Report Overview:
Total Clips (9)
Collaboration; Liquid Crystal Institute; Physics; Research (1)
Institutional Advancement (4)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Collaboration; Liquid Crystal Institute; Physics; Research (1)
Passion for Research Carries College of Wooster Students, Faculty through the Summer 07/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...crystals. "It is very intellectually stimulating. I'm happy to get my hands dirty again working in the lab." Garg is collaborating with scientists at Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute and the physics department through a grant from the National Science Foundation known as a Research...


Institutional Advancement (4)
Kent State University concludes Centennial Campaign with $265 million raised (Lefton, Finn) 07/11/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Local news briefs - July 10 07/11/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Centennial Campaign raises $265 million (Lefton, Finn) 07/11/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Record-Breaking $265 Million Raised by Kent State Centennial Campaign (Lefton, Finn) 07/11/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
New dean of Kent regional campuses prepares for school year 07/11/2012 East Liverpool Review Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (1)
Kent State University at Stark Theatre Announces Open Auditions for 'Buried Child' 07/10/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark Theatre has announced open auditions for the season's fall theatrical production, Buried Child by Sam Shepard. Sam...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Kent State cleans up storm damage (Andrews) 07/11/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Officials at Kent State University at Tuscarawas had to do some "significant cleanup" following recent severe storms in the area. Gregg Andrews, dean of the...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Review: 'The World Goes 'Round' features Kander and Ebb classics 07/11/2012 the330.com Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Passion for Research Carries College of Wooster Students, Faculty through the Summer | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WOOSTER, Ohio - Undergraduate research is more than an intellectual exercise at The College of Wooster; "It's in our blood," says Shila Garg, professor of physics. "We are very meticulous in the way we train our students to conduct research. They hit the ground running, and after four years, they are ready for graduate-level research."

Indeed, Wooster is nationally known for its commitment to undergraduate research, particularly its senior capstone experience, known as Independent Study, in which a student works one-on-one with a faculty mentor on a project that results in a thesis, performance, or exhibition of artwork.

The process begins early in a student's career with a range of opportunities, including the college-supported Sophomore Research program and Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU), which enables students to work on projects during the summer months through funding from the National Science Foundation. Garg was instrumental in bringing an REU site in physics to Wooster 18 years ago, and she has returned to the lab this summer after a decade-long hiatus, during which she served as dean of faculty and provost at Wooster.

"I was anxious to get back to doing my own research," says Garg, who specializes in the study of liquid crystals. "It is very intellectually stimulating. I'm happy to get my hands dirty again working in the lab."

Garg is collaborating with scientists at Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute and the physics department through a grant from the National Science Foundation known as a Research Opportunity Award. In addition to her own research, Garg, as part of the grant, is overseeing work by Matt Schmitthenner and Theresa Albon - both rising seniors from the Columbus area and both double majors in mathematics and physics - on a new family of liquid crystals, similar to the ones used in television flat screens, video games, wristwatches, cell phones, and other modern-technology gadgets.

Schmitthenner is focusing on three basic properties of the new crystals - elastic, optical, and electrical - in an effort to determine their suitability for applications. Albon is looking at a mechanical model of bent wire, or staples, in U, V, or H shapes to determine how they entangle and untangle in order to better understand how the process occurs at a microscopic level in a liquid crystal system.

Despite having no prior experience with liquid crystals, Schmitthenner and Albon have impressed their senior researchers at Kent State. "Matt and Theresa are outstanding students," says Garg. "They are conducting research that is fundamentally very important. They are creating new knowledge and original, publishable results, which has been a strong tradition in our REU program at Wooster.

"Not only that," adds Garg, "but they are also interacting with graduate students and university scientists in lab settings, which prepares them for scientific research in the real world. It is great exposure and excellent preparation for graduate school or the workforce."

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News Headline: Kent State University concludes Centennial Campaign with $265 million raised (Lefton, Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University announced it has concluded the largest fundraising campaign in its history by raising $265 million, surpassing its original goal by $15 million.

The fundraising effort, dubbed the Centennial Campaign, launched publicly in 2009 to coincide with the university's 100-year anniversary in 2010. Money raised during the campaign will support scholarships, research and several construction projects. Since the campaign's launch, donors have supported 290 endowed scholarship funds.

“The Centennial Campaign was just the beginning in terms of meeting our forward-looking agenda for the university,” Kent State President Lester Lefton said in a news release. “We simply could not have come this far without the support of our donor partners.”

