Report Overview:
Total Clips (19)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Students (1)
Alumni (2)
Art, School of; KSU Museum (1)
Blossom Music (1)
Blossom Music; Theatre and Dance (2)
College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Corporate and Community Services (1)
KSU at Salem (2)
KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (1)
KSU Museum (2)
Music; Town-Gown (2)
Psychology (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Students (1)
Veterans, Active Duty Converge on Special Job Fair 07/04/2012 Military.com Text Attachment Email

...hiring fair would change his luck. "I've applied for over 100 jobs online -- with no success so far," said Feathers, who graduates in December from Kent State University's exercise science program. "It's been really hard after I got out of the military to find a job. I thought being in the military...


Alumni (2)
Columnists to offer local view 07/04/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...Community College and Liberty University. She's the owner / director of Yoder Supported Living Services Inc. James Dunlap - The Mineral Ridge resident is a Kent State University graduate with a degree in business management with an emphasis on economics. He also attended Carson Long Military Institute...

FirstEnergy Names Mark Jones Vice President of External Affairs for Jersey Central Power & Light 07/03/2012 Electric Energy T&D Magazine - Online Text Attachment Email

...External Affairs manager. In 2011, he was named director of National Accounts and Customer Support. Jones earned a bachelor's degree in technology from Kent State University in Kent, Ohio. FirstEnergy is a diversified energy company dedicated to safety, reliability and operational excellence. Its...


Art, School of; KSU Museum (1)
ART BEST BETS 07/05/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Blossom Music (1)
CLASSICAL 07/05/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Blossom Music; Theatre and Dance (2)
Porthouse season continues with 'And the World Goes 'Round' 07/04/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

Porthouse Theatre will next stage "And the World Goes 'Round" July 5 through 21. The show consists of an eclectic collection of love songs, torch...

Porthouse season continues with 'And the World Goes 'Round' 07/05/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Porthouse Theatre will next stage "And the World Goes 'Round" July 5 through 21. The show consists of an eclectic collection of love songs, torch...


College of Nursing (CON) (2)
Study shows man's best friend is great for students, too 07/04/2012 Gainesville Sun - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...recently. “I always feel loved.” Nearly 25 percent of college students believed their pets helped them get through difficult times, according to a recent Ohio State University study. The study also found that students owning at least one dog, one cat or a combination of the two were less likely to...

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Awards Grants to 55 Schools of Nursing 07/04/2012 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...succeed in school, and thrive in the workforce." In this fifth year of the program, the following schools were awarded grants: Allen College Ashland University Bellarmine University Boston College California State University-Northridge College of Mount St. Joseph College...


Corporate and Community Services (1)
Train Tracks 07/05/2012 Inside Business Magazine (Northeast Ohio) Text Attachment Email


KSU at Salem (2)
Business news briefs -- July 03 - KSU offers insurance degree 07/04/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State will offer a bachelor's degree in insurance studies beginning with the fall semester. The degree - the first of its kind being offered...

METRO DIGEST || Garden tour 07/05/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...Vivian's Antiques & Collectibles in Columbiana. Reservations also may be made by calling 330-332-1632. The starting point for the tour is the plaza at Kent State City Center, 230 N Lincoln Ave. Proceeds benefit the restoration of the Victorian house on North Lincoln Avenue, the future home of The...


KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (1)
Ohio New Markets Tax Credit Program Supports Low-Income Communities 07/04/2012 Diversity Plus Magazine - Online Text Attachment Email

...Credit program in 2012 totaling $20 million. DFWR has identified five potential projects that would benefit from an Ohio New Markets award, including the Kent State University Foundation, Platinum Inn Ovation Hotel, Oberlin Gateway, Ashlawn Energy, and Vadxx Energy. Finance Fund (Statewide) will...


KSU Museum (2)
Kent State University museum receives $1.1 million cash gift (Crawford) 07/04/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Museum has received a $1.1 million donation - its largest cash gift ever -- from local business leader and Kent State...

Kent State University museum receives $1.1 million cash gift (Crawford) 07/05/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Museum has received a $1.1 million donation - its largest cash gift ever -- from local business leader and Kent State...


Music; Town-Gown (2)
Patriotic concert tonight in Kent 07/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

On With The Show - MUSICAL ACTIVITIES 07/04/2012 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

July 5 -- Kent State Communiversity Band, 7, Hometown Plaza, Main and Water streets in Kent.


Psychology (1)
Summer routine can ease kids' anxiety (Flessner) 07/05/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The days are getting hotter and longer... and the kids are home from school; what's a parent to do? According to Dr. Christopher A. Flessner, Kent State University, summer vacation usually signals a change in routine, which often leads to anxiety. "Most kids -- like adults -- thrive on...


University Press (1)
Heal Time (Marino) 07/05/2012 Inside Business Magazine (Northeast Ohio) Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Veterans, Active Duty Converge on Special Job Fair | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Military.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Joe Gojevic thought his military background would help him find work in the private sector.

But the college-educated, bilingual Middlefield Village resident has been underemployed for 26 months.

"It's been a long road," said the 39-year-old Gojevic. "The financial institution I worked at for a decade ended up closing. Now, I'm working part-time in business administration. It's difficult to feed your family on that."

Gojevic was one of an estimated 350 to 400 veterans and active duty military members who attended the 2012 Hiring Our Heroes Hiring Fair at the Wolstein Center in Cleveland on Friday. The free event was also open to Guard and Reserve members and eligible spouses.

Gojevic has a master's degree in business administration from Case Western University, speaks Croatian and served his country in the U.S. Army from 1992 to 1996. He wants a full-time job for the sake of his wife and two children, ages 4 and 9.

"I find employers would step away from me because they can't accept that I am willing to accept the bottom of the totem pole," said Gojevic, smartly-dressed in a black suit and tie. "Today, I wanted to meet people face-to-face. I came here to stand out."

Daniel Feathers, a 26-year-old Stow resident who served in Iraq in the Marine Corps, was hoping the hiring fair would change his luck.

