Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
Blossom Music; Theatre and Dance (3)
Centennial; Institutional Advancement (1)
Higher Education (1)
Institutional Advancement (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS); Research (1)
Political Science (1)
Town-Gown (2)
Tuition (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Blossom Music; Theatre and Dance (3)
Hot temps don't stifle hotter revue 07/19/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

...adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent. NEXT ON STAGE Porthouse Theatre will close its summer season with "The Sound of Music," which will be staged...

Hot temps don't stifle hotter revue (0 comments) 07/19/2012 Bedford Times Register - Online Text Attachment Email

...adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent. NEXT ON STAGE Porthouse Theatre will close its summer season with "The Sound of Music," which will be staged...

Hot temps don't stifle hotter revue 07/19/2012 MapleHeightsPress Text Attachment Email

...adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent. NEXT ON STAGE Porthouse Theatre will close its summer season with "The Sound of Music," which will be staged...


Centennial; Institutional Advancement (1)
School Notes (Finn) 07/19/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...structures, wooden blocks, garden areas and natural materials for building and creating art. KSU endowment funding at the $265 million level Kent State University's Centennial Campaign has raised $265 million -- $15 million more than its goal when it launched in 2010. The purpose of...


Higher Education (1)
Cleveland: Schools, levy will impact entire region 07/19/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Greater Cleveland should care about this...If we don't educate our children, we won't attract the jobs and the industries we need in our community." Kent State University Trustee Dennis Eckart says the cost of giving Cleveland schools graduates remedial classes to get them to a college-ready level...


Institutional Advancement (1)
MUSICAL ACTIVITIES n July 18: Nickelback, 6:30 p.m., 07/19/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

...6: Western Reserve Community Bank, 7 p.m., Home Savings Plaza in downtown Kent. n Sept. 8: Sheryl Crow, Los Lonely Boys, 6-11 p.m., Dix Stadium, the Kent State U. campus. THEATRICAL EVENTS n July 18: Cirque du Soleil, 8 p.m., the Quicken Loans Arena. n Now-July 21: "The World Goes Round,"...


KSU at Stark (1)
Jackson-Belden Food Fest, Balloon Classic set to lift off 07/20/2012 Suburbanite, The Text Attachment Email


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Performing Arts Center's new season soon to be unveiled 07/19/2012 Daily Jeffersonian - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KSU Performing Arts Center's new season soon to be unveiled Published: July 19, 2012 1:00PM NEW PHILADELPHIA -- Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia is holding a special "Season Unveiling" on July 21 to announce the more than 20 events scheduled...


KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (1)
Kent – Bringing It All Together 07/20/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...Gateway Project, Kent is re-inventing its downtown thanks to the efforts of city officials, the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority (PARTA), Kent State University and several private-sector developers. The Central Gateway provides something for all parties involved while creating a safe...


Library and Information Science (SLIS); Research (1)
New Library Science Study Findings Reported from Kent State University 07/20/2012 NewsRx.com Text Email

...interfaces is examined through articles published between 1989 and 2010." The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research by the author from Kent State University, "Children have developmental limitations, such as underdeveloped motor skills, difficulties with spelling, and trouble understanding...


Political Science (1)
The Elite Isn't Going to Lose Control (Stacher) 07/19/2012 Foreign Policy - Online Text Attachment Email

..."a force for stability" in the region. This bleak and somewhat harsh assessment begs tough questions. But Stacher, an assistant professor at Kent State University in Ohio, has earned the right to a voice in the debate about how the U.S. should respond to change in the Arab world....


Town-Gown (2)
Kent ruling on relocating landmark should be reversed 07/20/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

City loan to move Kent Wells Sherman House transferred to new friends group 07/20/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


Tuition (1)
State senators propose capping fees for Ohio college students who take extra credit hours 07/19/2012 JournalNews Text Attachment Email

...Fee Cap / Student Savings Per Credit Hour University of Cincinnati* 18 $450 $289 ($161) Kent State University*** 17 $440 $275 ($165) Cleveland State University 16 ...


University Press (1)
New Street signs major new Hemingway study ... 07/19/2012 PRLog Text Attachment Email

...critic, poet and author or editor of more than 20 volumes of criticism and poetry. His recent books include READING HEMINGWAY'S "THE SUN ALSO RISES" (Kent State University Press, 2007) and HURRICANE HYMN AND OTHER POEMS (Codhill Press, 2009). Stoneback is a former member of the Board of Directors...


News Headline: Hot temps don't stifle hotter revue | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Special Products Editor

Fans of Kander and Ebb's musicals will enjoy Porthouse Theatre's "The World Goes 'Round," a musical revue and tribute to several Kander and Ebb shows, including "70 Girls 70," "Kiss of the Spider Woman," "Chicago," "Cabaret" and "The Rink."

This show features the Porthouse Theatre Young Professional Company, including Parke Fech, Michael Glaven, Kyle Kemph, Nathan Mohebbi, Jack O'Brien, Sam Rohloff, Lucy Anders, Anastasia Arnold, Lauren Culver, Mackenzie Duan, Lisa Kuhnen and Jennie Nasser.

Sean Morrissey is director and choreographer for the show.

Despite the torrid temperatures on July 7, the ensemble gave a high-energy and fun performance. The show includes a nice variety of songs, ranging from serious like "Colored Lights," "My Coloring Book" and "Maybe This Time" to hilarious like "The Grass is Always Greener," "Sara Lee," "The Rink" and "Class."

TICKET AND SHOW INFORMATION

"The World Goes 'Round" runs through July 21.

Shows start at 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. The grounds open 90 minutes before curtain.

Porthouse Theatre is on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m,. or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online.

Tickets are $25 to $33 for adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students.

The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent.

NEXT ON STAGE

Porthouse Theatre will close its summer season with "The Sound of Music," which will be staged July 26 through Aug. 12.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

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News Headline: Hot temps don't stifle hotter revue (0 comments) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bedford Times Register - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Classifieds

Legals

MarketplaceOhio

by April Helms

Special Products Editor

Fans of Kander and Ebb's musicals will enjoy Porthouse Theatre's "The World Goes 'Round," a musical revue and tribute to several Kander and Ebb shows, including "70 Girls 70," "Kiss of the Spider Woman," "Chicago," "Cabaret" and "The Rink."

This show features the Porthouse Theatre Young Professional Company, including Parke Fech, Michael Glaven, Kyle Kemph, Nathan Mohebbi, Jack O'Brien, Sam Rohloff, Lucy Anders, Anastasia Arnold, Lauren Culver, Mackenzie Duan, Lisa Kuhnen and Jennie Nasser.

Sean Morrissey is director and choreographer for the show.

Despite the torrid temperatures on July 7, the ensemble gave a high-energy and fun performance. The show includes a nice variety of songs, ranging from serious like "Colored Lights," "My Coloring Book" and "Maybe This Time" to hilarious like "The Grass is Always Greener," "Sara Lee," "The Rink" and "Class."

TICKET AND SHOW INFORMATION

"The World Goes 'Round" runs through July 21.

Shows start at 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. The grounds open 90 minutes before curtain.

Porthouse Theatre is on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m,. or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online.

Tickets are $25 to $33 for adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students.

The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent.

NEXT ON STAGE

Porthouse Theatre will close its summer season with "The Sound of Music," which will be staged July 26 through Aug. 12.

