler's mammoth home run to right field.

The pitch to Dantzler was a cut fastball that “just happened to be in the wrong spot at the wrong time,” according to Skulina.

Both teams combined to put zeroes on the scoreboard for the final six innings, with Casey Wilson and Brian Clark combining for 21/3 shutout innings of relief for the Flashes.

After the game, Stricklin pulled his team into a huddle for the final time in 2012. The emotional meeting in short right field gave the team a chance to reflect on all it had accomplished — from capturing a Mid-American Conference tournament championship for a record fourth time in a row, to claiming the program's first Regional championship in Gary, then advancing in their Super Regional debut with an upset at Oregon, and finally winning over the hearts of the fans in Omaha while sending home No. 1-ranked Florida in Monday's first CWS elimination game.

“It was tough,” said Stricklin. “I always promise myself when the year is over I'm not going to choke up. I'm going to get through this. It took me 30 seconds before I could say something. I said, ‘Only one team gets to win their last game and we were one of five left standing.' No one expected it. I'm just really proud of what our guys accomplished. When no one expects you to do anything and you do it and you overachieve, it's such a satisfying feeling.

“I think our kids did prove on the national stage we belonged here. We earned a lot of respect along the way. Every place we've been, when we leave I think people understand we are a great program, our kids play the right way. We are doing things the right way with home-grown kids. When you do things the right way, it usually pays off.”

The Kent State loss left just four teams remaining in the College World Series — South Carolina, Arkansas, Arizona and Florida State.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball team welcomed home from College World Series (with gallery) (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Diane Smith | Staff Writer

With cheers of “Let's Go Kent” and “We Are Kent State,” students and residents welcomed the returning Kent State University baseball team Thursday, back at Kent State after the College World Series.

Hours after losing to South Carolina to end their ride in Omaha, the team boarded a plane, which landed in the Akron-Canton Regional Airport at about 8 p.m. A tour bus, escorted by police, brought the team to Dix Stadium, where a large, cheering crowd awaited them.

Mary Ann Clark of Akron, along with her daughter and granddaughter, were among them. The Akron woman is the grandmother of relief pitcher Michael Clark, and the family proudly displayed signs with his name and jersey number.

“I'm just so happy for them,” the grandmother said, added that she had traveled to Omaha to share in part of her grandson's journey.

She said she was thrilled to see the crowd welcome the team home.

“This is just so nice for Kent,” Mary Ann Clark said.

Kent Mayor Jerry Fiala said he had hoped the team would come downtown, but he was glad to see a large crowd welcome the team.

“We're very happy the team went as far as they did,” he said. “The kids played their hearts out. It's a great thing for the university and the city as a whole.”

Team members were presented with markers to sign autographs for eager fans, who crowded around them as they walked through the stadium gate.

Kent State head coach Scott Stricklin said he was amazed by the cheering crowd.

“It's a little overwhelming,” he said. “We knew we had some fans back here, but nothing like this.”

He acknowledged that some might have underestimated the Flashes “but once we got there, I think we showed everybody that we belonged there.”

Stricklin said the team would have liked to have stayed in Omaha a bit longer, and had a few chances to come back against South Carolina Thursday afternoon. He said the team will have a strong season next year, and said next year's team will be even stronger.

“We're going to build on this,” he said. “We're going to use this to get some great recruits in Northeast Ohio.”

To contact Diane Smith:

Email: dsmith@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-298-1139

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News Headline: Kent State Falls to South Carolina, Ending College World Series Run | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 4-1 loss comes after rain postponed their game a day
By Matt Fredmonsky

It had to end sometime.

The Cinderalla run of the Kent State University Golden Flashes men's baseball team ended with a 4-1 loss to the South Carolina Gamecocks this afternoon.

The loss came one day after rain postponed their game and just days after Kent State beat the No. 1 national team Florida in dramatic fashion.

Here's a recap from the game on Cleveland.com.

Lori Wemhoff, director of the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce, said in an email this afternoon that fans of the team can welcome the players home to Kent tonight at 8 p.m.

Wemhoff said the team bus will arrive then at Dix Stadium on Summit Street.

"The support of the fans, campus and business community has been amazing throughout the CWS, and we know it will continue tonight at Dix Stadium," Wemhoff said.

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News Headline: Golden Flashes Return Home to Hero's Welcome (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (VIDEO)
KENT, Ohio — The Kent State University Golden Flashes baseball team returned home from Omaha around 9 p.m. Thursday night to a roaring crowd of about 100 fans.

The crowd, decked out in blue and gold, cheered wildly when the team arrived with a police escort at Dix Stadium.

“It's a little overwhelming. I mean, we knew we'd have fans out here, but nothing like this,” said Coach Scott Stricklin.

Earlier Thursday afternoon, the team was knocked out of the College World Series in a 4-1 loss to South Carolina.

Although the team didn't win the World Series, they accomplished a lot during the historic season.

This was the first Kent State team to advance to the World Series and the first Mid-American Conference team to get there in nearly three decades.

The team also won 21 straight games, and eliminated the number-one seeded Florida Gators.

The Cinderella story captured the hearts of many baseball fans.

Kristin Dowlind traveled with her family to the World Series and says everyone seemed to be rooting for the underdog team from northeast Ohio.

“Just to have gotten where they did is fantastic,” said Dowlind.

The team finished the dream season as one of the top 5 teams out of 297 Division 1 teams.

Left-handed pitcher David Starn said, “It's an amazing experience. The fans are great, so it was awesome.”

Almost all of the players are from the Buckeye State. Twenty one guys are from Ohio, and six are from western Pennsylvania.

“That's what I'm most proud of,” said Coach Stricklin.

A handful of players are graduating seniors, but the bulk of the team will be back next season.

Coach Stricklin says, “We got a lot of heart and determination, and once we got there we showed everyone that we belonged.”

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News Headline: Kent: Golden Flashes baseball team receives warm welcome home (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (VIDEO)
KENT, Ohio -- When the charter bus pulled up to Dix Stadium on the Kent State University Campus, all the players could see out the window was a sea of gold.

Fans of all ages welcomed home the baseball team.

While the Golden Flashes were eliminated Thursday, they finished in the top five of 297 teams.

In the crowd were parents, school officials, children and friends.

Several alumni baseball players were there, as were members of the KSU football team and women's basketball team.

This is the first time KSU has made it to the College World Series.

The celebration continues next Thursday, at the Student Center Ballroom. A cookout will be held for the team and fans at 5:30 p.m.

WKYC-TV

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News Headline: Cinderella Story Ends (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Video clip

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News Headline: Cinderella Kent loses to national champs | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent baseball had support from even arch-rivals
Story by GREG ECHLIN

(PHOTO) MAC Coach of the Year Scott Stricklin got Kent to its first ever College World Series.

Kent State's baseball team is returning to Northeast Ohio tonight, after being knocked out of the College World Series by two-time defending national champion South Carolina.

Kent lost 4-1 this afternoon, ending its first-ever appearance in the College World Series. For WKSU, Greg Echlin has the story from Omaha.

The team will be at Dix Stadium at 2227 E. Summit St. in Kent at 8 p.m. tonight to greet fans.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball team welcomed home from Omaha (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Golden Flashes fall to two-time defending champs in College World Series
by WKSU's KABIR BHATIA

(PHOTO) Coach Scott Stricklin and the team returned from Omaha after a two-week road trip

Kent State's baseball team returned home Thursday night, with their season ending after a 4-1 loss to the South Carolina Gamecocks in the College World Series. The elimination game was rained out Wednesday and carried over to a Thursday morning start in Omaha.

Coach Scott Stricklin says much of the talent behind this year's Cinderella season will carry over to next year.

“We could have as many as 26 players from this roster coming back. And to be honest with you, before this season started, we felt like next year was the team that might make another run. Last year we were very talented, [and] we were very disappointed we got knocked off in the regional finals. We felt like this year would be a good team that could win another championship, but to go to Omaha, it's what every coach talks about but most of us are dreaming about it. And to actually get there, it's been amazing."

Two-time defending champ South Carolina beat undefeated Arkansas late Thursday night, and must beat the Razorbacks again on Friday to make it back to the championships. The game was the shortest at the College World Series since 2003.

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News Headline: South Carolina ends Kent State's Cinderella season in CWS (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: USA Today - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA – Kent State's Cinderella baseball season came to an end Thursday afternoon at the hands of a championship team and a standout pitcher who wasn't about to let that team's year end prematurely.

(PHOTO) South Carolina pitcher Michael Roth threw a complete-game two-hitter and retired the last 22 batters as the Gamecocks beat Kent State 4-1 at the College World Series.

Two-time defending champion South Carolina (47-18) ousted the Golden Flashes 4-1 from the College World Series behind the sterling pitching of left-hander Michael Roth, who threw a complete-game two-hitter and retired the last 22 batters.

South Carolina advanced to meet Southeastern Conference foe Arkansas Thursday night. The Gamecocks will have to beat the Razorbacks twice to reach the championship series and go for a third consecutive title, but they'll play Thursday night's game with a fresh bullpen after the relievers were able to rest and watch Roth handcuff the Golden Flashes.

Gamecocks coach Ray Tanner opted to go with Roth (9-1) after the game had been postponed Wednesday night by rain. Jordan Montgomery had been scheduled to pitch Wednesday against the Flashes, but with the extra day of rest, Roth got the call. He had last thrown on Saturday in South Carolina's opening victory against Florida.

Kent State had ousted top national seed Florida in its last game, but had no answers for Roth. He threw 106 pitches, 70 for strikes.

"He was very special today," said Tanner. "This was probably his most critical game for us because he went nine and the bullpen was able to rest. He's a guy who's going to strap it on for you and give you his best effort. He's going to give you a chance to win."

Roth tied a CWS record with his fourth career victory and set a record by reaching 53 2/3 career CWS innings. The game was the shortest in nine years at the CWS, lasting 2 hours and seven minutes.

Kent State (47-20) took a 1-0 lead in the top of the second on an RBI single by Sawyer Polen, which drove in George Roberts. But the singles by Polen and Roberts were all Roth allowed. He had eight strikeouts and no walks. He went to a three-ball count on only two batters.

"I was able to hit the strike zone with pretty much every pitch I threw," said Roth. "That helped me a lot. I didn't have any walks today, which limits their baserunners, and you can stay on that roll. So, it was nice to be able to throw everything for strikes."

The Gamecocks quickly turned the game around with four singles off Tyler Skulina (11-3) in their half of the second inning, with Grayson Greiner and Chase Vergason driving in runs for a 2-1 lead.

South Carolina struck again in the third when LB Dantzler poked a two-run home run to right, his 10th homer of the season, making it 4-1.

Skulina was removed in favor of Casey Wilson with two outs and two men on in the sixth after reaching 101 pitches. Wilson got out of the jam when Joey Pankake took a called third strike.

But although Skulina pitched well, he couldn't match the Gamecocks ace.

"He's a strike-throwing machine," Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said of Roth. "He throws from different arm angles. You never know what pitch is coming. The thing about Michael Roth is, he has so much experience.

It's almost like we made him mad when we scored that run in the second inning, and (he's saying) 'That's not happening anymore.' He was outstanding and just commanded the game. That's why he's an All American. He just knows how to pitch. I've enjoyed watching him on TV. I did not enjoy watching him today."

Still, Stricklin knows this season will long be remembered by Kent State fans.

"I'm just really proud of what they accomplished," he said of his players. "To come back and beat Florida (after losing to Arkansas), I think we made a statement that we belong here, and we made a statement that we're a program that should be recognized nationally."

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News Headline: KSU's Scott Stricklin prepares to renew recruiting efforts with season over: College World Series Insider (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (PHOTO) The final moments of Kent State's run to the College World Series was almost too difficult to watch for KSU sophomore Karla Santiago (left), who joined Brooklynn Hansley (center) and Roslynn Porch at the school's student center on Thursday.

OMAHA, Neb. -- In the world of college sports, a team is only as good as its recruits. Which means Kent State baseball has to get back to work, immediately.

"We're behind in recruiting right now," head coach Scott Stricklin said after Thursday's elimination from the College World Series. "We'll be on the road very quickly to catch up.

"We're not able to see recruits because we're out here, but recruits have been able to see us. That's the biggest key to coming out here, you're in the limelight, you're on the national stage. And the kids you've been in contact with for the last year have gotten to see us play."

Stricklin said he will be focusing on the pitcher's mound.

"Pitching is the key to success in college baseball, so we're always looking for arms," he said. "We're going to sign three or four arms. We're looking for 2013 grads. We've got a couple infielders already committed to us. We need to get an outfielder, we need to get a catcher, we need to get a few pitchers. A little bit of everything.

"We'll sign eight guys like we always do. We're not going to sign 15 or 20 and run guys off."

Final words: Stricklin had his team surround him in right field following the loss to South Carolina, but said his comments were hard to come by.

"It was tough," he said. "I always promise myself when the year's over I'm not going to choke up, I'm going to get through this. It took me about 30 seconds before I could say something.

"I said, 'Only one team gets to win their last game and we were one of five left standing. No one expected it. Just really proud of what our guys accomplished. When no one expects you to do anything and you do it and you overachieve, it's such a satisfying feeling. I think our kids did prove on the national stage we belonged here.

"We earned a lot of respect along the way. Every place we've been, when we leave I think people understand we're a great program, our kids play the right way, you don't see kids throwing their helmets and doing things they shouldn't be doing.