"I've applied for over 100 jobs online -- with no success so far," said Feathers, who graduates in December from Kent State University's exercise science program. "It's been really hard after I got out of the military to find a job. I thought being in the military would make it easier to find a meaningful career, but it hasn't."

About 100 employers and veterans services organizations registered for the event.

Cassie Sisler, human resources administrator for Republic Steel -- which has plants in Lorain and Canton -- said her company has 400 salaried and hourly positions open.

"We're trying to reach out to Lorain folks," she said. "We need these people, and we need them yesterday. Our benefits are excellent, and we have a 401(k) match."

Sisler added that Republic Steel is opening Electric Arc Furnace in Lorain in the summer of 2013 -- an $85 million project.

"The new opening will give us the ability to roll and melt steel at both facilities," she said. "We're hiring weekly. It's absolutely huge."

Job seekers were also interested in STERIS Corp. positions in Mentor.

STERIS recruiter John Carter said the global manufacturer of infection prevention products places a huge emphasis on diversity hiring -- focusing on veterans.

"We have dozens of open positions," he said. "A lot of military job classifications correlate to the (engineering and manufacturing) jobs we have here."

Linda Wright-Manuel, human resources manager for Enginetics Aerospace in Eastlake, said she's looking for trained engineers, general assemblers, material handlers, tool makers and CNC operators.

"I know the individuals who served our country in the military are dedicated and hard workers," she said. "Since we make engine parts, people's lives are at stake."

Shaun Carter, a spokesman for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's Hiring Our Heroes National Chamber Foundation, said about 12 percent of veterans are unemployed right now. For those ages 18 to 24, the number rises to 25 percent.

"I really think it's unfortunate that our heroes have such a high unemployment rate," he said.

Nationwide, military job fairs have connected about 10,000 veterans with jobs, Shaun Carter said.

In 2013, companies that hire veterans will receive tax credits. Companies that hire disabled vets who have looked for work for more than six months will receive as much as $9,600 in tax credits.

The VOW to Hire Veterans Act that was signed into law last year also provides better job training and counseling for unemployed veterans.

Terry Stone, director of AMVETS Post No. 32 in Elyria, was at the job fair trying to spread the word about what the local career center has to offer vets.

"I get a lot of veterans who don't know how to run a computer well enough," said Stone. "We offer free college-level courses for that. We also help with resume writing, interview skills and personal appearance for interviews."

The job fair also had experts on hand who could help people start their own businesses.

Nick Early, director of the Veterans Business Resource Council, said his organization can teach veterans how to market and sell their product, keep records, do their taxes and write contracts through a free, 18-week program for entrepreneurs.

"We've gotten a good response today," said Early, a Vietnam veteran who was injured in a helicopter crash.

Cleveland resident Jack McLaughlin, a 44-year-old Navy veteran of the Persian Gulf War, said he was feeling hopeless about ever finding work again until he attended the job fair.

"Before, my situation was really grim. I've been laid off for over a year," McLaughlin said as he left the event. "But this was wonderful. I think I have some great job leads. Coming here today was really a blessing."

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News Headline: Columnists to offer local view | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Tribune Chronicle is unveiling another year of community columnists beginning today.

Every 12 months, the Tribune seeks four Trumbull County residents to serve as community columnists on the Opinion page. Each one writes a column every two weeks. They appear mostly on Tuesdays and Fridays.

The goal is to increase the number of columns that contain topics of local interest. The newspaper wants to do this while displaying the local flair penned by friends and neighbors. The four columnists, after all, live right here in the community, unlike the syndicated pros.

Talented local writers have surpassed expectations. The Tribune Chronicle Editorial Board is excited about the new columnists doing the same.

This year's lineup includes:

Martha Yoder - The Farmington resident has spent most of her life in Trumbull County. She attended Lakeland Community College and Liberty University. She's the owner / director of Yoder Supported Living Services Inc.

James Dunlap - The Mineral Ridge resident is a Kent State University graduate with a degree in business management with an emphasis on economics. He also attended Carson Long Military Institute in New Bloomfield, Pa. He is an overhead crane operator in the V&M Star pipe mill.

Cynthia Beckes O'Connor - The Brookfield resident has a B.A. in American History from Cleveland State, an M.Ed. in higher education administration from Kent State and a B.L.S. in international education from Kent State. She has previously been published in the Plain Dealer, Dog Gone Magazine and Phi Beta Delta Medallion Magazine.

Dan Moadus - The lifelong Girard resident had served several terms as a city councilman. He has operated a family business - American Auto Painting - for the past 17 years.

Beginning today, Opinion page readers will get to know these Trumbull residents and in the process gain fresh perspectives on a plethora of topics.

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News Headline: FirstEnergy Names Mark Jones Vice President of External Affairs for Jersey Central Power & Light | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Electric Energy T&D Magazine - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Akron, OH, July 3, 2012 - FirstEnergy Corp. (NYSE: FE) recently named Mark A. Jones vice president of External Affairs for its Jersey Central Power & Light (JCP&L) subsidiary. Previously, Jones was director of National Accounts and Customer Service for FirstEnergy.

In his new position, Jones is responsible for JCP&L's external affairs efforts. His duties include supervising JCP&L's eight area managers who interact with local government and agency officials in the company's northern and central New Jersey service areas. In addition, Jones oversees JCP&L's Customer Support Group, which provides ongoing support to the company's commercial and industrial accounts in the region.

"Exceptional customer service has been the trademark of Mark's time with FirstEnergy," said Donald M. Lynch, president, JCP&L. "His extensive interpersonal communications experience will be put to good use as we continue to enhance our local outreach efforts in the communities we serve."

Jones joined FirstEnergy in 1999 as an industrial account executive with The Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company (CEI), another FirstEnergy subsidiary. In 2000, he was named national account executive with FirstEnergy Solutions, the company's competitive subsidiary and in 2003, he joined the Supply Chain Group for FirstEnergy's utility operations. In 2006, Jones was promoted to area manager at CEI and then named External Affairs manager. In 2011, he was named director of National Accounts and Customer Support.