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

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News Headline: Hot temps don't stifle hotter revue | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: MapleHeightsPress
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Classifieds

Legals

MarketplaceOhio

by April Helms

Special Products Editor

Fans of Kander and Ebb's musicals will enjoy Porthouse Theatre's "The World Goes 'Round," a musical revue and tribute to several Kander and Ebb shows, including "70 Girls 70," "Kiss of the Spider Woman," "Chicago," "Cabaret" and "The Rink."

This show features the Porthouse Theatre Young Professional Company, including Parke Fech, Michael Glaven, Kyle Kemph, Nathan Mohebbi, Jack O'Brien, Sam Rohloff, Lucy Anders, Anastasia Arnold, Lauren Culver, Mackenzie Duan, Lisa Kuhnen and Jennie Nasser.

Sean Morrissey is director and choreographer for the show.

Despite the torrid temperatures on July 7, the ensemble gave a high-energy and fun performance. The show includes a nice variety of songs, ranging from serious like "Colored Lights," "My Coloring Book" and "Maybe This Time" to hilarious like "The Grass is Always Greener," "Sara Lee," "The Rink" and "Class."

TICKET AND SHOW INFORMATION

"The World Goes 'Round" runs through July 21.

Shows start at 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. The grounds open 90 minutes before curtain.

Porthouse Theatre is on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

Tickets are available by calling 330-672-2497 or 330-672-3884, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m,. or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online.

Tickets are $25 to $33 for adults and seniors, and $17 to $20 for students.

The box office is in the Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive at Kent State University in Kent.

NEXT ON STAGE

Porthouse Theatre will close its summer season with "The Sound of Music," which will be staged July 26 through Aug. 12.

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

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News Headline: School Notes (Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Aurora schools log top

proficiency test scores

The Aurora school district once again led districts in Portage County, according to preliminary results of the Ohio Achievement Tests given in May, with proficient or above students generally reaching well over 90 percent.

The only categories where Aurora students were below 90 percent were third-grade math (87.6 percent) and fifth-grade reading (89.8).

The greatest percentage of proficient or above students was in sixth-grade reading (98.1), followed by eighth-grade reading (98.0).

All other figures for the tests given to third- to eighth-graders were between 90 percent and 96.4 percent.

A handful of other school districts in Portage posted numbers higher than 90 percent, while most of them registered in the 70s and 80s percent range of students proficient or above.

Personnel matters OK'd

A handful of personnel matters were handled during the Board of Education's July 11 special meeting.

Craddock second-grade teacher Kelly Wilk received an extended parental leave of absence for the first semester of 2012-13.

Kathryn E. Norris was hired as an elementary math tutor and James A. Wallish was employed as a high school Academic Resource Center tutor.

Lisa L. Braun was hired as a Craddock health-instructional assistant, and Karen Andexler was employed as a support staff substitute.

Supplemental contracts were awarded to Lois Schroeder-Girbino as art department chair, Jason Burdett as music department chair and Janice Biales as guidance department chair.

Superintendent selection

for Streetsboro pulls out

The Streetsboro Board of Education was ready to vote on a superintendent's contract for James Kalis on July 16, but Kalis withdrew his candidacy July 12 over concerns about the contract, according to Board president Kevin Grimm.

The Board was to meet July 16 to regroup and work to identify the next step in the district's continuing superintendent search.

"We'll go into executive session and discuss our options," he said. "We do have some other candidates to discuss, and we'll decide whether to call those individuals back or go in a different direction."

Kalis has been an administrator with the Riverside school district in Painesville for the past 15 years, the past five as superintendent. He did not return calls for comment.

Grimm said Kalis wasn't confident he would be able to fulfill all the terms of the contract.

Nature Classroom listing

is given to Co-op school

Aurora Cooperative Preschool on Crackel Road in Bainbridge Township has earned the national designation of a certified Nature Explore Classroom from the Arbor Day Foundation and Dimensions Educational Research Foundation.

"The preschool has taken an important leadership role in a profoundly needed initiative to connect young children with nation, setting a wonderful example for education centers across the country," said Susie Wirth, Nature Explore outreach director for the Arbor Day Foundation.

Outdoor classrooms that are designed according to principles described in the Dimensions Foundation's Learning With Nature Idea Book are eligible to become certified NECs.

The classrooms offer interactive elements, including musical instruments made of natural materials, climbing structures, wooden blocks, garden areas and natural materials for building and creating art.

KSU endowment funding

at the $265 million level

Kent State University's Centennial Campaign has raised $265 million -- $15 million more than its goal when it launched in 2010.

The purpose of the campaign is to fund the university's endowments, capital projects and operating needs, and emphasize student scholarships.

An increased endowment provides a longterm, stable funding source for university priorities, from scholarships to research to faculty support. Capital projects are ongoing, and have expanded facilities, allowing students to learn in modern classrooms and labs with state-of-the-art technology.

Also, current operating funds allow the university to address immediate and emerging needs.

Since the start of the campaign, donors committed to supporting nearly 290 endowed scholarship funds.

"Surpassing our goal for the Centennial Campaign was the result of a university and communitywide commitment," said Gene Finn, Kent State's vice president for institutional advancement.

"Now we're looking forward -- with the goal of continuing the momentum we've achieved -- to strengthen our fund raising potential and bring it to a new level to meet future needs."

VCA fun days coming up

Get Ready For School fun days are coming up Aug. 13-16 for classes at Valley Christian Academy in Aurora.

They will be at Hudson Springs Park on Stow Road and will allow students and their families to get acquainted with fellow students. Participating families should take a picnic lunch or snack.

For dates and times for each class, visit www.valleychristian.com. The annual ice cream social will be Aug. 20 at the school.

Faith open house slated

Faith Preschool at 2560 Post Road in Twinsburg will have a Popsicle open house tonight (July 18) from 5 to 7. Parents and children can attend to learn about the school's programs. For details, call 330-281-8075.

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News Headline: Cleveland: Schools, levy will impact entire region | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Tom Beres
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND -- Only Cleveland voters will decide whether to approve a supersized levy to enact a potentially transformative Cleveland schools improvement plan.

Only Cleveland school students, public and charter, will be impacted.

But many think the levy and the schools' future will have a dramatic impact on the outlook for Northeast Ohio's economy.

Greater Cleveland Partnership Vice President Carol Caruso says, "Anyone who cares about the future of Northeast Ohio and Greater Cleveland should care about this...If we don't educate our children, we won't attract the jobs and the industries we need in our community."

Kent State University Trustee Dennis Eckart says the cost of giving Cleveland schools graduates remedial classes to get them to a college-ready level adds to the overall cost of higher education.

"When that happens the cost of college education goes up for everyone...Whether it's Chagrin Falls or Collinwood, young people have to be ready to work or learn from day one...When part of that group can't, the community has a smaller pool of educated workers or students and that costs us all," Eckart said.

MMPI Vice President Jim Bennett is now the local point man for the Medical Mart/Convention Center project.

He's been involved with past levy and school support campaigns and many civic efforts.

"We are needing to employ directly or indirectly thousands of people..The better those kids are educated the better they handle sklls and the more successful we'll be in something critical," he said.

And if schools don't succeed, there's an additional social cost to taxpayers.

The Cleveland Foundation's Program Director for Education Helen Williams said, "When children are not educated, they wind up in a public system, either in prison or welfare and we all pay for that."

Cleveland voters will decide if the levy passes. And their decision will impact their budgets, the city's children and the region's economic potential.