"We've got the highest GPA here, our APR is in the top in the country. We're doing things the right way with homegrown kids. We you do things the right way it usually pays off."

This n' that: During the postseason, Kent outscored its opponents, 24-12, in the first four innings, but was outscored, 25-10, in the final five. ... While much of Kent's lineup struggled at the plate here, shortstop Jimmy Rider was stellar. He was 15-for-43 (.349) with four doubles, 10 runs scored and nine RBI throughout the NCAA run, including a double, homer, two RBI and four runs scored in three CWS games. ...

Kent State's two hits vs. South Carolina matched its season low against Akron on May 19. ... South Carolina pitcher Michael Roth is 8-0 in CWS games after defeating Kent and has never allowed more than three runs in any CWS game.

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News Headline: Kent State eliminated from College World Series in 4-1 loss to two-time champion South Carolina (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Elton Alexander, The Plain Dealer

(PHOTO) South Carolina southpaw Michael Roth allowed two hits in the second inning, with Sawyer Polen's RBI single briefly giving Kent State a 1-0 lead in Thursday's elimination game in Omaha. But Roth then got Nick Hamilton to ground into a double play to end the threat and then retired the next 21 consecutive batters in the 4-1 Gamecocks victory.

(INSET)

Beyond the Diamond

Score: South Carolina, 4-1
Key play: South Carolina's decision to start ace Michael Roth, over No. 3 Jordan Montgomery following Wednesday night's rain postponement.
Star of the game: Roth pitched a near-flawless nine innings with eight strikeouts and two hits, none after the second inning.
Elton's take: The failure of four of KSU's regulars — Nick Hamilton, Alex Miklos, Derek Toadvine and Alex Campbell — to get even one hit in three games in Omaha was just too much to overcome. Not having Game 2 hitting star Jason Bagoly (funeral) available was equally critical.
What's next: Kent State returned to campus Thursday night.

— Elton Alexander

OMAHA, Neb. -- South Carolina paid Kent State the ultimate respect on Thursday afternoon.

A little over two hours after Gamecocks ace Michael Roth took the mound, the Golden Flashes' postseason Cinderella experience was over, thanks to Roth's dominating two-hitter in a 4-1 victory for the two-time defending College World Series champions.

When rain forced a postponement of Wednesday's elimination game, South Carolina coach Ray Tanner decided to bypass No. 3 starter Jordan Montgomery for Roth, who was 7-0 over the last three College World Series.

Tanner was not looking ahead to Arkansas later Thursday evening, even if his team was a perceived favorite over KSU. He had Kent in his cross-hairs.

"If you don't pitch your best guy, it's a long off-season," he said.

Kent (47-20) had already posted a 3-1 postseason record against the Southeastern Conference, beating Kentucky twice in the Gary (Ind.) regional and sending No. 1-seeded Florida home on Monday. But with the exception of the second inning -- when Kent State scored its lone run on an RBI single by Sawyer Polen -- Roth (9-1) mowed the Flashes down like winter wheat on the prairie.

"Coach told me, 'you're getting the ball. I need you to go nine. About 105 pitches," Roth said after a 106-pitch effort that saw the last 22 Golden Flashes he faced go in order. He recorded eight strikeouts without a walk. "I was able to hit the strike zone with pretty much every pitch I threw."

Said Kent State head coach Scott Stricklin, "Michael Roth, he's unbelievable. He carved our guys up."

• Official Kent State-South Carolina boxscore

KSU starter Tyler Skulina (11-2) pitched a solid 5.2 innings with nine strikeouts, but was done in by a pair of two-out, two-run South Carolina bursts in the second and third innings. The latter included a towering LB Dantzler homer to right for the final scoring of the game.

"It just happened to be in the wrong spot at the wrong time," the 6-6, 235-pound Skulina said. "It's supposed to be a [cut] fastball out of my hand. It went a little too far in and he dropped his barrel on it. That was a mistake on my part."

Kent State had its chance one inning earlier. First baseman George Roberts opened the second with a single and advanced to second on an infield grounder before scoring on Polen's single to left. But Nick Hamilton continued his CWS struggles with a routine 6-4-3 double play to end the inning.

That was the extent of the KSU attack.

Kent State's offense labored in its three Omaha games with 12 of its 18 hits coming in Monday's 5-4 victory over Florida. The bottom of Kent's regular lineup -- Hamilton, Alex Miklos and Derek Toadvine, along with leadoff hitter Evan Campbell, were 0-for-Omaha.

Kent got a lift Monday from DH Jason Bagoly, who was 2-for-3. But Bagoly returned to Austintown, Ohio for his mother's funeral Wednesday, and was not back in time Thursday to play.

The Gamecocks (47-18) countered immediately in the second inning with a pair of one-out singles against Skulina. After a three-pitch strikeout of Tanner English, catcher Grayson Greiner' hard-hopper down the third-base line glanced off the glove of Polen for an RBI single. Chase Vergason's single up the middle provided the Gamecocks a 2-1 lead.

Skulina seemed on his way to an easy third inning. But a two-out double to Christian Walker was followed by Danzler's concession-stand blast to right for a 4-1 Gamecocks lead. That was the first homer Kent had given up in the tournament. Skulina steadied, but the damage was done.

Skulina departed in the sixth. With one out, English struck out on a wild pitch but reached first anyway. A two-out walk to Vergason ended Skulina's day. Reliever Casey Wilson whiffed Joey Pancake for a rare four-strikeout inning.

But Roth was totally in control by then, as Kent quietly -- and quickly, in just over two hours -- ended a postseason filled with excitement.

It was clearly the best season ever in Kent State baseball history.

"It's been unbelievable," Stricklin said.

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News Headline: New KSU students gather to watch Golden Flashes in College World Series (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: NewsChannel 5 at 11 PM - WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - A large crowd of incoming Kent State University freshmen gathered to show their support for the baseball team, playing Thursday in the College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska.

About 20 freshmen cheering "Let's Go Kent!" strolled into the student union Thursday afternoon, as the Golden Flashes took on South Carolina on national television.

"The incoming students are here for an overnight campus visit as part their orientation with 'Destination Kent State,'" said Eric Mansfield, the university's spokesman.

Kent State was scheduled to play South Carolina Wednesday night, but the game was rained out.

Dana Martin, 18, from Broadview Heights, said watching Kent in the tournament makes orientation week exciting.

"Just to see the energy and how everyone kind of comes together and celebrates it, it's really cool to see," Martin said.

Other freshmen were excited that the College World Series will help shine a spotlight on the university.

"Not too many people know about Kent State and with us on TV and winning so many games, it's going to bring more of a crowd," said Brennan Lance, 17, from Middleburg Heights.

"I think it's help us recruit more players and build the athletic department," said Alexa Maslowski, of Brunswick.

Unfortunately, the excitement from the incoming students turned to disappointment when the final pitch was thrown. Kent State lost to South Carolina 4-1.

Copyright 2012 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Read more: http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/oh_portage/new-ksu-students-gathering-to-watch-golden-flashes-in-college-world-series#ixzz1yXa06tXU

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News Headline: After loss, Flashes believe they'll be back at CWS (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox News Channel
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. – Kent State's first appearance in the College World Series is over.

The Golden Flashes don't think it will be their last.

South Carolina's Michael Roth pitched a two-hitter on Thursday, retiring the last 22 batters he faced in a 4-1 victory over the Flashes.

Kent State finished with 23 wins in 26 games after going 1-2 at the CWS.

"I believe it will just motivate us to get back here and just push us, make us better ballplayers," first baseman George Roberts said. "That's all you can ask for."

The Flashes (47-20) thought they missed their best chance to reach the CWS last year when they lost to Texas in regionals with a roster full of draft picks.

But they won the Mid-American Conference championship, swept through their regional and won a three-game super regional at Oregon to become the first MAC team to make it to Omaha since Eastern Michigan in 1976.

"We have a lot of guys returning next year, and with all of this experience under their belts, it will help them out a lot," said freshman pitcher Tyler Skulina. "We have a really good class coming in next year for our freshmen. So that's going to motivate them to want to beat us out for spots and be able to play, so that's just going to make our team better."

Kent State lost its CWS opener to Arkansas and eliminated No. 1 national seed Florida before succumbing to Roth, one of the most dominant pitchers in CWS history.

"I think we made a statement that we belong here, and we made a statement that we're a program that should be recognized nationally, not just regionally," Kent State coach Scott Stricklin said. "That's what I'm really proud of."

The loss to the two-time defending national champion Gamecocks came in a game that had been postponed by rain Wednesday.

The Gamecocks (47-18) play again Thursday night against Arkansas. They need two wins over the Razorbacks to advance to the championship round that starts Sunday.

Grayson Greiner and Chase Vergason hit consecutive RBI singles in the second inning to erase Kent State's 1-0 lead. LB Dantzler homered in the third against Skulina.

Roth (9-1) struck out eight and walked none. He was perfect after giving up Sawyer Polen's RBI single in the second inning.

"He is the biggest superstar our game has," Stricklin said. "He throws 85 mph. He just knows how to pitch. He does everything the right way. Great student. I've got a ton of respect for him. I've enjoyed watching him on TV. I did not enjoy watching him today."

Roth became the first CWS pitcher to throw a complete game with two hits or fewer since June 6, 1993, when Mike Fontana of Long Beach State threw a two-hitter against Kansas.

Roth also became the CWS' all-time leader in innings pitched, with 53 2-3 over three years, and tied a CWS career record for starts with his seventh.

The second was the only inning in which Roth allowed a baserunner. After Polen's single, he got Nick Hamilton to hit into a double play.

The game lasted just 2 hours, 7 minutes, making it the shortest at the CWS since 2003 when Rice and Missouri State played in 2:02.

Kent State had entered the game having won each of Skulina's last 12 starts. Skulina (11-3) left with two out in the sixth after allowing four runs on six hits and four walks. He struck out nine.

Roth earned his second win of the CWS. He pitched 6 1-3 innings in a 7-3 victory over Florida on Saturday. In 11 career NCAA tournament starts, Roth is 8-0, pitching at least five innings each time and never allowing more than three earned runs.

Kent State shut down South Carolina's offense after Dantzler hit his 10th homer of the year in the third. Skulina, Casey Wilson and Brian Clark held the Gamecocks to one hit the rest of the way.

South Carolina will become the first team since Georgia in 1987 to play all or part of two games in the same day at the CWS. The last team to play two full games on the same day was Michigan, on June 2, 1980.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/sports/2012/06/21/after-loss-flashes-believe-theyll-be-back-at-cws/#ixzz1yXbrEeS9

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News Headline: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing Program Awards Grants to 55 Schools of Nursing | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) today announced the schools of nursing that have been selected to participate in RWJF's prestigious New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN). During the 2012-2013 academic year, the schools will receive grants to support students in their accelerated baccalaureate and master's degree nursing programs, who are traditionally underrepresented in the field of nursing and are pursuing a second career in nursing. The NCIN Scholarship Program was launched in 2008 by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to expand enrollment in accelerated degree programs in schools of nursing while increasing diversity in the nursing workforce.

"We need a well-educated, diverse nursing workforce to provide quality care for our changing patient population," said David Krol, MD, MPH, FAAP, program officer for NCIN, RWJF senior program officer and team director of the RWJF Human Capital portfolio. "NCIN is strengthening nursing education and helping to fill the pipeline with capable, culturally-competent nurses."

Schools receiving grants through NCIN provide scholarships directly to students from groups underrepresented in nursing or from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Students who receive the NCIN scholarships—in the amount of $10,000 each—have already earned a bachelor's degree in another field, and are making a career switch to nursing through accelerated nursing degree programs. These programs prepare students to pass the licensure exam required for all registered nurses in as little as 12-18 months and provide quicker routes to workforce eligibility than traditional programs.

Since 2008, the NCIN program has distributed 2,717 scholarships to students at more than 100 unique schools of nursing. This year, funding for 400 scholarships was granted to 55 schools of nursing.

Students also receive other supports to help them meet the demands of an accelerated degree program. All NCIN grantee schools are required to maintain a mentoring program for their scholars, and many offer a pre-entry immersion program to help scholars learn study, test-taking and other skills that will aid them in managing the challenges of the program.

"AACN is proud to collaborate with RWJF on this unique effort. NCIN scholars bring life experience that makes them exceptional, mature nursing candidates, and they represent the diverse, culturally-competent nursing workforce our nation needs," said AACN President Jane Kirschling, DNS, RN, FAAN. "NCIN provides the scholarship and support these students need to succeed in school, and thrive in the workforce."

In this fifth year of the program, the following schools were awarded grants:

Allen College

Ashland University

Bellarmine University

Boston College

California State University-Northridge

College of Mount St. Joseph

College of St. Scholastica

Columbia University

Coppin State University

Creighton University

DePaul University

Duke University

Duquesne University

Edgewood College

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Georgia Health Sciences University

Kent State University

Linfield College

Medical University of South Carolina

MidAmerica Nazarene University

Montana State University

Mount St. Mary's College

Nebraska Methodist College of Nursing and Allied Health

New Mexico State University

New York University

Norfolk State University

Oregon Health & Science University

Quinnipiac University

Rush University Medical Center

Saint Louis University

Samuel Merritt University

Southern Connecticut State University

Stony Brook University

SUNY Downstate

The George Washington University

The University of Tennessee-Knoxville

The University of Texas at El Paso

Thomas Jefferson University

University of California-UCLA

University of Delaware

University of Hawaii

University of Maryland, Baltimore

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

University of Miami

University of Michigan-Flint

University of Mississippi Medical Center

University of Missouri-Columbia

University of Nebraska Medical Center

University of Pennsylvania

University of Rochester School of Nursing

University of Tennessee Health Science Center

University of Wyoming

West Virginia University

Winston-Salem State University

Yale University

The 2010 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, recommends increasing the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree or higher, and increasing the diversity of students to create a workforce prepared to meet the demands of diverse populations across the lifespan. The mission of the NCIN program is helping to advance those recommendations, enabling schools to expand student capacity in higher education, and encouraging more diversity.