Jones earned a bachelor's degree in technology from Kent State University in Kent, Ohio.

FirstEnergy is a diversified energy company dedicated to safety, reliability and operational excellence. Its 10 electric distribution companies comprise one of the nation's largest investor-owned electric systems. Its diverse generating fleet features non-emitting nuclear, scrubbed baseload coal, natural gas, hydro and pumped-storage hydro and other renewables, and has a total generating capacity of nearly 23,000 megawatts. www.firstenergycorp.com

Patti L. Michel

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News Headline: ART BEST BETS | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life — Through Aug. 26 at Kent State University Museum, 515 Hilltop Drive. 330-672-3450.

ARTISTS, TEACHERS, LOVERS — Through Aug. 1 at the Kent State University's School of Art Gallery, on the second floor of the School of Art building, Kent State University. 330-672-1369.

Gallery 6000 presents Snap Crackle Pop — Through July 31 in the Kent State University at Stark University Center Dining Room, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. 330-244-3518

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News Headline: CLASSICAL | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Chamber Player's Concerts — 7:30 p.m. Friday, 2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Ludwig Recital Hall, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent State University. Free. For information, call 330-672-2613 or go to www.kent.edu/blossom.

012 Kent Blossom Music Festival: Romance and Rhapsodies — 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Ludwig Recital Hall, 1325 Theatre Drive, Music and Speech Center, Kent State University. With the Cleveland Orchestra Piano Trio and Friends: Peter Otto, Richard Weiss, Joela Jones, Stan Konopka and Danna Sundet. $15, $5 students and children under 18. 330-672-2613 or www.kent.edu/blossom.

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News Headline: Porthouse season continues with 'And the World Goes 'Round' | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre will next stage "And the World Goes 'Round" July 5 through 21.

The show consists of an eclectic collection of love songs, torch songs, and acerbically witty comic numbers. It was conceived by director Scott Ellis, choreographer Susan Stroman, and librettist David Thompson, who collaborated on such Kander and Ebb shows as "Steel Pier" and the 1996 revival of "Chicago." Coincidentally, the show takes its title from a tune the songwriting team wrote for Liza Minnelli in the film, New York, New York.

"Audiences are really going to enjoy this production because it not only incorporates familiar, high-energy music from such popular musicals as 'Chicago,' 'Cabaret,' and 'New York, New York,' but it also has comic elements to it as well," said director and choreographer Sean Morrissey. Morrissey is the interim chair of the department of theatre and dance at Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois.

The production features the talents of the Porthouse Theatre Young Professional Company, which is made up of musical theatre majors and recent graduates from such universities as Kent State, Baldwin Wallace, Millikin, Oakland, and Marshall.

Porthouse Theatre is on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m,. or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online.

Tickets are $25 to $33 for adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students.

The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent.

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News Headline: Porthouse season continues with 'And the World Goes 'Round' | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre will next stage "And the World Goes 'Round" July 5 through 21.

The show consists of an eclectic collection of love songs, torch songs, and acerbically witty comic numbers. It was conceived by director Scott Ellis, choreographer Susan Stroman, and librettist David Thompson, who collaborated on such Kander and Ebb shows as "Steel Pier" and the 1996 revival of "Chicago." Coincidentally, the show takes its title from a tune the songwriting team wrote for Liza Minnelli in the film, New York, New York.

"Audiences are really going to enjoy this production because it not only incorporates familiar, high-energy music from such popular musicals as 'Chicago,' 'Cabaret,' and 'New York, New York,' but it also has comic elements to it as well," said director and choreographer Sean Morrissey. Morrissey is the interim chair of the department of theatre and dance at Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois.

The production features the talents of the Porthouse Theatre Young Professional Company, which is made up of musical theatre majors and recent graduates from such universities as Kent State, Baldwin Wallace, Millikin, Oakland, and Marshall.

Porthouse Theatre is on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m,. or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online.

Tickets are $25 to $33 for adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students.

The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent.

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News Headline: Study shows man's best friend is great for students, too | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gainesville Sun - Online, The
Contact Name: Samantha Block
News OCR Text: At the end of a tough day, Pocket's - all 3 pounds, 2 ounces of tail-wagging unconditional love - is all Valerie Snow needs to forget about the day's worries.

“Seeing my puppy after coming home from a long day of school and work is very rewarding,” Snow, a 20-year-old junior psychology major at the University of Florida, said recently. “I always feel loved.”

Nearly 25 percent of college students believed their pets helped them get through difficult times, according to a recent Ohio State University study.

The study also found that students owning at least one dog, one cat or a combination of the two were less likely to report feeling lonely and depressed.

Previous studies have already suggested that pets can improve the quality of life for those aging or who are chronically ill.

But more recent studies, such as one conducted by OSU's psychology department and published in 2008 in the journal Society and Animals, have shown that they can be beneficial for college students.

The top reason college students chose to own a pet is to avoid loneliness, according to the survey results. It is common for first- and second-year students to feel isolated when they first arrive at college. Students are being thrown into a new environment and expected to find their way.

Sara Staats, lead author of the OSU survey and professor emeritus of psychology at OSU's Newark campus, told Research News at OSU that pets are not a substitute for human social interaction. The pets do, however, provide interaction for those who might otherwise feel isolated in their current environment.

Staats said she doesn't advise everyone to go out and buy a pet. She said, however, that research clearly shows many students can benefit both psychologically and socially from having access to an animal.

Not all student housing allows for pets and busy students may not have the time to properly care for an animal. In recent years, schools from Kent State University to Emory University to Georgetown University have created alternatives - pet-therapy programs to help their students relax.

College libraries are known for their many books, but now at some libraries, students can check out pets, too. Harvard University has a dog, Cooper, who is available Tuesdays and Thursdays for anyone who needs a break. According to the Harvard Health Blog, Cooper is on duty to help students, staff and faculty members who need a little mid-day stress relief.

