Report Overview:
Total Clips (21)
Alumni; Theatre and Dance (1)
American Association University Professors (AAUP) (1)
Athletics (2)
Institutional Advancement (1)
Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum (1)
KSU at Stark (4)
May 4 (1)
Music (1)
Theatre and Dance (3)
Town-Gown (3)
Tuition (3)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Theatre and Dance (1)
'World Goes Round' a good addition to Kent State's Porthouse Theater summer list 07/18/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...to established works by John Kander and Fred Ebb. First appearing in the early 90's as an off-Broadway revue, "World Goes 'Round" is now being shown at Kent State University's Porthouse Theater at 1145 W. Steel Corners Road, near the Blossom Music Center. The final presentation of "World Goes 'Round"...


American Association University Professors (AAUP) (1)
Kent State negotiating new contract with faculty, administration (Vincent) 07/19/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Athletics (2)
Nutrition 101: KSU football players learn dos and don'ts at grocery store (Davis) 07/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

New KSU women's basketball coach Danielle O'Banion and staff up and running (Lanier, O'Banion) 07/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Institutional Advancement (1)
KSU Campaign Raises Record-Breaking $265M (Finn) 07/19/2012 Business Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum (1)
On With The Show (0 comments) 07/18/2012 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

Sept. 8 -- Sheryl Crow, Los Lonely Boys, 6-11 p.m., Dix Stadium, the Kent State U. campus. Currently -- "On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life," "A Day at the Beach," "Life, Thoughts & Garments:...


KSU at Stark (4)
BLOG: Ohio Utica Shale : 'Truthland' screening on Thursday in Jackson Twp. 07/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

July 18--The movie Truthland will be screened at 7 p.m. Thursday (July 19) at Kent State University's Stark campus. The film, touted as a counter to the anti-fracking film Gasland, is being presented by Energy in Depth-Ohio,...

2012 Pro Football HOF Festival schedule of events 07/19/2012 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

Entrepreneur Experience starts in September 07/19/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Small Business Development Center, Kent State University at Stark and the Stark Development Board will present the Entrepreneur Experience starting in September. The first event...

OH: 'Truthland' debunks anti-fracking claims 07/18/2012 Watchdog News Networks Text Attachment Email

...some of the more outlandish claims in “GasLand” is touring Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia, and will screen at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Kent State University Stark Campus. In one of the original's more dramatic claims, fire roars from a running kitchen faucet. This documentary,...


May 4 (1)
Last Call For 1960s Photos For Kent State Exhibit (Davis) 07/19/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Music (1)
Classical music 07/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Theatre and Dance (3)
Hot temps don't stifle hotter revue (0 comments) 07/18/2012 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

...adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent. NEXT ON STAGE Porthouse Theatre will close its summer season with "The Sound of Music," which will be staged...

Hot temps don't stifle hotter revue 07/19/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

Photo courtesy of Matt Unger; Pictured is some of the cast of Porthouse Theatre Young Professional Company. This group of actors will entertain audiences with a wide variety of great music and fun staging in...

REVIEW: Delightful 'The World Goes Round' @ Porthouse 07/19/2012 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (3)
Standing Rock Gallery Fans 'Celebrate The Garden' 07/18/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...for the Kent Wells Sherman House, an 1858 Greek Revival home that must be moved from its current East Erie Street site to make way for an extension of Kent State University's Esplanade project. On Tuesday, however, the Kent Planning Commission turned down the project's site plan.

Kent – Bringing It All Together 07/18/2012 Twinsburg Patch Text Attachment Email

...Gateway Project, Kent is re-inventing its downtown thanks to the efforts of city officials, the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority (PARTA), the Kent State University and several private-sector developers. The Central Gateway provides something for all parties involved while creating a safe...

Repeal of 2009 income tax hike may make Twinsburg's 2013 ballot 07/19/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

...and then we find out that we are in trouble and we have to go to the voters a second time," Yates said. "But we are experiencing economic growth with Kent State and the opportunities at the former Chrysler site nd] I think we will continue to see growth." Councilor Bill Furey said he thinks the...


Tuition (3)
Punishing fee - Editorials 07/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Cincinnati, both institutions applying the fees after 18 credit hours. Beyond 16 credit hours, the University of Akron will charge $333 per credit hour. At Kent State University, the fee will be $440 after 17 credit hours, the second highest fee. Sawyer is right that the size of the fees is becoming...

Ohio Senate bill would cap college "ambition penalty" 07/18/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...Democratic State Senator Tom Sawyer of Akron has introduced a bill to cap the additional credit-hour fees that are becoming a trend among Ohio colleges. Kent State and the University of Akron are among public universities charging students an "overload fee" for taking classes beyond the average full-time...

Senators propose cap on "overload" college fees 07/19/2012 Dayton Daily News - Online Text Attachment Email

...before Overload Fee Applies / 2012-13 Overload Fee / Proposed Fee Cap / Student Savings Per Credit Hour University of Cincinnati* 18 $450 $289 ($161) Kent State University*** 17 $440 $275 ($165) Cleveland State University 16 $373 $280 ($93) Wright State University 18 $365 $224 ($141) University...


News Headline: 'World Goes Round' a good addition to Kent State's Porthouse Theater summer list | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Consistently strong performances and a broad offering of faithfully executed classic tunes make "World Goes 'Round" at the Porthouse Theater a valuable addition to the theater's Summer 2012 season.

Borrowing tunes from classic productions such as "Chicago," "Cabaret," "New York, New York" and many more, "World Goes 'Round" serves as an homage to established works by John Kander and Fred Ebb. First appearing in the early 90's as an off-Broadway revue, "World Goes 'Round" is now being shown at Kent State University's Porthouse Theater at 1145 W. Steel Corners Road, near the Blossom Music Center.

The final presentation of "World Goes 'Round" is Saturday, July 21 at 8 p.m. Tickets can be purchased by calling 330-672-3884 or visiting www.porthousetheatre.com .

Rather than telling a linear story over the course of two acts, "World Goes 'Round" instead offers a series of bite-size stories in song form, ranging from somber and slow to racy and heartening. The works of Kander and Ebb are on showcase here, with many numbers easily recognizable to experienced fans of musical theater.

The young, talented Porthouse actors, many of whom are currently KSU theater students or alumni, meet the challenge of recreating these classic numbers head on and deliver beautifully. Stunning solos, exemplary duet chemistry, and expressive connection to the audience are just the start of what audiences can expect.

Though some vocals come through more clearly than others, cast members harmonize well and make good use of the stage space. With a somewhat bare set compared to other productions, the burden of aesthetics is placed on the performers themselves, who come through with sharp spacing and choreography.

Every song was performed admirably, but a few numbers stood out as particularly impressive. KSU alumna Lisa Kuhnen drives home a stellar rendition of "All That Jazz," supported by a commendable backup dance ensemble. KSU sophomore musical theater major Kyle Kemph displays excellent vocal and dance work in "Sara Lee," an amusing tune about a man's infatuation with baked goods.

Those seeking a solitary, cohesive plot line may not find it here, but enduring numbers performed professionally and skillfully with fantastic instrumental accompaniment make "World Goes 'Round" a worthy endeavor for theater fans old and new alike.

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News Headline: Kent State negotiating new contract with faculty, administration (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A proposed contract between Kent State University's administration and faculty would give standard raises of 2 percent to faculty for the next three school years, and create pools for merit-based bonus pay.

KSU Spokeswoman Emily Vincent said the "ratification process is currently under way" for a new agreement with the KSU chapter of the American Association of University Professors.

According to a summary of the contract on the KSU-AAUP website, retroactive across the board 2 percent raises for the 2011-12 will be given as a lump sum to faculty members.

The contract also provides for across the board increases of 2 percent for the 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 academic years.

The contract would also require KSU to provide a pool for additional merit-based bonuses for no more than 70 percent of the faculty in 2012-13.

The amount of faculty members who could win "merit pool" awards would shrink by 10 percent in the remaining two years of the contract.

Medical benefit costs through premiums would increase from the current 14 percent payment for employees at the median salary to 16 percent in 2013 and 17 percent in 2014 and 2015.

The contract would also call for KSU President Lester Lefton to convene a commission to make a recommendation on a new paid parental leave policy. Before that new policy is in place, the faculty will be permitted to use three weeks of sick leave as paid parental leave.

KSU's faculty and administration have been in contract negotiations for about a year.