In the release, Kent State said it is “beginning the next phase of a significant fundraising plan, in which private philanthropy will be the key to ongoing growth.”

“Surpassing our goal for the Centennial Campaign was the result of a university- and community-wide commitment,” said Gene Finn, Kent State's vice president for institutional advancement, in the release. “Now we're looking forward — with the goal of continuing the momentum we've achieved — to strengthen our fundraising potential and bring it to a new level to meet future needs.”

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News Headline: Local news briefs - July 10 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT STATE

Fund goal topped

KENT: Kent State University announced Tuesday it has raised $265 million through its Centennial Campaign to benefit the university's endowment, capital projects, operating needs and scholarships.

The total was $15 million more than the goal.

Since the start of the campaign, donors committed to supporting nearly 290 endowed scholarship funds, the university said.

The total included a gift of $13.5 million in software for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology (formerly the College of Technology) from Appropriate Technology and $3 million to the new School of Digital Sciences from the Enterprise Architecture Center of Excellence.

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News Headline: Kent State University Centennial Campaign raises $265 million (Lefton, Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Centennial Campaign has raised $265 million — $15 million more than its goal when it launched in 2010. The purpose of the campaign is to fund the university's endowments, capital projects and operating needs, and emphasize student scholarships.

An increased endowment provides a long-term, stable funding source for university priorities, from scholarships to research to faculty support. Capital projects are ongoing, and have expanded facilities, allowing students to learn in modern classrooms and labs with state-of-the-art technology. Also, current-operating funds allow the university to address immediate and emerging needs.

Since the start of the campaign, donors committed to supporting nearly 290 endowed scholarship funds.

“Surpassing our goal for the Centennial Campaign was the result of a university and community wide commitment,” said Gene Finn, Kent State's vice president for institutional advancement. “Now we're looking forward — with the goal of continuing the momentum we've achieved — to strengthen our fund raising potential and bring it to a new level to meet future needs.”

The Centennial Campaign generated gifts such as:

- $13.5 million in software for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.
- $6.5 million for the Roe Green Center for the Arts.
- $6 million for the Robert S. Morrison Health and Science Center at KSU at Ashtabula.
- $3 million to the new School of Digital Sciences.
- $1 million to the Kent State University Museum for the preservation and future support of museum collections and activities.
- 20 licenses for software to help students create control and automation systems in the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.

“To all those who contributed to the enormous success of the Centennial Campaign, thank you,” added Kent State President Lester Lefton. “We will work to ensure that Kent State University continues to be worthy of your support and investments and that our students are achieving excellence an impact on our future.”

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News Headline: Record-Breaking $265 Million Raised by Kent State Centennial Campaign (Lefton, Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The university has officially closed the Centennial Campaign and reports it raised a record-breaking $265 million

With the launch of the Centennial Campaign, Kent State University took on an aggressive agenda to raise $250 million to fund the university's endowment, capital projects and operating needs, with a particular emphasis on student scholarships.

The university has officially closed the Centennial Campaign and reports it raised a record-breaking $265 million, surpassing its goal by $15 million.

An increased endowment provides a long-term, stable funding source for university priorities, from scholarships to research to faculty support. Capital projects are ongoing, and have expanded facilities, allowing students to learn in modern classrooms and labs and giving them access to state-of-the-art technology. Also, current-operating funds allow the university to address immediate and emerging needs – providing the opportunity to quickly put resources toward the ever-changing educational landscape.

One of the single largest obstacles to student success is the financial aspect of their education, and the best tools to combat financial challenges are scholarships, which were a key focus of the Centennial Campaign. Since the start of the campaign, donors committed to supporting nearly 290 endowed scholarship funds.

Ron Pizzuti, who is a leading force behind the redevelopment of downtown Kent, Ohio, headed up the Centennial Campaign effort. He is also a Kent State alumnus and a scholarship donor. “As a graduate of Kent State, I was pleased and proud to help lead this instrumental fund raising effort,” Pizzuti said. “I'm also looking forward to continuing the legacy it has established so that future generations of students will benefit as well.”

With the end of this enormously successful effort, Kent State will be beginning the next phase of a significant fund raising plan, in which private philanthropy will be the key to ongoing growth.

