Report Overview:
Total Clips (26)
Accounting; Alumni (1)
Admissions; Financial Aid; Students (1)
Alumni (1)
Athletics (7)
Career Services Center (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
College of Public Health (COPH); KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (1)
College of Public Health (COPH); Regional Academic Center (1)
Digital Sciences (School of) (1)
Global Education (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Office of the President (1)
Political Science (1)
Research (3)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
WKSU (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Accounting; Alumni (1)
Three with ties to Kent State speaking at Vegas accountants conference 06/26/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Admissions; Financial Aid; Students (1)
Kent State Tuscarawas to have admissions open house 06/25/2012 Coshocton Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas to have admissions open house Jun. 25, 2012 | NEW PHILADELPHIA -- Kent State University at Tuscarawas will have...


Alumni (1)
31-year-old heads area PR group 06/26/2012 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...Steelworkers local union representing his father and others who had struck their employer, an aluminum extrusion plant in Struthers. Davila, a graduate of Kent State University, said the chapter is growing, attracting more people to its professional development activities and now has more than 100 members...


Athletics (7)
Beyond being there 06/26/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Celebration for Kent State Baseball Team is Thursday 06/26/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State knocked out of College World Series 06/25/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

OMAHA, Neb. -- Michael Roth pitched a two-hitter and two-time defending national champion South Carolina eliminated Kent State from the College World Series with a 4-1 victory on Thursday. The game had been postponed by rain Wednesday. The Gamecocks (47-18)...

Photos: Kent State vs South Carolina 06/25/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Photos from Kent State vs South Carolina at the College World Series in Omaha. The Gamecocks defeated the Golden Flashes 4-1 ending Kent's CWS run. Photos by...

Another Complete Game Gives Arizona an Edge (Stricklin) 06/25/2012 New York Times, The Text Email

...rest. Roth's only two career complete games have come in elimination games in Omaha, most recently his last start last Thursday, a two-hitter to beat Kent State, 4-1. That made Roth 8-0 with a 1.33 earned run average over his career in the N.C.A.A. tournament, and 4-0 with a 1.34 E.R.A. in the C.W.S....

Kent St. KO's No. 1 Florida 06/25/2012 Bucyrus Telegraph-Forum - Online Text Attachment Email

Top seed leaves bases loaded in 9th OMAHA, Neb. — Kent State scored four unearned runs and another on a wild pitch, then held off Florida’s comeback bid in the ninth to eliminate the top-seeded Gators...

Magnitude of achievement will be realized 06/26/2012 Camden News - Online Text Attachment Email

...Friday’s heart-breaking 3-2 elimination loss to SEC rival South Carolina at Ameritrade Park in Omaha, Neb. The Razorbacks, 2-0 in the CWS upon beating Kent State, 8-1 and South Carolina, 2-1, lost, 2-0 to South Carolina when they could have clinc...


Career Services Center (1)
Job prospects trending up in IT, emerging industries (Patterson) 06/25/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...increase 13% and 14%, respectively, in the same time period. And salaries in information technology are strong. Jody Patterson, career counselor with Kent State's Career Services Center, said she has seen starting salaries in IT-related jobs increase 3% in the last year. "We are talking about...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
No Charges in Crash that Killed Kent State Professor 06/26/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


College of Public Health (COPH); KSU at Geauga; Regional Academic Center (1)
New Kent State Twinsburg Campus To Offer New Public Health Degree (Alemagno) 06/25/2012 Twinsburg Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's College of Public Health is still accepting applications for Fall of 2012 A digital rendition of what students at the Kent...


College of Public Health (COPH); Regional Academic Center (1)
KENT STATE OFFERS NEW MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH DEGREE PROGRAM (Alemagno) 06/25/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, June 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's College of Public Health is pleased to announce the new...


Digital Sciences (School of) (1)
Crain's panel addresses benefits, pitfalls of multi-generational work force (Walker) 06/26/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Global Education (1)
Local news briefs -- June 26 - KENT STATE 06/26/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Thor Wasbotten hired to direct Kent State's journalism school (Wearden) 06/25/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication has hired Thor Wasbotten as its new director. Wasbotten will join the university...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Cleveland State University-Northeast Ohio Medical University partnership 06/26/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email


Office of the President (1)
Kent State president launches photography site (Leffton) 06/26/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Political Science (1)
Mursi keen to renew ties, says Iran media (Stacher) 06/26/2012 Business Day - Online Text Attachment Email

...the figurehead — to try to slowly accumulate powers to offset the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces ," said Joshua Stacher, a political scientist at Kent State University. "But what we have is a situation where the civilian, elected president will be taking the blame for Egypt's continuing problems,...


Research (3)
Should you go gluten-free? Start with correct information: Your Turn 06/25/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...appropriate reason and that you do it in a healthy, informed way. For more information about Celiac Disease, visit www.celiac.org. Olena Gudz is a Kent State University graduate student/dietetic intern with the WIC Division of the Medina County Health Department.

Common memory problems solved 06/26/2012 FOXNews.com Text Attachment Email

...stress-hormone levels increase, which is toxic to your neurons," Fotuhi explained. The Rx: If you're overweight, losing weight should help: A 2011 Kent State University study, for example, found that people who underwent bariatric surgery improved their memory loss 12 weeks post-procedure. And...

Men, women see 'get fit' ads differently 06/25/2012 FUTURITY Text Attachment Email

...immediately experienced benefits, such as well being, participate more than those who exercise for weight loss or health benefits. Researchers from Kent State University contributed to the study. More news from University of Michigan: http://www.ns.umich.edu/new/


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Bill Beard honored with United Way's service award (Rasinski) 06/26/2012 Herald-Mail - Online Text Attachment Email

...school, and the United Way program focused on the importance of reading. The keynote speaker was Timothy Rasinski, a professor of literacy education at Kent State University. Rasinski has authored, co-authored and edited more than 15 books and curriculum programs on reading education. He is also...


WKSU (2)
Drew Carey is guest for Cleveland taping of NPR show 06/26/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

The HeldenFiles Online: Drew Carey Joins "Wait Wait" Cleveland Show 06/26/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Three with ties to Kent State speaking at Vegas accountants conference | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Three accounting professionals with a Kent State University connection will be speakers at the Institute of Management Accountants 93rd Annual Conference and Exposition, being held this week at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in Las Vegas, Nev.

Dr. Norman Meonske, KSU professor emeritus of accounting, will conduct a seminar titled: "Truth & Consequences of Accounting Ethics - Beyond the Madoff & Enron Scandals (You Are Not in Kansas Anymore or Are you?)"

Nicholas R. Sucic, CPA, vice president and controller, The Davey Tree Expert Company, will be a member of a blue-ribbon panel "Envisioning the Roles of The Future Chief Financial and Chief Accounting Officer that will be moderated by Meonske. Sucic is a KSU accounting graduate who served as the national president of the KSU Alumni Association and the chair of the annual Ohio Council Meonske Professional Development Conference held annually at Kent State.

Michael Capellas, chairman of VCE, The Virtual Computing Environment Company, will be the keynote speaker on the topic: "Why Cloud Computing Changes Everything." Capellas is a KSU accounting graduate and also received an honorary doctorate degree from KSU. A 30-year IT veteran, Capellas has served as CEO of Compaq, the president of Hewlett Packard, and president of MCI.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to have admissions open house | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Coshocton Tribune - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas to have admissions open house

Jun. 25, 2012 |

NEW PHILADELPHIA -- Kent State University at Tuscarawas will have an Admissions Open House from 2 to 6 p.m. Thursday. During this open house and campus tour, prospective students of all ages can learn about the 29 bachelor's and associate degrees available at the university.