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News Headline: MUSICAL ACTIVITIES n July 18: Nickelback, 6:30 p.m., | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MUSICAL ACTIVITIES

n July 18: Nickelback, 6:30 p.m., Blossom Center, Cuya. Falls.

n July 19: Mary Chapin Carpenter, evening, Kent Stage in Kent.

n July 19: America, 8 p.m., Cain Park, Lee / Superior in Cleve. Hts.

n July 19: Beach House, evening, House of Blues in downtown Cleveland.

n Thursdays through Aug. 9: Downtown at Dusk concerts, 6:30 p.m., Akron Art Museum, Akron.

n July 20: The Numbers Band, evening, Kent Stage, E. Main St.

n July 20: Rod Stewart, 7:30, Quicken Loans Arena, Cleveland.

n July 20: Jonathan Kingham, 7, Cain Park in Cleveland Heights.

n Fridays throughout the summer: Rockin' on the River, evening, Riverfront Park, Cuya. Falls.

n Fridays throughout the summer: Concerts at Lock 3 Park, S. Main St. in downtown Akron.

n Fridays through Aug. 10: Summer music at the gazebo, 7, Springfield Lake in east Akron.

n July 20-21: Kent Blues Fest, 12 venues in downtown Kent July 20 and Kent Stage concert July 21.

n July 20: Red Earth, evening, the House of Blues, downtown Cleveland.

n July 21: Mitch Ryder, evening, the Kent Stage on East Main St.

n July 22: Josh Ritter, evening, Kent Stage on East Main Street.

n July 25: Expressway, 7 p.m., Breezy Point gazebo in Aurora.

n July 26: O.A.R., 7 p.m., Jacobs Pavilion, Flats in Cleveland.

n July 26: The Flipfops, 7 p.m., Brimfield gazebo, Route 43-Tallmadge Road, Brimfield Twp.

n July 26: Ledisi, Eric Benet, evening, House of Blues, downtown Cleveland.

n July 27: Kris Kristofferson, evening, Kent Stage, E. Main St.

n July 27: Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes, 8 p.m., Cain Park, Lee/Superior in Cleve. Hts.

n July 27-29: Buckethead and Ekoostik Hookah, Nelson Ledges Quarry Park, Nelson Township.

n July 27: Our Lady Peace, evening, House of Blues, downtown Cleveland.

n July 28: Van Halen, evening, Quicken Loans Arena, Cleveland.

n July 29: Kenny Chesney/Tim McGraw concert, 4:30, Cleveland Browns Stadium, the lakefront.

n July 29: Pitbull, 8 p.m., Jacobs Pavilion, Flats in Cleveland.

n July 30: Florence and the Machine, 8 p.m., the Jacobs Pavilion in the Flats in Cleveland.

n July 31: Head and Heart, evening, House of Blues, downtown Cleveland.

n Aug. 1: Big Time Rush, Cody Simpson and Rachel Crow, 7 p.m., Blossom Center, Cuyahoga Falls.

n Aug. 1: Josh Krajcik, evening, House of Blues in downtown Cleveland.

n Aug. 2: Barry Manilow, 8 p.m., Blossom Center, Cuyahoga Falls.

n Aug. 2: Shawn Colvin, evening, the Kent Stage, E. Main Street.

n Aug. 3: Twilight at the Zoo music festival, 7 p.m.-midnight, Cleve. Metroparks Zoo, SW side.

n Aug. 3-5: Summer dance, Nelson Ledges Quarry Park in Nelson Twp. (northeast Portage Co.).

n Aug. 3: Rufus Wainwright, evening, the House of Blues, Cleveland.

n Aug. 5: Trespass American Festival, 5 p.m., Jacobs Pavilion.

n Aug. 5: Neon Trees, evening, House of Blues in downtown Cleveland.

n Aug. 6: Jane's Addiction, 8 p.m., Jacobs Pavilion, the Flats.

n Aug. 8: Arrival, 7 p.m., the Breezy Point gazebo in Aurora.

n Aug. 8: Steve Earl and the Dukes, evening, the Kent Stage,

East Main St. in downtown Kent.

n Aug. 9: Helen Welch Quartet, 7 p.m., Home Savings Plaza, Water-Main sts., downtown Kent.

n Aug. 11: Clutch, evening, the House of Blues in downtown Cleveland.

n Aug. 12: 311 and Slightly Stoopid, 7 p.m., Jacobs Pavilion.

n Aug. 15: Jackson Browne, Sara Watkins, evening, Cain Park.

n Aug. 16: Kenny Wayne Shepard, evening, the Kent Stage, E. Main Street, downtown Kent.

n Aug. 17: St. Elvis and the Graceland Band, evening, the Kent Stage, East Main Street in Kent.

n Aug. 22: Heart and Soul, 7, Breezy Point gazebo in Aurora.

n Sept. 6: Western Reserve Community Bank, 7 p.m., Home Savings Plaza in downtown Kent.

n Sept. 8: Sheryl Crow, Los Lonely Boys, 6-11 p.m., Dix Stadium, the Kent State U. campus.

THEATRICAL EVENTS

n July 18: Cirque du Soleil, 8 p.m., the Quicken Loans Arena.

n Now-July 21: "The World Goes Round," Porthouse Theater at Blossom Music Center.

n Now-July 22: "Route 66," 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays, Actors' Summit, Akron.

n Now-July 22: "Mamma Mia," Playhouse Square on Euclid Ave.

n Now-July 28: "25th annual Putnam County Spelling Bee," 8 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays, 3 p.m. July 22, Aurora Community Theatre, E. Pioneer Trail off Route 43.

n July 19: "Families Love Musicals," 7, Cain Park in Cleve. Hts.

n July 27-Aug. 19: "One Night with Janis Joplin," Allen Theater, Playhouse Square in Cleveland.

n Sept. 5-9: "How to Train Your Dragon, the Quicken Loans Arena.

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

n Currently: "To the Arctic" and "Flying Monsters," Omnimax Theater at the Great Lakes Science Center on the lakefront off East 9th Street.

n Currently: "Frogs," the Great Lakes Science Center off E. 9th.

n Currently: "On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life," "A Day at the Beach," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques" and "Collectors and Collecting," the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State on East Main St.

n Currently: Exhibits include "Domare: The Art and History of Italian Stone Carving in Northeast Ohio," "Through the Lens: The Photography of Allen E. Cole" and "Kidzbits Family Education Center" and "Designing an Icon: Creativity & the American Automobile," (Crawford Auto Museum is under renovation), the Western Reserve Historical Society museum, University Circle off Euclid Avenue on the far east side of Cleveland.

n Currently: "The Works of Rev. Howard Finster," "Ray Turner: Population," "String of Hearts: Photographs by Bea Nettles," Akron Museum of Art in downtown area.

n Currently: "Mythic Creatures: Dragons, Unicorns & Mermaids," Cleveland Museum of Natural History on University Circle off Euclid Avenue, far east side Cleveland.

n Currently: "Modern Gothic: The Etchings of John Taylor Arms," "Youth and Beauty: Art of the American Twenties," Cleveland Museum of Art, East Blvd. in Univ. Circle.

n Currently: Butterflies of North America exhibit, Stan Hywet Hall/ Gardens, N. Portage Path, Akron.

n Now-July 21: The annual Chagrin Valley Hunter Jumper Classic, the Cleveland Metroparks Polo Field, Route 87 in Moreland Hills.

n Now-July 22: Carroll County Fair at the fairgrounds in Carrollton.

n July 20-22: Portage County Charity Horse Show, Sunbeau Valley Farm on Route 59 west of Ravenna.

n July 20-22: Ox Roast Fair, St. Joseph Church grounds off Pioneer Trail in Mantua.

n July 21: Rhythm & Brews music, art and beer festival, 1-7 p.m. Community Park, Route 91, Solon.

n July 22-22, 28-29, Aug. 4-5, 11-12: Medieval Faire and Marketplace, Route 534, 7 miles south of I-90 near Geneva.