Officials at the KSU AAUP declined to comment on the potential agreement due to ongoing negotiations.

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News Headline: Nutrition 101: KSU football players learn dos and don'ts at grocery store (Davis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: The closest Denzell Burton had ever come to grocery shopping was running into the convenience store closest to his Cleveland home to grab soda for his mother.

But there was Burton, an 18-year-old linebacker, and 19 other Kent State freshmen football players huddled around strength and conditioning coach Doug Davis in a Super Wal-Mart last Friday morning, all eyes on the back of the Moon Pie package in Davis' hand.

“This snack may be only 50 cents, but it's packed with 55 grams of carbs,” said Davis, who is in his second year with the Golden Flashes. “Not worth it, guys. Let's find a better option.”

Clad in Kent State navy blue shorts and a Flashes workout shirt, Davis led the group over to the nearby deli section, where rectangle bricks of cheese and round mounds of hams and turkey slabs awaited instructions to be sliced to customer's orders.

“You know what the one thing that the NFL guys do differently than you guys do?” he asked. “They ask a lot of questions so they're putting the right thing in their bodies.”

When second-year coach Darrell Hazell left Ohio State to take over at Kent State in December 2010, he brought Davis with him.

Davis, a Columbus native, had spent the previous four years designing and implementing a year-round strength, speed and conditioning program designed specifically for the OSU receivers and defensive backs. He also helped prepare the team's upperclassmen for the NFL Draft.

Davis is in charge of all the football players, a job that includes working with them in the weight room to optimize their performances on the field as well as in other areas.

Hence, the occasional field trip to the grocery store to help educate players on how to eat properly as an athlete.

“Sometimes the difference between teams are just little things,” Davis said. “It's worth it to take an hour out of my day to come to the store and teach them about the importance of what they're putting in their bodies. It's something that can impact their lives long term and hopefully give them an edge over their opponents.”

Armed with shopping carts and a copy of KSU's meal guidelines, the players fan out across the store in an effort to make informed choices.

Soon though, Davis notices an offensive lineman with his sights set on a slab of pork fat.

“You can get bacon,” Davis said reassuringly before quickly adding the zinger, “just make sure you get turkey bacon.”

Davis just shakes his head and smiles when the collective response is a chorus of “Oh man!” from those within earshot of the conversation.

During the season, the football team eats together for a majority of big meals. The meal guidelines list focuses on the foods the players might opt to eat when they're on their own, hanging out in their dorm rooms and apartments.

The sheet is divided into three sections: items to “Choose Often” such as water to drink, whole grain cereal for breakfast and a turkey burger for lunch/dinner; items to “Choose Seldom” such as diet soda, white toast and mashed potatoes; and items to “Avoid” like coffee, home fries and fried chicken.

With the list handy, placing bags of apples and oranges and packs of yogurt in their carts proved to be the easy part. In the snack aisle, the guideline list proved to be one big buzz kill.

“I've never been to the grocery store, my mom always was the one to go,” said Burton, who kept track of the growing cost of his purchases with the calculator on his cell phone. “But I wish she would have taken me. It's kind of intimidating trying to figure out what to get, what's good for you.”

Not only was Burton, a Glenville graduate, maneuvering through the maze of packed grocery aisles for the first time, he was doing so on a strict budget. So while reading the backs of packages for nutrient counts, Burton was also comparing generic items to their name-brand counterparts in an effort to maximize his $30 personal budget for the day.

“Coach Davis wouldn't let me get the regular mayo,” Burton said with a frown, pointing to a small jar of Kraft non-fat mayo in his shopping cart.

Needing a few breakfast items to finish his shopping, Burton headed toward the frozen food aisle and grabbed one of his favorite microwave breakfasts — Jimmy Dean sausage, egg and cheese croissants. But he didn't even get the box in his cart before Davis spied him and grabbed it out of his hand.

“What are these?” Davis asked with a raised accusatory eyebrow, quickly flipping the box over to scan the nutritional content. “Oh, no. No way, man! More than 50 percent of the calories in here come from fat.”

Switching to fat-free mayo was one thing, but this revelation comes as a low blow to Burton, who backed away from Davis and shook his head as the reality of just how deep this college-life change is becoming.

“Come on,” Davis beckoned to Burton like a parent to a disappointed child, “let's get you another option.”

They move down the aisle a bit and settle in front of one of Davis' personal favorite meat substitutes. After careful consideration, he hands Burton a box of Jimmy Dean turkey sausage.

“Same brand, but it has 70 percent less fat,” Davis said. “You just pop it into the microwave for two minutes, put it on some whole wheat bread, slap on some fat-free cheese and you've got the same thing you wanted over there, but with better nutritional value.”

Davis smiled, clearly pleased with himself. To Burton's credit, he didn't say what appeared to be on his mind — something along the lines of “sure, but no way it tastes the same” — based on the way his face scrunched up.

A few aisles over, defensive back Adam Maxie seriously studied the back of a Ramen Cup of Noodles. Sure, it's easy fixings — just add hot water to the Styrofoam cup. But is it a good choice? Finally, the Texas native worked up the nerve to ask Davis his opinion.

“It's not the best choice [high sodium], but a couple aren't gonna kill ya,” Davis said, flipping the cup into Maxie's cart. As he does, he notices a box of generic fruit snacks. “These are high in sugar, but for you, that's OK.”

What the lean Maxie really needs, Davis determines is carbs. So he grabs Maxie and similarly built Texas defensive back Kerrick Rhone and leads them to the bread aisle.

“You guys need to eat a lot of bread and rice,” Davis said, settling in front of a large display of Uncle Ben's microwave Ready Rice packets. “You guys need all the carbs you can get. After a workout, come home and pop one of these bags into the microwave and eat it with a piece of fruit and it puts over 400 calories right back into your body. For you guys, that's no big deal. For the bigger guys, I'm a lot more picky.”

With that comment, Davis noticed a trend.

“It's funny, but the little guys are always hanging out over here by the snacks and the big guys are always over there by all the meat,” he said.

As the players get older, Davis will teach them to eat more specifically for their role — beefy lineman obviously consume a lot more calories per day than do speedy defensive backs. But for now, just getting the group to pay attention to what they're putting into their mouths is a good start.

As Davis follows the players around and stops often to help them make good choices, the group receives a lot of curious stares from mothers pushing babies in carts that eventually melt into knowing smiles.

The rest of the players are nearly all checked out and headed back to campus by the time the final two guys have made their way toward the checkout register.

Burton is thrilled his purchases have come in under budget at $27.23 with a little change to spare, and running back C.J. Brathwaite, a Michigan native, was happy to share some of the lessons he had learned that morning.

“Before we came to the store we worked out and Coach Davis told us how important it was to build up the smaller muscles we don't usually use to help with stability,” Brathwaite said.

“We never did much in the weight room in high school, so all this is new to me. Of course, we never did anything like this before, either. But when he said we were going shopping, I was all for it. We're already learning a lot that's really gonna help us as football players.”

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News Headline: New KSU women's basketball coach Danielle O'Banion and staff up and running (Lanier, O'Banion) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: There are plenty of moving boxes that still need to be unpacked sitting around the new home of Kent State women's basketball coach Danielle O'Banion. And she's been on the job for three months.

But that's nothing compared to assistant coach Geoff Lanier's temporary housing situation.

Thankfully, there's an end in sight for Lanier, who has only three more days before he, wife Amy, 13-year-old daughter Madison and the family beagle can turn in their key at the TownePlace suites in Streetsboro after a three-week stay. They sold their home in Massachusetts last month, and closing on the family's new home in Green is expected to be done Friday.

These are simply the kind of things that are pushed aside when a Division I basketball program is being revamped. O'Banion and her staff are taking over for longtime KSU coach Bob Lindsay, whose contract was not renewed after 22 seasons.

“It's coming together as we go,” said Lanier, a nine-year Division I assistant coach who spent the past four seasons as the recruiting coordinator at Boston College — O'Banion's alma mater — following stints as an assistant in the Mid-American Conference at Ohio and Akron.

“We're going a little bit by the seat of our pants, but we have the same vision in mind and it's getting fun because these phone calls we're getting back are from kids interested in the direction Kent State is headed in. Selling coach O'Banion is very easy. It's one of the easiest jobs I've ever had. It's like, get a kid on the phone with her once, and we've got 'em.”

It's easy to see why.