An open academic advising session will be offered, along with an FAFSA session led by a member of the campus' financial aid staff.

Applicants are encouraged to take their 2011 income tax information to participate in the FAFSA session. Students who are interested in transferring from another college can take their transcripts for a review session.

Individuals who apply for admission to Kent State Tuscarawas during the event will have the $30 application fee waived.

For more information, call (330) 339-3391, email info@tusc.kent.edu or visit www.tusc.kent.edu/ admissions/visit.

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News Headline: 31-year-old heads area PR group | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (Akron Beacon Journal (OH) Via Acquire Media NewsEdge) June 24--Ralph Davila, 31, is among the youngest to serve as president of the Akron Area Public Relations Society of America.

Davila was in his early 20s when he directed his first PR campaign -- for the United Steelworkers local union representing his father and others who had struck their employer, an aluminum extrusion plant in Struthers.

Davila, a graduate of Kent State University, said the chapter is growing, attracting more people to its professional development activities and now has more than 100 members spread over 13 counties. Members come from public relations agencies, corporations, government, medical institutions and other organizations.

Davila, director of public relations at WhiteSpace Creative, a marketing communications company in Akron, gave the following interview to the Beacon Journal: Q: What is public relations? A: It's harnessing business, organizational objectives to communicate and create relationships with target publics. I underline relationships. A lot of public relations graduates who are coming out of school now don't realize the power of face-to-face relationship building.

Q: Along with face-to-face conversations, you're a big believer in social media -- Facebook, Twitter, etc.

A: Yes and our Public Relations Society of America members really want to hear about social media, the new-age technology -- how to merge together social media and traditional public relations. Either you get social media a little, or you get it a lot, or you're just completely out of the loop. Helping people get it a little is kind of one of the things I specialize in.

Q: What is the minimum amount of social media companies should use? A: I would ask, 'Are you in an industry where it is needed right now? Think about your competitors, customers, where are they. Are they on Twitter? Or are they using LinkedIn heavily?' If they are, start there, and only there.

You don't need to use every network available because there are thousands. It's impossible. Focus on one, where your competitors are and your potential customers and current customers are. Go on there and create a venue for them to speak and so you can listen. Listening is so important in social media. The things you hear from your customers and your competitors can drive your business.

Q: The Akron Area PRSA chapter hosted an event at which public relations professionals revealed their biggest mistakes. What's yours? A: It's not a specific moment. But I've overpromised in some situations, thinking I could do something so big and then not being able to do it. Now, granted, I was able to bring it back to a certain degree. But I would go for it, and realize there's no money, no budget.

Managing expectations is important. ... You get more experience under your belt. You realize what it takes to do certain things. I've learned to be realistic, and ask others in the business, find a mentor.

Q: Who is your mentor? A: Tom Duke. [Duke is a longtime area public relations professional. He is vice chairman of the Akron-area SCORE counseling group and is a contributing editor at Tire Review and president at Duke Public Relations. Among his earlier posts, he was senior vice president at the Urda Co. and director of community relations at the former B.F. Goodrich Co.] Q: What is your biggest success? A: I did work for the Akron Marathon. We tried some different tactics. I put together different story ideas, snippets. A fitness publication out of the United Kingdom picked up a story I wrote -- a 2,500-word piece about behind the scenes at the Akron Marathon. It was a worldwide publication, reaching top-tier people acclaimed in running, and I won a bronze Anvil for best feature. [The award is a national honor, recognizing outstanding public relations tactics.] Katie Byard can be reached at 330-996-3781 or kbyard@thebeaconjournal.com ___ (c)2012 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com Distributed by MCT Information Services

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News Headline: Beyond being there | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Too often the conversation in sports gets stuck on which team or player stands at the top. Everyone wants to be part of No. 1. Well, not everyone can get there. Arizona and South Carolina reached the final of the College World Series. Yet the accomplishment for both is the sustained excellence of their baseball programs.

That is the achievement of Kent State and its baseball team, all worth more celebrating on Thursday evening at the campus student center. Kent reached the College World Series with wins over Purdue and Kentucky (in 21 innings!). Then, the Golden Flashes grabbed two, nail-biting wins over Oregon — in Eugene — to make the Elite Eight, the best in college baseball.

Luck played a part. (It always does.) So did timely hitting, firm defense and gritty pitching.

Count as the most revealing moment in Omaha the win over Florida, the top seed, Kent facing elimination, having just been whacked by Arkansas in the opening game. How easy it would have been for the Flashes to take their reward, enjoy the cheers for getting so far.

Yet they climbed to an early lead, and held their ground, Florida closing the gap to 5-4 but getting no further. The Gators were gone. Kent would continue playing, confirming that its presence was no fluke. That is what Coach Scott Stricklin and his players have been building, competing at the highest level, ready to triumph over anyone.

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News Headline: Celebration for Kent State Baseball Team is Thursday | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University will honor team for first-ever College World Series appearance

41.15375-81.351269primaryCelebration for Kent State Baseball Team is ThursdayKent State University500 E Main St, Kent, OH/listings/kent-state-university-31094461 /locations/7314397
Schools, SportsCelebration for Kent State Baseball Team is Thursday
University will honor team for first-ever College World Series appearance

By Matt Fredmonsky Email the authorJune 25, 2012 Email Print Comment
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The Kent State baseball team during the 2012 College World Series. Kent State University context
Photos (1) Photos Credit Kent State University
Upload Photos and Videos | Search Patch Archive
http://kent.patch.com/articles/celebration-for-kent-state-baseball-team-is-thursday/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1340721867asset[new_asset_attachment_attributes][to_id]2317570asset[new_asset_attachment_attributes][to_type]Articlearticle[new_asset_attachment_attributes][user_id]new_asset_attachment_attributesKent State University's Golden Flashes baseball team will be honored at a “Season of Champions” celebration event on Thursday, June 28, at the Kent Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., with a presentation beginning at 7 p.m.

The celebration event is free and open to all. Attendees will receive a free T-shirt, including other giveaways, and will have the opportunity for a meet-and-greet and signing with members of the baseball team before and after the event. Refreshments will be served at the event, which also will feature video highlights from the championship season.

The 2012 Mid-American Conference Coach of the Year Scott Stricklin, who led the team, will address attendees at the celebration event.

The Kent State baseball team made its 12th NCAA tournament appearance this year and advanced to the Super Regional for the first time this season. The team also played in the College World Series for the first time in program history, which dates back to 1915. The Golden Flashes edged out top seed Florida in its second game at the College World Series.

The public is encouraged to wear blue and gold and join the Kent State community as it celebrates the Golden Flashes on a successful championship season.

For more information about Kent State Athletics, visit www.kentstatesports.com.

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News Headline: Kent State knocked out of College World Series | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: ERIC OLSON
News OCR Text: OMAHA, Neb. -- Michael Roth pitched a two-hitter and two-time defending national champion South Carolina eliminated Kent State from the College World Series with a 4-1 victory on Thursday.

The game had been postponed by rain Wednesday.

The Gamecocks (47-18) play again Thursday night against Arkansas. They need two wins over the Razorbacks to advance to the championship round that starts Sunday.