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News Headline: Jackson-Belden Food Fest, Balloon Classic set to lift off | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jackson TWP, Ohio —

The annual Balloon Classic and Jackson- Belden Food Fest and Fireworks will be held today through Sunday on the Kent State University Stark campus.

One change for this year's event is the date.

The hot air balloon launch and food festival is being held a week earlier than the typical date.
The move was needed due to a conflict with the United States National Hot Air Balloon Championship, which is scheduled during the same time the local balloon event is usually held in Longview, Texas.

“I hope that everyone is aware of the schedule change and comes out and supports us,” said Steve Meeks, president of the Jackson-Belden Chamber of Commerce.

Meeks said crews started working late last week setting up tents, seats and bleachers.
The earlier date posed plenty of other challenges, according to Meeks.

“We had to work with food vendors who work circuits,” he said. “We've been able to put together a great lineup.”

From food, entertainment and activities, Meeks added that “there will be something for people of all ages.”

The event has proved to be a popular annual attraction and Meeks said that other than the dates this year, there will be no other changes.

“We've found a formula that really works,” he said.

Vendors offer plenty of fare, including such festival staples as French fries, Italian sausage sandwiches, pizza, corn dogs, hot dogs, cotton candy, lemon shakes and funnel cakes.

Festival goers also can partake in barbecue ribs, pulled pork sandwiches, stromboli, subs, nachos, chicken tenders, banana splits, hot fudge sundaes, hamburgers, chicken on a stick and cheese steaks.

Meeks added that the festival also will offer plenty of fun things for children to do in the play area with activities and inflatables.

The festival hours are 4 to 11:30 p.m. Public parking lots are available off Frank Road; parking is $5 per vehicle after 3 p.m. Be prepared for a walk and wear comfortable shoes.

SCHEDULE

TODAY
4 p.m. Jackson-Belden Food Fest and Fireworks, Kent State Stark/ Stark State campuses
4 p.m. Balloon Classic and Night Glow, Kent State Stark/Stark State campuses

SATURDAY
6 a.m. Balloon Classic, Kent State Stark/Stark State campuses
4 p.m. Jackson-Belden Food Fest and Fireworks, Kent State Stark/ Stark State campuses
4 p.m. Balloon Classic, Kent State Stark/Stark State campuses

SUNDAY
6 a.m. Balloon Classic, Kent State Stark/Stark State campuses

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News Headline: KSU Performing Arts Center's new season soon to be unveiled | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily Jeffersonian - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU Performing Arts Center's new season soon to be unveiled

Published: July 19, 2012 1:00PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -- Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia is holding a special "Season Unveiling" on July 21 to announce the more than 20 events scheduled for the Performing Arts Center's 2012-2013 season....

The Daily Jeffersonian is available to subscribers. To continue reading, please log in or purchase a subscription.

Login if you are a subscriber

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News Headline: Kent – Bringing It All Together | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AMATS proud of role agency has played in new development projects.

new

TAKING A STROLL: Children enjoy a mid-day stroll through Kent's Acorn Alley under the gaze of the area's unofficial mascot. AMATS (Kerry Prater)

http://kent.patch.com/articles/kent-bringing-it-all-together-0db8de1c/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1342778258

Many pieces of a unique puzzle are coming together in downtown Kent. When those pieces are finally assembled, they'll make a complete picture of what could be ahead for downtowns in the Greater Akron area.

With its ambitious Central Gateway Project, Kent is re-inventing its downtown thanks to the efforts of city officials, the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority (PARTA), Kent State University and several private-sector developers.

The Central Gateway provides something for all parties involved while creating a safe and comfortable environment for pedestrians, cyclists, transit riders and motorists. The project will provide the city and its downtown businesses with additional parking for customers; PARTA will get a multi-modal transfer point for its riders; commuters and pedestrians will have easy access to key areas – including employers, shops and restaurants; the university will gain access to downtown and along State Route 59 through the KSU Esplanade; and two major employers in the region – The Davey Tree Expert Co. and Ametek – will have new facilities.

One of greatest benefits to the Greater Akron area is the promise of 1,000 new jobs that Central Gateway backers say it will generate upon completion.

Kent's renewed downtown exemplifies what can be accomplished by cooperation between the public and private sectors and the use of urban design principles to create a sense of place and support a vibrant downtown.  The project is a puzzle of many pieces and one of its key pieces was a $20 million federal Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant.

The ‘TIGER' Pounces

In January 2010, PARTA received the TIGER grant to build its soon-to-be completed Kent Transit Center.  Located in Kent's Erie Street and Haymaker Parkway (state Route 59) area, the center will be the transportation hub of the Central Gateway and will be home to 10 bus bays that will serve local and express bus routes operated by PARTA.  With its location near The PORTAGE Hike & Bike Trail, the center will include bike and pedestrian facilities, such as lockers, showers and bike racks.

Although Kent had been planning the re-development of its downtown for years – Kent Engineer Jim Bowling notes that the city began acquiring property in the area between Haymaker Parkway and Water, South Depeyster and Erie streets in 2005 – it wasn't until PARTA landed the grant that the community's efforts gained a newfound momentum.  With the grant in hand, PARTA and Kent officials found a greater willingness by the parties involved to commit to the Central Gateway area.  The grant's initial $20 million led to investments in downtown that eventually grew to $100 million, according to Bowling.

“If you remember, back in those days, funding and lending from the banks were hard to come by and the economy wasn't doing so well,” Bowling continues, “It really wasn't until the TIGER grant that we were able to.  That was the impetus to get the final funding wrapped up from the banks, and the city and the university.”

PARTA Planning Director Bryan Smith says that demonstrating that the new transit center would promote a mix of travel modes – transit, pedestrian, cycling and motor vehicles – was instrumental in securing the grant from federal officials.  Smith notes that the area is named the Central Gateway because – upon completion – it will be the gateway between the downtown and the university via an extension of the KSU Esplanade, a pathway for cyclists and pedestrians.

Funded in part with $700,000 in AMATS Transportation Enhancement Program funds, the KSU Esplanade will extend from the university's Fashion Institute to Haymaker Parkway along Erie Street.  Haymaker Parkway is also undergoing extensive improvements that will allow pedestrians and cyclists to travel safely between the Esplanade and The PORTAGE.  PARTA's transit center will open in two stages, with its parking facilities opening first in March 2013.  The center is expected to be fully operational by July 2013.

Bowling observes that bringing many transportation modes together will not only present convenient travel options for downtown visitors, but foster a new sense of identity for the area as a destination.  “Downtown Kent is meant to be a place for people to go to – a community,” Bowling adds.

Creating a multi-modal downtown tied into the university was an aim of Kent's redevelopment efforts dating back to the 1980s.  Those plans lay fallow until 2005, when two of the city's largest employers – The Davey Tree Expert Company and Ametek – began discussions with city officials about their need for new facilities.  Those employers – together with KSU officials – also expressed an interest in a new hotel and conference center for their respective needs.

“Each of the public and private entities had a different goal in mind.  These goals didn't necessarily contradict each other, but if you looked at them in the right light, they actually complemented each other very well,” Bowling says.

The TIGER grant paved the way – not only for PARTA to construct a state-of-the art facility – but for the city to develop an additional 230 parking spaces on top of the transit center for employers and other businesses, according to Smith.  With the lure of additional parking in place, Fairmount Properties and its joint venture partner Premiere Development Partners soon secured funding to construct three new buildings for the Davey Resource Group and Ametek.  The first building – located at the corner of Haymaker Parkway and South Water Street – will house the Davey Resource Group and is expected to be completed soon.  Likewise, the Kent State University Foundation committed to building a 120 room hotel and conference center in the area.