O'Banion, who began crisscrossing the country recruiting just hours after being introduced on campus at a press conference April 19, is the kind of person who makes others feel like they've known her for years, even if they met just minutes ago.

Down to earth but playful, she loves the idea of having two of her favorite KSU slogans — Flash Forward and Expect G.R.E.A.T. — put on the ceiling tiles above her desk in an otherwise sparse office.

“It was a gift from the person doing some of the changes for us in here,” O'Banion said. “He said he just wanted to show me some options he had for making my space unique. So, we now have these tiles in here and four others in the locker room. The girls love them.”

Looking at a bare corner of her office one day recently, O'Banion mentioned to Wyketha Harrell, another new assistant, that the space needed something. A large potted plant would be perfect, but O'Banion was afraid she'd accidentally kill it out of neglect. She was thrilled when Harrell surprised her with a plastic Little Tykes basketball hoop, complete with a rubber basketball, as the perfect stand-in.

With so much catching up to do, O'Banion has found herself juggling many tasks each day when she's in the office and not out on the road. That's why she keeps a to do list, written on a legal pad, handy, finding much personal joy in the process of marking each task off with “little squiggly marks” even if it takes a couple of days.

Changing the font of the team's email letter head, picking new paint colors for the office walls, adjusting the logo, touching base with the interior decorator, emailing the facilities contact regarding the office's new furniture, O'Banion is finding she has a hand in even the most minute details.

“They're little things, but anything we can do to change the messaging and the brand is important as we start fresh,” she said. “We're doing things to help everyone realize we're different now. Not necessarily better or worse, just different.”

After spending 11 years as an assistant coach, O'Banion's main focus since taking the KSU job has been building the team. When she arrived, the Flashes had just 10 players — eight returning players and two new signees from the former coaching staff.

With the coaching change, one of the newcomers decided to go elsewhere, leaving KSU with nine players for 15 available scholarships.

“Turns out this year is a great year to be in transition because there were over 70 head coaching transitions in women's basketball,” O'Banion said. “We've benefited greatly from that. Of any year to be looking late for quality signees, this is a great year. We really got lucky with the four we've been able to sign.”

There's still a chance that she could add a junior college player. In the meantime, Lanier is convinced the sacrifice the staff has made in putting the bulk of their personal lives on hold while laying the groundwork for next year's team will pay dividends more quickly than most rebuilding programs.

“It's been a little nerve-wracking because sometimes you sit and think, ‘oh my gosh, we are so behind!' ” Lanier said. “But at the same time, we're fresh, we're new and we're exciting, and that's something we're taking full advantage of right now.”

Without having the opportunity to get the team together to practice until school starts in late August, O'Banion and staff (which includes assistant coach Jennifer Poff and director of basketball operations Jessica Jackson), simply have to trust the process.

“Right now we're recruiting kids and we've not yet coached the ones we have,” Lanier said. “That's what makes this time of the year difficult. But when we get through all this, getting the plan in place, getting everybody settled, getting the kids finished with summer school, and we can actually get on the court and work with them, then that's what we're all really here for.”

In the meantime, the team will have to settle for bonding over the occasional get-together allowed under NCAA rules. That's why this morning, if O'Banion's new neighbors were to peek through her window around all the boxes, they'll notice a house full of women cooking breakfast.

“Food brings people together, that's one thing I learned in the south [as an assistant coach at Memphis],” O'Banion said. “So we're all going to cook and spend some time together.”

It'll be one of the first times the returning players will get to spend some time with the newcomers who just made it to campus.

“We're not going to change our entire system to what we want to do and leave the [returning] kids out in the cold,” Lanier said. “Danny's made a commitment. She wants these seniors to have a very good senior year. So, what you see from us on the floor this first year may not be what you see four years from now. But right now, we're going to do everything in our power to make sure these kids go out on a great note. And with the pieces we added late, I really think we can have a good first year.”

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News Headline: KSU Campaign Raises Record-Breaking $265M (Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Business Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University's Centennial Campaign raised a record-breaking $265 million, surpassing its $250 million goal by $15 million, the university reports.

The campaign put a particular emphasis on student scholarships, said Ron Pizzuti, a leading force behind redevelopment of downtown Kent, head of the Centennial Campaign effort, a Kent State alumnus and scholarship donor. One of the single largest obstacles to student success is the financial aspect of their education, and the best tools to combat financial challenges are scholarships, he noted. Since the start of the campaign, donors committed to supporting nearly 290 endowed scholarship funds.

With the end of the effort, Kent State will begin the next phase of a significant fundraising plan, in which private philanthropy will be the key to ongoing growth. “Surpassing our goal for the Centennial Campaign was the result of a university and community wide commitment,” said Gene Finn, Kent State's vice president for institutional advancement. “Now we're looking forward -- with the goal of continuing the momentum we've achieved -- to strengthen our fundraising potential and bring it to a new level to meet future needs.”

The Centennial Campaign gifts include:

•$13.5 million in software for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology (formerly known as the College of Technology) from Appropriate Technology
•$6.5 million for the Roe Green Center for the Arts
•$6 million for the Robert S. Morrison Health and Science Center at Kent State University at Ashtabula
•$3 million to the new School of Digital Sciences from the Enterprise Architecture Center of Excellence
•$1 million from Gerald Schweigert to the Kent State University Museum for the preservation and future support of museum collections and activities
•20 licenses for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology from Rockwell Automation for Classroom Toolkit, software to help students create control and automation systems

Published by The Business Journal, Youngstown, Ohio.
.

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News Headline: On With The Show (0 comments) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sept. 8 -- Sheryl Crow, Los Lonely Boys, 6-11 p.m., Dix Stadium, the Kent State U. campus.

Currently -- "On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life," "A Day at the Beach," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques" and "Collectors and Collecting," the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State on East Main St.

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News Headline: BLOG: Ohio Utica Shale : 'Truthland' screening on Thursday in Jackson Twp. | Email

News Date: 07/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Downing, Bob
News OCR Text: July 18--The movie Truthland will be screened at 7 p.m. Thursday (July 19) at Kent State University's Stark campus.

The film, touted as a counter to the anti-fracking film Gasland, is being presented by Energy in Depth-Ohio, the pro-drilling industry group.

A key figure from the film, Shelly Depue, who lives in northeast Pennsylvania, will join in a panel discussion of drilling after the film is shown.

The film will be shown in the auditorium at Main Hall at 6000 Frank Ave. NW. Free.

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News Headline: 2012 Pro Football HOF Festival schedule of events | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: FRIDAY, JULY 20

• Balloon Classic and Jackson-Belden Food Fest 4 p.m.; Kent State Stark/Stark State College campuses, 6000-6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; food vendors, live music, children's activities, Balloon Classic Night Glow; free admission; 330-456-7253.

SATURDAY, JULY 21

• Balloon Classic 6 a.m.; Kent State Stark/Stark State College campuses, 6000-6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; more than 60 hot-air balloons take flight; free; 330-456-7253.

SATURDAY, JULY 21

• Balloon Classic and Jackson-Belden Food Fest & Fireworks 4 p.m.; Kent State Stark/Stark State College campuses, 6000-6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; food vendors, live music, children's activities, Balloon Classic in which more than 60 hot-air balloons take flight; fireworks; free admission; 330-456-7253.

SUNDAY, JULY 22

• Balloon Classic 6 a.m.; Kent State Stark/Stark State College campuses, 6000-6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; more than 60 hot-air balloons take flight; free.

SATURDAY, JULY 28

• Festival Concert and Fireworks 6 p.m., food vendors, activities for kids, concert; 9 p.m., fireworks choreographed to music; Cornerstone Square, Walnut Avenue and Tuscarawas Street E, downtown Canton; free; 330-456-7253.

SUNDAY, JULY 29

• 2-Mile and 5-Mile Races, 5-Mile Competitive Walk, Kids Fun Run 8 a.m.; Pro Football Hall of Fame, 2121 George Halas Drive NW, Canton; course starts and ends at Football Hall of Fame, goes through Canton parks; also 400-meter free Kids Fun Run in which costumed characters accompany children 6 and younger; register at http://bit.ly/2012races; registration online, $20; after July 20, $22; kids fun run is free; final day to register for all four events, July 28, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Pro Football Hall of Fame packet pickup area; 330-456-7253.

SUNDAY, JULY 29

• Community Parade 2:30 p.m.; about 125 units will travel from 11th Street and Market Avenue N, south on Market through the heart of downtown Canton, to Second Street SE; wide array of community youth groups, marching bands, antique vehicles, specialty units, giant helium balloon; free; no reserved bleachers or chairs; bring your lawn chair; 330-458-2056.