By bringing more nurses into the profession at the baccalaureate and master's degree levels, the NCIN program also helps to address the nation's nurse faculty shortage. Data from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration show that nurses entering the profession via baccalaureate programs are four times more likely than other nurses to pursue a graduate degree in nursing. This trend is reflected in the NCIN scholars, as 91 percent of the students receiving funding in the first three years of the program indicate a desire to advance their education to the master's and doctoral levels.

To find learn more about the NCIN program, visit www.newcareersinnursing.org.

About NCIN

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) joined with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to create New Careers in Nursing: an RWJF Scholarship Program to help alleviate the nursing shortage and increase the diversity of nursing professionals. Through annual grants to schools of nursing, NCIN provides $10,000 scholarships to college graduates with degrees in other fields who wish to transition into nursing through an accelerated baccalaureate or master's nursing program. For more information, visit www.newcareersinnursing.org .

About RWJF

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country. As the nation's largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, measurable and timely change. For 40 years, the Foundation has brought experience, commitment and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves. When it comes to helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need, the Foundation expects to make a difference in your lifetime. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org .

About AACN

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing is the national voice for baccalaureate and graduate programs in nursing. Representing more than 700 member schools of nursing at public and private institutions nationwide, AACN's educational, research, governmental advocacy, data collection, publications and other programs work to establish quality standards for bachelor's and graduate degree nursing education, assist deans and directors to implement those standards, influence the nursing profession to improve health care, and promote public support of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education, research and practice. For more information, visit www.aacn.nche.edu .

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News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MUSICAL ACTIVITIES

June 20 -- Freaks of Nature tour, evening, the House of Blues.

June 21 -- Dar Williams, 8 p.m., Cain Park, Cleveland Hts.

June 21 -- Cinderella, evening, the House of Blues in Cleveland.

Thursdays through Aug. 9 -- Downtown at Dusk concerts, 6:30 p.m., Akron Art Museum, downtown.

Fridays throughout the summer -- Rockin' on the River, evening, Riverfront Park, Cuya. Falls.

Fridays throughout the summer -- Concerts at Lock 3 Park, S. Main St. in downtown Akron.

Fridays through Aug. 10 -- Summer music at the gazebo, 7 p.m., Springfield Lake in east Akron.

June 22 -- Rebeats (Beatles tribute), evening, House of Blues on Euclid Avenue in Cleveland.

June 22 -- Two-Part Invention, 8 p.m., Cain Park, superior and Lee roads in Cleveland Heights.

June 23 -- Steve Miller Band, evening, Jacobs Pavilion in Flats.

June 23 -- Hawks and Wolves, evening, Kent Stage, E. Main St.

June 24 -- Phish, 7 p.m., Blossom Center in Cuyahoga Falls.

June 24 -- Reel Big Fish, Goldfinger, Bodeans, evening, House of Blues in downtown Cleveland.

June 27 -- Kris Kristofferson, evening, Kent Stage, E. Main St.

June 29 -- Rascal Flatts, Eli Young Band, Edens Edge, evening, Blossom Center, Cuyahoga Falls.

June 29 -- Todd Snider and the Burnouts, evening, the Kent Stage, East Main Street in Kent.

June 30 -- Styx, Ted Nugent and REO Speedwagon, evening, Blossom Center, Cuyahoga Falls.

July 1 -- Neil Diamond, 8 p.m., Quicken Loans Arena, Cleveland.

July 3 -- Death Cab for Cutie, evening, Jacobs Pavilion in Flats.

July 5-8 -- Gratefulfest featuring Rusted Root and others, Nelson Ledges Quarry Park, Nelson.

July 5 -- Kent State Communiversity Band, 7, Hometown Plaza, Main and Water streets in Kent.

July 6 -- Fiona Apple, evening, Cain Park in Cleveland Heights.

July 9 -- James Taylor, the Jacobs Pavilion, Flats in Cleveland.

July 11 -- Van's Warped Tour, noon, the Blossom Music Center.

July 12 -- Brass Band of the Western Reserve, 7, Hometown Plaza, Main-Water sts. in Kent.

July 19 -- Mary Chapin Carpenter, evening, the Kent Stage in Kent.

July 21 -- Mitch Ryder, evening, the Kent Stage on East Main St.

July 22 -- Josh Ritter, evening, Kent Stage on East Main Street.

July 27 -- Kris Kristofferson, evening, the Kent Stage, East Main St.

July 27-29 -- Buckethead and Ekoostik Hookah, Nelson Ledges Quarry Park, Nelson Township.

July 29 -- Kenny Chesney/Tim McGraw concert, 4:30, Cleveland Browns Stadium, the lakefront.

Aug. 3 -- Twilight at the Zoo music festival, 7 p.m.-midnight, Cleve. Metroparks Zoo, SW side.

Aug. 3-5 -- Summer dance, Nelson Ledges Quarry Park in Nelson Twp.

Sept. 8 -- Sheryl Crow, Los Lonely Boys, 6-11 p.m., Dix Stadium at Kent State U.

THEATRICAL EVENTS

Now-July 1 -- "Avenue Q," Cain Park in Cleveland Heights.

Now-July 8 -- "Sondheim on Sonheim" by Great Lakes Theater, the Hanna Theater in Cleveland.

Now-June 24, 26-30 -- "Damn Yankees," 8 p.m. except 2 p.m. June 24, Porthouse Theater at Blossom Music Center.

Now-July 8 -- "The Drowsy Chaperone," Weathervane Playhouse in north Akron.

June 30 -- "Sleeping Beauty" by the Ohio Dance Theater, 2 p.m., the Elyria Performing Arts Center.

July 27-Aug. 19 -- "One Night with Janis Joplin," Allen Theater, Playhouse Square in Cleveland.

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

Currently -- "To the Arctic" and "Flying Monsters," Omnimax Theater at the Great Lakes Science Center on the lakefront off East 9th Street.

Currently -- "Frogs," the Great Lakes Science Center off E. 9th.

Currently -- "On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life," "A Day at the Beach," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques" and "Collectors and Collecting," the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State on East Main St.

Currently -- Exhibits include "Domare: The Art and History of Italian Stone Carving in Northeast Ohio," "Through the Lens: The Photography of Allen E. Cole" and "Kidzbits Family Education Center" and "Designing an Icon: Creativity & the American Automobile," (Crawford Auto Museum is under renovation), the Western Reserve Historical Society museum, University Circle off Euclid Avenue on the far east side of Cleveland.

Currently -- "The Works of Rev. Howard Finster," "Ray Turner: Population," "String of Hearts: Photographs by Bea Nettles," Akron Museum of Art in downtown area.

Currently -- "Mythic Creatures: Dragons, Unicorns & Mermaids," Cleveland Museum of Natural History on University Circle off Euclid Avenue, far east side Cleveland.

Currently -- "Modern Gothic: The Etchings of John Taylor Arms" (starts June 9), "Youth and Beauty: Art of the American Twenties" (starts July 1), Cleveland Museum of Art, East Blvd. in Univ. Circle.

Currently -- Butterflies of North America exhibit, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, Akron.

June 23-24 -- German Family Society's Old European Days and Bierfest, 4 p.m.-midnight Saturday, 2-8 p.m. Sunday, Ranfield Road in Brimfield Township.

June 24 -- Knee-High Naturalists program for children, noon-4 p.m., Cleveland Metroparks' South Chagrin Reservation, Bentleyville.

June 30 -- Waterloo Arts Festival, noon-7, east side of Cleveland.

July 14 -- Rubber City Rollergirls, 6 p.m., John S. Knight Center, Akron.

July 15 -- The 89th annual Cesky Den, 11 a.m. to dusk, DTJ Farm, Auburn Twp. (Geauga County).

Aug. 4-5 -- Annual Twins Days, various locations in city of Twinsburg.

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News Headline: Ohio Cub pilots were never really lost (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: AOPA Pilot - Online
Contact Name: Mike Collins
News OCR Text: Welcome to AOPA's new website. Please refresh your browser. For the best experience, view the website in Firefox or Chrome, or in Internet Explorer 8 or higher.

The flight log documenting stops at airports in 88 Ohio counties.

Two Ohio pilots have completed a journey that included landing in each of the state's 88 counties—a trip they made in their 1946 Piper J-3 Cubs. The quest of Joe Murray, an assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University, and retired physician Ron Siwik has been documented on a website, Lost in Oscar Hotel.

Murray, who plans to write a book about flying in Ohio, said he woke up one day last November and realized that he couldn't do that without seeing as much of the state as possible from the air. After talking with his students, he thought the flight might inspire contributions to a scholarship. Murray's students also helped to document portions of the flight.

Their plans coincided with the anniversary of the Piper Cub, which first flew 75 years ago. “I'd do this every year if I could,” Murray said after the two returned to their home field, Portage County Airport in Ravenna. “The weather made it really enjoyable.”

“It was like a high pressure system just parked over us,” Siwik added. The pair had only one weather delay during the trip. Siwik said he invited himself along on the trip about two or three months after Murray began planning for it, although adventures are nothing new to him—in 2008, he flew his Bonanza on a 24,604-mile solo flight around the world. Siwik also owns and regularly flies a Pitts S-1 and a helicopter in addition to his Cub and the Bonanza.

Aircraft fabric signed by well-wishers from airports across Ohio.

After nine days of flying, the pilots and their Cubs arrived at Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport on May 22 to an “amazing” reception, orchestrated by Wright B Flyer Inc. and FBO Commander-Aero. But their mission was not complete—the airport in Newark had been closed for a runway-resurfacing project, so they had not yet landed in Licking County.

Murray and Siwik had planned a journey of 1,670 miles that would take 26 hours of flight time, over about a two-week period. On their way back to Ravenna, however, they detoured back to Newark—the public airport was still closed, but they were able to land on a private airfield, Buckeye Airport in nearby Hebron. Including that detour, the trip ended up covering 1,809 miles over 36 hours and six minutes of flight time.

Of the 88 airports they visited, Murray said he had only been to “a handful,” while Siwik estimated that he'd been to about a third of them. Murray quipped that he got to the point that he wanted to land someplace that Siwik had never landed, or did not know anyone. “I tease him about that, but that's one of the things about flying that I love,” Murray said. “Everybody's connected.” And Murray got to meet the man who last overhauled the engine of his Cub. “He came out and said, ‘That's one of my babies.'”

It's hard for Murray to pick the most memorable moment of the trip. “I liked landing at [Neil] Armstrong [Airport], and I liked Checkpoint Charlie. But we had trouble contacting the owner for permission.” The private airfield in Lowell got its name from Air National Guard C-130 pilots who would call in as they passed over the strip. Finally, Siwik called the county sheriff, who provided a phone number for the son of owner Charlie Pickering. When Chip Pickering answered, he said he was at the airport and offered to mow the grass for their arrival.

“To me the most memorable thing was the constant welcome—the unrelenting enthusiasm at every stop,” Siwik noted. “It was obvious to everybody that this was the thing to do.”

Murray's brother, Mike, managed their flight log and real-time flight tracking online. “I never imagined people would be watching it like television,” he said.

“I think the reason we had so much attention was the tracking,” Siwik added. “It gave people a lead time and a confirmation of the arrival.”

Murray said that at the end of the trip, his arm was sore—not from crosswind landings in the Cub, but from shaking so many hands at the airports they visited. “We're going to be writing thank-yous for many months—people were so good to us,” he said.

Since surviving a brush with a tornado at the Sun ‘n Fun Fly-in last year, the perfectly restored Tornado Husky has flown to the Rocky Mountains, crossed the Great Plains, toured the majestic Chesapeake Bay and dropped in on the rugged Maine coast. The aerial adventures awaiting the winner of this tremendously versatile and frisky young Husky are limitless!

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News Headline: Youngstown News,Today | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: Thu, June 21, 2012 @ 12:00 a.m.

Today

Fairs, Festivals

Cortland Lions Street Fair, 6 p.m., West Main Street, downtown Cortland.

St. Charles Parish Festival, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., St. Charles Church, 7345 Westview Drive, Boardman; 330-758-2325.

Outdoor Music

Jack Vasko & Company, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Boardman Park, 375 Boardman-Poland Road, Boardman; 330-726-8105.

Jim Frank Trio, 7 p.m., Shepherd of the Valley, 1500 McKinley Ave., Niles; 330-544-0771.

Teez, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., McKinley Memorial Library, 40 N. Main St., Niles; 330-652-1704.

The Rocco Monaco Orchrestra, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Mauthe Park, 156 Smithfield St., Struthers; 330-755-7977.

UHF, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Warren Community Amphitheater, 303 Mahoning Ave., Warren; 330-922-8399.

Friday

Dances

Eddie & the Edsels, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., Kuzman's, 1025 S. State St,, Girard; 330-545-8995.

Fairs, Festivals

Cortland Lions Street Fair, 6 p.m., West Main Street, downtown Cortland.