As these pieces were coming together for the Central Gateway, Kent's Ron Burbick was busy planting some “acorns” of his own nearby.

‘Acorns' Take Root

Dr. Burbick had a vision for a walk-able retail and restaurant district in the heart of downtown.  The businessman began by investing millions of his own money and other investors through his RLB Phoenix Properties LLC in developing Acorn Alley I.  Located along East Main and Depeyster streets, Acorn Alley I is a popular destination since its opening in September 2009 with its unique mix of shops, offices and restaurants.  It sprouted Acorn Alley II, which opened in November 2011 at the corner of South Depeyster and East Erie streets and is home to new stores and eateries.  The former five-story Franklin Hotel located at the intersection of East Main and South Depeyster streets is the site of Dr. Burbick's next renovation project – Acorn Corner.

The Acorn Alley area is easily accessible by walking and cycling with ample parking nearby and ties in neatly with the Central Gateway area. Dr. Burbick says that it was through his participation with various civic committees and Main Street Kent – a historic preservation group – that he became aware of key principles regarding downtown revitalization.  One principle that impressed Dr. Burbick seems relatively simple: People must have reasons to visit downtowns.

When retail, restaurants and related businesses leave downtowns, the remaining occupants tend to be lower-floor offices, such as those for non-profit organizations, that do not attract many visitors to the area, Dr. Burbick says.  After years of frustration due to a lack of participants, he decided that he would apply some of Main Street Kent's principles on his own by redeveloping a single building that housed several non-profits.  That redeveloped building drew new tenants and mushroomed into another redeveloped building that drew new tenants, and then a third building that eventually became Acorn Alley I.

Vibrant downtowns are important – not only for commerce – but for a sense of community, Dr. Burbick observes.

“Here, in the last 30 years, everyone hopped in their car and went to a mall someplace,” he continues. “You don't even know the people that live next door to you. Now, just this last Saturday we had this ‘Masterpieces on Main,' a wine and art festival downtown. It was packed. You never had that in the past.”

He adds that changes in leadership in the city of Kent and Kent State University helped him in the pursuit of his projects. Prior to these changes, the mindset was to leave downtown Kent as it was. He praises KSU President Lester A. Lefton for pursuing development of the KSU Esplanade to overcome a psychological “town-gown” barrier to connect the campus with downtown.

AMATS was a supporting player throughout the drama of Kent's downtown redevelopment. The agency programmed funding for several projects directly related to the Central Gateway – most notably the KSU Esplanade – and other nearby projects that would impact downtown such as the Crain Avenue Bridge project.  (For a complete map and listing of projects, click here.)

One significant contribution by the agency wasn't related to a particular project or funding at all, but concerned ideas, strategies and principles.

Released by AMATS in September 2010, Connecting Communities – A Guide to Integrating Land Use and Transportation presents strategies to help create connected livable communities through increasing transportation choices, encouraging coordinated development and reducing environmental impacts.

Planning Coordinator Krista Beniston explains that agency officials developed the guide after deciding that it was time to incorporate a more holistic approach to transportation planning – one that promoted sustainable land use strategies such as preserving urban centers like Kent's downtown area.  Prior to this change in approach, the agency tended to tackle problems with the region's highways and public transit systems separately with little consideration as to how they might tie-in with one another or nearby pedestrian systems such as sidewalks and trails.

“In the past, our agency would look at a problem and we'd begin thinking about a new lane for a highway or a new intersection to relieve congestion. Our transit planners would tend to look at ridership in certain areas and begin thinking about proposing new routes or stops,” Beniston continues, “We felt that the time had come to stop looking at challenges as separate pieces and start looking at them as a whole.”

Urban design principles – such as those presented in Connecting Communities – are found throughout the Central Gateway. Bowling cites the 15-foot wide sidewalks that will crisscross the area to accommodate pedestrians with ease and ample on-street parking to slow vehicular traffic for the safety of cyclists as examples of the principles pursued by Kent. Dr. Burbick notes with pride that he incorporated similar concepts into Acorn Alley I and II and cites the abundance of bike racks and well-lit walking areas as examples.

Smith notes that PARTA helped AMATS craft Connecting Communities and that participation later benefitted the transit authority. “We used the principles that came out of that to further our own (TIGER Grant) application,” Smith continues, “We were able to show to the funding agencies at the federal level that this is something that our community wants.  We care about how our places are connected and we've thought about it.”

Thanks to the pursuit of such principles and a commitment to public-private sector partnerships, Kent has a revitalized vibrant downtown. Along with this new flurry of downtown activity and commerce, have come new aesthetically pleasing facilities – such as the new transit center and Acorn Alley – that also contribute to a heightened sense of community. More such facilities are on the way, including a veterans' memorial that is being planned on the transit center grounds.

AMATS officials hope that that the principles that went into revitalizing downtown Kent will be pursued by other Greater Akron area communities.  Beniston says that Kent's efforts could serve as a template for other communities, but Dr. Burbick notes that the resources that led to success in revitalizing Kent's downtown – such as a large regional university and a committed local developer – may not be available to other communities.  He does offer them one piece of advice in the pursuit of such efforts.  “Play to your strengths,” he advises.

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News Headline: New Library Science Study Findings Reported from Kent State University | Email

News Date: 07/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Library Science. According to news reporting from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx editors, the researcher stated "The way children's cognitive states affect how they function in digital interfaces is examined through articles published between 1989 and 2010."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research by the author from Kent State University, "Children have developmental limitations, such as underdeveloped motor skills, difficulties with spelling, and trouble understanding hierarchies, classification schemes, and metadata, that make it difficult for them to find information, and challenging for adult designers to accommodate their needs. From icons to metadata to hierarchies, the best research in designing digital resources for children, (OPACs such as Pejtersen's Book House, online public libraries such as the Internet Public Library, and online collections of books such as the International Children's Digital Library), places the child user at the center, and takes an interdisciplinary and intergenerational approach."

According to the news reporters, the researchers concluded: "The literature indicates that research in designing for children is valuable, not only because it seeks to improve children's experience with digital resources. but also because such research translates to other marginalized users and special needs populations."

For more information on this research see: Issues of access and usability in designing digital resources for children. Library & Information Science Research, 2012;34(3):159-168. Library & Information Science Research can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Inc, 360 Park Ave South, New York, NY 10010-1710, USA. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Library & Information Science Research - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/620211)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M. Martens, Kent State University, Sch Lib & Informat Sci, Kent, OH 44242, United States (see also ).

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, Pediatrics, United States, Library Science, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2012 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: The Elite Isn't Going to Lose Control (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Foreign Policy - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JULY 19, 2012

'The Elite Isn't Going to Lose Control'

Middle East scholar Joshua Stacher explains why democratization in Egypt is

only skin deep.



BY PAUL STAROBIN | JULY 19, 2012



In the West, authoritarian regimes in foreign lands tend to

be depicted as uniformly brittle and hollow, ever ripe for popular overthrow.

But that blanket characterization fails to do justice to the differing natures

of authoritarian systems, argues author and political scientist Joshua Stacher . Authoritarianism is not, by definition, "a

stagnant governing approach," he writes in his timely and provocative new book,

Adaptable Autocrats: Regime Power in Egypt and Syria .