AUG. 1, 2, 3

• Ribs Burnoff 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., ribs burnoff; 8 p.m., concert; Stark County Fairgrounds, 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton; local and national ribs vendors compete for cash prizes, specialty foods, interactive inflatables in Fantasy Football Zone, master sand sculptor, face painting, more; watch builders in Exhibition Hall put finishing touches on floats for Aug. 4 Timken Grand Parade; free admission; 330-456-7253.

THURSDAY, AUG. 2

• First Play event 10 a.m.; youngsters line a two-mile route to pass an official NFL football from the site in downtown Canton where the National Football League was founded in 1920 to the front steps of the Pro Football Hall of Fame; free; for information on how to participate, call Jerry Czaki at Hall of Fame; 330-456-8207.

FRIDAY, AUG. 3

• FASHION SHOW LUNCHEON 11 a.m., doors open; 11:30, luncheon and style show; Canton Memorial Civic Center and Cultural Center, 1101 Market Ave. N; arguably largest and finest runway fashion show in Ohio showcases professional models wearing the season's hottest men's and women's fashions with state-of-the-art sound, lighting, video; tickets from $55; tickets at Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, 222 Market Ave. N; 330-456-7253 or 800-533-4302.

FRIDAY, AUG. 3

• Enshrinees GOLD JACKET Dinner 5:15 p.m.; Canton Memorial Civic Center and Cultural Center, 1101 Market Ave. N; cocktail party, dinner, then ceremony in which Jack Butler, Dermontti Dawson, Chris Doleman, Cortez Kennedy, Curtis Martin and Willie Roaf will receive Hall of Fame gold jacket; emceed by acclaimed sports broadcaster; also presentation of Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award to Hall of Famer Alliance native Len Dawson and the Daniel F. Reeves Pioneer Award to Art McNally; $112 and $114; fan packages available; 330-458-2048 or 800-913-9788.

FRIDAY, AUG. 3

• Friday Night Reception 6 p.m.; Pro Football Hall of Fame, 2121 George Halas Drive NW, Canton; watch live broadcast of sold-out Enshrinees' Gold Jacket Dinner in Hall of Fame's NFL Films Theater and on TV monitors throughout museum while enjoying dinner stations, beer and wine bar, exclusive museum access, and more; $75; fan packages available; 330-456-8207 or 800-913-9788.

SATURDAY, AUG. 4

• Timken Grand Parade 8 a.m.; from Sixth Street SW north on Cleveland Avenue to 25th Street NW in Canton; 2.2 mile route; parade features this year's enshrinees, many past enshrinees, marching bands, giant helium balloons, floats, specialty units; lasts about three hours; free; reserved chair or bleacher seat, $8.50; Kim, 330-458-2048 or 800-533-4302; info, Laura, 330-458-2054, laurap@cantochamber.org; 330-458-2048.

SATURDAY, AUG. 4

• Autograph Sessions Noon; Pro Football Hall of Fame, 2121 George Halas Drive NW, Canton; multiple autograph sessions with Pro Football Hall of Famers returning to Canton for Enshrinement festivities; presented by Mounted Memories; price varies with item and player; 330-456-8207 or 954-742-8544.

SATURDAY, AUG. 4

• Fan Party 4 p.m.; Football Hall of Fame, upper lot, 2121 George Halas Drive NW, Canton; all-inclusive food and beverages with party music by disc jockey; returning Pro Football Hall of Famers on hand for meet-and-greet opportunities; $60; fan packages available; 330-456-8207 or 800-913-9788.

SATURDAY, AUG. 4

• Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement 7 p.m.; Hall of Fame Field at Fawcett Stadium, 1835 Harrison Ave. NW, Canton; Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement ceremony, in which newest members of Pro Football Hall of Fame take their place among pro football's greatest players, coaches and contributors; $35, $45, $60, $70; fan packages available; 330-456-8207 or 800-913-9788.

SUNDAY, AUG. 5

• GameDay Roundtable 12:30 p.m.; Canton Memorial Civic Center and Cultural Center, 1101 Market Ave. N; lunch followed by a center-stage roundtable presentation featuring 2012 class of enshrinees, Jack Butler, Dermontti Dawson, Chris Doleman, Cortez Kennedy, Curtis Martin, Willie Roaf; an unscripted, up-close-and-personal format in which enshrinees share stories and memories of their careers; emceed by nationally acclaimed sports broadcaster; $56, $48; fan packages available; 330-458-2048 or 800-913-9788.

SUNDAY, AUG. 5

• Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2012 Autograph Session 3 p.m.; Pro Football Hall of Fame, 2121 George Halas Drive NW, Canton; football fans can obtain autographs of members of the 2012 class of enshrinees, Jack Butler, Dermontti Dawson, Chris Doleman, Cortez Kennedy, Curtis Martin, Willie Roaf; $300; fan packages available; 330-456-8207 or 800-913-9788.

SUNDAY, AUG. 5

• Fan Appreciation Tailgate Party 5:30 p.m.; Pro Football Hall of Fame, upper lot, 2121 George Halas Drive NW, Canton; all-inclusive package featuring traditional tailgate food and beverages; returning Hall of Famers on hand for autographs and meet-and-greet opportunities; $60; fan packages available; 330-456-8207 or 800-913-9788.

SUNDAY, AUG. 5

• NFL/Pro Football Hall of Fame Game 8 p.m.; Hall of Fame Field in Fawcett Stadium, 1835 Harrison Ave. NW, Canton (across street from HOF Museum); kick off the 2012 NFL pre-season at the annual NFL/Pro Football Hall of Fame Game, Arizona Cardinals vs. New Orleans Saints; $52, $62, $67, $72; fan packages available; 330-456-8207 or 800-913-9788.

MONDAY, AUG. 6

• Drum and Bugle Corps International Competition 6:30 p.m.; Paul Brown Tiger Stadium, 314 Russell Blvd. SE, Massillon; pageantry of eight superb corps in America, including Canton Bluecoats, at the peak of their performance just one week before the world championships; 330-458-2048 or 800-533-4302.

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News Headline: Entrepreneur Experience starts in September | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Small Business Development Center, Kent State University at Stark and the Stark Development Board will present the Entrepreneur Experience starting in September.

The first event in the series will be from 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sept. 25 at Kent State Stark's The University Center, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. Check-in and continental breakfast will be from 7:45 to 8:15 a.m. Speakers will be Monica Cornetti, owner of EntrepreNow! business training and consulting firm, and Jennifer Downey, president of Ambiance.

Cornetti will present "Your Face Isn't Finished Until Your Lipstick is On: Rules of the Women's Success Game" from 8:15 to 11:15 a.m. Downey will present the lunch session from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Cornetti will present "Let's Talk! _ The Secret of Powerful Communication Skills for Women" from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

The special registration fee for the Entrepreneur Experience is $49 per person. The Small Business Development Center is providing a $100 endowment per person, reducing the regular fee of $149. The registration fee for the event includes breakfast, break stations, lunch and Cornetti's book. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Small Business Development Center Scholarship Fund.

Visit www.cantonsbdc.org to register. For more details, call 330-244-3290 or email info@cantonsbdc.org.

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News Headline: OH: 'Truthland' debunks anti-fracking claims | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Watchdog News Networks
Contact Name: Jon Cassidy
News OCR Text: Shelly Depue watches Robert Sandell light the naturally ocurring methane gas coming out The image of fire exploding from a running kitchen faucet became iconic, catapaulting the documentary “GasLand” to a 2011 Oscar nomination and a central place in the debate over hydraulic fracturing.

COLUMBUS — A new documentary rebutting some of the more outlandish claims in “GasLand” is touring Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia, and will screen at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Kent State University Stark Campus.

In one of the original's more dramatic claims, fire roars from a running kitchen faucet.

This documentary, called “Truthland,” has a flaming faucet of its own, in a kitchen that's miles from any fracking activity.

“Truthland” follows Pennsylvania schoolteacher Shelly Depue around the country while she interviews energy experts and others. She occasionally sets fire to naturally occurring methane in creeks.

The 35-minute short can also be seen at truthlandmovie.com. The production costs were paid by natural gas companies, but protagonist Depue and the experts appearing on screen weren't paid anything, according to the film's producers.