St. Charles Parish Festival, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., St. Charles Church, 7345 Westview Drive, Boardman; 330-758-2325.

music

Outdoor Christian concert, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., Second Chance Outreach Ministry, 1747 S. Raccoon Road, Austintown; 330-301-6501.

Red, White and Blue Concert, 8 p.m., Main Street Theater, 5 N. Main St., Columbiana; 330-482-9647.

Onstage

“Drowsy Chaperone,” 7 p.m., by Stage Left Players, Trinity Playhouse, 234 E. Lincoln Way, Lisbon; 330-831-7249.

“Last Summer at Bluefish Cove,” 8 p.m., The Oakland Center for the Arts, 220 W. Boardman St., Youngstown; 330-746-0404.

“Princess and the Pea” and magic show, 7 p.m., Kent State University Trumbull Campus, 4314 Mahoning Ave. NW, Warren; 330-847-0571.

“Ship of Dreams,SDRq 6 p.m., First United Methodist Church-Sharon, 237 W. Silver St., Sharon, Pa.; 724-983-0200.

“The Lion in Winter,” 7:30 p.m., Victorian Players Theater, 702 Mahoning Ave., Youngstown; 330-746-5455.

“The Reunion” and “The Way to the Corn Roast,SDRq 8 p.m., Rust Belt Theater, Calvin Center, 755 Mahoning Ave., Youngstown; 330-398-6659.

“Lend Me A Tenor,” 7:30 p.m., The Youngstown Playhouse, Glenwood Avenue, Youngstown; 330-788-8739.

Outdoor Music

Backwoods Bluegrass Band with Mercer Community Band, 6 p.m., Mercer County Courthouse Square, 103 North Diamond Street, Mercer, Pa.; 724-662-3800.

Dennis Drummond Group, noon to 1 p.m., Courthouse Park, Courthouse Square, Warren.

French Blue, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Churchill Park, Belmont Avenue, Liberty.

Good Old Boys, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Riverwalk Amphitheater, East Washington and East St., New Castle, Pa.; 724-654-8408.

Party on the Plaza with The Houseband and Triple Threat, 8 p.m., Buffalo Wild Wings, 50 Federal Plaza, Youngstown; 330-744-2999.

Shania Live! tribute band, 6 p.m., Warren Community Amphitheatre, 303 Mahoning Ave., Warren; 330-922-8399.

Saturday

Comedy

Kirk Bogos, 9 p.m., Funny Farm Comedy Club in Quality Inn, 4055 Belmont Ave., Liberty; 330-759-4242.

Dance

Contemporary ballet by Ruth's Dance and Fitness, 7 p.m., Canfield High Auditorium, Canfield; 330-782-6785.

Dances

Del Sinchak, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., Kuzman's, 1025 S. State St., Girard; 330-545-8995.

Fairs, Festivals

Cortland Lions Street Fair, 1 p.m., West Main Street, downtown Cortland.

New Castle Italian Festival, 10 a.m., Cascade Park Pavilion, East Washington Street, New Castle, Pa.; 888-284-7599.

St. Charles Parish Festival, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., St. Charles Church, 7345 Westview Drive, Boardman; 330-758-2325.

St. Ambrose Parish Festival, 6 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 10692 Freedom St., Garrettsville.

Music

Red, White and Blue Concert, 8 p.m., Main Street Theater, 5 N. Main St., Columbiana; 330-482-9647.

Onstage

“Drowsy Chaperone,SDRq 7 p.m., by Stage Left Players, Trinity Playhouse, 234 E. Lincoln Way, Lisbon; 330-831-7249.

“Last Summer at Blue-fish Cove,SDRq 8 p.m., The Oakland Center for the Arts, 220 W. Boardman St., Youngstown; 330-746-0404.

“The Lion in Winter,” 7:30 p.m., Victorian Players Theater, 702 Mahoning Ave., Youngstown; 330-746-5455.

“The Reunion” and “The Way to the Corn Roast,” 8 p.m., Rust Belt Theater, inside Calvin Center, 755 Mahoning Ave., Youngstown; 330-398-6659.

“Lend Me A Tenor,SDRq 7:30 p.m., The Youngstown Playhouse, Glenwood Avenue, Youngstown; 330-788-8739.

Pop, Rock, Jazz

Phish, 7 p.m., First Niagara Pavilion, 665 Route 18, Burgettstown, Pa.; 800-745-3000.

Sales Shows

Lake Milton Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to noon, Lake Milton State Park/Amphitheater, Craig Beach.

Mahoning County Saddle- horse show, Canfield Fairgrounds, 7265 Columbiana-Canfield Road, Canfield; 330-533-4107.

Mahoning Valley Rose Society Show, noon to 5 p.m., Fellows Riverside Gardens, 123 McKinley Ave., Youngstown; 330-797-4055.

Sunday

Dances

Dance party with DJ Ron Chick, 6 p.m., Stambaugh Auditorium, 1000 Fifth Ave., Youngstown; 330-980-8929.

Fairs, Festivals

New Castle Italian Festival, 10 a.m., Cascade Park Pavilion, East Washington Street, New Castle, Pa.; 888-284-7599.

St. Charles Parish Festival, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., St. Charles Church, 7345 Westview Drive, Boardman; 330-758-2325.

St. Ambrose Parish Festival, 6 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 10692 Freedom St., Garrettsville.

Music

Red, White and Blue Concert, 8 p.m., Main Street Theater, 5 N. Main St., Columbiana; 330-482-9647.

Onstage

“Drowsy Chaperone,SDRq 2 p.m., by Stage Left Players, Trinity Playhouse, 234 E. Lincoln Way, Lisbon; 330-831-7249.

“The Lion in Winter,” 2 p.m., Victorian Players Theater, 702 Mahoning Ave., Youngstown; 330-746-5455.

“Lend Me A Tenor,SDRq 2:30 p.m., The Youngstown Playhouse, Glenwood Avenue, Youngstown; 330-788-8739.

Outdoor Music

Loren Coler, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Firestone Park, 347 E. Park Ave, Columbiana; 330-482-2656.

John Ruman Combo, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Tod Park, Lawrence Avenue, Girard; 330-545-4625.

Rocco Monaco Band, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Harding Park, 249 Roosevelt Drive, Hubbard; 330-534-3098.

The Sensations, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Waterworth Memorial Park, 866 Sunset Blvd., Salem.

W.D. Packard Concert Band, 7 p.m., South Lawn, W.D. Packard Music Hall, 1703 Mahoning Ave. NW, Warren; 330-399-4885.

Youngstown Area Community Concert Band, 6 p.m., Buhl Farm Park, 730 Forker Blvd., Sharon, Pa.; 724-981-5522.

Pop, Rock, Jazz

Phish, 7 p.m., Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cleveland; 800-745-3000.

Sales, Shows

Senior citizen art show reception, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Davis Family YMCA, 45 McClurg Road, Boardman; 330-480-5656.

Mahoning County Saddlehorse show, , Canfield Fairgrounds , 7265 Columbiana Canfield Road, Canfield; 330-533-4107.

Mahoning Valley Rose Society Show), 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fellows Riverside Gardens, 123 McKinley Ave., Youngstown; 330-740-7116.

Monday

Dances

Happy Feet, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Weathersfield Fire Station 40, 2229 Garden-land Ave. SE, Niles.

Music

Niki Slaven and Tyler Stouffer, 6:30 p.m., Leetonia Community Library, 24 Walnut St, Leetonia; 330-427-6635.

Onstage

“Princess and the Pea,SDRq 10:30 a.m., Kent State University Trumbull Campus, 4314 Mahoning Ave., NW, Warren; 330-847-0571.

Outdoor Music

Frank Gallo Band, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Poland Village Town Hall, 308 S. Main St, Poland; 330-757-2112.

Tuesday

Onstage

“Princess and the Pea,” 10:30 a.m., Kent State University Trumbull Campus, 4314 Mahoning Ave., NW, Warren; 330-847-0571.

Outdoor Music

Everyday America (Sugarland tribute band), 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Austintown Township Park, 6000 Kirk Road, Austintown; 330-793-0718.

Wednesday

Dances

DJ Carl Severino, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., Kuzman's, 1025 S. State St,, Girard; 330-545-8995.

Onstage

“Princess and the Pea,” 10:30 a.m., Kent State University Trumbull Campus, 4314 Mahoning Ave., NW, Warren; 330-847-0571.

Outdoor Music

Guys Without Ties, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Woodworth Park, Luther Avenue between Market St. and Southern Blvd., North Lima; 330-549-9552.

John Lapinski and Friends, 7 p.m., The Commons at Greenbriar, 8060 South Ave., Boardman; 330-758-8855.

Nick Fiasco (sounds of Frank Sinatra), 6 p.m., Buhl Farm Park, 730 Forker Blvd., Sharon, Pa.; 724-981-5522.

Quaker City Legion Band, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Waterworth Memorial Park, 866 Sunset Blvd., Salem;

Hoss and the Juggernauts, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Wick Recreation Area, McCollum Road, Mill Creek Metroparks, Youngstown.

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News Headline: Briefs | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tech - Online
Contact Name: Ritual Marks Kent State Shooting
News OCR Text: The Washington Post

KENT, Ohio

By now, 25 years after the event, the rituals that commemorate the terrible 13 seconds are well established.

They began late Wednesday night when about 1,000 people holding candles gathered on the Commons of the Kent State University.

There the candlelight vigil continued until 12:24 p.m. Thursday. Then the "Victory Bell" in the Commons was rung again to recall the 13 seconds of gunfire from a phalanx of Ohio National Guard troops on a ridge overlooking the parking lot, four students shot dead - William Schroeder Jr., Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller and Sandra Scheuer - and nine others wounded.

Thursday, the students of the 1990s sprawled on the steep slope of Blanket Hill. The Victory Bell tolled 15 times, once for each of the Kent State casualties and for two Jackson State University students who were killed at a protest 11 days later in Mississippi.

The prelude to the killings was the invasion of Cambodia, ordered by Richard Nixon. Student protests erupted on various campuses. On May 2, the Kent State ROTC building was destroyed by fire.

Ohio Gov. James A. Rhodes (R) ordered the National Guard to the campus. On May 4, in a haze of tear gas fired to disperse an anti-war rally, Guardsmen on the right flank suddenly wheeled, aimed and fired. More than 60 shots were fired in the direction of students.

GOP Senators Disagree on Foster

Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON

Prospects for confirmation of surgeon general nominee Dr. Henry W. Foster continued to appear uncertain Thursday, as leading Republican senators disagreed over whether the issue should be put to the full Senate.

Sen. Nancy Kassebaum, R-Kan. - who heads the committee considering the nomination - said she believes he deserves full consideration by the Senate. But Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, R-Kan., indicated he would not budge from his threat to keep it from a vote.

Kassebaum, chairwoman of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, predicted the nomination would survive the committee, but acknowledged that Foster's Senate opponents could tangle up the nomination for months.

Dole indicated Thursday in a letter to Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle, D-S.D., that he had not changed his mind about preventing a vote.

The panel, which is dominated 9-7 by Republicans, is expected to vote within several weeks. It could send the nomination to the floor with a favorable recommendation, with an unfavorable recommendation or with no recommendation, or it could send the nomination back to President Clinton, in effect killing it.

Simpson Team Says Blood Tainted

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES

Turning to the central accusation in the O.J. Simpson legal team's police-conspiracy theory, a defense lawyer attempted Thursday to show that enough of Simpson's blood sample is missing to have allowed officers to taint evidence in the case.

At the same time, the attorney accused Gregory Matheson, an assistant director and chief forensic chemist at the Los Angeles Police Department's crime lab, of misreading test results that could point to another suspect in the June 1994 murders.

After reviewing LAPD records and acknowledging that a Police Department nurse said he drew about 8 milliliters of Simpson's blood on the day after the murders, Matheson said the records do not account for what happened to about 1.5 milliliters.

If blood was used to taint swatches and someone substituted them for the ones collected at the scene of the crimes and other locations, it would compromise any later DNA test results. Matheson said Simpson Lawyer Robert Blasier's computations exaggerated the amount of blood that cannot be accounted for because they did not track blood lost when it is transferred from one vial to another.

Prosecutors also intend to rebut the defense's allegation of tainted evidence by presenting results of other tests that they say will show that the test tube of Simpson's blood could not be the source of stains sent to the laboratories.

Senate Blocks Lawsuit Bill

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON

A rebellious Senate Thursday blocked passage of legislation to limit punitive damages in all civil lawsuits, dealing a stunning blow to Republican efforts to overhaul the nation's civil litigation system.

Republicans vowed to salvage some of the bill but conceded they may have to settle for curbs on product-liability awards, as proposed before they expanded the legislation to cover civil litigation.

In a defeat for Majority Leader Robert J. Dole, R-Kan., Republicans fell 14 votes short of the 60 needed to cut debate on the measure and force a vote on final passage. They failed even to get a majority, losing by votes of 46-53 and 47-52 in back-to-back rollcalls.

As originally introduced, the bill, cosponsored by Sens. Slade Gorton, R-Wash., and John D. Rockefeller IV, D-W.Va., proposed only to limit punitive damages in cases against manufacturers of faulty and dangerous products, a goal pursued by many lawmakers over the past decade.

But it was broadened in several ways during two weeks of debate, including approval Wednesday of a proposal by Dole to limit punitive damages in all civil cases to twice the level of other awards, including lost wages, medical bills and pain-and-suffering.

Orange County Is Ground Zero Of Privatization Craze

Los Angeles Times

SANTA ANA, Calif.