His defining example of an authoritarian regime that is

masterful at perpetuating its rule comes from Egypt, the Arab country he knows

best. With last year's toppling of "ruler for life" Hosni Muburak and the

recent election as president of Mohamed Morsi , the candidate of the Muslim

Brotherhood (and decidedly not of the military and other powerful state

institutions), some analysts see a brighter prospect for democracy. "Democratization

is becoming rooted in Arab societies," Egypt included, the historian Olivier

Roy recently declared . But Stacher doesn't think so. Egypt, he says in

his book, has not experienced a genuine democratic revolution. While

"structural changes to the ruling coalition have undoubtedly occurred," the

same old elites, especially the military (its power concentrated in the SCAF --

the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces), remain firmly in control of the country.



Syria, in this formulation, offers a contrast to Egypt.

Because political and economic power is more decentralized in Syria, with

Damascus having only a tenuous hold on events in the outlying regions, Bashar

al-Assad's ruling coalition might collapse. The result is apt to be an unstable

power vacuum of the sort Egypt has so far managed to avoid. But in any case,

Stacher concludes that "neither Egypt nor Syria is democratizing, and neither

is likely to do so in the wake of the 2011 Arab uprisings." And Washington, he

asserts, is complicit in this squelching of popular aspirations for grassroots

democracy; its rhetoric notwithstanding, the Obama Administration, like its

predecessors both Republican and Democratic, is generally comfortable with the

diverse forms of autocratic governance in the Middle East. After all, in 2009,

President Obama called Mubarak "a force for stability" in the region.



This bleak and somewhat harsh assessment begs tough

questions. But Stacher, an assistant professor at Kent State University in

Ohio, has earned the right to a voice in the debate about how the U.S. should respond

to change in the Arab world. His knowledge of the terrain is hard-won and

first-hand: He devoted three years of fieldwork in Egypt and Syria to research

for the book, including, as he notes, "more than one hundred interviews with

government decision-makers, political activists, journalists, academics, and

dissidents." He speaks fluent Arabic and lived in the Arab world (mainly in

Cairo), from 1998 to 2007. A native of a small town in southwestern

Pennsylvania, Stacher first visited Egypt in 1997, on a college study-abroad

program. "I fell in love with Egypt because of how chaotic it was," he recalled.

"Back in '97, you had this major city, Cairo, where there were no traffic cops,

no traffic rules." In the following interview, he fleshes out his perspective

on events in Egypt and the Middle East as well as Washington's reaction to them:



Foreign Policy: How

do Egyptians talk about democracy? Does it mean the same thing to them that it

means to people in the West?





Joshua Stacher: They

don't have the same exact conception of democracy that we do. What Egyptians

are really looking for is equality of opportunity. Basic protection under the

law. They want to feel like they're getting a fair shake -- in getting into

school, getting a job, getting a car, getting an apartment. The problem is,

they don't have basic rights protected. If you're Egyptian, and you get thrown

into jail, what [social] class you're in determines whether you're going to get

tortured or not.



FP: Certainly

many people in the West also would include "basic protection under the law" as

an element of their conception of democracy. Is part of your argument that, as

a historical and cultural matter, Egyptians are more accepting of authoritarian

rule than are people in the West?





JS: I don't

believe that Egyptians think that authoritarianism in their lives is productive

developmentally, politically, socially.



FP: So why, then,

are you so pessimistic about the prospects for democracy in Egypt, if it

represents  a strong popular urge?





JS: Because I

don't believe the elites are going to lose control and that the population is

actually going to be empowered. Elites by their nature are conservative. They

want to preserve power and direct power to serve their interests. I don't

believe that the transition in Egypt is haphazard or just sort of happening day

by day. I believe that there are very structured processes, negotiated

processes that are bringing about outcomes that are preserving military rule.

If you like grand spectacle, like elections or protests or Mubarak being put in

a cage in front of a judge, then yes, a tremendous amount of change has

happened. But if you want to measure change in terms of how power is

distributed, or how social hierarchies are being displaced, then there hasn't

been that.



FP: Egypt has its

first civilian president in Mohamed Morsi, a top figure in the Muslim

Brotherhood. There's very little mention of the Brotherhood in your book. You

don't see the Brotherhood's ascension as containing any seed or promise of

democracy? And why do you see the Brotherhood as a relatively powerless force

vis-à-vis the military?





JS: I've done a

lot of work on the Muslim Brotherhood outside of this book. At the end of the

day, they are a more or less an Egyptian institution. If you look at the

Egyptian state, it is modeled on a very hierarchical, very top down, very

class-ist way of operating. The Muslim Brotherhood functions in almost

identical ways to this. If you go to the top of the Brotherhood, a lot of them

[top officials] are intermarried and have family links.



FP: Do you know

Mohamed Morsi?





JS: I know

Mohamed Morsi extremely well. I met him in 2005, I interviewed him in 2006,

2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010, and I talked to him on the phone before he was

named president.



FP: In what

capacity did you talk to him?





JS: As a friend

to a friend. The kind of research that I'm interested in doing requires that I

develop personal relationships and commitments to human beings. I called him to

basically congratulate him and wish him well -- that was it.



FP: The story

line in the Western media about what's playing out in Egypt is in some respects

at odds with your assessment. The main narrative is that there is this grand

tension working itself out between the Muslim Brotherhood and the military, as

seen, for example, in the current battle over reconvening the Brotherhood-dominated parliament seated

earlier this year but afterwards dissolved by the courts. Make your analytic

point: Why do you think that story line is essentially wrong?





JS: If we were to

measure power on a 100-point scale, the army controls an overwhelming majority

of that scale. Any time there is any type of negotiation or any type of

interaction between the Muslim Brotherhood and Morsi and the military, eight to

nine times out of ten the Brotherhood doesn't get what it wants. This latest

thing with parliament has proven that point very clearly. Morsi made some grand

gesture: We're going to reconvene the parliament. Well, parliament reconvened

for [a few] minutes. And that's the end of it.





Morsi has accepted the logic that there will be a new

elected parliament. In the end, he didn't wrestle any executive power away from

the SCAF, he didn't wrestle any legislative power away from the SCAF, and

they're having new elections, which is exactly what the SCAF wanted.



FP: What's

preventing the revolution from breaking out?





JS: In my

opinion, it is the SCAF . I mean the SCAF is the one playing social

forces off each other, they've been inciting these sectarian clashes, they allowed the

storming of the Israeli Embassy. The SCAF has been involved with

completely hijacking the constitution, writing themselves into the

constitution, allowing the elections to reconstitute a political field that

marginalizes the people in the streets from having a say in what was going on.



FP: Do you know

any of the generals, have you talked to them?





JS: I haven't met

any of the generals, no.



FP: You take a

tough line on Washington's role as an actor in advancing democracy in places

like Egypt, writing in the book that "despite its shifting rhetoric, the U.S.

Administration is pathologically against the empowerment of Arab populations

given its actions thus far." Pathologically? What's your evidence for that?

Perhaps you'd like to take back that word?





JS: I don't want

to take it back. I intentionally chose that word. I thought about that word for

a long time. In what instance, in what place, have we ever seen the United

States support democracy in the Arab World?



FP: Why wouldn't

Washington want to see the empowerment of Arab populations?





JS: Because this

is a structured relationship. Do you know how many times we use over-flights to

fly over Egyptian airspace to go bomb something or do surveillance on

something? And what about the unrestricted use

of the Suez Canal? We don't want a democratically elected population to say,

"Hey, look, you can't just go bomb Iraq without having evidence."