The discovery of hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of natural gas reserves in the Marcellus Shale and Utica Shale has brought economic rebirth to the once-moribund northern Appalachian region. It's also central to Gov. John Kasich's tax plans.

The term refers to the practice of blasting a solution of water, sand, and chemicals into wells to crack the shale rock found a mile or more below ground, freeing natural gas to flow back up the well. The industry reports that it's been used in more than a million wells over the past 50 years.

Some environmentalists worry that chemicals could make their way back up to water tables, which are usually a few hundred feet below ground.

“GasLand” argues that chemicals are doing just that — and making people sick. But “Truthland” includes a clip of Lisa Jackson, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, refuting the claim.

“In no case have we made a definitive determination that fracking has caused chemicals to enter groundwater,” she said.

“Definitive” is the keyword. There are concerns about groundwater pollution at one Wyoming location, although they are far from proven, and a new study in Pennsylvania raises the possibility of underground passageways that could lead to groundwater contamination one day, but that study is also preliminary, and unconnected to fracking.

Screw-ups in the drilling process also pose environmental risks, but that's true for all types of drilling.

Those concerns are rather less dramatic than the ailing livestock and mysterious diseases “GasLand” traffics in. “Truthland” easily rebuts the misinformation.

“We've never had one case of frack fluids going down the gas well and coming back up and contaminating somebody's water well,” says John Hanger, former secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.

Terry Engelder, a geoscience professor at Penn State, tells Depue that the flaw in “GasLand” “is that there is a tremendous amount of innuendo in the movie. The innuendo, of course, is that all of the problems you see filmed in that movie are a direct result of the gas industry, and in particular, hydraulic fracturing.”

Gary Hanson, the director of Red River Watershed Management Institute in Louisiana, says “it's literally impossible to frack up into a groundwater zone.”

The “Truthland” crew also talked to Jim Marston of the Environmental Defense Fund, who says “most of the probems we see in the natural gas area are due to poor well construction, poor cement work, spilling stuff on the ground. Fracking itself does not seem to have caused a lot of problems so far.”

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News Headline: Last Call For 1960s Photos For Kent State Exhibit (Davis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New May 4 Visitors Center seeking 'home photos' depicting all facets of life in that era.

Your personal photos showing what people looked like, what they experienced and what they cared about in the 1960s can be a part of the Kent State University May 4 Visitors Center exhibit

Laura Davis, professor of English and faculty coordinator for May 4 initiatives at Kent State, said “selected photos will be displayed in the May 4 Visitors Center's gallery 1, which sets the May 4 story in its time.”

“We're looking for home photos taken between 1950 and 1970. We'd like to show people from all walks of life, engaging in their everyday lives in the '60s,” she explained.

On May 4, 1970, members of the Ohio National Guard fired at demonstrators, wounding 13 Kent State students, four of them fatally. Many consider May 4 a turning point in the course of the Vietnam War and the Nixon presidency.

The 10-year legal battle that followed May 4 raised important Constitutional questions and set precedent in the U.S. Supreme Court. The event also led to reform in military policy.

Opening this fall, the May 4 Visitors Center at Kent State will tell the May 4 story, set against the political and cultural changes of the 1960s. The center will be located in Taylor Hall, adjacent to the May 4 Memorial on the Kent campus.

The deadline to submit photos is July 31. Click this link for detailed information about how to submit them.

Photo submissions are reviewed weekly and a prize is awarded for the week's favorite photo. The winner will be sent a May 4 Visitors Center milestone 40th commemoration T-shirt. Photo submissions will be displayed in the Photo Gallery at http://www.kent.edu/may4.

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News Headline: Classical music | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Chamber Player's Concerts — 7:30 p.m. Friday, 2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Ludwig Recital Hall, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent State University. Free. For more information, call 330-672-2613 or go to www.kent.edu/blossom.

The Winds of the Cleveland Orchestra — 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Ludwig Recital Hall, 1325 Theatre Drive, Music and Speech Center, Kent State University. With Marisela Sager, Jeffrey Rathbun, Daniel McKelway, Barrick Stees, and Richard King. $15 adults and seniors, $5 students and under age 18. 330-672-2613 or www.kent.edu/blossom.

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News Headline: Hot temps don't stifle hotter revue (0 comments) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Pictured is some of the cast of Porthouse Theatre Young Professional Company. This group of actors will entertain audiences with a wide variety of great music and fun staging in “The World Goes ‘Round.”

Fans of Kander and Ebb's musicals will enjoy Porthouse Theatre's "The World Goes 'Round," a musical revue and tribute to several Kander and Ebb shows, including "70 Girls 70," "Kiss of the Spider Woman," "Chicago," "Cabaret" and "The Rink."

This show features the Porthouse Theatre Young Professional Company, including Parke Fech, Michael Glaven, Kyle Kemph, Nathan Mohebbi, Jack O'Brien, Sam Rohloff, Lucy Anders, Anastasia Arnold, Lauren Culver, Mackenzie Duan, Lisa Kuhnen and Jennie Nasser.

Sean Morrissey is director and choreographer for the show.

Despite the torrid temperatures on July 7, the ensemble gave a high-energy and fun performance. The show includes a nice variety of songs, ranging from serious like "Colored Lights," "My Coloring Book" and "Maybe This Time" to hilarious like "The Grass is Always Greener," "Sara Lee," "The Rink" and "Class."

TICKET AND SHOW INFORMATION

"The World Goes 'Round" runs through July 21.

Shows start at 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. The grounds open 90 minutes before curtain.

Porthouse Theatre is on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m,. or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online.

Tickets are $25 to $33 for adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students.

The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent.

NEXT ON STAGE

Porthouse Theatre will close its summer season with "The Sound of Music," which will be staged July 26 through Aug. 12.

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

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News Headline: Hot temps don't stifle hotter revue | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Photo courtesy of Matt Unger; Pictured is some of the cast of Porthouse Theatre Young Professional Company. This group of actors will entertain audiences with a wide variety of great music and fun staging in “The World Goes ‘Round.”

Fans of Kander and Ebb's musicals will enjoy Porthouse Theatre's "The World Goes 'Round," a musical revue and tribute to several Kander and Ebb shows, including "70 Girls 70," "Kiss of the Spider Woman," "Chicago," "Cabaret" and "The Rink."

This show features the Porthouse Theatre Young Professional Company, including Parke Fech, Michael Glaven, Kyle Kemph, Nathan Mohebbi, Jack O'Brien, Sam Rohloff, Lucy Anders, Anastasia Arnold, Lauren Culver, Mackenzie Duan, Lisa Kuhnen and Jennie Nasser.

Sean Morrissey is director and choreographer for the show.

Despite the torrid temperatures on July 7, the ensemble gave a high-energy and fun performance. The show includes a nice variety of songs, ranging from serious like "Colored Lights," "My Coloring Book" and "Maybe This Time" to hilarious like "The Grass is Always Greener," "Sara Lee," "The Rink" and "Class."

TICKET AND SHOW INFORMATION

"The World Goes 'Round" runs through July 21.

Shows start at 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. The grounds open 90 minutes before curtain.

Porthouse Theatre is on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m,. or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online.

Tickets are $25 to $33 for adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students.

The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent.

NEXT ON STAGE

Porthouse Theatre will close its summer season with "The Sound of Music," which will be staged July 26 through Aug. 12.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

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News Headline: REVIEW: Delightful 'The World Goes Round' @ Porthouse | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Musical reviews are a collection of songs which are performed as a single production. They usually contain no storyline, per se, but highlight either a theme such as patriotism (e.g., WELCOME HOME: A PATRIOTIC MUSICAL), a person (e.g., WILL RODGERS FOLLIES), a body of work by a performer (e.g., COME FLY WITH ME, the songs of Frank Sinatra), or the writings of a particular song writer or writing team (e.g., SONDHEIM ON SONDHEIM).

THE WORLD GOES ROUND is one of the latter, an evening of songs conceived by John Kander (music) and Fred Ebb (lyrics), which were written for their Broadway shows. The duo wrote such hits as CHICAGO, CABARET, FUNNY LADY, and KISS OF THE SPIDER WOMAN.

For a review to be more than escapist enjoyment requires a talented cast who can both sing and dance, a fine musical director who can develop strong musical arrangements, and a creative director and choreographer. Fortunately, Porthouse has such a team.

