Report Overview:
Total Clips (30)
Alumni; Institutional Advancement; KSU Foundation; Office of the University Architect (1)
Athletics (1)
Biomedical Science (1)
Board of Trustees (1)
College of Podiatric Medicine (1)
Commencement (1)
Higher Education (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Third Frontier (1)
Music (1)
Psychology (1)
Public Safety; Students (7)
Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
Students (3)
Theatre and Dance (2)
Town-Gown (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Institutional Advancement; KSU Foundation; Office of the University Architect (1)
$6.5 million campus building planned at Kent State (Finn, Bruder) 08/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is planning a new $6.5 million building on its Kent campus to house its fundraising and alumni outreach operations. Construction...


Athletics (1)
ALONG THE WAY: Bleeding Blue and Gold? (Stricklin) 08/06/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Biomedical Science (1)
$307,000 grant awarded for liver disease research 08/05/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...Zhang joined the Department of Integrative Medical Sciences at NEOMED in 2008 and also serves as a faculty member in the School of Biomedical Sciences at Kent State University. He received a master of science degree and a doctor of medicine degree from Wuhan University School of Medicine.


Board of Trustees (1)
Kasich names new member to KSU Board of Trustees 08/04/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Gov. John Kasich has named Ralph M. Della Ratta Jr. of Gates Mills to serve on the Kent State University Board of Trustees. Della Ratta's appointment runs through May 16, 2021. Della Ratta is founder and managing partner of...


College of Podiatric Medicine (1)
College of Podiatric Medicine 08/06/2012 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio – Kent State University will celebrate its new College of Podiatric Medicine with a ribbon-tying event on Wednesday, August 8 at 11:00 a.m. The...


Commencement (1)
Gershen, Page to address KSU summer gards 08/06/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Higher Education (1)
Eastern Gateway awards free-tuition grants to 16 students 08/04/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...“You get the same quality for a lot less cost.” He plans to pursue his general-education courses for the next two years then transfer his credits to Kent State University to study computer science. The grant program is making it possible for Shannon Ricketson of North Jackson to start college...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Free Training for High School Teachers 08/04/2012 Web Newswire Text Attachment Email

...Foundation. The Institute will take place at five accredited journalism schools: Arizona State University, Phoenix University of Texas at Austin Kent State University, Ohio University of Nevada, Reno University of Missouri, Columbia Details and an online application form are available...


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
Big changes result in short summer at ATI 08/06/2012 Daily Record - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...little more challenging for ATI are changes in leadership. ATI Director Stephen Nameth is resigning from his post this summer to become the dean of Kent State University's Columbiana County regional campuses in East Liverpool and Salem. Bobby Moser, vice president for agricultural administration...


KSU at Stark (1)
'Entrepreneur Experience' Features Women Business Leaders 08/06/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

...owner of the business training and consulting firm, EntrepreNow!, will be the keynote speaker for the Sept. 25 "Entrepreneur Experience" presented by Kent State University at Stark's Small Business Development Center and the Stark Development Board. Kent State University at Stark http://northcanton.patch.com/articles/entrepreneur-experience-features-women-business-leaders/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1344247303...


KSU Museum (1)
Sunshine state of dress; Today's beach fashions too revealing for you? 08/04/2012 National Post Text Email

...by borderline nudity. A hundred and fifty years ago, vacationers wore more to the seaside than we do to black tie balls today. A Day at the Beach, Kent State University Museum's current fashion installation of bygone summer tourism garments, represents a time when modesty, rather than moxie,...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Going Places: Aug. 6, 2012 08/06/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

Find out who's climbing Cleveland's corporate ladder. KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Tomas A. Lipinski to director, School of Library and Information Science.


Liquid Crystal Institute; Third Frontier (1)
Developing Clarity 08/05/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...July, the panel picked up the pace, allocating $21 million, with several million flowing in grants to business-university partnerships in Northeast Ohio. Kent State received $3 million to work with four local companies on polymer and liquid crystal technologies. As welcome as the investments are,...


Music (1)
Wadsworth and Akron Students Participate in Kent State University's 2012 Piano Institute 08/03/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Stefanie Wyszkowski of Wadsworth and Carter Carlos of Akron, recently participated in Kent State University's 2012 Piano Institute. Stefanie's parents are Andrew and Frances Wyszkowski. Carlos' parents are David and Denise Carlos. ...


Psychology (1)
Hudson Library Events: "An Introduction to Childhood Anxiety and Its Treatment" 08/05/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...types of anxiety disorders and treatment options for children and their families. Flessner is an assistant professor in the department of psychology at Kent State University and director of the Child Anxiety Research Program -- a specialty clinic at KSU offering evaluation and treatment services for...