It's a lazy approach to empire. You rely on the local

strongman to keep the natives in their place. That has been the policy, with

pretty much bipartisan support in Washington, for the last sixty years in the

Middle East.



FP: I thought you

might say that the empowerment of the Arab populations could produce a much

more anti-Israel posture in countries like Egypt.



JS: No doubt it

probably would produce an anti-Israel posture, but that's something for the

Israelis and these individual states to negotiate.



FP: Have you had

the chance to present your analysis to decision makers in Washington?





JS: I had an

opportunity to go the White House on January 31, 2011, to meet with senior

members of the National Security Council, on Egypt. I made incredibly critical

comments. The problem is that they think they are actually supporting democracy,

when the bottom line is that the major line of communication with Egypt right

now is going from the Pentagon to the SCAF.





The reason why the Obama Administration didn't go absolutely

insane with what was going on in Egypt is because they never understood it as

falling beyond the reach of the section of the Egyptian state that they were

best connected to -- and that was the military. That was connected to the Camp

David agreement. They got what they paid for.



FP: Let's turn to

Syria. Democracy promotion in Washington sometimes takes the form of calls for

armed intervention to topple autocrats. Right now, there are voices urging that

approach towards the Assad regime in Syria. For example, former CIA officer

Reuel Marc Gerecht is advocating a "coordinated, CIA-led effort to pour

anti-tank, antiaircraft, and anti-personnel weaponry" into the hands of the

Syrian rebels. Without such an effort, Gerecht says, there is apt to be a

"protracted bloodbath" in Syria. Why not try something like this plan?





JS: Because if

you topple the regime with outside assistance, the people that come in, the

next elites that come in, are beholden to you. What you end up doing is

creating more dependency than you do actual autonomy. If you want Assad to be

toppled, the movements will find a way to overthrow him. The regime will

fragment. It's already sort of happened. If I was Bashar al-Assad, I would not

sleep well at night. I would think my days are numbered. Because that is the par excellence of a regime not adapting

well. If you stop adapting, you become extinct.



Save big when you subscribe to FP .

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News Headline: Kent ruling on relocating landmark should be reversed | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ACTION ON WELLS SHERMAN HOUSE
SWAYED BY ARGUMENTS ON LAND USE

THE KENT PLANNING COMMIS
sion's rejection of the site plan for
the relocation of a 160-year-old
landmark with direct ties to the city's
founding family could jeopardize efforts
to save the structure from demolition.
That's disturbing,
not only because loss
of the Kent Wells Sherman
House would permanently
and, in our
opinion, needlessly
obliterate part of the community's 19th
Century heritage, but also because it appears
the commission overstepped its authority
in its ruling on the site plan.
The 3-2 decision appears to have been
swayed by arguments dealing with the
use of the proposed site for the relocated
structure, a North Water Street parcel
that has been used as a de facto park and
venue for cultural activities. The pros and
cons of the site plan itself appear to have
taken a back seat to more emotional concerns
dealing with the use of the property,
which was not the issue at hand.
The Kent Wells Sherman House, now
located on Erie Street on a site that will
become part of Kent State's Esplanade
walkway, dates to the 1850s. One of the
few surviving pre-Civil War era residences
in Kent, it originally was the home of
a daughter of Zenas Kent, the community's
founding father, and later was the
home of Dr. Aaron Sherman, a Civil War
surgeon who practiced medicine in Kent
for many years.
The plan to relocate the structure calls
for it to be moved to a vacant site at 247
N. Water St., next to Standing Rock Cultural
Arts, which has utilized and maintained
the location for 20 years with permission
of its owner.
The site plan presented to the planning
commission would preserve much of the
greenspace at the location and includes
other features, such as a rain garden, that
indicate a sensitivity to the current use of
the area and a willingness to accommodate
concerns expressed by SRCA members
and others.
The discussion leading to Tuesday's
vote, however, seemed to focus less on
the site plan — which SRCA founder Jeff
Ingram said “looks like a decent plan” —
than on changing the use of the vacant lot.
“We do have to weigh what we're gaining
and what we're losing,” Planning Commission
member Anthony Catalano, who
voted against the site plan, said during
the discussion.
The decision, if allowed to stand, could
set a worrisome precedent, granting
neighbors with no ownership rights a
seeming veto over the use of the land by
its rightful owner. We hope there is some
way for this ill-advised ruling to be reversed.
The clock is ticking for the Kent Wells
Sherman House. Kent State has been patient
in delaying final demolition for the
Esplanade to enable efforts to be made
to relocate the structure, but it appears
that work in the area is set to resume in
early August. The loss of 160 years of history
is a shameful possibility.
Kent City Council has the power to
overturn the Planning Commission's decision.
We hope that they do.

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News Headline: City loan to move Kent Wells Sherman House transferred to new friends group | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Thomas Gallick | Staff Writer

Despite numerous challenges and setbacks to the project, Kent City Council has pledged its continued support to finding a new home for the Kent Wells Sherman House.

Kent City Council voted 7-1 Wednesday to transfer a $15,000 loan from the non-profit group Transportage to the new non-profit, Friends of the Kent Wells Sherman House, which has assumed interest in the project.

“I think there's a real value in historic preservation,” Councilwoman Heidi Shaffer said in praise of the group. “They've worked very hard ... up against a lot of difficulties.”

Representatives of the Friends of the Kent Wells Sherman House, founded to move the Greek Revival home with ties to the Kent family and Civil War surgeon Dr. Aaron Sherman from out of the path of Kent State University's Esplanade walkway expansion on Erie Street, believe they have until Aug. 11 to move the building before it is demolished.

Officials at Kent's engineering department and Kent State would not confirm the Aug. 11 date, but said the remaining houses in the path of the Esplanade Expansion would be demolished in early August.

The group has proposed moving the house from its position on the future walkway to a lot at 247 N. Water St. next to Standing Rock Cultural Arts' building, a plan opposed by SRCA and its supporters. SRCA officials also stated their opposition to the loan moving from Transportage to Friends of the Kent Wells-Sherman House.

SRCA treasurer Fred Pierre said he thought the Kent Wells Sherman group was getting special treatment from council that other non-profit groups without “proven track records” would not receive.

“When I first heard about this, I thought ‘That's a little bit unfair,'” Pierre said.

SRCA supporters said they wanted to continue to use the lot, which they do not own but have been allowed to use for 20 years, for urban gardens, children's theater and other outdoor events.

The Kent Wells Sherman House group also found its plan opposed by Kent's Planning Commission, which voted 3-2 Tuesday against approving the site plan for the house's new location on Water Street.

Roger Thurman, vice chair of the Friends of the Kent Wells Sherman House, said he believed the commission had overstepped its authority in blocking the project.

“(The Planning Commission) dealt with the use of the (Water Street) property, not with the site plan,” Thurman said. “We don't think that's necessarily the job of the Planning Commission.”

Under Kent's zoning code, the Planning Commission is tasked with reviewing site plans of “the proposed development as presented on the submitted application, plans and specifications.” However, the code says the commission “may also take into account comments from the administration or the general public in its evaluation of the project.”

Kent Law Director James Silver did not return a call seeking comment on whether he believed Kent Planning Commission acted within its authority in making the decision.

Thurman said his group plans to appeal the Planning Commission's decision to the Board of Zoning Appeals, but that board does not meet again until Aug. 20.

After hearing about the deadline conflict, council approved a motion to direct the city's administration to look for a possible location to temporarily store the house if the Kent Wells Sherman House needs to be moved to save it from demolition.