The cast for THE WORLD GOES ROUND, composed entirely of college students, is generally fine. Lauren Culver, who has an excellent singing voice, well interprets “And the World Goes ‘Round” and “Maybe This Time.” She, like so many in the cast, sing meanings, not just words, thus making the songs purposeful, even out of the context of the script for which they were written.

Lisa Kuhnen makes “Cabaret” into a life affirming anthem, while creating a clear story in “Colored Lights.” Jennie Nasser's “A Quiet Thing” and “World Goes ‘Round” were well sung. Jack O'Brien showcases a fine voice in “Sometimes a Day Goes By” and displays the right amount of pathetic appeal in “Mr. Cellophane.”

Sam Rohloff and Nathan Mohebbi display excellent dancing skills. Anastasia Arnold and Lisa Kuhnen are delightful in “The Grass is Always Greener.” Rohloff, Culver and MacKenzie Duan create a well-blended and compelling medley of “We Can Make It,” “Maybe This Time,” and “Isn't This Better.” Kyle Kempf showcases a fine sense of humor and timing in “Sara Lee.”

Other highlights were “Yes,” “All That Jazz,” and “Me and My Baby.”

Musical director Kevin Long not only has his orchestra in good tune, but his arrangements are enveloping.

The star of the show, however, is not seen on stage. The highlight is Sean Morrissey's creative directing and choreography. Each segment has its own approach. He doesn't repeat dance moves or styles. The staging is casual yet well honed. The cast interprets songs well in form and word meaning.

CAPSULE JUDGMENT: Musical reviews tend not to be my favorite form of theatre. I prefer storylines. But, more productions like THE WORLD GOES ROUND, as directed and choreographed by Sean Morrissey, could make a review lover out of me. Go to Porthouse. Sit back and relax, and let the talented and well-directed cast carry you away on a fine musical trip to Kanter and Ebb's Broadway.

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News Headline: Standing Rock Gallery Fans 'Celebrate The Garden' | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Kasha Legeza
News OCR Text: Music, poetry, dancing and food were draws to Spicebush & Spearmint Festival.

Members of the New World Children's Theater rehearse a skit during the Spicebush & Spearmint Festival on Sunday in the vacant lot next to Standing Rock Cultural Arts on North Water Street. Lisa Regula

http://kent.patch.com/articles/standing-rock-gallery-supporters-celebrate-greenspace/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1342605480

About 50 artists and supporters of Standing Rock Cultural Arts whiled away their afternoon Sunday listening to music and poetry, watching children perform and play during the Spicebush & Spearmint Festival.

The event was held to celebrate the green space located next to the North Water Street Gallery that has been used by Standing Rock over the past 20 years for events, programs and community gardening.

“We wanted to be together to celebrate that space,” said Lisa Regula, one of the festival organizers. “There is something really special about that site. It just gives you a really positive vibe.”

The Standing Rock Garden was chosen as the new location for the Kent Wells Sherman House, an 1858 Greek Revival home that must be moved from its current East Erie Street site to make way for an extension of Kent State University's Esplanade project.

On Tuesday, however, the Kent Planning Commission turned down the project's site plan.

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News Headline: Kent – Bringing It All Together | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TAKING A STROLL: Children enjoy a mid-day stroll through Kent's Acorn Alley under the gaze of the area's unofficial mascot.

http://stow.patch.com/blog_posts/kent-bringing-it-all-together/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1342563635

Many pieces of a unique puzzle are coming together in downtown Kent – but when those pieces are finally assembled – they'll make a complete picture of what could be ahead for downtowns in the Greater Akron area.

With its ambitious Central Gateway Project, Kent is re-inventing its downtown thanks to the efforts of city officials, the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority (PARTA), the Kent State University and several private-sector developers.

The Central Gateway provides something for all parties involved while creating a safe and comfortable environment for pedestrians, cyclists, transit riders and motorists.  The project will provide the city and its downtown businesses with additional parking for customers; PARTA will get a multi-modal transfer point for its riders; commuters and pedestrians will have easy access to key areas – including employers, shops and restaurants; the university will gain access to downtown and along state Route 59 through the KSU Esplanade; and two major employers in the region – The Davey Tree Expert Company and Ametek – will have new facilities.

One of greatest benefits to the Greater Akron area is the promise of 1,000 new jobs that Central Gateway backers say it will generate upon completion.

Kent's renewed downtown exemplifies what can be accomplished by cooperation between the public and private sectors and the use of urban design principles to create a sense of place and support a vibrant downtown.  The project is a puzzle of many pieces and one of its key pieces was a $20 million federal Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant.

The ‘TIGER' Pounces

In January 2010, PARTA received the TIGER grant to build its soon-to-be completed Kent Transit Center.  Located in Kent's Erie Street and Haymaker Parkway (state Route 59) area, the center will be the transportation hub of the Central Gateway and will be home to 10 bus bays that will serve local and express bus routes operated by PARTA.  With its location near The PORTAGE Hike & Bike Trail, the center will include bike and pedestrian facilities, such as lockers, showers and bike racks.

Although Kent had been planning the re-development of its downtown for years – Kent Engineer Jim Bowling notes that the city began acquiring property in the area between Haymaker Parkway and Water, South Depeyster and Erie streets in 2005 – it wasn't until PARTA landed the grant that the community's efforts gained a newfound momentum.  With the grant in hand, PARTA and Kent officials found a greater willingness by the parties involved to commit to the Central Gateway area.  The grant's initial $20 million led to investments in downtown that eventually grew to $100 million, according to Bowling.

“If you remember, back in those days, funding and lending from the banks were hard to come by and the economy wasn't doing so well,” Bowling continues, “It really wasn't until the TIGER grant that we were able to.  That was the impetus to get the final funding wrapped up from the banks, and the city and the university.”

PARTA Planning Director Bryan Smith says that demonstrating that the new transit center would promote a mix of travel modes – transit, pedestrian, cycling and motor vehicles – was instrumental in securing the grant from federal officials.  Smith notes that the area is named the Central Gateway because – upon completion – it will be the gateway between the downtown and the university via an extension of the KSU Esplanade, a pathway for cyclists and pedestrians.

Funded in part with $700,000 in AMATS Transportation Enhancement Program funds, the KSU Esplanade will extend from the university's Fashion Institute to Haymaker Parkway along Erie Street.  Haymaker Parkway is also undergoing extensive improvements that will allow pedestrians and cyclists to travel safely between the Esplanade and The PORTAGE.  PARTA's transit center will open in two stages, with its parking facilities opening first in March 2013.  The center is expected to be fully operational by July 2013.

Bowling observes that bringing many transportation modes together will not only present convenient travel options for downtown visitors, but foster a new sense of identity for the area as a destination.  “Downtown Kent is meant to be a place for people to go to – a community,” Bowling adds.

Creating a multi-modal downtown tied into the university was an aim of Kent's redevelopment efforts dating back to the 1980s.  Those plans lay fallow until 2005, when two of the city's largest employers – The Davey Tree Expert Company and Ametek – began discussions with city officials about their need for new facilities.  Those employers – together with KSU officials – also expressed an interest in a new hotel and conference center for their respective needs.

“Each of the public and private entities had a different goal in mind.  These goals didn't necessarily contradict each other, but if you looked at them in the right light, they actually complemented each other very well,” Bowling says.

The TIGER grant paved the way – not only for PARTA to construct a state-of-the art facility – but for the city to develop an additional 230 parking spaces on top of the transit center for employers and other businesses, according to Smith.  With the lure of additional parking in place, Fairmount Properties and its joint venture partner Premiere Development Partners soon secured funding to construct three new buildings for the Davey Resource Group and Ametek.  The first building – located at the corner of Haymaker Parkway and South Water Street – will house the Davey Resource Group and is expected to be completed soon.  Likewise, the Kent State University Foundation committed to building a 120 room hotel and conference center in the area.

As these pieces were coming together for the Central Gateway, Kent's Ron Burbick was busy planting some “acorns” of his own nearby.

‘Acorns' Take Root

Dr. Burbick had a vision for a walk-able retail and restaurant district in the heart of downtown.  The businessman began by investing millions of his own money and other investors through his RLB Phoenix Properties LLC in developing Acorn Alley I.  Located along East Main and Depeyster streets, Acorn Alley I is a popular destination since its opening in September 2009 with its unique mix of shops, offices and restaurants.  It sprouted Acorn Alley II, which opened in November 2011 at the corner of South Depeyster and East Erie streets and is home to new stores and eateries.  The former five-story Franklin Hotel located at the intersection of East Main and South Depeyster streets is the site of Dr. Burbick's next renovation project – Acorn Corner.