Seeing green in Orange County's river of red ink, home-grown entrepreneurs and some of the nation's largest enterprises aim to provide home care for the elderly, defend impoverished defendants in court, and care for those locked up in jail. Some seek to buy county departments whole, including those that issue building permits and oversee redevelopment.

Orange County is ground zero of a national privatization craze.

Government agencies have toyed for years with the idea of selling off assets and farming out services to private business. But Orange County - desperate for cash after last year's collapse of its investment fund, distrustful of government, and deferential toward business - may well turn out to be the United States' most willing guinea pig.

Having slashed its operating budget by nearly half, adopted plans to lay off 11 percent of its work force and reduced the salaries of its highest-paid employees, the county is considering every offer, no matter how impractical or far-fetched it seems.

Political leaders can scarcely see the bottom of the black hole left by the December failure of the county's investment pool. With $1.7 billion in losses spread among cities, schools, special government districts and the county itself, privatization and asset sales are viewed by officials as critical ingredients in an odd stew of possible solutions.

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News Headline: Birds-eye video shows 100 years of Kent State and downtown Kent growth in 3 minutes | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio.com > News >

Birds-eye video shows 100 years of Kent State and downtown Kent growth in 3 minutes

By Paula Schleis

Beacon Journal staff writer

Published: June 22, 2012 - 01:01 AM

Birds-eye video shows 100 years of Kent State and downtown Kent growth in 3 minutes June 22,2012 05:01 AM GMT

Paula Schleis

Beacon Journal Publishing Co.

A virtual 3-D video making the rounds in Kent shows how the massive Kent State University campus grew from open farmland and how current downtown construction is tying the business district to the campus.

In just three minutes, the story of a century unfolds as an aerial camera flies over the town, witnessing the rise of some 70 structures, from Lowry and Merrill halls in 1913 to three entire blocks under construction in the city center.

The purpose of the video is to help people visualize how far the campus has come in anticipation of a planned $170 million makeover, said Michael Bruder, director of design and construction at the KSU architect's office.

"We added 30 seconds more on downtown redevelopment so people can see how the campus is being tied in downtown," he said.

The video was created by Columbus-based Glavan ImageWorks, which spent two months on the project, Vice President Alana Thompson said.

While software, including 3D Studio Max, helped pull the project together in the end, it took a lot of footwork to collect all the information to feed into the program, she said.

Every building on campus and downtown had to be photographed from several angles so all sides are visible as the ever-moving aerial flies over Kent.

A Google Earth image of the campus and downtown provided the template for the video, but modern buildings and roads were removed and replaced with an early 20th century view of trees, fields and Model T's on the roads.

As the video advances, a cursor moves steadily along a timeline as each building is born.

Glavan ImageWorks is the sister company to Glavan Feher Architects, the architects for the new Kent State University hotel and conference center and the mixed-use business and retail center under construction, Thompson noted. "And the owner of both companies, Jeff Glavan, is a graduate of Kent State, so we're tied in on many levels."

Bruder said no decision has been made, but KSU might update the video to reflect the school's coming building boom.

To see the video, visit YouTube.com and search for "kent ksu progress."

Paula Schleis can be reached at 330-996-3741 or pschleis@thebeaconjournal.com . Follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/paulaschleis .

Click here to read or leave a comment on this story.

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News Headline: Police Bust Prostitutes at Rutgers University Party (Peach) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tech - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: university wire

Four individuals - including at least one Rutgers College student - and two guests were arrested early Sunday morning in connection with a party where police allege prostitution services were made available and alcohol was sold illegally.

Police charged Gregory Wilson Jr., 29, with promoting prostitution and maintaining a nuisance. Wilson's three roommates - Obinna Linton, 23, Rutgers College senior Ryan Brown, 22, and Bryan Kahn, 19 - were charged with maintaining a nuisance and illegal sales of alcohol. Wilson was released on $2,500 bail, and Linton and Brown were released on their own recognizance.

In addition, police charged Tiffany Rhodes, 23, and Aqueelah Howard, 21, with prostitution. Rhodes was given an additional charge of possession of marijuana under 50 grams.

Lt. Les Levine of the New Brunswick Police Department said police were prompted to stake out the three-story home after they received fliers advertising a pay-at-the-door party with lap dancing, "special VIP rooms" and "very tight security."

The fliers also included such slogans as "cum in peace."

"Based on the information we received and the fact that they were charging a charge, and the sexual overtones of the flier, we set up surveillance," he said.

In an interview with The Daily Targum, Wilson said the incident was all because of a misunderstanding.

"I don't even think much about it," he said.

He said he intends to argue in court that the police could not come into his home because they did not have a warrant.

Levine said over the course of a three-hour surveillance Saturday night, police observed nearly 100 people paying for admission to the house.

"Several people were milling in and around the area," he said. "There were several local residents with whom we were familiar and for the most part what we assumed to be college kids."

He said police entered the home at about 12:15 a.m. Sunday, where they observed between 150 and 175 patrons, about 95 percent of whom were male, and a strong smell of marijuana."

"People started scurrying around and running out the front door," Levine said. "We spoke to the people who actually lived in the house."

Levine said police discovered the residents of the home had been running a raffle in which the winner would have sex with Howard or Rhodes.

He said police found Howard and Rhodes on the second floor of the house half-dressed. In a second-floor bedroom, Levine said police found condoms, a bed and two chairs officers believe were used for lap dancing.

[Daily Targum, Oct. 6]

Va. Tech students abduct stripper

Police arrested and charged a Virginia Tech student and member of the Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity with abducting an exotic dancer and her escort.

Ryan Worch, a senior accounting major, allegedly held 18-year-old Mischelle Russell, an exotic dancer who works for the Always Amber Escort Service in Roanoke and David Cheresnovsky, her guard, against their will late on the night of Sept. 19 to early in the morning of Sept. 20, according to the Blacksburg Police Department.

The fraternity called the service and requested an exotic dancer, identifying themselves as professors at Virginia Tech having a bachelor party, said Larry Hincker, the associate vice president of university relations at Virginia Tech, referring to a statement Russell made about the incident.

Hincker said Russell went to the fraternity and performed. Afterward, some members of the fraternity asked her to come dance in a private room.

They then asked her to perform a strip act and when Russell refused they held her and Cheresnovsky against their will.

[The Collegiate Times, Oct. 7]

Kent State protests hate speech

A Student Anti-Racist Action and Lesbian Gay Bisexual Union rally began Tuesday morning with chants of "drop the charges," escalated into verbal attacks on Kent State administrators and police and ended peacefully with a march to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

The rally, organized in protest to assault and disorderly conduct charges against student Ben Brucato and graduate Chris Stringer, also focused on the difference between free speech and harassment.

The charges stem from an incident which occurred in the Student Center Plaza Sept. 29 when Brucato's nose was broken in a fight with traveling preacher Charles Spingola.

Spingola was led away from the plaza in handcuffs but was released later. Kent State police said Brucato and Stringer provoked Spingola.

Protesters at the Student Center Plaza rally said Spingola harassed and belittled students several times and the university did nothing to stop his abuse.

Brucato, speaking to observers with a microphone, said Spingola was only on campus to spread hate and violence with his speech.

"The kind of speech this guy was spreading was about devaluing life," Brucato said.

Brucato said Spingola's words and actions forced him to defend himself.

"This university, this police department, is charging students for defending themselves," Brucato said. "I get assaulted by this preacher and end up getting arrested for assault."

Brucato said Spingola violated university policy on harassment, but no one chose to remove him from campus.

Sheryl Smith, director of the Office of Campus Life, said she felt the administration was responsive to the students' concerns.

"I continue to feel that we are not ignoring their concerns," Smith said. "But we also have a responsibility to protect free speech on campus."

Brucato said Kent State police ignored the facts of the case because of their own personal feelings and bigotry.

Kent State Police Chief John Peach said the police charged Brucato and Stringer based on witness accounts and a videotape of the incident.

"We have to go where the investigative facts take us," Peach said. "They are not privy to the facts and information we have.

We can't expect them to understand everything."

Marjorie Tyson, a freshman pre-education major, said she was behind Brucato.

"I support Ben because the issue here is more of a hate speech issue," Tyson said.

"I think he was protecting himself, and he stands for the protection of other students."

Brucato said hundreds of students signed a petition that circulated the crowd asking for the charges to be dropped and for the university to recognize Spingola's offenses.

"I think that a lot of students support this," Brucato said.

One student, Brian Shura, approached the protesters and took the microphone. Shura, a senior information systems major, said he felt Brucato got what he deserved, and the students had harassed Spingola too.

"The preacher had the right to be here and the students were harassing him a lot," Shura said. "I saw a lot of hate on both sides."

Shura's statement was met by applause from some observers, and several people congratulated him.

Junior John Hartman said he felt the students were in the wrong during the Sept. 29 confrontation.

"Even though they didn't like what he was saying, he had a right to speak," Hartman said.

"They had a right to protest, but they didn't have a right to violate his space."

Molly Merryman, director of the Women's Resource Center, said she supports the students who protested.

"The problem with this is that the university hasn't yet brought charges against the preacher, but they have used it against the students," Merryman said.

She said the Women's Resource Center has received over 40 letters from parents, students and faculty protesting Spingola's presence on campus.

"It is not an appropriate thing to allow at a university," Merryman said.

In a statement issued before Tuesday's protest, Nancy Scott, vice president and dean of Enrollment Management and Student Affairs, said: "As we carefully examine the incidents that have taken place on our campus over the past several weeks, we are struggling with two very difficult issues. Specifically, how to protect the rights of free speech, while considering the rights and privileges of the students, faculty and staff who make up our university community.

"These are difficult issues that require us to examine our levels of tolerance and respect."

"While we do not yet have the answers to these difficult issues, we want to ensure all students that their concerns are not being ignored. We are committed to maintaining a thoughtful dialogue on free speech, hate speech and harassment, and we will continue to address the application of policies and opportunities for educational dialogue."

Brucato ended the rally with a request for students to follow him to the Office of Judicial Affairs, where he was scheduled to be advised of the university charges against him.

[Daily Kent Stater, Oct. 8]

Virginia Tech student wields knife

A disgruntled student threatened desk attendants with a knife at the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid Wednesday afternoon, making this the third knife incident in the area in five days.

The student was upset about his credit hours having been blocked due to his financial aid inadequacy, according to Virginia Tech police.

At approximately 4:30 p.m. yesterday, bicycle police officer Jeremy Williams of the Tech police department arrived at Burruss Hall to find the suspect in a chair with a closed knife in his hand.

Williams approached the student and forcefully removed the knife. Several minutes later, assisting officers arrived on the scene.

A second knife incident occurred Tuesday evening in downtown Blacksburg.

Ross Norton, 29, of Abingdon, Va., was taken into custody outside of Bollo's coffee house after he exposed what Eric Famisan, a Bollo's employee who served Norton, described to be a 3-inch Swiss army knife the suspect held behind his back.

Famisan said Norton began to create a scene when he was asked to pay the $2.39 for his beverage.

When Norton attempted to pay for the drink with a $1 bill, Famison said he told him it wasn't enough. With a $5 bill clearly in sight, Famison said Norton then tried to pay with a $100 and got upset when Famison said the store would be unable to make change.

Norton finally paid for the drink, but not before he said, according to Famison, "I'm an American, I can choose to spend my money any way I want."

Famison said Norton then pulled the knife from his pocket and flashed the weapon at his side.

Norton was arrested by the Blacksburg police on accounts of drunk in public, obstruction, larceny and assault.

Police arrested Norton for larceny when they found a stolen camera in his pocket, and on assault charges when he spit in a police officer's face.

Norton was held on a $7,000 bond in Christiansburg at the Montgomery County Jail.

[The Collegiate Times, Oct. 8]

Alcohol banned in Pitt dorms

As part of an effort to decrease alcohol consumption on campus, a Pittsburgh University committee has designated three residence halls as alcohol-free and has begun to offer awards to students who avoid alcohol abuse.

Towers A and B and Amos Hall have been designated as alcohol- free residential quarters, according to Dr. Steve Sivulich, chairman of the Residential Living Committee.

"(That means) that no one, even if they are 21, can bring alcoholic beverages into them," he said.

While Sivulich said he doesn't think there is a particular problem with alcohol abuse on Pitt's campus, he said the University is trying to prevent problems from arising in the future.

Pitt's urban location enables students to drink in local bars rather than on campus. Supermarkets and convenience stores do not sell alcoholic beverages, making it more difficult to obtain liquor to bring onto campus.

Part of the residential living committee's objective is to increase the number and variety of activities for resident students. Sivulich said the committee will concentrate on activities promoting a residential life free from disturbances associated with drinking, such as noise, vandalism and physical altercations.

Freshman Alex Gill, who lives in Tower B, supports the alcohol-free designation.

"There are mostly freshmen and sophomores living in the towers, and none of us are of drinking age," Gill said. "I enjoy my quiet time. If they want to, (other students) can go off campus to drink."

Freshman Mathew Hoffan agreed.

"Designating the towers as alcohol-free is fine with me," he said.

However, the new rule was not met with acceptance by all students.

"These Towers are supposed to be our homes," said Jay Reichenbacher. "Having restrictions placed on you plus� having no choice in the matter is not what I call home.

"People cause problems regardless of whether they are drunk or not," he said. "Besides, people come into these Towers with concealed beer cans. Some have them in their backpacks, and others have them wrapped up in something. They get through, drunk or not, and don't cause problems. We don't get searched when we come in, so who knows what you've got."