To contact Thomas Gallick:

Email: tgallick@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-298-1126

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News Headline: State senators propose capping fees for Ohio college students who take extra credit hours | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: JournalNews
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Updated: 3:11 p.m. Thursday, July 19, 2012 | Posted: 5:37 p.m. Wednesday, July 18, 2012

State senators propose capping fees for Ohio college students who take extra credit hours

favorite

By Meagan Pant

Staff writer

State Sen. Tom Sawyer of Akron wants to limit fees college students pay for extra classes they take on top of a full-time load - costs the Democrat calls "ambition penalties."

Sawyer's Ambition Penalty Relief Act aims to cap what students pay for courses they take above what a university considers a maximum full-time courseload. His bill, introduced Tuesday, would reduce costs for students at seven public universities, including Wright State University.

WSU students pay full-time tuition for classes they take between 11 and 18 credit hours. Central State University and University of Cincinnati students pay that between 12 and 18 credit hours. But above 18 credit hours, students at the schools pay an "overload fee," ranging from the state's highest rate of $450 per credit hour at UC, to $365 at WSU to $144 at CSU.

A very small percent of students opt to take more credit hours to graduate early or in pursuit of a double major. And although charging them is not new, "the increasing size of the fees make it unfair," Sawyer said.

State Sen. Peggy Lehner, R-Kettering, who has pledged her support and is co-sponsoring the bill, said she is not opposed to a fee, but it should not be higher than the normal credit hour charge.

"I don't think that a student should be basically fiscally punished for being willing to take on a heavier load than the average student is," said Lehner, chairwoman of the Senate Education Committee.

Sawyer claims schools "justify these fees on the grounds that they are needed for long-deferred capital maintenance costs." But universities say the fees "reflect the real costs associated with instruction," said UC spokesman Greg Hand.

"Full-time tuition charges cover the average costs for a majority of our students but, beyond a certain amount, there are real expenses incurred in delivering instruction, and those expenses are covered by additional charges," Hand said. At UC, 362 students took more than 18 credit hours last year. Most of them, 217 students, were taking 19 credit hours, Hand said. UC has more than 42,000 students.

Last fall, 690 WSU students took 19 credit hours or more. WSU had nearly 19,800 students that quarter, according to Thomas Sudkamp, WSU associate provost for undergraduate studies. He said it is worth studying how many students pursue that courseload as Ohio focuses on showing students how they can earn their degree in three years.

"Those students are ones who are going above and beyond and hopefully are getting through degree programs more quickly," he said.

Miami University students pay the same for a full-time load whether it is the minimum 12 credit hours or 20, according to the university. Approval is needed to take more than 20 credit hours. Spokeswoman Claire Wagner said the university's policy helps students who want to pursue more than one major. At Miami, 11 percent of students double major. Last fall,

1,248 of the 14,853 students in Oxford took 19 credit hours or more.

Ohio State University expects few students will take more than 18 credit hours under the new semester calendar. OSU has a new pricing structure charging

$397 per credit hour to students who take more than 18 hours. Spokeswoman Liz Cook said at OSU, 18 semester credit hours is the equivalent of 27 quarter credit hours. "Our research indicated that there were very few students, even honors students, who took that many credit hours under the quarter system," she said.

Sawyer's bill proposes three changes to cap the fees and hold universities harmless with $31.5 million in relief from the state for deferred maintenance.

The fees would be limited based on a university's tuition and credit hours allowed before the fee applies. Sawyer explains that if a university charges $4,000 in tuition, covering up to 16 credit hours, the fee would be capped at $250.

His bill would also re-enact the former method of allocating capital funds to universities and restore the ability of the chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents to develop a funding formula.

The senators say the move is important as student loan debt - which covers tuition, living expenses, books and other costs of education - exceeds $1 trillion nationally and Ohio pushes to increase the number of residents with bachelor's degree. Ohio ranks seventh nationally in student debt with an average of $27,213 per student. Currently 35.79 percent of Ohio adults have a college degree, according to the Lumina Foundation.

"We're doing a lot in the state right now to try to encourage the completion of college and for some people that means doing it quicker and they shouldn't be penalized," Lehner said.

The bill has to go through the legislative process, which starts with the senate Rules and References Committee, according to Lehner's office.

Actual and proposed fees

Institution / Last Credit Hour before Overload Fee Applies / 2012-13 Overload Fee / Proposed Fee Cap / Student Savings Per Credit Hour

University of Cincinnati* 18 $450 $289 ($161)

Kent State University*** 17 $440 $275 ($165)

Cleveland State University 16 $373 $280 ($93)

Wright State University 18 $365 $224 ($141)

University of Akron 16 $333 $289 ($44)

Youngstown State University 16 $320 $233 ($87)

University of Toledo** N/A $317 $317 N/A

Shawnee State University 18 $279 $188 ($91)

Ohio University* 20 $239 $247 N/A

Bowling Green State University 18 $200 $279 N/A

Central State University 18 $144 $158 N/A

The Ohio State University none $0 N/A N/A

Miami University none $0 N/A N/A

* For comparison purposes, fees were converted from quarter to semester system for University of Cincinnati and Ohio University.

** The University of Toledo charges the same per-credit hour course fee for all courses.

*** The proposed Kent State University cap is 17 credit hours for 2012-13 and 16 for 2013-14.

SOURCE: Office of Senator Tom Sawyer (D-Akron)

Miami University

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News Headline: New Street signs major new Hemingway study ... | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: PRLog
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New Street signs major new Hemingway study ...

Coming this November from leading Hemingway scholar H.R. Stoneback ... HEMINGWAY'S PROVENCE: OUR PROVENCE?

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

H.R. Stoneback at work in Paris.

PRLog (Press Release) - Jul 19, 2012 -

New Street Communications, LLC has acquired a major new work concerning Ernest Hemingway and his life and writings as influenced by Provence, France. The book is written by H.R. Stoneback - distinguished poet, professor and leading Hemingway scholar - and will include previously unpublished Hemingway photographs.

Stoneback's earlier New Street book HEMINGWAY'S PARIS: OUR PARIS? has been acclaimed by a range of critics and commentators.

"H.R. Stoneback knows his Hemingway and his Paris," wrote Valerie Hemingway. "I had the incomparable experience of visiting Paris twice while working for Ernest Hemingway in 1959. I viewed the city at the side of the writer while he added the finishing touches to A MOVEABLE FEAST. Professor Stoneback's evocation of Hemingway's Paris of the 1920s is as close as I have come since to reliving those Paris days in the company of Ernest Hemingway." In turn, close Hemingway friend A.E. Hotchner (author of the classic PAPA HEMINGWAY) commented: "Professor Stoneback's lyrical prose takes the reader inside the soul of Hemingway's Paris, penetrating the surface of guide-books to reveal tantalizing secrets."

H.R. Stoneback holds the title Distinguished Professor of English at the State University of New York, New Paltz. Stoneback has received numerous awards and honors for criticism, poetry and teaching. He has served as visiting professor at the University of Paris, Fulbright Professor at Peking University and director of the American Center for Students and Artists in Paris. A leading scholar of international reputation on Ernest Hemingway, Stoneback is also a widely published literary critic, poet and author or editor of more than 20 volumes of criticism and poetry. His recent books include READING HEMINGWAY'S "THE SUN ALSO RISES" (Kent State University Press, 2007) and HURRICANE HYMN AND OTHER POEMS (Codhill Press, 2009). Stoneback is a former member of the Board of Directors of the Hemingway Society.

For more information on this book, contact Monica Wister - office@newstreetcommunications.com

For more information on the publisher, go to http://newstreetcommunications.com

Photo:

http://www.prlog.org/11928781/1

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