“Surpassing our goal for the Centennial Campaign was the result of a university and community wide commitment,” said Gene Finn, Kent State's vice president for institutional advancement. “Now we're looking forward – with the goal of continuing the momentum we've achieved – to strengthen our fund raising potential and bring it to a new level to meet future needs.”

The Centennial Campaign generated gifts such as:

- $13.5 million in software for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology (formerly known as the College of Technology) from Appropriate Technology
- $6.5 million for the Roe Green Center for the Arts
- $6 million for the Robert S. Morrison Health and Science Center at Kent State University at Ashtabula
- $3 million to the new School of Digital Sciences from the Enterprise Architecture Center of Excellence
- $1 million from Gerald Schweigert to the Kent State University Museum for the preservation and future support of museum collections and activities
-20 licenses for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology from Rockwell Automation for Classroom Toolkit, software to help students create control and automation systems

“The Centennial Campaign was just the beginning in terms of meeting our forward-looking agenda for the university,” added Kent State President Lester A. Lefton. “We simply could not have come this far without the support of our donor partners. To all those who contributed to the enormous success of the Centennial Campaign, thank you. We will work to ensure that Kent State University continues to be worthy of your support and investments and that our students are achieving excellence and making an impact on our future.”

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News Headline: New dean of Kent regional campuses prepares for school year | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL -Stephen Nameth is a man in training.

An avid cyclist, he's preparing for a cross-state, four-day ride for the American Cancer Society later this month.

Then, on Aug. 1, he assumes his duties as dean and chief administrative officer of the Kent State University Columbiana County campuses - a position he's been in training for 59 years.

Nameth will split his time between the Salem and East Liverpool campuses at a time when branch campuses are under increasing scrutiny for their low graduation rates.

"The students come in with the intention of graduating, and there are many factors that keep them from doing that," he said. "These students are being pulled in many different directions than I was at their age."

Nameth grew up in neighboring Beaver County, Pa., and, then, at the age of 14, the only child moved to Los Angeles. "My mother didn't see a lot of opportunities where we were living. ... In 1969 (Southern California) was a bit of a culture shock," he said.

Nameth finished high school in Whittier, Calif., the hometown of Richard Nixon, and started his college career at Cerritos Community College, where he earned an associate degree in natural science. He finished his bachelor and master's degrees at California State Polytechnic in Pomona and received his Ph.D. in plant pathology from the University of California, Riverside, in 1985.

That same year, he moved to Columbus to take a teaching position at the Ohio State University. Nameth distinguished himself in the field of plant pathology, authoring or co-authoring more than 150 bulletins and technical reports on plant diseases and growing practices.

His peer-reviewed journal articles include "Bacterial blight of geranium: A diagnostic challenge," "Digital video technology as a means of quantifying root rot," and "First report of cucumber mosaic virus in garlic mustard (Alliaria officinalis) in Ohio."

Nameth's career in higher education took him from teaching to administration in 2004, when he became director of OSU's Agricultural Technical Institute in Wooster. He is just finishing up his second four-year term there, during which time he helped secure more than $7.2 million in external funding, increase enrollment of incoming freshmen and broaden the school's mission by developing new classes, programs and majors.

"I enjoy problem solving. I enjoy working with people. I'm very fascinated by people," Nameth said. "I enjoy being around the students, and the youth and the vitality of what they bring to the campus."

Nameth said he's impressed with what he's seen of the Salem and East Liverpool campuses - and with the fact that Columbiana County has two KSU campuses.

"I see that as a real benefit," he said. "I see myself really promoting those campuses and letting people know of the opportunities that both campuses bring to the Columbiana County area. ... We're in an area where we can have a dramatic effect on the social and economic environment and be a real benefit to the people in that area."

Nameth said he is aware of the media reports listing KSU East Liverpool among the public universities with the worst graduation rate in the country. One report had the branch campus' graduation rate at 8.9 percent - third-lowest in the country.

Also ranking low are the Ohio University Southern campus in Ironton, Ohio (sixth), KSU Tuscarawas (seventh), and OU at Chillicothe (10th).

"I think that can be improved," Nameth said, "but I don't think it's as dismal as it's portrayed because we are serving a purpose for those students."

A lot of students enroll at the East Liverpool campus with the intention of eventually transferring to the Kent campus or elsewhere, he said. Others are unable to complete for reasons outside the university's control, he said.

"There are a lot of reasons why students don't graduate," Nameth said. "Some of that is a reflection of the economics we're going through right now. Some go back home and work. ... Some want to take two years and move on to the Kent campus. The regional campus has served its purpose for that student in that case."