The Acorn Alley area is easily accessible by walking and cycling with ample parking nearby and ties in neatly with the Central Gateway area.  Dr. Burbick says that it was through his participation with various civic committees and Main Street Kent – a historic preservation group – that he became aware of key principles regarding downtown revitalization.  One principle that impressed Dr. Burbick seems relatively simple: People must have reasons to visit downtowns.

When retail, restaurants and related businesses leave downtowns, the remaining occupants tend to be lower-floor offices, such as those for non-profit organizations, that do not attract many visitors to the area, Dr. Burbick says.  After years of frustration due to a lack of participants, he decided that he would apply some of Main Street Kent's principles on his own by redeveloping a single building that housed several non-profits.  That redeveloped building drew new tenants and mushroomed into another redeveloped building that drew new tenants, and then a third building that eventually became Acorn Alley I.

Vibrant downtowns are important – not only for commerce – but for a sense of community, Dr. Burbick observes.

“Here, in the last 30 years, everyone hopped in their car and went to a mall someplace,” he continues, “You don't even know the people that live next door to you.  Now, just this last Saturday we had this ‘Masterpieces on Main,' a wine and art festival downtown.  It was packed.  You never had that in the past.”

He adds that changes in leadership in the city of Kent and Kent State University helped him in the pursuit of his projects.  Prior to these changes, the mindset was to leave downtown Kent as it was.  He praises KSU President Lester A. Lefton for pursuing development of the KSU Esplanade to overcome a psychological “town-gown” barrier to connect the campus with downtown.

AMATS was a supporting player throughout the drama of Kent's downtown redevelopment.  The agency programmed funding for several projects directly related to the Central Gateway – most notably the KSU Esplanade – and other nearby projects that would impact downtown such as the Crain Avenue Bridge project.  (For a complete map and listing of projects, click here.)

One significant contribution by the agency wasn't related to a particular project or funding at all, but concerned ideas, strategies and principles.

Released by AMATS in September 2010, Connecting Communities – A Guide to Integrating Land Use and Transportation presents strategies to help create connected livable communities through increasing transportation choices, encouraging coordinated development and reducing environmental impacts.

Planning Coordinator Krista Beniston explains that agency officials developed the guide after deciding that it was time to incorporate a more holistic approach to transportation planning – one that promoted sustainable land use strategies such as preserving urban centers like Kent's downtown area.  Prior to this change in approach, the agency tended to tackle problems with the region's highways and public transit systems separately with little consideration as to how they might tie-in with one another or nearby pedestrian systems such as sidewalks and trails.

“In the past, our agency would look at a problem and we'd begin thinking about a new lane for a highway or a new intersection to relieve congestion.  Our transit planners would tend to look at ridership in certain areas and begin thinking about proposing new routes or stops,” Beniston continues, “We felt that the time had come to stop looking at challenges as separate pieces and start looking at them as a whole.”

Urban design principles – such as those presented in Connecting Communities – are found throughout the Central Gateway.  Bowling cites the 15-foot wide sidewalks that will crisscross the area to accommodate pedestrians with ease and ample on-street parking to slow vehicular traffic for the safety of cyclists as examples of the principles pursued by Kent.  Dr. Burbick notes with pride that he incorporated similar concepts into Acorn Alley I and II and cites the abundance of bike racks and well-lit walking areas as examples.

Smith notes that PARTA helped AMATS craft Connecting Communities and that participation later benefitted the transit authority.   “We used the principles that came out of that to further our own (TIGER Grant) application,” Smith continues, “We were able to show to the funding agencies at the federal level that this is something that our community wants.  We care about how our places are connected and we've thought about it.”

Thanks to the pursuit of such principles and a commitment to public-private sector partnerships, Kent has a revitalized vibrant downtown.  Along with this new flurry of downtown activity and commerce, have come new aesthetically pleasing facilities – such as the new transit center and Acorn Alley – that also contribute to a heightened sense of community.  More such facilities are on the way, including a veterans' memorial that is being planned on the transit center grounds.

AMATS officials hope that that the principles that went into revitalizing downtown Kent will be pursued by other Greater Akron area communities.  Beniston says that Kent's efforts could serve as a template for other communities, but Dr. Burbick notes that the resources that led to success in revitalizing Kent's downtown – such as a large regional university and a committed local developer – may not be available to other communities.  He does offer them one piece of advice in the pursuit of such efforts.  “Play to your strengths,” he advises.

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News Headline: Repeal of 2009 income tax hike may make Twinsburg's 2013 ballot | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name: Emily Canning
News OCR Text: Twinsburg -- When city officials campaigned for a quarter percent income tax increase in 2009, they told voters that their goal was to offer residents the chance to repeal the tax hike four years later if the city was financially healthy enough to do without the extra revenue.

Officials now say that goal could be in reach by the end of next year.

"I would like to keep the tax increase in place at least through 2013 [which would take the tax increase to the four-year mark]." said Mayor Katherine Procop. "But we will begin reviewing next year to see if the increase can be repealed at the end of 2013."

"We will place something on the ballot next year asking voters if they want to repeal the tax," said Councilor Gary Sorace. "If we aren't in a good place financially and don't think we can do without the quarter percent, we can campaign against the repeal."

"We are seeing growth and I think the city is moving in the right direction."

Sorace added that the repeal should be on the ballot next year no matter what because he believes that residents should have the final say in the city's income tax rate.

"If by next year we decide we aren't quite ready, I would be more in favor of holding off one more year to put the repeal on the ballot instead of putting it on and asking people to vote against it," said Councilor Sam Scaffide. "But if we aren't ready to repeal the tax, I think we really have a lot of explaining to do to the residents. Still, the way things are going I am hopeful that we will be ready for the repeal."

Finance Director Karen Howse described the city's income tax revenue as "healthy" at a finance committee meeting July 10. As of June 30, the city has collected $15.8 million of the $21.8 million of estimated revenue for 2012.

The city asked voters for the income tax increase in 2009 after predicting a $2.4 million decrease in income tax revenue with the closure of Chrysler and more than $1 million in decreased revenue from other city businesses.

"That means that at the halfway point of the year, we have collected 77 percent of the estimated revenue for 2012," Howse told the finance committee.

Howse said the healthy revenue stream can be partially attributed to increased income tax revenue from two businesses that have each enjoyed a spike in net profits this year. She would not disclose the identity of the businesses adding that she can't discuss the profits of a private sector business.

Howse added that the city cannot anticipate such spikes in profits every year. She also said that the quarter percent income tax -- which produces between $2.7 million and $2.9 million annually -- has also helped to build up the city's reserves.

"But I will support whatever decision the mayor and Council make regarding the quarter percent," Howse said.

The city currently has an unexpended revenue balance of $21.1 million in its general fund. That number was $15 million in 2011, $10.2 million in 2010 and $5.7 million in 2009.

"So basically our cash balance is increasing by about $5 million each year," Howse said. "That is a great sign that we are financially healthy."

Council President Ted Yates said he is optimistic that the city can repeal the income tax increase by the end of 2013, but added that he wants the opportunity to thoroughly review the city's finances before making any decisions.

"It seems that we will be in a position to do this, but I don't want to make the mistake of having to repeal the increase too soon and then we find out that we are in trouble and we have to go to the voters a second time," Yates said. "But we are experiencing economic growth with Kent State and the opportunities at the former Chrysler site nd] I think we will continue to see growth."

Councilor Bill Furey said he thinks the city could do without the quarter percent if the economy continues to stabilize and the city continues to control spending.

"There was a time when I was first on Council that we were spending every dime we brought in," Furey said. "But now we are working with 20 less city employees than we had a few years ago and we have curbed spending. When you see how our cash balance keeps increasing each year, it is clear that cutting spending has helped."

Voters approved the income tax increase in 2009, 57.27 percent to 42.73 percent, increasing the municipal income tax from 2 percent to 2.25 percent. The increase costs an individual with a salary of $50,000 an additional $125 per year.

The city began collecting the extra quarter percent at the beginning of 2010. If voters repeal the quarter percent in 2013, the city would stop collecting the additional tax revenue at the beginning of 2014.

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News Headline: Punishing fee - Editorials | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some college students sign up for just enough credit hours to remain bona fide students. Others choose to carry a full credit load and some more. They may load up because they feel up to the extra challenge, or to lock in certain courses or professors when they are available, or to save themselves time and money by graduating early.