Freshman Jessica Barber objected to making Towers A and B dry while still permitting alcohol in Tower C.

"Either have it where there's no drinking in the Towers or (make it so) you can drink in all of them, not just certain ones," she said.

As an incentive for students to avoid alcohol abuse, the Residential Living Committee will offer a series of awards to students who refrain from misusing alcohol.

"If students go off campus to drink and come back to the dorms and they can walk and talk and are not banging into the walls and are not falling down, there is no problem," Sivulich said. "But if they come back and can't show their I.D. cards, and they don't know their names and need assistance to their rooms, that's a problem and will preclude them from receiving an award."

Resident directors and assistants, along with other students, nominate individuals who support established programs, display good behavior and refrain from misusing and abusing alcohol. The committee then convenes to select an individual or an entire floor of a residence hall worthy of winning an award.

"We want to give awards and provide incentives as positive reinforcement," said Sivulich.

The Residential Living Committee will reward students who adhere to the following criteria.

� Students cannot have a record of an alcohol violation or misbehavior related to alcohol on or off campus.

� Students must actively participate in and support activities and programs designed to decrease the amount of alcohol on campus. Some of these programs include activities held in residence halls, the University-wide alcohol-free program, Alcohol Awareness Week and the Wellness Fair.

� Students must act as good role models by displaying responsible behavior, mutual respect and leadership capabilities.

An award is also given to a floor that actively participates in and follows the criteria established by the Residential Living Committee.

Awards are donated by organizations that support the University's efforts in curtailing the consumption of alcoholic beverages in residence halls.

� Student Affairs and Residence Life donated 13 $50 gift certificates for the University Book Center.

� Student Affairs contributed three $200 cash awards for individual floors.

� The University Book Center donated a Pitt sweatshirt with the "Alcohol Free@Pitt" logo on it.

� Food Services donated $50 to be used anywhere dining dollars are accepted.

� The Department of Parking and Transportation gave away a month of free parking.

The Residential Living Committee is promoting social activities as an alternative to excessive drinking. Another committee goal is to provide an appropriate and stable living environment for students who are recovering from alcohol dependency.

"People have said to me, �Do you think that the University of Pittsburgh has an alcohol problem?' and I said �No, I don't think the University of Pittsburgh does,'" Sivulich said. "But I think many students attending the University do."

[The Pitt News, Oct. 6]

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News Headline: Doctors try to revive Mubarak (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: National Post
Contact Name: Sara Hussein
News OCR Text: CAIRO - Egypt's Hosni Mubarak remained in a coma on life support Wednesday at a Cairo hospital, sources said, as tension spiked over who will succeed him as president and moves by the ruling military to extend its powers.

The uncertainty over the health of the ousted leader comes amid new political upheaval, with both candidates in a presidential vote claiming victory and the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) granting itself sweeping powers.

Mr. Mubarak "is not clinically dead," said a medical source. "He is in a coma and the doctors are trying to revive him."

"He has been placed on an artificial respirator," the source added, in an account confirmed by a member of Egypt's ruling military council, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

This follows conflicting reports by state media Tuesday the former president had died.

News of Mr. Mubarak's failing health came as Egypt wrapped up a presidential election runoff and faced "the most critical 48 hours in its history," said the state-owned daily newspaper Al-Ahram.

The Muslim Brotherhood said early Monday its candidate, Mohamed Mursi, had won the runoff. On Tuesday it provided what it said were certified copies of ballot tallies to bolster the claims.

But Mr. Mursi's rival Ahmed Shafik, Mr. Mubarak's last prime minister, has also claimed victory. His campaign accuses the Brotherhood of issuing false figures and insists the official results will declare him president.

These were due to be issued Thursday, but late Wednesday the Supreme Elections Commission said it needed more time to look into complaints presented by the candidates.

There have been about 400 election complaints and no new date has been set for the announcement of the result.

Regardless of the result, the new president will not wield the near-absolute authority Mr. Mubarak enjoyed for three decades, after the SCAF issued a constitutional declaration Sunday claiming sweeping powers.

His successor will also inherit a struggling economy, increased insecurity and the challenge of uniting a nation divided by the uprising and its deadly aftermath.

Should Mr. Mursi win, it will be a real test for the Muslim Brotherhood's ability to deal with problems on the ground.

The new dynamics will mean "SCAF will command the national security of Egypt

and leave domestic issues to the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio.

The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamistdominated parliament after the country's constitutional court on Thursday ordered the body dissolved.

It also grants the military council veto power over the drafting of a permanent constitution, angering activists who denounced the declaration and an earlier order giving the army power to arrest civilians, as a "coup."

The Brotherhood also rejected the declaration, insisting parliament retains legislative power and pledging to participate in "popular activities" against it.

Father Raymond J. de Souza, Page A12

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News Headline: Egypt delays poll results, ousted president in coma _ The Express Tribune (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Express Tribune
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Alerts

Egypt delays poll results, ousted president in coma

We will contin­ue examin­ing appeal­s, requir­ing more time before announ­cement of final result­s: Electi­on commis­sion.

By AFP

Published: June 21, 2012

We will continue examining appeals, requiring more time before announcement of final results: Election commission. PHOTO: AFP.

CAIRO: Egypt�s election commission delayed the announcement of presidential results scheduled for Thursday, as tension spiked over who will succeed ousted president Hosni Mubarak, said to be in a coma.

"Egypt's election commission, headed by Judge Faruq Sultan... has decided to delay the announcement of the presidential election run-off," the official MENA news agency said late on Wednesday, without giving a new date.

The news came amid moves by the military to extend its powers.

The run-off election, which took place on June 16 and 17, pitted Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi against Mubarak's last Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq, with both candidates claiming victory.

The election commission said it was looking into appeals from lawyers of both candidates into alleged campaign violations and disputed vote counting.

The commission said it would "continue examining the appeals... which will require more time before the final results are announced."

The announcement came as uncertainty mounted over the health of Mubarak, following a flurry of reports about his condition.

Mubarak "is not clinically dead," a medical source told AFP. "He is in a coma and the doctors are trying to revive him."

"He has been placed on an artificial respirator," the source added, in an account confirmed by a member of Egypt's ruling military council, who spoke to AFP on condition of anonymity.

Egypt's state television carried a ticker item saying Mubarak was in "a coma and is not clinically dead."

State news agency MENA had earlier said the ousted strongman, 84, had been declared clinically dead after suffering a stroke in prison and being transferred to hospital.

News of Mubarak's failing condition came amid a backdrop of legal and political chaos.

The Brotherhood appeared set on a confrontation path with the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) which issued a new constitutional declaration granting itself sweeping powers.

The state-owned daily Al-Ahram summed up the mood, saying Egypt was facing "the most critical 48 hours in its history."

In Washington, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton insisted that the Egyptian military authorities must cede power to the winner of the country's presidential election.

"We think that it is imperative that the military fulfil its promise to the Egyptian people to turn power over to the legitimate winner," Clinton said in a discussion hosted at the State Department.

Some of the actions by the military leadership in past days were "clearly troubling," Clinton said.

Early Monday the Brotherhood said their candidate had won the run-off, and on Tuesday provided what they said were certified copies of ballot tallies to bolster their claims.

But Morsi's rival Shafiq also claimed victory, with his campaign accusing the Brotherhood of issuing false figures.

A group of independent judges - headed by the ex-head of the Judges Union, Zakaria Abdel Aziz - who monitored the voting process, confirmed in a news conference that Morsi had won, according to their tally.

The new president, irrespective of the result, will not wield the near-absolute authority Mubarak enjoyed for three decades, after SCAF issued a constitutional declaration on Sunday claiming wide powers.

Mubarak's successor will also inherit a struggling economy, increased insecurity and the challenge of uniting a nation divided by last year's uprising and its deadly aftermath.

Should Morsi win, it will be a real test for the Brotherhood's ability to deal with problems on the ground.

The new dynamics will mean that "SCAF will command the national security of Egypt and leave domestic issues to the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University.

The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamist-dominated parliament after the country's constitutional court ordered, last week, the body dissolved.

And it grants the military council veto power over the drafting of a permanent constitution, angering activists who denounced the declaration and an earlier order giving the army power to arrest civilians, as a "coup."

The Brotherhood insists the parliament retains legislative power and has pledged to counter the SCAF decisions with "popular activities."

Mubarak was taken to a Cairo prison on June 2, after a court handed down a life sentence against him over his involvement in the deaths of protesters during the 2011 uprising that pushed him from power.

His health deteriorated after the transfer, with doctors defibrillating him twice earlier this month, and reports saying he was suffering from bouts of depression, high blood pressure and shortness of breath.

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News Headline: Doctors try to revive Mubarak; 'In a coma': source; Tensions in Egypt rise as election results delayed (Stacher) | Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: National Post
Contact Name: Hussein, Sara
News OCR Text: CAIRO - Egypt's Hosni Mubarak remained in a coma on life support Wednesday at a Cairo hospital, sources said, as tension spiked over who will succeed him as president and moves by the ruling military to extend its powers.

The uncertainty over the health of the ousted leader comes amid new political upheaval, with both candidates in a presidential vote claiming victory and the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) granting itself sweeping powers.

Mr. Mubarak "is not clinically dead," said a medical source. "He is in a coma and the doctors are trying to revive him.'

"He has been placed on an artificial respirator," the source added, in an account confirmed by a member of Egypt's ruling military council, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

This follows conflicting reports by state media Tuesday the former president had died.

News of Mr. Mubarak's failing health came as Egypt wrapped up a presidential election runoff and faced 'the most critical 48 hours in its history,' said the state-owned daily newspaper Al-Ahram.

The Muslim Brotherhood said early Monday its candidate, Mohamed Mursi, had won the runoff. On Tuesday it provided what it said were certified copies of ballot tallies to bolster the claims.

But Mr. Mursi's rival Ahmed Shafik, Mr. Mubarak's last prime minister, has also claimed victory. His campaign accuses the Brotherhood of issuing false figures and insists the official results will declare him president.

These were due to be issued Thursday, but late Wednesday the Supreme Elections Commission said it needed more time to look into complaints presented by the candidates.

There have been about 400 election complaints and no new date has been set for the announcement of the result.

Regardless of the result, the new president will not wield the near-absolute authority Mr. Mubarak enjoyed for three decades, after the SCAF issued a constitutional declaration Sunday claiming sweeping powers.

His successor will also inherit a struggling economy, increased insecurity and the challenge of uniting a nation divided by the uprising and its deadly aftermath.

Should Mr. Mursi win, it will be a real test for the Muslim Brotherhood's ability to deal with problems on the ground.

The new dynamics will mean "SCAF will command the national security of Egypt

and leave domestic issues to the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative,' said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio.

The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamistdominated parliament after the country's constitutional court on Thursday ordered the body dissolved.

It also grants the military council veto power over the drafting of a permanent constitution, angering activists who denounced the declaration and an earlier order giving the army power to arrest civilians, as a 'coup.'

The Brotherhood also rejected the declaration, insisting parliament retains legislative power and pledging to participate in 'popular activities' against it.

Father Raymond J. de Souza, Page A12

Black & White Photo: Daniel Berehulak, Getty Images / A supporter of Hosni Mubarak holds a poster of the former Egyptian president Wednesday outside of the Maadi Armed Forces Hospital in Cairo.;

Copyright © 2012 Agence France-Presse, with files from The Daily Telegraph

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News Headline: .:Middle East Online::Egypt delays presidential poll results:. (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Middle Easy Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Egypt delays presidential poll results

Election commission is looking into appeals from lawyers of both candidates into alleged campaign violations.

Middle East Online

By Jailan Zayan - CAIRO

No date given for announcing the results

Egypt's election commission delayed the announcement of presidential results scheduled for Thursday, as tension spiked over who will succeed ousted president Hosni Mubarak, said to be in a coma.

"Egypt's election commission, headed by Judge Faruq Sultan... has decided to delay the announcement of the presidential election run-off," the official MENA news agency said late on Wednesday, without giving a new date.

The news came amid moves by the military to extend its powers.

The run-off election, which took place on June 16 and 17, pitted Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi against Mubarak's last prime minister Ahmed Shafiq, with both candidates claiming victory.

The election commission said it was looking into appeals from lawyers of both candidates into alleged campaign violations and disputed vote counting.

The commission said it would "continue examining the appeals... which will require more time before the final results are announced."

The announcement came as uncertainty mounted over the health of Mubarak, following a flurry of reports about his condition.

Mubarak "is not clinically dead," a medical source said. "He is in a coma and the doctors are trying to revive him."

"He has been placed on an artificial respirator," the source added, in an account confirmed by a member of Egypt's ruling military council, who said on condition of anonymity.

Egypt's state television carried a ticker item saying Mubarak was in "a coma and is not clinically dead."

State news agency MENA had earlier said the ousted strongman, 84, had been declared clinically dead after suffering a stroke in prison and being transferred to hospital.

News of Mubarak's failing condition came amid a backdrop of legal and political chaos.

The Brotherhood appeared set on a confrontation path with the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) which issued a new constitutional declaration granting itself sweeping powers.

The state-owned daily Al-Ahram summed up the mood, saying Egypt was facing "the most critical 48 hours in its history."

In Washington, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton insisted that the Egyptian military authorities must cede power to the winner of the country's presidential election.

"We think that it is imperative that the military fulfill its promise to the Egyptian people to turn power over to the legitimate winner," Clinton said in a discussion hosted at the State Department.

Some of the actions by the military leadership in past days were "clearly troubling," Clinton said.