Grayson Greiner and Chase Vergason hit consecutive RBI singles in the second inning to erase Kent State's 1-0 lead. LB Dantzler homered in the third against Tyler Skulina (11-2).

Kent State (47-20) finished 1-2 in its first CWS appearance.

Roth (9-1) struck out eight and walked none. He retired 22 in a row after giving up Sawyer Polen's RBI single in the second inning.

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News Headline: Photos: Kent State vs South Carolina | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Photos from Kent State vs South Carolina at the College World Series in Omaha. The Gamecocks defeated the Golden Flashes 4-1 ending Kent's CWS run. Photos by Matt Ryerson/US Presswire.

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News Headline: Another Complete Game Gives Arizona an Edge (Stricklin) | Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: New York Times, The
Contact Name: BORZI, PAT
News OCR Text: OMAHA -- The last time Arizona Coach Andy Lopez thought he had a team with a shot at the national championship, in 2008, he fashioned his pitching staff the way he prefers -- in reverse. He stuck his power arms, the major league first-round draft picks Ryan Perry and Daniel Schlereth, in the bullpen. Then he told his starters to give him five innings and go wave towels in the dugout while the relievers finished up.

Those Wildcats fell short of the College World Series, losing a super regional to Miami. Four years later Arizona finally made it here, but with a bullpen so shaky that five weeks into the season, Lopez told starters Kurt Heyer, Konner Wade and James Farris they were on their own. He needed complete games. So if Lopez approached the mound, they should not presume he wanted the ball.

''I'll come out and talk to you, but I'm just going to ask you what the weather is like on the mound and what it's like in the dugout, because I'm going back in there,'' Lopez said last week. ''When it's 125, 130 pitches, then I'll come out and make a pitching change.''

Fifteen complete games later, the Wildcats found themselves in the C.W.S. best-of-three championship series. On Sunday night, a precise Wade added one more complete game, his third straight in the postseason, limiting two-time defending champion South Carolina to six hits in a 5-1 victory in Game 1.

If Arizona (47-17) wins Game 2 on Monday night or Game 3 on Tuesday at TD Ameritrade Park, Lopez will become the second coach to have won a World Series title at more than one school. Augie Garrido won two at Cal State-Fullerton (1979 and 1984) and three at Texas (1995, 2002 and 2005). Lopez, whose sons David and Michael are reserves for the Wildcats, coached Pepperdine to the 1992 championship.

''It would be nice,'' Lopez said. ''I'm not going to lie. Shoot, it would be great, a sweet thing to remember.''

Robert Refsnyder, the Yankees' fifth-round pick in the amateur draft earlier this month, hit a two-run homer to the opposite field in the first, a blow that so affected the Gamecocks that Coach Ray Tanner made his pitchers intentionally walk Refsnyder the next two times up with men in scoring position. Alex Mejia, a St. Louis Cardinals draftee, and the Cincinnati Reds selection Seth Mejias-Brean added run-scoring singles in the third and fifth to give Wade a 4-0 lead.

Lopez did go talk to Wade in the sixth after Evan Marzilli broke up the shutout bit with a run-scoring single for South Carolina (49-19). But Lopez had no one throwing in the bullpen, and Wade retired Christian Walker on a ground ball to end the inning. Wade (11-3) threw 73 strikes out of 110 pitches, with one walk.

''Them not having anyone warming up shows they have confidence in me,'' said Wade, who shut out U.C.L.A. in his first C.W.S. start June 17. South Carolina's path from the loser's bracket forced Tanner to burn through starting pitchers Michael Roth, Jordan Montgomery and Colby Holmes on Thursday and Friday. So Sunday he turned to the sophomore right-hander Forrest Koumas, who pitched effectively in last year's opening game of the championship series, when he held Florida to one run and three hits in five and two-thirds innings. The Gamecocks won, 4-3, in 11 innings.

But this season Koumas missed about a month with a stress fracture in his right elbow, and he had not pitched since a May 25 relief appearance against Florida in the Southeastern Conference tournament. It showed. Four batters into the game, he trailed, 2-0, and Koumas gave up one more unearned run before Tanner took him out after two and a third innings.

Tanner said it would probably be up to Roth, a senior left-hander who has never lost in N.C.A.A. tournament play, to even the series Monday night on three days of rest. Roth's only two career complete games have come in elimination games in Omaha, most recently his last start last Thursday, a two-hitter to beat Kent State, 4-1. That made Roth 8-0 with a 1.33 earned run average over his career in the N.C.A.A. tournament, and 4-0 with a 1.34 E.R.A. in the C.W.S.

''He is a strike-throwing machine,'' Kent State Coach Scott Stricklin said of Roth, a Los Angeles Angels draftee. ''He's the biggest superstar our game has, and he throws 85 miles an hour. He just knows how to pitch.''

The South Korean-born Refsnyder, adopted by a California couple as an infant, wears No. 2 in honor of Derek Jeter. His homer followed a Jeter-like arc into the South Carolina bullpen in right. Refsnyder, a right-handed batter, is hitting .444 (8 for 18) with two homers and five runs batted in in the C.W.S.

A right fielder whom the Yankees project as a second baseman, he later stifled a potential South Carolina rally in the seventh, throwing out Adam Matthews as he tried to go from first to third on a Kyle Martin single with nobody out.

''I really wasn't expecting Matthews to go,'' Refsnyder said. ''But I thought he kind of hesitated, so I decided to let it rip.''

PHOTO: The Wildcats' dugout after Robert Refsnyder scored in the seventh inning on Sunday. Refsnyder hit a home run in the first. (PHOTOGRAPH BY HARRY HOW/GETTY IMAGES)

Copyright © 2012 The New York Times Company

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News Headline: Kent St. KO's No. 1 Florida | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bucyrus Telegraph-Forum - Online
Contact Name: Eric Olson Associated Press
News OCR Text: Top seed leaves bases loaded in 9th

OMAHA, Neb. — Kent State scored four unearned runs and another on a wild pitch, then held off Florida’s comeback bid in the ninth to eliminate the top-seeded Gators from the College World Series with a 5-4 victory Monday.The Gators loaded the bases with one out in the ninth against shaky relievers Michael Clark and Josh Pierce.

Pierce fought back from a 3-0 count to strike out Casey Turgeon when Turgeon couldn’t check his swing and got called out on an appeal to the third-base umpire. Justin Shafer flew out to right to end the game, with Pierce pumping his right fist once the ball landed in right fielder T.J. Sutton’s glove.

The Gators (47-20), who reached the CWS finals last year, committed five errors in two games after coming to Omaha seventh in the nation in fielding.

In Monday’s late game, Arkansas stayed perfect in Omaha with a 2-1 win over South Carolina.

Florida’s Hudson Randall (9-3) left after the first inning because of heat-related symptoms. Ryan Bores (10-3) got the win for Kent State (47-19), making its first CWS appearance. Pierce earned his third save.

Kent State had 12 hits against four pitchers, but it was Florida’s continuing problems in the field that allowed the Flashes to build a 5-1 lead.

George Roberts drove in runs each of the first two innings after shortstop Nolan Fontana and third baseman Josh Tobias committed errors.

Florida scored in the sixth and added two more runs in the seventh to make it 5-4.

Three outs away from a pulling the upset, Clark walked Preston Tucker on four straight pitches to start the ninth. He was 2-0 against Mike Zunino when Kent State coach Scott Stricklin called on Pierce, who also struggled and put Zunino on.