The practice is hardly the kind for which a student should be penalized. But as state Sen. Tom Sawyer points out, state universities are imposing a penalty on ambition by ratcheting up the fees they charge for extra credit hours. In the next school year, students at 11 of Ohio's 13 four-year public universities will face overload fees that range from $144 per credit hour at Central State University to $450 at the University of Cincinnati, both institutions applying the fees after 18 credit hours. Beyond 16 credit hours, the University of Akron will charge $333 per credit hour. At Kent State University, the fee will be $440 after 17 credit hours, the second highest fee.

Sawyer is right that the size of the fees is becoming a significant disincentive for students who are motivated to accelerate their education or to pursue another major. The Akron Democrat introduced this week legislation to cap the overload - or excess credit - fees. Tuition costs have increased sharply during the past decade or more and continue to rise. Low- and middle-income families are finding it increasingly difficult to finance higher education without piling up huge debt. As Sawyer reminds, the typical Ohio graduate is carrying a student debt load of about $27,700, higher than the $25,200 national average. Tacking on more high fees simply adds to the financial uncertainties many students confront in the effort to complete their coursework.

Sawyer's proposal presents a reasonable formula for capping the overload fee, which promises to lower the cost per excess credit hour roughly 12 percent to 40 percent. In exchange, the legislation, Senate Bill 359, calls for a supplementary appropriation of $31.5 million to help the universities cover capital maintenance costs.

Without question, Ohio's public universities are in a financial bind themselves and under pressure to find other sources of funding as state support continues to erode. The institutions are offering "products" students want to buy, and tuition and student fees are a principal source of revenue to cover the costs. Still, the schools risk the appearance of fleecing students with hefty fee increases. State leaders are pressing universities to increase avenues for early graduation to raise the number of college-educated Ohioans. It hardly helps to spook students making full use of the offerings.

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News Headline: Ohio Senate bill would cap college "ambition penalty" | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio Senate bill would cap college "ambition penalty"

Bi-partisan bill would cap fees for students taking extra courseloads

College students facing a new kind of fee may catch a break. A bipartisan bill has been introduced in the state Senate called the "Ambition Penalty Relieve Act. WKSU's M.L. Schultze has more ...

Democratic State Senator Tom Sawyer of Akron has introduced a bill to cap the additional credit-hour fees that are becoming a trend among Ohio colleges. Kent State and the University of Akron are among public universities charging students an "overload fee" for taking classes beyond the average full-time load.

Sawyer says the state's mounting student-loan debt pushed him to introduce the bill. He hopes it will strike a balance between lowering that debt while keeping the universities afloat.

"I'm trying to put together a reliable revenue stream that would avoid building additional debt on the backs of tuition payers, while at the same time meeting the needs of universities where this mounting deferred maintenance problem has building up over time, was the real genesis of this legislation."

John Liptak is a junior musical theater major at Kent State. He helped organize on-campus protests earlier this year in response to the credit fees and says Sawyer's bill, which would reduce Kent's overage fee from $440 to $275, could make tuition a little more manageable.

"In a completely ideal world, I would love for it to go away, but I'm much more willing to pay $250 per additional credit hour than $400."

Kent state declined to comment, saying it's a statewide issue, not a university issue. Two Republican state senators, Peggy Lehner of Kettering and Bill Seitz of Cincinnati, are co-sponsoring the bill.

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News Headline: Senators propose cap on "overload" college fees | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Dayton Daily News - Online
Contact Name: Meagan Pant
News OCR Text: State Sen. Tom Sawyer of Akron wants to limit fees college students pay for extra classes they take on top of a full-time load — costs the Democrat calls “ambition penalties.”

Sawyer's Ambition Penalty Relief Act aims to cap what students pay for courses they take above what a university considers a maximum full-time courseload. His bill, introduced Tuesday, would reduce costs for students at seven public universities, including Wright State University.

WSU students pay full-time tuition for classes they take between 11 and 18 credit hours. Central State University and University of Cincinnati students pay that between 12 and 18 credit hours. But above 18 credit hours, students at the schools pay an “overload fee,” ranging from the state's highest rate of $450 per credit hour at UC, to $365 at WSU to $144 at CSU.

A very small percent of students opt to take more credit hours to graduate early or in pursuit of a double major. And although charging them is not new, “the increasing size of the fees make it unfair,” Sawyer said.

State Sen. Peggy Lehner, R-Kettering, who has pledged her support and is co-sponsoring the bill, said she is not opposed to a fee, but it should not be higher than the normal credit hour charge.

“I don't think that a student should be basically fiscally punished for being willing to take on a heavier load than the average student is,” said Lehner, chairwoman of the Senate Education Committee.

Sawyer claims schools “justify these fees on the grounds that they are needed for long-deferred capital maintenance costs.” But universities say the fees “reflect the real costs associated with instruction,” said UC spokesman Greg Hand.

“Full-time tuition charges cover the average costs for a majority of our students but, beyond a certain amount, there are real expenses incurred in delivering instruction, and those expenses are covered by additional charges,” Hand said. At UC, 362 students took more than 18 credit hours last year. Most of them, 217 students, were taking 19 credit hours, Hand said. UC has more than 42,000 students.

Last fall, 690 WSU students took 19 credit hours or more. WSU had nearly 19,800 students that quarter, according to Thomas Sudkamp, WSU associate provost for undergraduate studies. He said it is worth studying how many students pursue that courseload as Ohio focuses on showing students how they can earn their degree in three years.

“Those students are ones who are going above and beyond and hopefully are getting through degree programs more quickly,” he said.

Miami University students pay the same for a full-time load whether it is the minimum 12 credit hours or 20, according to the university. Approval is needed to take more than 20 credit hours. Spokeswoman Claire Wagner said the university's policy helps students who want to pursue more than one major. At Miami, 11 percent of students double major. Last fall, 1,248 of the 14,853 students in Oxford took 19 credit hours or more.

Ohio State University expects few students will take more than 18 credit hours under the new semester calendar. OSU has a new pricing structure charging $397 per credit hour to students who take more than 18 hours. Spokeswoman Liz Cook said at OSU, 18 semester credit hours is the equivalent of 27 quarter credit hours. “Our research indicated that there were very few students, even honors students, who took that many credit hours under the quarter system,” she said.

Sawyer's bill proposes three changes to cap the fees and hold universities harmless with $31.5 million in relief from the state for deferred maintenance.

The fees would be limited based on a university's tuition and credit hours allowed before the fee applies. Sawyer explains that if a university charges $4,000 in tuition, covering up to 16 credit hours, the fee would be capped at $250.

His bill would also re-enact the former method of allocating capital funds to universities and restore the ability of the chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents to develop a funding formula.

The senators say the move is important as student loan debt — which covers tuition, living expenses, books and other costs of education — exceeds $1 trillion nationally and Ohio pushes to increase the number of residents with bachelor's degree. Ohio ranks seventh nationally in student debt with an average of $27,213 per student. Currently 35.79 percent of Ohio adults have a college degree, according to the Lumina Foundation.

“We're doing a lot in the state right now to try to encourage the completion of college and for some people that means doing it quicker and they shouldn't be penalized,” Lehner said.

The bill has to go through the legislative process, which starts with the senate Rules and References Committee, according to Lehner's office.

Actual and proposed fees

Institution / Last Credit Hour before Overload Fee Applies / 2012-13 Overload Fee / Proposed Fee Cap / Student Savings Per Credit Hour

University of Cincinnati* 18 $450 $289 ($161)

Kent State University*** 17 $440 $275 ($165)

Cleveland State University 16 $373 $280 ($93)

Wright State University 18 $365 $224 ($141)

University of Akron 16 $333 $289 ($44)

Youngstown State University 16 $320 $233 ($87)

University of Toledo** N/A $317 $317 N/A

Shawnee State University 18 $279 $188 ($91)

Ohio University* 20 $239 $247 N/A

Bowling Green State University 18 $200 $279 N/A

Central State University 18 $144 $158 N/A

The Ohio State University none $0 N/A N/A

Miami University none $0 N/A N/A

* For comparison purposes, fees were converted from quarter to semester system for University of Cincinnati and Ohio University.

** The University of Toledo charges the same per-credit hour course fee for all courses.

*** The proposed Kent State University cap is 17 credit hours for 2012-13 and 16 for 2013-14.

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