UF tried something similar this year. At the De-Stress Study Fest, students could interact with cats and dogs. Activities like these on campus are a great alternative for busy students, according to Dr. Thomas Summers, a local psychotherapist and graduate from UF.

Summers uses dogs in his practice and has a Pembroke Welch Corgi, Zeke, who attends his sessions with him. When a client is crying, Zeke sometimes will jump on his or her lap and help console the person. Zeke also will sit at people's feet and nudge them to show them he is there and cares.

“Some of my clients come just to see Zeke, and find it relaxing to take him for a walk and just talk,” said Summers.

Colleges are also starting to create pet-friendly dorms where students can bring their dogs or cats from home. UF has opened new housing for graduate students, The Continuum, which is pet-friendly.

“We realize how stressful graduate school can be and how pets can help relieve that stress,” said Andrea Gardner, an employee at The Continuum and a junior business major at UF.

“There should be more apartments that allow animals so that students have the opportunity to have a loving companion,” said Snow. “I wouldn't give up my dog for anything.

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News Headline: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Awards Grants to 55 Schools of Nursing | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) today announced the schools of nursing that have been selected to participate in RWJF's prestigious New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN). During the 2012-2013 academic year, the schools will receive grants to support students in their accelerated baccalaureate and master's degree nursing programs, who are traditionally underrepresented in the field of nursing and are pursuing a second career in nursing. The NCIN Scholarship Program was launched in 2008 by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to expand enrollment in accelerated degree programs in schools of nursing while increasing diversity in the nursing workforce.

"We need a well-educated, diverse nursing workforce to provide quality care for our changing patient population," said David Krol, MD, MPH, FAAP, program officer for NCIN, RWJF senior program officer and team director of the RWJF Human Capital portfolio. "NCIN is strengthening nursing education and helping to fill the pipeline with capable, culturally-competent nurses."

Schools receiving grants through NCIN provide scholarships directly to students from groups underrepresented in nursing or from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Students who receive the NCIN scholarships—in the amount of $10,000 each—have already earned a bachelor's degree in another field, and are making a career switch to nursing through accelerated nursing degree programs. These programs prepare students to pass the licensure exam required for all registered nurses in as little as 12-18 months and provide quicker routes to workforce eligibility than traditional programs.

Since 2008, the NCIN program has distributed 2,717 scholarships to students at more than 100 unique schools of nursing. This year, funding for 400 scholarships was granted to 55 schools of nursing.

Students also receive other supports to help them meet the demands of an accelerated degree program. All NCIN grantee schools are required to maintain a mentoring program for their scholars, and many offer a pre-entry immersion program to help scholars learn study, test-taking and other skills that will aid them in managing the challenges of the program.

"AACN is proud to collaborate with RWJF on this unique effort. NCIN scholars bring life experience that makes them exceptional, mature nursing candidates, and they represent the diverse, culturally-competent nursing workforce our nation needs," said AACN President Jane Kirschling, DNS, RN, FAAN. "NCIN provides the scholarship and support these students need to succeed in school, and thrive in the workforce."

In this fifth year of the program, the following schools were awarded grants:

Allen College

Ashland University

Bellarmine University

Boston College

California State University-Northridge

College of Mount St. Joseph

College of St. Scholastica

Columbia University

Coppin State University

Creighton University

DePaul University

Duke University

Duquesne University

Edgewood College

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Georgia Health Sciences University

Kent State University

Linfield College

Medical University of South Carolina

MidAmerica Nazarene University

Montana State University

Mount St. Mary's College

Nebraska Methodist College of Nursing and Allied Health

New Mexico State University

New York University

Norfolk State University

Oregon Health & Science University

Quinnipiac University

Rush University Medical Center

Saint Louis University

Samuel Merritt University

Southern Connecticut State University

Stony Brook University

SUNY Downstate

The George Washington University

The University of Tennessee-Knoxville

The University of Texas at El Paso

Thomas Jefferson University

University of California-UCLA

University of Delaware

University of Hawaii

University of Maryland, Baltimore

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

University of Miami

University of Michigan-Flint

University of Mississippi Medical Center

University of Missouri-Columbia

University of Nebraska Medical Center

University of Pennsylvania

University of Rochester School of Nursing

University of Tennessee Health Science Center

University of Wyoming

West Virginia University

Winston-Salem State University

Yale University

The 2010 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, recommends increasing the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree or higher, and increasing the diversity of students to create a workforce prepared to meet the demands of diverse populations across the lifespan. The mission of the NCIN program is helping to advance those recommendations, enabling schools to expand student capacity in higher education, and encouraging more diversity.

By bringing more nurses into the profession at the baccalaureate and master's degree levels, the NCIN program also helps to address the nation's nurse faculty shortage. Data from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration show that nurses entering the profession via baccalaureate programs are four times more likely than other nurses to pursue a graduate degree in nursing. This trend is reflected in the NCIN scholars, as 91 percent of the students receiving funding in the first three years of the program indicate a desire to advance their education to the master's and doctoral levels.

To find learn more about the NCIN program, visit www.newcareersinnursing.org.

About NCIN

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) joined with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to create New Careers in Nursing: an RWJF Scholarship Program to help alleviate the nursing shortage and increase the diversity of nursing professionals. Through annual grants to schools of nursing, NCIN provides $10,000 scholarships to college graduates with degrees in other fields who wish to transition into nursing through an accelerated baccalaureate or master's nursing program. For more information, visit www.newcareersinnursing.org .

About RWJF

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country. As the nation's largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, measurable and timely change. For 40 years, the Foundation has brought experience, commitment and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves. When it comes to helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need, the Foundation expects to make a difference in your lifetime. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org .

About AACN

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing is the national voice for baccalaureate and graduate programs in nursing. Representing more than 700 member schools of nursing at public and private institutions nationwide, AACN's educational, research, governmental advocacy, data collection, publications and other programs work to establish quality standards for bachelor's and graduate degree nursing education, assist deans and directors to implement those standards, influence the nursing profession to improve health care, and promote public support of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education, research and practice. For more information, visit www.aacn.nche.edu .