After pinch hitter Cody Dent moved over the runners with a sacrifice, Pierce hit Daniel Pigott in the shoulder to load the bases.

Pierce fell behind 3-0 to Turgeon before throwing a strike. It looked like Turgeon would walk — TV replays indicated strike two was outside — but he couldn’t hold back on his check swing on the next pitch and third base umpire Jeff Henrichs called him out.

Shafer put a good swing on Pierce’s next pitch, but Sutton was able to chase down the fly to end the game.

It was 95 degrees at the start of the game, making it the warmest first pitch at the CWS since June 11, 2001.

Bores, a 27th-round pick of the Texas Rangers, worked six innings and allowed two runs on six hits.

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News Headline: Magnitude of achievement will be realized | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Camden News - Online
Contact Name: Nate Allen
News OCR Text: FAYETTEVILLE -  Eventually the anguish of missing two chances to be one of the last two standing contending for the national championship will abate, and the Arkansas Razorbacks will realize their magnitude of finishing third in the country at the College World Series.

It seemed they already realized it even in the postgame of Friday’s heart-breaking 3-2 elimination loss to SEC rival South Carolina at Ameritrade Park in Omaha, Neb.

The Razorbacks, 2-0 in the CWS upon beating Kent State, 8-1 and South Carolina, 2-1, lost, 2-0 to South Carolina when they could have clinc...

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News Headline: Job prospects trending up in IT, emerging industries (Patterson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The notion that there aren't any decent jobs out there simply isn't true, according to the area's college and career counselors, who say employment - and in many cases earnings - prospects for today's students are good.

And that's not only the case for the fast-growing fields of health care, information technology and financial services, they say, but also for older sectors, such as manufacturing, and emerging ones, like alternative energy.

"With regards to technology, computer science and information sciences, we can't fill all the positions with the number of students we have available," said Carmen Castro-Rivera, director of career services at Baldwin-Wallace College.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts that employment of computer software engineers alone is expected to increase by 32% nationally between 2008 and 2018, which is much faster than the average for all occupations.

The demand for computer information managers and computer systems analysts in Ohio will increase 13% and 14%, respectively, in the same time period.

And salaries in information technology are strong. Jody Patterson, career counselor with Kent State's Career Services Center, said she has seen starting salaries in IT-related jobs increase 3% in the last year.

"We are talking about starting salaries well over $50,000, sometimes in the $60,000s," Ms. Patterson said. Computer information research scientists and actuaries in Greater Cleveland clear more than $100,000, according to Baldwin-Wallace professor of economics Veronica Kalich.

Such statistics debunk the perception that high-paying IT jobs are outsourced overseas. IT positions requiring lots of client and customer interaction or decision-making or that have security implications have remained in the U.S. and are on a growth curve, Ms. Castro-Rivera said.

Healthy future

Northeast Ohio's global leadership in medical care coupled with the aging population's growing demand for health care service translates into ample employment opportunities in the health care field.

The BLS projects the health care and social assistance industry will create about 28% of all new jobs, or 5.7 million new jobs, in the U.S. through 2018. In Ohio, the demand for both acute care nurses and clinical nurse specialists will increase 18%, Ms. Patterson said.

Other areas of health care job growth include care support services, such as social workers, which will rise 20% and mental health practitioners, which will see a 25% jump.

"The wonderful thing about careers in health care is the pathways that exist for people who want to enter the field," said Patricia Coyne, placement specialist with Cuyahoga Valley Career Center in Brecksville. "Students can earn certification with short-term training in direct patient care fields such as STNA (a state-tested nursing assistant or aid), medical assistant or phlebotomist ... find employment and continue their career path to become a paramedic or LPN (license practical nurse), and continue on from there to complete an associate degree or bachelor's degree in nursing or allied health."

Accounting, auditing and related financial service positions are another bright spot. Ohio is expected to add 16% more accounting jobs between 2008 and 2018 with a similar increase in the number of auditing jobs. The BLS reports that the median annual wage of accountants and auditors was $61,690 in May 2010.

"In times when things are more uncertain in terms of the financial picture, we all want people with expertise to help manage our insurance, retirement planning accounts and investment accounts," Ms. Castro-Rivera said. "For corporations, when there is not a lot of money for day-to-day operations, they need people who can handle it well."

Making jobs

A local manufacturing resurgence and the alternative energy industry are expected to provide increased opportunities for students who get the necessary expertise.

Liz Walton, adult education director at CVCC, said the grubby manufacturing jobs of the past have given way to clean advanced manufacturing jobs - many of which are going unfilled as too few get the training necessary to replace retiring, experienced workers.

Here in the Cleveland area, CNC operators, charged with operating computer-control machines or robots in automated manufacturing processes, averaged slightly more than $36,000 a year as of May 2010, according to the BLS.

According to Ms. Coyne, not a day goes by that a manufacturer doesn't call CVCC looking for a machinist, CNC operator, maintenance technician or welder.

Schools like hers provide a range of certification programs, but don't have enough students to meet the escalating demand. "I think many students have old-fashioned views of manufacturing jobs as dirty, boring or declining. In fact, careers in advanced manufacturing offer exciting opportunities for people interested in designing and improving products, operating high-tech tools and machinery, analyzing problems and coming up with creative solutions," she said.

Going into the unknown

Of course, there are other fields expected to be fruitful here in Northeast Ohio. Dr. Kalich pointed out that legal jobs, along with business and financial professionals and health care practitioners, rank high both in terms of salary potential and concentration in the area.

It is also impossible to know what new fields or jobs might materialize as a result of new technologies or products. "In 2012, we are seeing a lot of positions related to social media that did not even exist four years ago," said Hilary Flanagan, director of John Carroll's Center for Career Services.

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News Headline: No Charges in Crash that Killed Kent State Professor | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Gordon F. Vars' death ruled accidental

Dr. Gordon Vars, pictured in 1969, just three years after he started at Kent State University as a professor of education in the Department of Teaching, Leadership and Curriculum Studies and as coordinator of the Middle School Division of the Kent State University School of Education. No charges will be filed in the death of a Kent State University emeritus professor who died shortly after being struck by a car in January near his Kent home.

The death of Gordon F. Vars has been ruled an accident by police and coroner officials. Vars, 88, died Jan. 31 after he was hit while walking across Fairchild Avenue in front of his house late at night.

Kent Police Capt. Paul Canfield said the department's accident reconstruction expert including information from the final coroner's report in reviewing the case.

"Our investigation reveals that the driver was at or near the speed limit, and it was just a bad set of circumstances that led to the collision," Canfield said.

Vars was crossing Fairchild Avenue in a marked crosswalk on the west side of Woodard Avenue when he was struck by Deborah Graef, 57, of Cuyahoga Falls. Graef was driving westbound on Fairchild Avenue. The speed limit is 25 mph in that stretch of road.

Graef was driving a 2004 Volkswagen Beetle. Vars was hit at about 10 p.m. The Kent Fire Department transported him to Akron City Hospital, where he died of his injuries at 11:32 p.m.

Canfield said the darkness and a light rain — both of which reduce visibility — were contributing factors in the crash.

"As you're driving, particularly westbound, it's not the most well-lit intersection," he said.

Patrick Gillespie, a spokesperson for the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office, said Vars' death was ruled accidental though he sustained blunt force trauma to the head.