Graduation rates also are a reflection of how well-prepared students are as they graduate from high school and enter college, he said.

Nameth said he was attracted to Kent State because it has "an ideal view of what the branch campus should be." It can be an entry point for students who want to start their college career close to home, or it can be a "stand-alone" place to finish a degree, he said.

"When you start looking at the two-year programs, it's a starting and end point for students who can walk away with a degree from KSU that's no different from a degree at the Kent campus," he said, "and you have a skill that's going to allow them to have a successful career."

Nameth said both campuses - Salem and East Liverpool - have their strong points, whether its degree programs or the role of the campus in the community.

"The thing with the East Liverpool campus - when you look at that part of the city, it's very similar to the towns where I grew up in western Pennsylvania," he said. "You can see the university is making a tremendous impact on that part of town. It's kind of like urban renewal going on around that campus. It's very positive."

Nameth said he and his wife of 37 years, Sharon, are looking for a home in East Liverpool. The couple has two daughters and three grandchildren.

"I will be riding my bicycle back and forth to work," he said.

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News Headline: Kent State University at Stark Theatre Announces Open Auditions for 'Buried Child' | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark Theatre has announced open auditions for the season's fall theatrical production, Buried Child by Sam Shepard.

Sam Shepard's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama takes a macabre look at the disintegration of the American dream. Mystery and humor combine in the Midwestern home of a dysfunctional family with a very dark secret that plunges them into bizarre degeneration and finally, toward hope. For mature audiences only.

Auditions will be held on September 4 and 5 at 7 p.m. in the theatre of the Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township. If necessary, callbacks may be held on September 6.

Auditions are open to everyone, including students and community persons. Roles are available for five men and two women. Those auditioning have the choice of working from sides (selected scene excerpts) or they may perform a prepared monologue. The director may also choose sides for people. For specific role information, visit www.stark.kent.edu/theatre and click on Audition Information for All Shows in the right-hand column.

The production will be performed on November 2-4 and 9-11 in the Kent State Stark Theatre. Rehearsals commence on September 9 and will take place five evenings a week until opening.

Scripts (and audition sides or scene excerpts used for the auditions) are available for perusal for periods up to 24 hours from the secretary (330-244-5151) of the Fine Arts Building, Monday through Friday, during business hours (8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.). Audition appointments are recommended, but not required. Scripts and audition sides will also be available in the reserve area of the Stark Campus Library.

Technical production opportunities are also available, such as stage and assistant stage managers, assistants to lighting, scenic, sound and costume designers. For more information about these openings, contact Theatre Specialist Louis Williams at 330-244-3375.

To learn more about Kent State Stark's Theatre Department, contact Theatre Director Brian Newberg at 330-244-3352 or bnewberg@kent.edu or visit www.stark.kent.edu/theatre.

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News Headline: Kent State cleans up storm damage (Andrews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Officials at Kent State University at Tuscarawas had to do some "significant cleanup" following recent severe storms in the area.

Gregg Andrews, dean of the campus, told trustees at their meeting Tuesday that several trees were downed during recent storms. But he noted that university crews did "an outstanding job" of taking care of any problems.

"I just wanted you to know how hard the crew worked," Andrews said.

Cleanup efforts finished Tuesday when AEP Ohio fixed a power line in front of University Hall (the former Colonial Manor) that provided service for an outside light. The line was knocked down by a tree that fell in front of the building, he said.

In light of the recent storms, Andrews suggested that the campus look into any legal liability it might have if one of its trees fell on the airport beacon for Harry Clever Field on the hill behind the Tuscarawas County Attention Center. The campus owns the property where the beacon is located.

"If trees come down, what is the liability of the trustees?" Andrews asked. "We need to do some research."

Andrews also reported:

• An educational needs assessment for the Carroll County area is under way to determine what classes Kent State Tuscarawas should provide at the Atwood Lake Resort & Conference Center, which is now owned by Carroll County commissioners. The campus is holding off on any action until commissioners sign a lease agreement with Radius Hospitality of Canton to operate the lodge.

• A steering committee has met to begin planning for the future use of University Hall. A structural analysis has found that the building is solid, Andrews said. An environmental analysis is under way to determine how much lead paint and asbestos is in the building. Officials have been told that there will be significant costs involved in turning University Hall into an educational facility, he said.