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News Headline: Train Tracks | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Inside Business Magazine (Northeast Ohio)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Northeast Ohio's colleges and universities are developing new programs and innovative ways to meet industry needs for skilled workers.

Plant closings and the ensuing layoffs make for big news. Expansions, hiring and promotions, on the other hand, tend to be quiet affairs. Maybe that explains the popular perception that manufacturing jobs are scarce.

John Gajewski, executive director of Cuyahoga Community College's Workforce and Economic Development Division, knows better. “We need welders, steelworkers, CNC operators, machinists and more,” he says, adding there are actually quite a few well-paying manufacturing jobs to be had in Northeast Ohio.

Tri-C has partnered with ArcelorMittal and United Steelworkers Local 970 to offer a Steelworker for the Future program, starting this fall. Together they developed a
2 1/2-year work-study program that includes paid internships.

Students who finish the program will earn an associate of applied science degree with a specialization in either electrical or mechanical steelmaking technology.

They're hoping for a minimum of 20 students in the first class, with a comparable size group every year moving forward. (Lakeland Community College in Lake County launched a similar class earlier this year.)

Old know-how can only take a job applicant so far, and it's at least one of the culprits behind a conundrum that's stifling Northeast Ohio's economy: High unemployment persists in the region as thousands of jobs go unfilled.

But the skill gaps, which prevent candidates from getting certain jobs, are getting notice from Gajewski and others like him, who regularly touch base with industry contacts, advisory councils and students. The goal is to spot the weak areas and create or supplement degrees and continuing education to buck them up.

The manufacturing, information technology and engineering fields all have a need for skilled workers. In a recent report for the Cleveland area, the state documented more than 4,000 help-wanted ads for computer systems analysts, Web developers and other computer jobs; 2,100 ads for industrial and mechanical engineers and more than 1,000 for machinists and welders.

Keeping up to date with the needs of the health care industry — the largest source of our region's job openings — is a perennial focus.

The goal is to reach a happy medium, says Terri Burgess Sandu, executive director of workforce development at Lorain County Community College. Schools want to create a pipeline of future employees, but not flood the market with people.

Forecasting has been more challenging lately, Sandu says, as companies are pulled in different directions: They're hesitant to hire because of the still-struggling economy, yet eager to replace upcoming retirees.

“It's a fascinating time,” Sandu says. “We expend a lot of effort trying to stay out in front, not only for today, but for two years, five years, 10 years out.”

In addition to the Steelworker for the Future program it will launch this fall, Tri-C has updated a core metal-machining program to expand into polymer and composite parts. The college is also seeing increased demand for operators of machines that run via computer numerical control.

Companies have been hiring Tri-C students for paid internships. About two dozen spend time outside of class at a handful of small- to mid-size companies, helping make parts for the automotive and aerospace industries.

“That's a new phenomenon over the last eight months,” Gajewski says.

In the manufacturing sector in particular, training has a sense of urgency because of a pending wave of retirements.

As the economy improves, Gajewski claims, older workers who held off on retiring are now thinking of calling it quits. And employers want to have someone waiting to fill each opening.

The number of people going through company-sponsored workforce training is on the rise at Tri-C. Enrollment in these programs jumped from about 350 people in 2010 to 634 in 2011, and close to 800 this year. New and displaced workers signing up for classes is also on the rise: from 550 in 2010 to 600 in 2011, and about 700 this year.

Lorain County Community College has been working with the Regional Information Technology Engagement board to make sure they know what IT employers need and to strategize ways to reach potential students, according to Sandu. The end goal addresses both quantity and quality: Engage faculty with industry on a regular basis, keep the curriculum current and build a pipeline of skilled students.

“Whether people are intimidated by math, unaware of the openings, unsure of what the jobs are exactly or are of the mistaken belief that all these jobs have been outsourced to India, we need to address those concerns,” Sandu says.

Anna Gibas, 43, finished a 16-month IT Fast Track program at LCCC in May. The former high school English teacher and mother of three was looking for a new career, and while working on the last U.S. Census, she noted the importance of IT skills for landing the best office jobs.

“Anyone who had them became much more valuable,” she says.

She signed up for a program that offered a number of computer skills, from programming to Web design and database implementation. “I figured, this isn't beyond me,” she says. “I just need to get some skills, catch up with the rest of the world and make myself more marketable.”

Now she's looking into technical writing jobs and may pursue Web development.

“This just gives me more options,” Gibas says.

In addition to vocational skills, universities in the area say companies are also in need of employees with strong soft-skills. Local executives say they want people who can collaborate, work in teams and use technology, says Gina Cuffari, territory vice president for the Ohio and Kentucky campuses of the University of Phoenix.

The university worked with the City Club of Cleveland to organize a skills-gap panel discussion with CEOs in June. The school has also dedicated advisers to work with community colleges to help students extend their training into four-year degrees.

A growing number of employers are also beginning to ask for quality training programs such as Lean and Six Sigma.

Originally used by Toyota and Motorola, the training has been picked up and adapted by other industries, including hospitals, industrial plants and banking, says Amy Lane, executive director for Kent State University's Center for Corporate and Professional Development. Students learn to eliminate and reduce waste and reassess practices and products based on statistical data.

Companies are realizing that it's not all about cutting employees, but making more efficient use of what they have, says Dan Hickey, director of workforce development and continuing education at the University of Akron.

Brian Malloy knows this first hand.

After Malloy was laid off from a job in the electrical power industry, he headed to the want ads and noticed more and more calls for Six Sigma and Lean training.

Malloy had a business degree, but it wasn't helping him get a job. So he signed up for both Six Sigma and Lean at the University of Akron to pump up his resume. Now Malloy works for the university as a workforce training coordinator, contacting companies regarding training opportunities. He beat out 80 other candidates for the job.