"We ruled it an accident, and he died from blunt force trauma he received in the crash," Gillespie said.

Vars was an emeritus professor of teaching, leadership and curriculum studies.

He was a very active member of Friends of the Kent Bog, a group "dedicated to the protection and preservation of the Tom S. Cooperrider Kent Bog State Nature Preserve for the education, enjoyment and inspiration of present and future generations.

The half-mile long boardwalk winding through the Kent Bog is being named in his honor.

In March, the Portage Park District Foundation named Vars among its 2012 Portage County Environmental Conservation Award Winners.

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News Headline: New Kent State Twinsburg Campus To Offer New Public Health Degree (Alemagno) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Patch
Contact Name: Mitch Cooper
News OCR Text: Kent State University's College of Public Health is still accepting applications for Fall of 2012

A digital rendition of what students at the Kent State Geauga campus will see in the fall of 2012. Kent State University

http://twinsburg.patch.com/articles/new-kent-state-twinsburg-campus-will-offer-master-of-public-health-degree-program/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1340657013

Kent State University's College of Public Health announced Monday a new public health program will be offered at the new Twinsburg campus.

The new Master of Public Health (MPH) degree in Health Policy and Management, Leadership elective is designed for working health professionals who want to gain advanced skills in organizational change and leadership development.

The program will be offered at the new Kent State University Regional Academic Center in Twinsburg, with courses offered on Tuesday nights. Sequential courses are 5-8 weeks in duration, and the entire sequence can be completed in two years.

“We are thrilled to now be able to offer the healthcare professional in Cleveland, Akron, Youngstown and Canton area a convenient and efficient solution to earning our MPH in optimum time,” expressed Sonia Alemagno, Ph.D., dean of the College of Public Health at Kent State, in a press release. “This is our answer to the growing preferred education requirements of public health professionals in Ohio and the world.”

The program provides the competitive edge today's health professionals need to compete globally. Global field leadership from faculty like Ken Zakariasen, Ph.D., ensures graduates of this program are equipped with the skills and knowledge to become the next leaders. His work is published in international journals, such as the Journal of Learning and the Journal of Healthcare Leadership. Zakariasen's studies focus on innovative whole-systems approaches to organizational strategy and change, as well as leadership and leadership team development – “big-picture” thinking. Zakariasen successfully led a recognized MPH leadership/organizational change program at the University of Alberta.

“Our world today needs more leaders well-prepared to take on the complex health challenges of our society – and of other societies around the world,” Zakariasen stated. “I am excited to share what I have learned and experienced in preparing future leaders who will catalyze the change processes that will continuously improve our health systems.”

Those enrolled can experience onsite courses like Emerging Issues in Health Policy and Management and Health Care Systems. The program can include short-term experiences in the health care systems of other countries. In addition, the practicum can be completed as a change intervention designed and implemented within professional's current organizations.

Applications are still being accepted for the Fall 2012 semester. Please note that a limited number of scholarships are available. For more details, please visit http://publichealth-emph.com/.

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News Headline: KENT STATE OFFERS NEW MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH DEGREE PROGRAM (Alemagno) | Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, June 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's College of Public Health is pleased to announce the new Master of Public Health (MPH) degree in Health Policy and Management, Leadership elective.This unique graduate degree is designed for working health professionals who want to gain advanced skills in organizational change and leadership development.The program is conveniently offered at the new Kent State University Regional Academic Center in Twinsburg, Ohio, with courses offered on Tuesday evenings.Sequential courses are 5-8 weeks in duration, and the entire sequence can be completed in two years.

"We are thrilled to now be able to offer the healthcare professional in Cleveland, Akron, Youngstown and Canton area a convenient and efficient solution to earning our MPH in optimum time," expressed Sonia Alemagno, Ph.D., dean of the College of Public Health at Kent State."This is our answer to the growing preferred education requirements of public health professionals in Ohio and the world."

The program provides the competitive edge today's health professionals need to compete globally.Global field leadership from faculty like Ken Zakariasen, Ph.D., ensures graduates of this program are equipped with the skills and knowledge to become the next leaders.His work is published in international journals, such as the Journal of Learning and the Journal of Healthcare Leadership.Zakariasen's studies focus on innovative whole-systems approaches to organizational strategy and change, as well as leadership and leadership team development - "big-picture" thinking.Zakariasen successfully led a recognized MPH leadership/organizational change program at the University of Alberta.

"Our world today needs more leaders well-prepared to take on the complex health challenges of our society - and of other societies around the world," Zakariasen stated."I am excited to share what I have learned and experienced in preparing future leaders who will catalyze the change processes that will continuously improve our health systems."

Those enrolled can experience onsite courses like Emerging Issues in Health Policy and Management and Health Care Systems.The program can include short-term experiences in the health care systems of other countries.In addition, the practicum can be completed as a change intervention designed and implemented within professional's current organizations.

Applications are still being accepted for the Fall 2012 semester.Please note that a limited number of scholarships are available.For more details, please visit http://publichealth-emph.com/.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Crain's panel addresses benefits, pitfalls of multi-generational work force (Walker) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Crain's continued its 2012 Ideas at Dawn Business Breakfast Series on Thursday morning with a panel discussion on ways to bridge the generational gap in the workplace. The breakfast, sponsored by Kent State University and underwritten, like all Crain's breakfasts, by Kaiser Permanente, was held at the Ritz-Carlton Cleveland.

Often, these days, different generations — baby boomers, Generation X and millennials, also referred to as Gen Y — are clashing in the workplace, either due to perceived characteristics mentioned by panelists or through actual abilities and deficiencies in the workplace.

Yet each generation brings talents that companies should be able to use to their advantage.

Bob Walker, the director of the school of digital sciences at Kent State, said boomers, for instance, carry institutional knowledge, both of company and industry, that can be valuable, while younger employees bring a wealth of technological knowledge that companies can use.

The latter, of course, presents its own problems, he said: Younger employees wanting to use their personal electronic devices for company purposes, while potentially making them more efficient, also can open companies to potential danger when it comes to losing intellectual property.

Christine Ferrone of Ernst & Young said members of different generations often are competing for the same jobs, due most likely to recessionary factors. That can create tension in the workplace, she said.

Managers can help ease any of that tension, said Alan Loos, a manager of information technology at FedEx International Clearance & Supply Chain, by asking what challenges the different generations in their offices are facing.

“Successful managers these days are doing a lot less talking and a lot more listening, more coaching,” Mr. Loos said.

Evan Ishida, the senior manager of performance and learning consulting at Eaton Corp., said companies should incorporate ways to engage younger employees outside the office, as a way to keep them connected to their work. That can include volunteer activities and other participatory offerings.

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News Headline: Local news briefs -- June 26 - KENT STATE | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Director promoted

KENT: Kent State University has promoted Marcello Fantoni to associate provost for global education.

He will make $170,000 in the new position.

Fantoni has been director of KSU's program in Florence, Italy, since 2005 and manager of KSU's European studies programs since 2011. He also teaches historical studies in architecture and urban design.

Fantoni will begin his new job in August. He replaces Mary Anne Saunders, who took a similar position at the University of New Mexico

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News Headline: Thor Wasbotten hired to direct Kent State's journalism school (Wearden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication has hired Thor Wasbotten as its new director. Wasbotten will join the university July 1 to replace Jeff Fruit, who stepped down after 10 years as the school's leader to teach full time.