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News Headline: Review: 'The World Goes 'Round' features Kander and Ebb classics | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: the330.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: At opening night for The World Goes 'Round, artistic director Terri Kent commented to the audience before the curtain went up about how love and money make the world go 'round.

But in this musical revue, which celebrates the work of songwriting team John Kander and Fred Ebb, it's mostly about the love.

Most people know Kander and Ebb best from their cynical, darker shows Chicago and Cabaret. But the musical revue The World Goes 'Round, which debuted off-Broadway in 1991, is most memorable for its yearning love songs, which unfold effortlessly through the talented young professional cast members at Porthouse.

The transitions are seamless as the show thoughtfully explores Kander and Ebb's work, with emotional song groupings including I Don't Remember You from The Happy Time and Sometimes a Day Goes By from Woman of the Year. Nathan Mohebbi and Jack O'Brien each sing songs of broken hearts, and then both melodies are melded together beautifully.

Later, Samuel Rohloff, Lauren Culver and Mackenzie Duan create fabulous vocals in one of the show's high points, weaving together the wistful We Can Make It, Maybe This Time and Isn't This Better.

The songs come from Kander and Ebb's work in musical theater and on TV and film, including tunes they created for Liza Minnelli and Barbra Streisand. The revue's title is the name of a song Minnelli sang in the movie New York, New York.

No story necessary

The World Goes 'Round, created by director Scott Ellis, choreographer Susan Stroman and librettist David Thompson, gives audiences the chance to explore Kander and Ebb's lesser-known musicals, including The Happy Hour, The Rink, The Act and Flora the Red Menace. The show doesn't need a story (it doesn't have one) to get at the heart of their creations.

The revue originally featured five actors, including University of Akron graduate and Broadway dance powerhouse Karen Ziemba. At Porthouse, 12 young actors sing their hearts out in a production that's sophisticated, slick, funny and entertaining.

Dressed in rich jewel tones, the cast includes college students and recent graduates from Kent State, Baldwin-Wallace, Millikin, Oakland and Marshall.

Director/choreographer Sean Morrissey, who hails from Millikin University, succeeds in eliciting a range of emotional performances from his actors, as well as creating some memorable choreography.

That ranges from the just-naughty-enough splits the adorable Duan executes in Arthur in the Afternoon, an ode to sexual trysts, to the angular, off-kilter Fosse formations in All That Jazz.

Commanding the stage

You can't take your eyes off New York actress/dance captain Lisa Kuhnen in this number, who has a huge voice and creates a cool edginess throughout the show, including as the femme fatale in Kiss of the Spider Woman.

These young artists can switch moods on a dime, moving from Lucy Anders' vaudeville-style comedy in Ring Them Bells to Kyle Kemph's powerful vocals in the threatening Kiss of the Spider Woman.

The show doesn't get too dark, though. Under Morrissey's direction, the well-known The Money Song from Cabaret is entertaining without the much darker cynicism of the musical.

The versatile cast gets to do a little bit of everything, including playing instruments as a tinny-sounding jazz-era band and even executing impressive chorus line kicks while wearing roller skates. The whole show's a seamless musical affair, backed by an accomplished onstage band composed of Kevin Long, Brian Laakso, Brandon Covey and Bill Sallak.

DETAILS

Musical revue: The World Goes 'Round

When: Through July 21, 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays

Where: Porthouse Theatre, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls

Onstage: Parke Fech, Michael Glavan, Kyle Kemph, Nathan Mohebbi, Jack O'Brien, Sam Rohloff, Lucy Anders, Anastasia Arnold, Lauren Culver, Mackenzie Duan, Lisa Kuhnen, Jennie Nasser. Onstage band: Kevin Long, conductor/keyboard; Brian Laakso, keyboard; Brandon Covey, bass; Bill Sallak, drums/percussion

Offstage: John Kander, music; Fred Ebb, lyrics; Scott Ellis, Susan Stroman and David Thompson, conception; Sean Morrissey, director/choreographer; Kevin Long, music director; Nolan O'Dell, scenic designer; Jan Evans, costumes; Dave Krupla, lighting; Brian Chismar, sound; Kelly Cosgrove, stage manager; Lizzie Robinson, production stage manager

Tickets: $25-$33; students, $17-$20

Information: 330-672-2497, 330-672-3884, 330-929-4416 orwww.porthousetheatre.com

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