“If the training is old, people might not have what's needed in today's job market,” Hickey says. “People have to be pretty nimble.”

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News Headline: Business news briefs -- July 03 - KSU offers insurance degree | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State will offer a bachelor's degree in insurance studies beginning with the fall semester. The degree - the first of its kind being offered by a public or private college in Northeast Ohio - initially will be offered only at KSU's Salem campus. Students will complete the main courses online.

The degree program, designed to tap into a projected growth in employment in Ohio's insurance industry, got a boost with a $20,000 donation from the Independent Insurance Agents of Ohio. The grant is the group's first charitable donation to an institution of higher education.

For information about the degree, go to www.col.kent.edu/insurance .

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News Headline: METRO DIGEST || Garden tour | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: Thu, July 5, 2012 @ 12:03 a.m.

Garden tour planned

SALEM

The Salem Storybook Museum will offer a Jack & Jill Summer Garden Tour from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. July 12-13.

The tour will feature nine gardens, seven in private residences and two museums, and the historic Teegarden-Centennial Bridge.

Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Tickets are available at the Salem Area Chamber of Commerce and Vivian's Antiques & Collectibles in Columbiana. Reservations also may be made by calling 330-332-1632.

The starting point for the tour is the plaza at Kent State City Center, 230 N Lincoln Ave. Proceeds benefit the restoration of the Victorian house on North Lincoln Avenue, the future home of The Salem Storybook Museum.

Meet the Growers

BOARDMAN

Grow Youngstown will have its second annual ”Meet the Growers” summer fundraiser from 5 to 8 p.m. July 15 at Vintage Estate Wine and Beer, 7317 South Ave.

The event includes wine tasting and dishes prepared with locally grown food. Participants will meet area farmers who supply food for Grow Youngstown's community-supported agriculture program. Music will be provided by the Brady's Leap band and the Lawtz acoustic duo.

Grow Youngstown provides a weekly basket of locally grown fruits and vegetables to more than 150 families, makes fresh food available to low-income households and helps create small farms and urban gardens.

Tickets to the event are $35 in advance or $40 at the door. To purchase tickets, go to GrowYoungstown.org or call 330-286-0688

Free screenings

BOARDMAN

Walgreens is having a grand re-opening from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 14. The store, 7295 Market St., will offer free health screenings and yearlong AARP memberships to all participants. Youngstown State University mascots Pete and Penny Penguin and the YSU cheerleaders will be at the store from 12 to 2 p.m. An auction, raffle, bounce-a-round, petting zoo and other activities are planned. Proceeds benefit Akron Children's Hospital Mahoning Valley.

Southington fire

SOUTHINGTON

Firefighters were called to the 2700 block of Warren Burton Road NW in Southington about 10 a.m. Wednesday for a house fire. The fire was under control about a half-hour after crews arrived on scene. Reports state no one was injured.

Downtown robbery

YOUNGSTOWN

A 21-year-old city man is facing two counts of aggravated robbery following an altercation late Tuesday.

Police arrested Jessie Riffle of West Ravenwood Avenue at about 12:30 a.m. Wednesday in front of the Western Reserve Transit Authority's Federal Station.

Police said Riffle asked a woman for a cigarette and she declined to give him one. The woman told officers Riffle brandished a knife at her and when she asked a bystander for help, Riffle turned to the bystander and demanded that he empty his pockets, according to reports.

The bystander told police that Riffle then took his belt off and hit him twice on the stomach with the buckle, records show. Police recovered the knife and belt, which was hanging from Riffle's neck when police arrived on scene, officers said.

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News Headline: Ohio New Markets Tax Credit Program Supports Low-Income Communities | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Diversity Plus Magazine - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio New Markets Tax Credit Program Supports Low-Income Communities

Columbus, Ohio - Today, the Ohio Department of Development Director Christiane Schmenk announced that $10 million in Ohio New Markets Tax Credits are being made available to six Ohio entities to spur economic investments of at least $25.6 million in Ohio. The program is designed to help finance business investments in low-income communities by providing investors with state tax credits in exchange for delivering below-market-rate investment options to Ohio businesses.

"This money ensures future economic development by encouraging investments in areas of Ohio that need it most," said Schmenk. "Too often, businesses in these communities struggle to get the help they need to grow. We are breaking down these economic development barriers, allowing companies to succeed and create jobs."

The Ohio New Markets Tax Credit program leverages the successful Federal New Markets Tax Credit Program to attract additional investments to Ohio. The federal program has created more than $21 billion in investments and has awarded more than $1 billion to Ohio-based Community Development Entities. The first Round of Ohio New Markets Tax Credit awards were made in October 2010.

The Ohio program, administered by the Department's Office of Redevelopment, provides a 39 percent tax credit over seven years for qualified investments. Community Development Entities that received a tax credit allocation from the Federal New Markets Tax Credit program are eligible to apply.

Recipients of the Third Round of Ohio New Markets Tax Credits

Cincinnati New Markets Fund, LLC (Hamilton County) will receive $3 million in tax credits for a minimum of $7.69 million in investments. Cincinnati New Markets Fund is located in the City of Cincinnati and will serve the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood. They have received four allocations from the Federal New Markets Tax Credit program totaling $153 million. They have identified three potential projects that would benefit from an Ohio New Markets award, including the Central Parkway YMCA, Cincy Tech Campus, and the Meiner Flats Office Building.

Cleveland New Markets Investment Fund II, LLC (Cuyahoga County) will receive $2 million in tax credits for a minimum of $5.1 million in investments. The Cleveland New Markets Investment Fund II is located in the City of Cleveland, and is controlled by the Cleveland Development Advisors, Inc. They have received three allocations from the Federal New Markets Tax Credit program totaling $75 million. Their service area is Cuyahoga County. They have identified eight potential projects that would benefit from an Ohio New Markets award, including the Orlando Baking Company, Intesa, Shoreway Commerce – Phase II, the Hanna Annex, the Schofield Building, Steelyard Commons II, the East Ohio Building, and Miceli Dairy Products.