Wasbotten most recently served as the assistant dean for student media and online operations at The Pennsylvania State University, where he also was a senior lecturer of journalism.

"Mr. Wasbotten comes to Kent State University with strong leadership experience in several important arenas: television, student media, academics and accreditation," said Dr. Stanley T. Wearden, dean of the College of Communication and Information at KSU. "He is highly regarded both in the media industry and in the academic community. He is a skilled communicator and a visionary with regard to both media technology and curriculum. We are confident he will be a great asset to the College of Communication and Information leadership team."

Wasbotten's former academic appointments include time as a visiting professor at the Shanghai International Studies University; participation in the Broadcasters-in-Residence Program at the University of Oklahoma; and teaching as an instructor at Pacific University and as a gradate fellow at the University of Oregon in Eugene, Ore.

"I look forward to working with a tremendous faculty with strong academic and professional credentials," Wasbotten said. "I'm eager to work in a building which serves as a national model for effective infrastructure and educational support, and I'm excited to serve the energized and engaged JMC students who believe in Kent State and their education."

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News Headline: Cleveland State University-Northeast Ohio Medical University partnership | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Receives grant from Mt. Sinai Health Care Foundation: Higher Education

Kent State University seeks grandmothers raising grandchildren: Project C.O.P.E. (Caring for Others as a Positive Experience) is looking for grandmothers in Northeast Ohio to participate in a research study.
The study will compare different ways to support grandmothers raising grandchildren between ages four and 12 without the help of birthparents.
During the 10-week program, grandmothers will receive a curriculum-based program to support them in raising their grandchildren. At each session, participants will be provided with a meal and childcare. Grandmothers also will be asked to complete a total of six assessments over a two-year period. After each assessment, the participant will receive a $35 check to cover travel expenses.
“Custodial grandparents are a really underserved population,” said Karie Feldman, project director of Kent State's School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences, in a press release. Kent State is one of four universities conducting the study, funded by the National Institute for Nursing Research.
If you are a grandmother who qualifies for this study or know of someone who is, call 855-260-2433 or contact Feldman at grandmothers@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Kent State president launches photography site (Leffton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Kent State President Lester Lefton has added another feather to his cap: professional photographer.

Lefton has launched a website under his name to sell his photos of a wide variety of subjects — everything from a Halifax fishing village to the second-largest Jewish cemetery in Europe to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland.

“I have determined, after great research, that I need an eighth day in every week for photography,” he says on the website.

Lefton does not directly identify himself as head of one of the largest public universities in Ohio. He refers to himself as a university educator/administrator who works “seven days a week, pretty much 24 hours a day” in his quests to “improve America one student at a time” and to “increase artistic sensitivity one pixel at a time.”

Through KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent, he said he is not looking to promote the site and that the photos speak for themselves.

“Photography is one of his hobbies,” Vincent said in an email. “He decided to make his work available online since he is often asked about his photography and getting prints of his work.”

The website stems from Lefton's early love of photography, working in the studio his father owned and operated. The photos come from Lester's wide travels and are accompanied by brief explanations.

One section is devoted to his visits to Florence, Italy, where KSU has a campus he has visited three times since becoming president, most recently in April with friends and alumni. Other collections feature inanimate objects, like vehicles in Havana, and of such people as a street performer in Barcelona, Spain, and a lone KSU football player in the bleachers.

Lefton offers most of his color photos for sale on the website, www.lesterlefton.com. Prices range from $29.99 for an 8-by-10-inch print to $1,131.99 for a premium, 24-by-30-inch giclee watercolor of museum standards. SmugMug, a paid digital photosharing service, handles the ordering and processing of photos.

On the website Lefton says proceeds will go toward a student scholarship: “Buy a print, support a student. What a deal!”

Fans of Lefton's work apparently don't have to buy it to have it around. The work can be copied, distributed and transmitted without cost, although Lefton wants to be credited for the work and it should not be used for commercial purposes.

The website, designed by KSU web coordinator Nick Gehring, includes a casual photo of a smiling Lefton in a blue and yellow plaid shirt.

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News Headline: Mursi keen to renew ties, says Iran media (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Business Day - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Egypt's president-elect, Mohamed Mursi, has voiced interest in restoring ties with Tehran to create a strategic ‘balance' in the region

FOREIGN STAFF

EGYPT's president-elect, Mohamed Mursi, voiced interest in restoring ties with Tehran to create a strategic "balance" in the region, in an interview published yesterday with Iran's Fars news agency.

Mr Mursi's comments are likely to unsettle western powers as they try to isolate Iran over its disputed nuclear programme.

Since former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak was toppled by a popular uprising last year, both countries have signalled their interest in renewing ties severed more than 30 years ago.

"We must restore normal relations with Iran based on shared interests, and expand areas of political co-ordination and economic cooperation because this will create a balance of pressure in the region," Mr Mursi was quoted as saying.

Fars said it had spoken to Mr Mursi a few hours before Sunday's announcement that declared him the winner of the presidential election. Mr Mursi denied reports yesterday that his first state visit would be to Saudi Arabia.

In his first televised address, on Sunday night, Mr Mursi called for national unity, reassured women and Christians their rights would be protected and pledged to heal rifts that had deepened in the 16 months since Mr Mubarak's overthrow. He saluted the people killed during the revolution and their families and also paid tribute to the armed forces.

Some of Mr Mursi's more ambitious pledges — to implement Islamic sharia, for example — could be shelved as the realities of a country deeply divided by the idea of Muslim Brotherhood rule are realised.

Mr Mursi does not have a parliament to pass such legislation, although he will form both a presidential administration and appoint a prime minister and government. The Brotherhood-led legislature, elected in January, was dissolved by the generals, who have given themselves the power over legislation.

"Mursi's thinking was to get a foothold in the presidency and to use some of the informal powers that come with it — being the figurehead — to try to slowly accumulate powers to offset the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces ," said Joshua Stacher, a political scientist at Kent State University. "But what we have is a situation where the civilian, elected president will be taking the blame for Egypt's continuing problems, while the military council is above such criticism. It has become king-like."

Fars yesterday also quoted Mr Mursi as saying Egypt's Camp David peace accord with Israel "will be reviewed", without elaborating. The peace treaty remains a linchpin of US Middle East policy and was the cornerstone of Israeli security. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said he respected the results of Egypt's democratic process and hoped the peace agreement would remain intact. Israel has labelled Brotherhood members "terrorists".

A spokesman for Catherine Ashton, the European Union's foreign policy chief, said she hoped the new president would be "representative of Egypt's diversity".

As in Cairo, ecstatic residents in the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip flocked into the streets and fired guns in the air in celebration.

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News Headline: Should you go gluten-free? Start with correct information: Your Turn | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Sun News Readers
News OCR Text: Guest Columnist

“Gluten-free” remains a hot topic in both the healthcare field and the food industry. There is no shortage of gluten-free diet books, cookbooks, specialty foods, or celebrities proclaiming the benefits of this diet. Having correct information will allow you to know fact from fiction and make appropriate choices for your health.

Gluten is found in wheat, rye, and barley and is not totally digested by the stomach. In most people, this is not a problem. However, people with Celiac Disease suffer from several complications when they eat gluten. The body has a negative reaction to gluten and the small intestine becomes damaged. As a result, the body cannot properly absorb essential nutrients from food. Celiac Disease affects one in every 133 people in the United State and can occur at any point in your life.