Early Monday the Brotherhood said their candidate had won the run-off, and on Tuesday provided what they said were certified copies of ballot tallies to bolster their claims.

But Morsi's rival Shafiq also claimed victory, with his campaign accusing the Brotherhood of issuing false figures.

A group of independent judges -- headed by the ex-head of the Judges Union, Zakaria Abdel Aziz -- who monitored the voting process confirmed in a news conference that Morsi had won, according to their tally.

The new president, irrespective of the result, will not wield the near-absolute authority Mubarak enjoyed for three decades, after SCAF issued a constitutional declaration on Sunday claiming wide powers.

Mubarak's successor will also inherit a struggling economy, increased insecurity and the challenge of uniting a nation divided by last year's uprising and its deadly aftermath.

Should Mursi win, it will be a real test for the Brotherhood's ability to deal with problems on the ground.

The new dynamics will mean that "SCAF will command the national security of Egypt and leave domestic issues to the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University.

The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamist-dominated parliament after the country's constitutional court ordered, last week, the body dissolved.

And it grants the military council veto power over the drafting of a permanent constitution, angering activists who denounced the declaration and an earlier order giving the army power to arrest civilians, as a "coup."

The Brotherhood insists the parliament retains legislative power and has pledged to counter the SCAF decisions with "popular activities."

Mubarak was taken to a Cairo prison on June 2, after a court handed down a life sentence against him over his involvement in the deaths of protesters during the 2011 uprising that pushed him from power.

His health deteriorated after the transfer, with doctors defibrillating him twice earlier this month, and reports saying he was suffering from bouts of depression, high blood pressure and shortness of breath.

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News Headline: HaveeruOnline - Egypt delays poll results, ousted president in coma (Starcher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Haveeru Daily Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Egypt delays poll results, ousted president in coma

Jun 21, 2012 - 08:18

An Egyptian woman named Tahani holds a poster of ousted president Hosni Mubarak as she stands outside the military hospital where he was transfered after suffering a stroke in prison. PHOTO/ AFP

Egypt's election commission delayed the announcement of presidential results scheduled for Thursday, as tension spiked over who will succeed ailing ousted president Hosni Mubarak after moves by the ruling military to extend powers.

"Egypt's election commission, headed by Judge Faruq Sultan... has decided to delay the announcement of the presidential election run-off," the official MENA news agency said late on Wednesday, without giving a new date.

The run-off, which took place on June 16 and 17 pitted Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi against Mubarak's last prime minister Ahmed Shafiq, with both candidates claiming victory.

The election commission said it was looking into appeals from lawyers of both candidates into alleged campaign violations and disputed vote counting.

The commission said it would "continue examining the appeals... which will require more time before the final results are announced."

The announcement came amid uncertainty over the health of Mubarak, following a flurry of reports about his condition.

Mubarak "is not clinically dead," a medical source told AFP. "He is in a coma and the doctors are trying to revive him."

"He has been placed on an artificial respirator," the source added, in an account confirmed by a member of Egypt's ruling military council, who spoke to AFP on condition of anonymity.

Egypt's state television carried a ticker item saying Mubarak was in "a coma and is not clinically dead."

State news agency MENA had earlier said the ousted strongman, 84, had been declared clinically dead after suffering a stroke in prison and being transferred to hospital.

"Hosni Mubarak is clinically dead," the report said. "Medical sources told MENA his heart had stopped beating and did not respond to defibrillation."

News of Mubarak's failing condition came amid a backdrop of legal and political chaos.

The Brotherhood appeared set on a confrontation path with the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) which which issued a new constitutional declaration granting itself sweeping powers.

The state-owned daily Al-Ahram summed up the mood saying Egypt was facing "the most critical 48 hours in its history."

Early Monday the Brotherhood said their candidate had won the runoff, and on Tuesday provided what they said were certified copies of ballot tallies to bolster their claims.

But Morsi's rival Shafiq also claimed a victory, with his campaign accusing the Brotherhood of issuing false figures.

A group of independent judges -- headed by the ex-head of the Judges Union, Zakaria Abdel Aziz -- who monitored the voting process confirmed in a news conference that Morsi had won, according to their tally.

The new president, irrespective of the result, will not wield the near-absolute authority Mubarak enjoyed for three decades, after SCAF issued a constitutional declaration on Sunday claiming sweeping powers.

Mubarak's successor will also inherit a struggling economy, increased insecurity and the challenge of uniting a nation divided by the uprising and its deadly aftermath.

Should Mursi win, it will be a real test for the Brotherhood's ability to deal with problems on the ground.

The new dynamics will mean that "SCAF will command the national security of Egypt and leave domestic issues to the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University.

The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamist-dominated parliament after the country's constitutional court ordered, last week, the body dissolved.

And it grants the military council veto power over the drafting of a permanent constitution, angering activists who denounced the declaration and an earlier order giving the army power to arrest civilians, as a "coup."

The Brotherhood insists the parliament retains legislative power and has pledged to counter the SCAF decisions with "popular activities."

On Tuesday night, the Brotherhood joined a mass demonstration in Cairo's Tahrir square, which attracted over 15,000 protesters, some celebrating Morsi's win as much as denouncing the military move.

The demonstrators were still in the square as the conflicting details of Mubarak's condition filtered in.

"It's divine retribution," said Saber Amr, a teacher. "God doesn't forgive those who do wrong to their people. God doesn't forgive those who kill innocents."

Nearby, Abdel Mottaleb, a Brotherhood supporter, offered a more conciliatory tone, saying "God will judge him."

Mubarak was taken to a Cairo prison on June 2, after a court handed down a life sentence against him over his involvement in the deaths of protesters during the 2011 uprising that pushed him from power.

His health deteriorated after the transfer, with doctors defibrillating him twice earlier this month, and reports saying he was suffering from bouts of depression, high blood pressure and shortness of breath.

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News Headline: Egypt junta delays results of elections | Kuwait Times (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: www.kuwaittimes.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Follow Us On

Egypt junta delays results of elections

CAIRO: An Egyptian woman chants religious slogans as she holds posters of ousted President Hosni Mubarak outside the Maadi military hospital yesterday where Mubarak was on life support. – AP

CAIRO: Egypt's election commission delayed the announcement of presidential results scheduled for today, as tension spiked over who will succeed ailing ousted president Hosni Mubarak after moves by the ruling military to extend powers. "Egypt's election commission, headed by Judge Faruq Sultan... has decided to delay the announcement of the presidential election run-off," the official MENA news agency said late on Wednesday, without giving a new date. The run-off, which took place on June 16 and 17 pitted Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Mursi against Mubarak's last prime minister Ahmed Shafiq, with both candidates claiming victory.

The election commission said it was looking into appeals from lawyers of both candidates into alleged campaign violations and disputed vote counting. The commission said it would "continue examining the appeals... which will require more time before the final results are announced". The announcement came amid uncertainty over the health of Mubarak, following a flurry of reports about his condition. Mubarak "is not clinically dead," a medical source told AFP. "He is in a coma and the doctors are trying to revive him. He has been placed on an artificial respirator," the source added, in an account confirmed by a member of Egypt's ruling military council, who spoke to AFP on condition of anonymity.

Egypt's state television carried a ticker item saying Mubarak was in "a coma and is not clinically dead". State news agency MENA had earlier said the ousted strongman, 84, had been declared clinically dead after suffering a stroke in prison and being transferred to hospital. "Hosni Mubarak is clinically dead," the report said. "Medical sources told MENA his heart had stopped beating and did not respond to defibrillation."

News of Mubarak's failing condition came amid a backdrop of legal and political chaos. The Brotherhood appeared set on a confrontation path with the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) which which issued a new constitutional declaration granting itself sweeping powers. The state-owned daily Al-Ahram summed up the mood saying Egypt was facing "the most critical 48 hours in its history".

Early Monday the Brotherhood said their candidate had won the runoff, and on Tuesday provided what they said were certified copies of ballot tallies to bolster their claims. But Mursi's rival Shafiq also claimed a victory, with his campaign accusing the Brotherhood of issuing false figures. A group of independent judges _ headed by the ex-head of the Judges Union, Zakaria Abdel Aziz _ who monitored the voting process confirmed in a news conference that Mursi had won, according to their tally.

The new president, irrespective of the result, will not wield the near-absolute authority Mubarak enjoyed for three decades, after SCAF issued a constitutional declaration on Sunday claiming sweeping powers. Mubarak's successor will also inherit a struggling economy, increased insecurity and the challenge of uniting a nation divided by the uprising and its deadly aftermath. Should Mursi win, it will be a real test for the Brotherhood's ability to deal with problems on the ground.

The new dynamics will mean that "SCAF will command the national security of Egypt and leave domestic issues to the president. Any problems and the blame will be shifted to the elected representative," said Joshua Stacher, a political analyst and Egypt expert at Kent State University. The SCAF's document said it would retake legislative powers from the Islamist-dominated parliament after the country's constitutional court ordered, last week, the body dissolved. And it grants the military council veto power over the drafting of a permanent constitution, angering activists who denounced the declaration and an earlier order giving the army power to arrest civilians, as a "coup". The Brotherhood insists the parliament retains legislative power and has pledged to counter the SCAF decisions with "popular activities".

On Tuesday night, the Brotherhood joined a mass demonstration in Cairo's Tahrir square, which attracted over 15,000 protesters, some celebrating Mursi's win as much as denouncing the military move. The demonstrators were still in the square as the conflicting details of Mubarak's condition filtered in. "It's divine retribution," said Saber Amr, a teacher. "God doesn't forgive those who do wrong to their people. God doesn't forgive those who kill innocents." Nearby, Abdel Mottaleb, a Brotherhood supporter, offered a more conciliatory tone, saying "God will judge him."

Mubarak was taken to a Cairo prison on June 2, after a court handed down a life sentence against him over his involvement in the deaths of protesters during the 2011 uprising that pushed him from power. His health deteriorated after the transfer, with doctors defibrillating him twice earlier this month, and reports saying he was suffering from bouts of depression, high blood pressure and shortness of breath. _ AFP

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News Headline: How to Solve Common Memory Problems | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: MSN Health
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Content provided by:

How to Solve Common Memory Problems

Hallie Levine Sklar

So you keep misplacing your keys and walking into the living room without remembering why. That doesn't mean you've got early Alzheimer's: "Normal memory problems—like being a little forgetful—start as early as age 27," says Majid Fotuhi, MD, chairman of the Neurology Institute for Brain Health and Fitness in Baltimore and author of The Memory Cure.

Luckily, your memory is like a muscle, Dr. Fotuhi says—you can exercise it and improve it at any age. Here are some smart moves to help you do just that.

Problem #1: Stress

The lowdown: "In our fast-paced, wired world, many of us live our lives in chronic stress," says Gary Small, MD, director of the UCLA Longevity Center and author of The Alzheimer's Prevention Program. That means we're perpetually bathing our brains in stress hormones like cortisol. The result? Studies done in mice show that chronically elevated stress hormone levels shrink the hippocampus, so you're less likely to form new memories.

You get a similar result if you're struggling with depression. "Some studies suggest that depressed individuals have fewer hippocampal neurons," says Gary Kennedy, MD, director of the division of geriatric psychiatry at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. Other research has found that depressed people have lower levels of brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF), a protein that promotes the health of brain neurons, and thus boosts memory function.

The Rx: Unfortunately, there's no way to get rid of stress entirely. But you can at least try to keep your anxiety levels at a minimum. Dr. Small's number-one tactic? Meditation. One recent Harvard study found that participants who meditated for about 30 minutes a day over eight weeks increased their hippocampus size. "Meditation also fires up the frontal areas of the brain that are associated with attention," Dr. Small says. That means you'll be less likely to focus on feeling stressed or down, and more able to concentrate on the tasks at hand, so you can actually remember what's going on.

Here's a super easy way to start: Get comfortable and begin breathing slowly and deeply. Expand your rib cage as you inhale; feel your abdomen rise with each intake of breath. Stay relaxed and focus on each breath in and out. Start with three minutes and work up to 30.

If you suspect you're depressed—say, you're having persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" feelings that last more than a couple of weeks, and other symptoms such as fatigue, irritability, and loss of interest in hobbies—get a referral for a good psychologist or psychiatrist, who can provide counseling and possibly medication.

Problem #2: Estrogen in flux

The lowdown: In addition to its many other bodily functions, estrogen may help keep women's brains sharp, Dr. Small says. The hormone increases the concentration of an enzyme needed to synthesize the memory-boosting brain chemical acetylcholine and enhances communication between neurons in your hippocampus.

So it's no surprise that we often experience brain fog during a time of life when estrogen levels wax and wane: A study published in the journal Neurology found that 60 percent of women going through perimenopause, when estrogen levels are sputtering out, reported decreased memory. And a study from the UK found that expectant moms—who experience wild surges of estrogen—performed worse on certain types of memory tests, and that those changes were still present three months after the women gave birth.

The Rx: If you're going through menopause, talk to your doctor about going on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for a year or two, Dr. Small suggests. The Neurology study found that women who start HRT in perimenopause (before menopause, when periods stop completely) have better memory and cognitive function than those who go on it post-menopause. Even if you opt against HRT, there's good news: Your cognitive function should rebound after menopause, once your body has had a chance to adjust to its newly stabilized hormone levels.

Problem #3: Weight and sleep troubles

The lowdown: Memory problems are often attributable to (changeable!) lifestyle factors. Take weight: A 2010 study found that for every one-point increase in a woman's BMI (body mass index), her memory score dropped by one point.