Development Fund of the Western Reserve (Northeast Ohio) will receive $1 million in tax credits for a minimum of $2.56 million in investments. Their service area covers 18 counties in Northeast Ohio. The Development Fund of the Western Reserve (DFWR) received its first allocation from the Federal New Markets Tax Credit program in 2012 totaling $20 million. DFWR has identified five potential projects that would benefit from an Ohio New Markets award, including the Kent State University Foundation, Platinum Inn Ovation Hotel, Oberlin Gateway, Ashlawn Energy, and Vadxx Energy.

Finance Fund (Statewide) will receive $2 million in tax credits for a minimum of $5.1 million in investments. They have received seven allocations from the Federal New Markets Tax Credit program, totaling $200 million. Their service area includes the entire State of Ohio. Finance Fund has identified eight potential projects that would benefit from an Ohio New Markets award, including the Ronald McDonald House (Cleveland), Marietta Armory Restoration (Marietta), St. Mary's Medical Center (Ironton), Kent State University Conference Center and Hotel (Kent), Paycor (Dayton), Wright State University Duke Ellis Institute (Dayton), Oberlin Gateway (Oberlin), and the Midwest Terminal-Ironville Project (Toledo).

Northeast Ohio Development Fund, LLC (Cuyahoga County) will receive $1 million in tax credits for a minimum of $2.56 million in investments. The Northeast Ohio Development Fund (NEODF) is located in the City of Cleveland, and is controlled by the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Port Authority. They have received three allocations from the Federal New Markets Tax Credit program, totaling $95 million. Their service area is Cuyahoga County. NEODF has identified 10 potential projects that would benefit from an Ohio New Markets award, including the Northeast Ohio Alternative Energy District Solar Special Improvement District, Nanomanufacturer AlSher, Great Lakes Towing Company, Cleveland State University Solar Renewable Energy Project, Rosby Resource Recycling, GeoSolutions, Carbon Vision, Cleveland Athletic Club, Vadxx Energy, and Orlando Baking Company.

Stonehenge Community Development, LLC (Statewide) will receive $1 million in tax credits for a minimum of $2.56 million in investments. They have received six allocations from the Federal New Markets Tax Credit program, totaling more than $505 million. Their service area includes the entire State of Ohio. Stonehenge has identified two potential projects in their pipeline that would benefit from an Ohio New Markets award.

For more information on the program and the application period, please visit http://www.development.ohio.gov/urban/ONM/.

The Office of Redevelopment assists communities with place-based redevelopment which creates wealth from personal, business, and community successes. The Office works to identify the resources and financing necessary to enhance the economic viability of local communities.

Working with our partners across business, state and local governments, academia, and the nonprofit sector, the Ohio Department of Development works to attract, create, grow, and retain businesses through competitive incentives and targeted investments. Engaged every day in marketing, innovating, investing, and collaborating, the Ohio Department of Development works to accelerate and support the teamwork that is necessary for success by providing financial, informational, and technical assistance to those making an investment in Ohio's future.

OTHER NEWS

SPECIALS

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News Headline: Kent State University museum receives $1.1 million cash gift (Crawford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Museum has received a $1.1 million donation - its largest cash gift ever -- from local business leader and Kent State alumnus Gerald Schweigert.

The donation, in the form of a charitable gift annuity, will be instrumental in the preservation and future support of museum collections and activities.

A longtime donor to Kent State whose past contributions include a Medallion Scholarship for a deserving fashion student, and a gift to Intercollegiate Athletics, Schweigert is a native of Copley and currently resides in West Akron.

"Shannon left a wonderful gift with his collection, but no endowment fund," Schweigert said. "I'm just trying to do my part to keep the legacy going."

John Crawford, dean of the College of the Arts at Kent State, commented, "Jerry's gift will enable the museum to continue the great legacy that Schweigert's friends, Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman, left us. Thanks to Mr. Schweigert's generous donation, we'll be able to maintain and expand the programming of the Kent State University Museum for years to come."

For more information about the Kent State University Museum, visit www.kent.edu/museum.

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News Headline: Kent State University museum receives $1.1 million cash gift (Crawford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Museum has received a $1.1 million donation - its largest cash gift ever -- from local business leader and Kent State alumnus Gerald Schweigert.

The donation, in the form of a charitable gift annuity, will be instrumental in the preservation and future support of museum collections and activities.

A longtime donor to Kent State whose past contributions include a Medallion Scholarship for a deserving fashion student, and a gift to Intercollegiate Athletics, Schweigert is a native of Copley and currently resides in West Akron.

"Shannon left a wonderful gift with his collection, but no endowment fund," Schweigert said. "I'm just trying to do my part to keep the legacy going."

John Crawford, dean of the College of the Arts at Kent State, commented, "Jerry's gift will enable the museum to continue the great legacy that Schweigert's friends, Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman, left us. Thanks to Mr. Schweigert's generous donation, we'll be able to maintain and expand the programming of the Kent State University Museum for years to come."

For more information about the Kent State University Museum, visit www.kent.edu/museum.>