Some common symptoms of Celiac Disease include abdominal pain, bloating, gas, indigestion, constipation, decreased appetite, diarrhea, lactose intolerance, nausea, vomiting, and unexplained weight loss. If Celiac Disease is left untreated, other symptoms such as depression, anxiety, itchy skin, seizures, and easy bruising may eventually develop. If you have been experiencing many of these symptoms regularly, discuss them with your healthcare provider to see if you should be tested for Celiac Disease.

It is best not to “self-diagnose” when it comes to Celiac Disease. Doing so may lead to incorrect results. If you suspect that you have Celiac Disease, one of the most important things to do is to keep the gluten-containing foods in your diet to be sure test results are accurate. There are several blood tests used to detect Celiac Disease, but the final diagnosis is with a small bowel biopsy. Again, once Celiac Disease is confirmed by your healthcare provider, the only treatment is eating a gluten-free diet for life.

Gluten-free diets have recently been promoted as a way to lose weight. However, this is not supported by any scientific research. In fact, some gluten-free foods can have just as many, if not more, calories or carbohydrates than foods with gluten. Eliminating gluten-containing foods without proper guidance from a physician or registered dietitian can also lead to deficiencies in important nutrients found in grains, such as fiber and the B vitamins. Some people also believe that a gluten-free diet may improve symptoms of autism, but this has not been proven by any scientific studies.Before you eliminate gluten from your diet, make sure that it is for an appropriate reason and that you do it in a healthy, informed way.

For more information about Celiac Disease, visit www.celiac.org.

Olena Gudz is a Kent State University graduate student/dietetic intern with the WIC Division of the Medina County Health Department.

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News Headline: Common memory problems solved | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: FOXNews.com
Contact Name: Hallie Levine Sklar
News OCR Text: So you keep misplacing your keys and walking into the living room without remembering why. That doesn't mean you've got early Alzheimer's: "Normal memory problems—like being a little forgetful—start as early as age 27," said Dr. Majid Fotuhi, chairman of the Neurology Institute for Brain Health and Fitness in Baltimore and author of The Memory Cure.

Luckily, your memory is like a muscle, Fotuhi says—you can exercise it and improve it at any age. Here are some smart moves to help you do just that.

Problem #1: Stress

The lowdown: "In our fast-paced, wired world, many of us live our lives in chronic stress," said Dr. Gary Small, director of the UCLA Longevity Center and author of The Alzheimer's Prevention Program. That means we're perpetually bathing our brains in stress hormones like cortisol. The result? Studies done in mice show that chronically elevated stress hormone levels shrink the hippocampus, so you're less likely to form new memories.

You get a similar result if you're struggling with depression. "Some studies suggest that depressed individuals have fewer hippocampal neurons," said Dr. Gary Kennedy, director of the division of geriatric psychiatry at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. Other research has found that depressed people have lower levels of brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF), a protein that promotes the health of brain neurons, and thus boosts memory function.

The Rx: Unfortunately, there's no way to get rid of stress entirely. But you can at least try to keep your anxiety levels at a minimum. Small's number-one tactic? Meditation. One recent Harvard study found that participants who meditated for about 30 minutes a day over eight weeks increased their hippocampus size.

"Meditation also fires up the frontal areas of the brain that are associated with attention," Small said. That means you'll be less likely to focus on feeling stressed or down, and more able to concentrate on the tasks at hand, so you can actually remember what's going on.

Here's a super easy way to start: Get comfortable and begin breathing slowly and deeply. Expand your rib cage as you inhale; feel your abdomen rise with each intake of breath. Stay relaxed and focus on each breath in and out. Start with three minutes and work up to 30.

If you suspect you're depressed—say, you're having persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" feelings that last more than a couple of weeks, and other symptoms such as fatigue, irritability, and loss of interest in hobbies—get a referral for a good psychologist or psychiatrist, who can provide counseling and possibly medication.

__________________________________________________

More from Health.com

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Problem #2: Estrogen in Flux

The lowdown: In addition to its many other bodily functions, estrogen may help keep women's brains sharp, Small said. The hormone increases the concentration of an enzyme needed to synthesize the memory-boosting brain chemical acetylcholine and enhances communication between neurons in your hippocampus.

So it's no surprise that we often experience brain fog during a time of life when estrogen levels wax and wane: A study published in the journal Neurology found that 60 percent of women going through perimenopause, when estrogen levels are sputtering out, reported decreased memory. And a study from the UK found that expectant moms—who experience wild surges of estrogen—performed worse on certain types of memory tests, and that those changes were still present three months after the women gave birth.

The Rx: If you're going through menopause, talk to your doctor about going on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for a year or two, Small suggested. The Neurology study found that women who start HRT in perimenopause (before menopause, when periods stop completely) have better memory and cognitive function than those who go on it post-menopause. Even if you opt against HRT, there's good news: Your cognitive function should rebound after menopause, once your body has had a chance to adjust to its newly stabilized hormone levels.

Problem #3: Weight and sleep troubles

The lowdown: Memory problems are often attributable to (changeable!) lifestyle factors. Take weight: A 2010 study found that for every one-point increase in a woman's BMI (body mass index), her memory score dropped by one point.

If you're thin and a couch potato, you're still at risk. "There's a link between physical fitness, which improves blood flow, and brain volume," Fotuhi said. "Exercise can actually increase the size of the hippocampus."

Lack of sleep impairs your memory, too. "When you're sleep deprived, your stress-hormone levels increase, which is toxic to your neurons," Fotuhi explained.

The Rx: If you're overweight, losing weight should help: A 2011 Kent State University study, for example, found that people who underwent bariatric surgery improved their memory loss 12 weeks post-procedure. And especially if you're feeling less than sharp, make a good night's sleep a priority.

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News Headline: Men, women see 'get fit' ads differently | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: FUTURITY
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Futurity: Discover the Future

Men, women see 'get fit' ads differently

For overweight women, "featuring weight loss as the reason to exercise not only decreases intrinsic motivation, it also worsens body image," says Michelle Segar. "This is not true for men." (Credit: iStockphoto )

U. MICHIGAN (US) — Overweight women are motivated by exercise programs that promote "daily well-being" in ads, but terms like "weight loss" and "health" are what get men moving, a new study shows.

Researchers investigated whether reading a one-page advertisement featuring one of those three reasons would influence intrinsic motivation for exercising, and whether men and women respond differently.

Straight from the Source

Read the original study

DOI: 10.1155/2012/354721

The study, funded by National Institutes of Health, was conducted among 1,690 overweight and obese women and men between 40 and 60 years old.

"Exercise is frequently prescribed as a way to lose weight," says principal investigator Michelle Segar, associate director for the Sport, Health, and Activity Research and Policy (SHARP) Center for Women and Girls and research investigator at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at the University of Michigan .

"But promoting activity primarily for weight loss may backfire among overweight women. Our findings suggest that featuring weight loss as the reason to exercise not only decreases intrinsic motivation, it also worsens body image. This is not true for men."

To optimally motivate both men and women to be physically active, public health marketing and messages may need to target gender, she says.

"For men, promoting exercise for weight loss or better health may be effective. But for women, messages might be more motivating if they highlighted the connection between exercise and well-being. We should consider rebranding exercise for women," Segar says.