If you're thin and a couch potato, you're still at risk. "There's a link between physical fitness, which improves blood flow, and brain volume," Dr. Fotuhi says. "Exercise can actually increase the size of the hippocampus."

Lack of sleep impairs your memory, too. "When you're sleep deprived, your stress-hormone levels increase, which is toxic to your neurons," Dr. Fotuhi explains.

The Rx: If you're overweight, losing weight should help: A 2011 Kent State University study, for example, found that people who underwent bariatric surgery improved their memory loss 12 weeks post-procedure. And especially if you're feeling less than sharp, make a good night's sleep a priority.

Copyright © 2012 Health Media Ventures, Inc. All rights reserved.

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News Headline: 5 Things: Tips to Beat the Heat | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Editor's Note: This story originally ran the summer of 2011, but in light of this week's "heatwave" — Thursday's forecast high is 9o degrees Fahrenheit — we thought readers would appreciate a re-print of these stay-cool tips.

There are lots of ways to stay cool around Kent. Here are five tips for beating the heat today and throughout the summer.

Read a book. The Kent Free Library is air conditioned, and for those who don't have the luxury of keeping their house or apartment below 72 degrees Fahrenheit, the library can be a welcome respite — especially for seniors — and it's free.
Cool down in the pool at the Kent State Recreation and Wellness Center. The natatorium is open from 6 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. today, and the leisure pool opens at noon. Non-members can use the pool for $10 a day with photo ID. In addition, the center offers special deals for seniors. The SilverSneakers Fitness Program offers a free membership to the rec center for anyone Medicare eligible with a qualifying secondary insurer. To find out if they are eligible, interested members can log on to www.silversneakers.com. And seniors who don't qualify for SilverSneakers can still get a 10 percent discount on a membership with their Golden Buckeye card.
Speaking of pools, the pool at Theodore Roosevelt High School is open Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 7:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. and on Saturday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Click here for admission rates.
Lower your core temperature with a tasty treat from ice cream shops like the Arctic Squirrel, Katie's Korner Ice Cream, Stoddard's Frozen Custards, Dairy Queen, or try a root beer float at A&W.
On Saturdays, take a trip on the Cuyahoga River with Crooked River Adventures.

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News Headline: TransPortage gets $15,000 Loan to Relocate Wells-Sherman House | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Support, opposition voiced by crowd at Kent City Council meeting

new

The Historic Wells Sherman House, ca. 1858

Credit Matt Fredmonsky http://o3.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/resize/273x203/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/9547d9429d88153e3c2f76e12a317b88 http://o2.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/patch/d31da196df401783c338a8057cee56a2

Credit Matt Fredmonsky http://o5.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/resize/273x203/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/d0ea797c1b8cbdbc796fe5a2ce28efa http://o3.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/patch/f8c4d38c069c6a9ab605b12cc8bb40ba

http://kent.patch.com/articles/transportage-gets-15-000-loan-to-relocate-wells-sherman-house/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1340273136

One of several dominoes that needs to fall to save the historic Kent Wells-Sherman House did just that Wednesday night at Kent City Council.

There are still a few more blocks to fall.

Council voted Wednesday to finalize a vote taken earlier this month to loan $15,000 to the non-profit group TransPortage to relocate the house from 250 E. Erie St. to a plot of greenspace on North Water Street between Scribbles Coffee and Standing Rock Cultural Arts.

Kent State University has also promised to lend $40,000 to the effort to relocate the house. The house stands in the path of Kent State's Esplanade extension and must be moved this summer so construction can start.

Yet TransPortage still has to buy the land — a purchase agreement is in place — and get a line of credit to cover the other expenses associated with moving, renovating and bringing the house up to code. A copy of their estimated expenses is attached to this story.

And, perhaps more importantly, the Kent Planning Commission and Kent Board of Zoning Appeals have yet to vote on the site plan for the house as it would sit on the lot. They are expected to review the site plans in July, but the planning commission did hear a cursory presentation last month.

But none of those issues really seemed to be at the forefront Wednesday. Instead, it was the more controversial issue of the potential loss of the green space that Standing Rock has used for more than 20 years that people were talking about at the meeting.

About a dozen people on both sides of the greenspace issue spoke to council to air their concerns over the site TransPortage has said was one of about 12 locations considered for the house.

Jill Twark, a member of TransPortage, said they are hopeful to work with members of Standing Rock to use the space "to provide the greatest benefit to the greatest number of people" after the house is relocated there.

"This piece of land on North Water Street turned out to be … the best site for it, as disappointing as that may be to some people," she said.

Josh Goran, who said he has friends on both sides of the issue, leaned towards preserving the greenspace and finding another spot for the Wells-Sherman House.

"While I understand the value of historical architecture and preservation thereof, I believe preervation of the greenspace ... is a more needed concern," he said.

Kent architect Doug Fuller tried to be the voice of reason while supporting the relocation of the house to the lot.

"If there's ever an opportunity that's been crying out for a little cooperation between people, it's this one," Fuller said. "This house is not a big house. There's a tremendous amount of the site that's left that with cooperation can be (used) together. The building will be an asset to North Water Street and it can be an asset to other people wanting to use it."

Council voted 6-2 to support lending the $15,000 to TransPortage. Councilmen John Kuhar and Wayne Wilson cast the two opposing votes with councilman Garret Ferrara absent Wednesday.

Kuhar said he voted against lending the financial support because the initial presentation to council about saving the house asked only for administrative support from city staff members.

"Now it's turned into financial support," he said.

Like Fuller, Councilman Robin Turner urged the two groups, TransPortage and Standing Rock Cultural Arts, to find a middle ground.

"It is a situation where we're under the gun right now," Turner said. "The hope is that the two groups right now can work together to see if we can make a benefit out of this for everyone concerned."

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News Headline: Porthouse opens season with ‘Damn Yankees’ | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Leader Publications - Online
Contact Name: David Ritchey
News OCR Text: 6/21/2012 - West Side Leader

Washington Senator ballplayer Rocky (Jack O'Brian), at center, reminds the team to think about the game in Porthouse Theatre's production of “Damn Yankees.”

Photo: Matt Unger, courtesy of Kent State University

CUYAHOGA FALLS — Porthouse Theatre opened its season June 15 with “Damn Yankees,” which will run through June 30.

It is a musical comedy of the classic style. The love story demands a willing suspension of disbelief. Joe Boyd (Marc Moritz) loves baseball and especially the Washington Senators. Frustrated by his love for a losing team, Boyd declares he'd sell his soul if it would help his team win. Out of the fog steps Mr. Applegate (Eric van Baars), the Devil, who wants to help Joe make good on his promise.

Applegate turns Boyd into Joe Hardy (Michael Glavan), a hitter, who can knock the ball out of the stadium. Hardy can do no wrong. The team wins and moves forward in the rankings.

But Hardy is homesick for his wife (Boyd's wife) and rents a room in her house. Meg Boyd (Mary Anne Prevost) waits patiently for her husband to return.

Mr. Applegate tests Boyd/Hardy with Lola (MaryAnn Black). This sexy temptation sings “Whatever Lola Wants” to him, and he doesn't give in to the temptress — he wants his wife.

The 50-plus-year-old show is sweet, gentle and kind. When the show opened in 1955, “Damn Yankees” was spicy and a bit naughty, but it celebrated home, hearth and the homerun.

The plot is right out of the 1950s — think of “Father Knows Best,” “Leave It to Beaver” and anything with Ozzie and Harriet. And that's the problem — the script is so old that it creaks.

“Damn Yankees” brought several songs to popularity — “Heart,” “Whatever Lola Wants” and “Two Lost Souls.”

With words and music by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross and the book by George Abbott and Douglass Wallop, the play is based on Wallop's novel “The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant.”

The production is rescued by the outstanding work of director Terri Kent and choreographer John Crawford.

Black and van Baars have played opposite each other in many shows at Porthouse. Once again, they have a number of scenes together, and they knock a homerun with each scene and song.

Glavan, a senior at Kent State, plans to make his way to New York City after graduation and establish himself as an actor. He is off to a good start as an actor with the Joe Hardy role. Glavan sings, dances and reads a line fairly well. With a little more training and polish, he should be ready for the Big Apple.

The singers and dancers are supported by a 10-piece orchestra conducted by Jonathan Swoboda. This group is on key with enough volume and the right pace to keep the show moving without seeming rushed.

The real star of the show is the baseball team. This team sings and dances to keep the audience's focus on baseball.

For ticket information, call 330-672-3884.

David Ritchey has a Ph.D. in communications and is a professor of communications at The University of Akron. He is a member of the American Theatre Critics Association.

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News Headline: 'Damn Yankees' at Porthouse Theatre bedeviled by some pointed details | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Andrea Simakis, The Plain Dealer

"Damn Yankees" opened on Broadway in 1955 and scored seven Tonys, including awards for choreographer Bob Fosse and the flame-haired Gwen Verdon for her portrayal of damned temptress Lola, as in "whatever Lola wants, Lola gets." (The ridiculously talented duo would later marry and stay hitched until Fosse's death in 1987.)

The mesmerizing Bebe Neuwirth wriggled into Lola's fishnets in a Broadway revival in 1994, a performance I would have sold my soul to see.

In fact, Lola -- once "the ugliest woman in Providence, R.I.," before she made a pact with the devil for her glorious gams and a bod made for sin -- is still one of the best reasons to stage "Damn Yankees" today. It's a role the right actress can rocket out of the park, overriding the scent of old cheese permeating the musty musical.

Fifty-seven years after its premiere, the tale of one baseball fan's Faustian bargain to help his team win the pennant feels like a worn glove with busted stitching: You can still field balls with it on a lazy Sunday in the park, but I wouldn't use it in a game that mattered.

The story is one to which Indians fans can relate. "I just once would like to lick those damn Yankees!" exclaims aging baseball fan Joe Boyd (a marvelously understated Marc Moritz) after his beloved team, the Washington Senators, takes another crushing loss from the Bronx Bombers. "I would sell my soul for one long-ball hitter!"

Cue Mephistopheles, also known as Mr. Applegate, a talent scout from hell (Eric van Baars, camping it up like the red-horned demon on the can of Underwood Deviled Ham Spread).

Mr. A offers to change middle-aged Joe into a young phenom named Joe Hardy (lanky, affable Kent State University senior Michael Glavan), the Senators' best chance to whup the Yankees. The price? Only Joe's immortal soul.

And here's where the smell of limburger starts to waft through the open-air seats. Before Joe joins the ball club, he writes a letter to his wife, Meg (Mary Anne Prevost, delivering a quiet, effective performance that dovetails nicely with the work of Moritz).

As he pens the note, he sings "Goodbye, Old Girl," a ballad that, to today's ears, sounds hopelessly dated, the sort of endearment you'd expect from Archie Bunker in a rerun of "All in the Family."

What's a director to do? The songs are what they are; it's hard to breathe new life into a chestnut, and Terri Kent doesn't try. But why not throw a few curves -- say, make the devil a closet cross-dresser or, better yet, a drag queen? I'm imagining Eddie Izzard, all dolled up in a corset and pumps, as he was in his fiercely funny stand-up act before he went all Hollywood butch.

There is a handful of earthly delights here: The ensemble making up the Senators' bench -- a mix of college students and recent grads -- delivers some great barbershop harmonies and impressive balletic leaps. As Sister and Doris, the Boyds' chattering, nattering neighbors and die-hard Senators fans, Lenne Snively and Lissy Gulick provide the only genuine laughs in two acts.

And sadly, even Lola can't deliver a base-clearing homer. Porthouse assistant artistic director MaryAnn Black is an accomplished hoofer with killer legs -- which she shows us, again and again, in "Cabaret"-style contortions on chaise longues and when she lunges at young Joe and wraps them around his waist in a scissors grip.

She also has a dancer's lithe body; we would expect no less from a woman who taught for exercise guru Jane Fonda back in the day. But as Lola, Black is miscast.

When Verdon and Neuwirth played the part, they were in their 30s; Black is nearly 60, and when she catapults herself at Joe and virtually climbs his trunk, you're likely to hear "Mrs. Robinson" looping through your brain.

The age difference creates moments of unintentional comedy -- "Joe, you make me feel girlish, and I'm 172" -- and it doesn't help that despite her formidable dancing chops, she mugs and winks like Mitzi Gaynor on speed, never achieving the requisite heat for which Lola is famous.

It has been said that a good actor can play any role, no matter what her driver's license says. That might be true, but it doesn't mean she'll fit in with the cast around her.

During what is supposed to be a smoldering samba by the couple at a speakeasy in hell -- "Two Lost Souls"-- the vibe smacks of a mother dancing with her son at his wedding. Time to make room for the bride.

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News Headline: College Of Architecture & Environmental Design | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mike Beder, Evan Bailey and Brian Bower co-own new business in Acorn Alley II.

The owners of Kent's newest Acorn Alley II business – Tree City Coffee & Pastry – are excited to see city residents gathering alongside Kent State University residents in an environment designed to make everyone feel like part of one community. Co-owners Mike Beder, Evan Bailey and Brian Bower are excited to finally open the doors at 5:30 a.m. Monday to start serving up their eight different coffees, made-fresh-daily muffins and pastries and a unique selection of sandwiches made on fresh-baked breads. Tree City Coffee collaborated with Bent Tree Coffee Roasters in Kent to create the Two Trees blend. The shop's house blend is a direct trade coffee created through Solstice Coffee Tea Service in Cleveland. Beder, Bailey and Bower have labored…

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