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News Headline: Patriotic concert tonight in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Communiversity Band, a
collection of musicians from many
backgrounds, is to perform a patriotic
concert from 7 to 9 p.m. today
at Hometown Plaza, at the
corner of Water and Main streets
in Kent.
Kent State University students,
alumni and instructors join forces
with Kent Roosevelt band students
and instructors, as well as other local
citizens, to form the Communiversity
Band, a musical collaboration
between KSU and the Kent
community.
The concert is a patriotic celebration
of American music and
a joint effort by musicians of all
ages. Songs will include “Stars and
Stripes Forever” and “Celebration
Fanfare” as well as assorted Disney
World music and armed forces
themes. Guest directors of the
performance are Joni Stoll, band
director at Southeast High School
and John Roebke, band director at
Kent Roosevelt High School.
“It really is a pulling together of
the university and community,”
said Principle Director Patricia
Grutzmacher. “I'm really pleased
that John (Roebke) is directing.
That strengthens the bond between
university and community.”
Amy Wooley, a senior music education
major at KSU, plays bassoon
in the band and works as the
band's office clerk. She said the
band offers a great source of musical
and professional experience.
“It's a great thing to add to your
resume,” Wooley said. “It's always
great to have experience playing in
different types of bands.”
An interesting aspect of the Communiversity
Band, said Wooley, is
the wide age range of its members.
Wooley said that unlike other pursuits,
music can be practiced from
youth practically to one's deathbed.
“In sports, you can't play until
you're 90,” Wooley said.
The Communiversity Band
meets and rehearses every June,
with each season culminating in
an early July concert. Grutzmach
said the goal of these performances
is to celebrate cooperation between
KSU and the Kent community
and to foster appreciation of
classical music.
“I think the point is enjoyment,”
Grutzmacher said. “What I want is
for people to enjoy what they hear
and go home feeling good about
their community. The music we're
doing is all a part of our American
heritage.”
In case of rain, the concert will
be held instead at the Ludwig Recital
Hall on KSU campus.

IF YOU GO
WHAT: The Communiversity Band
WHERE: Hometown Plaza, corner of
Water and Main streets, Kent
WHEN: From 7 to 9 tonight
COST: Free

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News Headline: On With The Show - MUSICAL ACTIVITIES | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: July 5 -- Kent State Communiversity Band, 7, Hometown Plaza, Main and Water streets in Kent.

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News Headline: Summer routine can ease kids' anxiety (Flessner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The days are getting hotter and longer... and the kids are home from school; what's a parent to do?

According to Dr. Christopher A. Flessner, Kent State University, summer vacation usually signals a change in routine, which often leads to anxiety.

"Most kids -- like adults -- thrive on a routine," said Dr. Flessner. "We all like to know what to expect. When something unexpected happens, it can sometimes throw us for a loop. School is all about routine. Kids do the same things day in and day out. In some kids, the change in routine during the summer can lead to increased anxiety. But there are solutions."

By developing a "Summer routine" (e.g., waking up and going to bed at set times, having meals at set times, keeping a calendar of events for the day/week/month) parents can help children cope with anxiety by knowing just what to expect from day-to-day.

"Boredom is also a concern for children during summer vacation," said Dr. Flessner. "When adults get bored, we can find something productive to do (e.g., go for a bike ride, drive to a store). But kids, particularly younger kids, don't have the same kind of freedom as adults do."

For anxious kids, boredom gives their minds a chance to dwell on all the things in the world that they shouldn't have to worry about ... but do. Parents can help combat this boredom by working with them to develop a list of activities they can post on the refrigerator.

When boredom sets in, kids can refer to the list (which they helped to create) and play some of the fun games or activities.

Keeping a basic schedule during the summer will also help the family to identify potential "boredom zones" and come up with plans to fight off boredom.

"And then there is the month of August, which represents the end of summer fun and the start of the new school year.

Suddenly the kids have to prepare for new teachers, new classes, and maybe even making new friends," reported Dr. Flessner. "For anxious kids, August can be particularly difficult because their school-related worries can start to creep up."

These worries tend to get worse closer to when school begins. Parents can help by making the "going back to school" process as fun as possible (e.g., letting their son/daughter pick out pens/pencils or folders that they like, etc.).

Parents can also begin to help their child prepare for school by shifting their summer schedule to more closely fit with what the child's school schedule will be like (e.g., waking/sleeping and eating at "school year" times).

Finally, parents can help to reassure their child that a lot of other kids are nervous about the first day of school. A little reassurance can go along way.

Christopher A. Flessner, Ph.D., is director, Child Anxiety Research (CARe) Program and Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Kent State University. His research examines biological (e.g., neurocognitive deficits) and psychosocial risk factors (e.g., parenting practices) relevant to the pathogenesis of child anxiety and related disorders, particularly OCD, hair pulling disorder (trichotillomania), and Tourette's syndrome.

In turn, Dr. Flessner is interested in translating these findings into more efficacious therapeutic interventions for these and related forms of child psychopathology.

By developing a "Summer routine," parents can help children cope with anxiety by knowing just what to expect from day-to-day.

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News Headline: Heal Time (Marino) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Inside Business Magazine (Northeast Ohio)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Heal Time

Jacqueline Marino's White Coats examines the long and arduous road to becoming a doctor.

For four years, Jacqueline Marino followed three students through Case Western Reserve University Medical School, earning their trust, hearing their secret doubts, watching as they talked to patients and dissected a cadaver for the first time. Her story about their journey toward becoming doctors, which started as a series in Cleveland Magazine, became the book White Coats (Kent State University Press, $28.95). She talked with us about why we look up to doctors, how she chose her main characters and how they navigated the overwhelming and isolating task of becoming a doctor.

Q. What are people who are curious about doctors and the medical profession going to get out of this book?

A. We, as a culture, hold doctors in very high esteem because they are people that can diagnose our cancers and fix our child's heart problem. We think if you become a doctor, you must be a really smart person who has gone through incredible training. But why do we have that belief? Anybody who wonders about that will get something from this book. They will be able to see the process that someone goes through.

Q. What did you discover?

A. All of the students said at some point, "I don't know how I'm going to do this." The amount of medical knowledge is so vast. The best thing that they learn is how to think like a doctor. They learn how to ask the right questions and how to find the right answers.

Q. What did you learn about Case Medical School's place in the medical profession?

A. It's a very well-regarded medical school. In the U.S. News and World Report rankings, they were 24th in research and 34th in primary care. When I started doing this project in 2005, then-dean [Ralph] Horwitz decided he was going to revamp the curriculum and marry public health to medical education. The group that I followed, they were the guinea pigs. They were the first group to have to deal with shortened teaching time and the thesis.

Q. If you were a doctor, what kind of doctor would you want to be?

A. I really enjoyed my time in labor and delivery. I was pregnant at the time myself. To see a birth from that perspective really made me think about how wonderful being an OB-GYN would be.

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