Published in Journal of Obesity�s current special issue on Self-regulation, Motivation, and Psychosocial Factors in Weight Management, the study extends research on participation showing that intrinsic motivation for exercising—finding pleasure in exercise—helps people stick with it. It also builds on previous research suggesting that overweight women who exercise for immediately experienced benefits, such as well being, participate more than those who exercise for weight loss or health benefits.

Researchers from Kent State University contributed to the study.

More news from University of Michigan: http://www.ns.umich.edu/new/

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News Headline: Bill Beard honored with United Way's service award (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Herald-Mail - Online
Contact Name: Tim Rasinski
News OCR Text: First Data receives Caring Award for Service Excellence

Bill Beard, left, gets a pat on the shoulder from Bob Barnhart after Beard was named the 2012 Jesse Kagle Award recipient Monday at the United Way of Washington County's annual dinner. (By Ric Dugan/Staff Photographer / June 25, 2012)

By DAVE McMILLION davem@herald-mail.com

Bill Beard received the Jesse L. Kagle Jr. Service Award Monday night for his service to Washington County during an annual dinner and report to the community from the United Way of Washington County.

The award is given to remember the community spirit shown by the late Jesse L. Kagle Jr., who was the United Way's executive director for 24 years.

Beard, who was honored during a banquet at Fountain Head Country Club, has made the county more accessible to people with disabilities and is the “go-to ramp guy,” according to biographical information provided to The Herald-Mail. Beard founded the Corporation for Assistive Technology, where he designs and builds ramps for wheelchair-bound residents.

Beard has also worked with Many Individuals Helping Individuals, or MIHI, on various projects, including a playground project at Halfway Park, has been instrumental in creating and serving on the Human Services Transportation Coordination Subcommittee of the Washington County Developmental Disabilities Advisory Committee and has helped train people working to start small businesses through SCORE.

Beard was also a 2007 recipient of the Community Foundation's People's Choice Award, has worked on the Strategic Community Impact Planning process, known as SCIP, has served on the United Way of Washington County's board of directors and has been president of the Washington County Commission on Aging.

Beard made brief remarks after walking to the podium to receive the award.

“It's really fun volunteering. It's the way you stay healthy,” Beard told the estimated 115 people in attendance.

First Data won the Robert T. Barnhart Day of Caring Award for Service Excellence for its work on Day of Caring, where volunteers fan out throughout the county every year to work on projects.

During the banquet, United Way officials outlined how they are spending their money from the organization's annual fundraising campaign. Last year's campaign raised $1.62 million. Besides funding programs related to health services and other organizations like Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and a local cold-weather shelter, the United Way this year is focusing on enhanced learning opportunities for local children during the summer.

Officials at the dinner talked about “learning loss” that kids can experience during the summer when they are away from school, and the United Way program focused on the importance of reading.

The keynote speaker was Timothy Rasinski, a professor of literacy education at Kent State University. Rasinski has authored, co-authored and edited more than 15 books and curriculum programs on reading education.

He is also co-author of the award-winning fluency program called Fluency First, published by the Wright Group.

Rasinski talked about troubling statistics related to childhood literacy, including that one-third of the country's fourth-graders are reading below level.

Rasinski talked about other ways to inspire children's interest in reading, such as returning to the practice of singing in class.

“It just makes sense. In order to look forward, we have to sometimes look backward,” said Rasinski, who led the group in song at one point.

Peter E. Perini Sr., co-chairman of the 2012 United Way campaign, talked about how United Way officials have been in touch with Washington County Public Schools Superintendent Clayton Wilcox about how to work together on childhood literacy efforts.

The crowd also heard from Christina Thompson, who talked about her life-changing experience at Girls Inc., where she was exposed to a library of books.

“We want to take it to the next level,” Perini said.

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News Headline: Drew Carey is guest for Cleveland taping of NPR show | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Producers for NPR's award-winning quiz show "Wait Wait . . . Don't Tell Me" wanted a very special guest star for Thursday night's Cleveland taping at PlayhouseSquare's State Theatre. Don't tell me: they wanted Drew Carey. And they got him.

The Cleveland native and host of CBS' "The Price Is Right" is coming home to participate in the 7:30 p.m. State Theatre taping. Featured in the "Not My Job" segment, Carey will be asked questions about a profession outside his realm of expertise.

He's no newcomer to "Wait Wait . . . Don't Tell Me." The comedian was interviewed as a "Not My Job" guest for a February 2008 episode. He also was on the on the show's three-celebrity panel in April 2008.

With WKSU FM/89.7 and WCPN FM/90.3 as hosts for the evening, "Wait Wait . . . Don't Tell Me" quizmaster Peter Sagal and official judge and scorekeeper Carl Kasell will be joined on stage by panelists Mo Rocca, Kyrie O'Connor and Alonzo Bodden. Tickets ($31 to $66) are now on sale for the event through the PlayhouseSquare box office: 216-241-6000 and 866-546-1353 or online at playhousesquare.org. The episode will be aired at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 30, on WKSU and at 2 p.m. Sunday, July 1, on WCPN.

In its 14th season, the fast-paced "Wait Wait . . . Don't Tell Me" challenges panelists and listeners with a series of games based on current events. Regular segments include "Not My Job," "The Limerick Challenge," "Who's Carl This Time?" and a final-panelist lightning round. A co-production of NPR and WBEZ in Chicago, it attracts a weekly national audience of 3.2 million people. It ranks second only "Car Talk" on the list of NPR's highest-rated weekend programming.

"Who's Carl This Time?" allows veteran broadcaster Kassel to toss aside his serious image by impersonating the week's newsmakers and having listeners guess is identity.

This is the show's second visit to Northeast Ohio. An episode was taped in 2003 at Akron's Civic Theatre.

Carey, a former United States Marine Reservist and Kent State University student, has been the host of "The Price Is Right" since the fall of 2007. Carey, 54, is best known as the co-creator and star of ABC's "The Drew Carey Show" (1995-2004), which was set in Cleveland. During the long run of this sitcom, Carey also did double duty as the host of the improvisational comedy series "Whose Line Is It Anyway?"

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News Headline: The HeldenFiles Online: Drew Carey Joins "Wait Wait" Cleveland Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Drew Carey will appear in the "Not My Job" segment when the NPR series "Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me" tapes a show in Cleveland's State Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. The segment of the quiz/comedy show has celebrities answering questions whimsically connected to their work. For instance, "Stand By Me" director Rob Reiner answered questions about people you would not want standing by you, and "The World According to Garp" author John Irving answered questions about gorp, another name for trail mix.

Carey is a fan of the program, having done "Not My Job" before in 2008 and being a guest panelist that same year. Where some celebs are on the show by telephone, I am told Carey will be in the State Theatre on Thursday.

The show is taped for later broadcast, with tapings running longer than the on-air version, so the show promises more onstage than you will hear on radio.

Other details: . Host Peter Sagal and Official Judge and Scorekeeper Carl Kasell will be joined on stage by Mo Rocca, Kyrie O'Connor and Alonzo Bodden. Tickets are now on sale through the PlayhouseSquare box office – (216) 241-6000 or (866) 546-1353 or online at www.playhousesquare.org. [Prices are $31 to $66, not counting service charges.]

The live show in Cleveland is co-hosted by 89.7 WKSU and 90.3 WCPN ideastream. The event will be taped and edited for broadcast on NPR stations nationwide the weekend of June 30 and July 1. WKSU airs the program Saturdays at 11 a.m. and it is heard on 90.3 WCPN at 2 p.m. on Sundays

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