Public Safety; Students (7)
Felony charges dropped against Kent State student over Twitter threat , indicted on misdemeanor 08/03/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A Kent State University sophomore arrested and charged with inducing panic for threatening the school in a public Twitter message, will not face felony...

Kent State student accused of threat won't face felony 08/03/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT, OHIO: A Kent State University student accused of posting on Twitter that he would be "shooting up" the Ohio campus is no longer facing a felony charge. ...

Felony charge dropped in KSU threat incident (Vincent) 08/04/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

A Kent State University sophomore accused of threatening violence against the university and its president is no longer facing a felony charge. Instead,...

Charges Dropped, Reduced in Kent State Twitter Threat Case 08/06/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State student accused of threat won't face felony 08/03/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT -- A Kent State University student accused of posting on Twitter that he would be "shooting up" the Ohio campus is no longer facing a felony charge. ...

Felony charge dropped for Kent St. student accused of tweeting he'd be 'shooting up' school 08/06/2012 Washington Post Text Attachment Email

Tweet threat nets lesser charge 08/06/2012 Gazette, The Text Attachment Email


Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
Black Squirrel Adventure Race is this Weekend 08/03/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Triathlon combines paddling, biking and running The second annual Black Squirrel 5K takes place Saturday starting at 8 a.m. at Kent State University. The race begins and ends in front of the university's Student Recreation and Wellness Center. Kent State University ...


Students (3)
Pet Place: From bad boy to canine hero 08/04/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...enjoys being around people and playing with other dogs. When we tell people about Dizzy's history, most people simply don't believe it." A student at Kent State University in pre-veterinary medicine, Yost founded Bird Nerd Rescue/Sanctuary seven years ago in her home. The business is dedicated to...

Pet Place: From bad boy to canine hero 08/04/2012 Chicago Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...enjoys being around people and playing with other dogs. When we tell people about Dizzy's history, most people simply don't believe it." A student at Kent State University in pre-veterinary medicine, Yost founded Bird Nerd Rescue/Sanctuary seven years ago in her home. The business is dedicated to...

Pet Place: From bad boy to canine hero 08/04/2012 Baltimore Sun - Online Text Attachment Email

...enjoys being around people and playing with other dogs. When we tell people about Dizzy's history, most people simply don't believe it." A student at Kent State University in pre-veterinary medicine, Yost founded Bird Nerd Rescue/Sanctuary seven years ago in her home. The business is dedicated to...


Theatre and Dance (2)
'Sound of Music' is alive at Porthouse Theatre 08/06/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

'Music' ends season on a high note (Kent) 08/05/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...W. Steels Corners Road in Cuyahoga Falls. Single tickets range from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in Kent State's Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent. Tickets also are available by calling 330-672-3884...


Town-Gown (2)
'T-shirt diplomacy' underscores Kent-KSU partnership (Lefton) 08/06/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Esplanade Construction to Start Monday (Vincent, Lefton) 08/05/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Demolition of houses, grading work scheduled to start This architectural rendering shows the planned path for the Esplanade, which will extend from Kent State's campus through the neighborhood on its western edge and into downtown Kent. The university is at right in the image with downtown Kent...


News Headline: $6.5 million campus building planned at Kent State (Finn, Bruder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is planning a new $6.5 million building on its Kent campus to house its fundraising and alumni outreach operations.

Construction firms have until Wednesday to submit qualifications for the proposed 22,000-square-foot institutional advancement building. The new building will act as a centralized workspace for KSU's institutional advancement and alumni association units, along with the KSU Foundation, with office space, meeting rooms and event space.

According to a legal advertisement placed by the university, the site for the building has been selected, but it has not yet been publicly announced.

Michael Bruder, KSU's director of design and construction in the Office of the University Architect, said the site "has not been finalized." He said the building would be on KSU property, and the university's delay in announcing the project's site was not related to land acquisition.

Bruder said KSU officials hope construction on the new building begins next spring and wraps up by the spring of 2014, but added that was a "rough schedule."

The proposed Institutional advancement building joins a long list of new construction and renovation projects KSU hopes to complete within the next few years.

According to the office of the university architect, KSU is also planning:

n $80 million in renovations to its science buildings.

n A $40 million new building for the College of Architecture and Environmental design

n $25 million in renovations for the School of Art.

n A $15 million new building for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.

Bruder said all of the new projects will be under construction "essentially at the same time," although the construction schedule will be staggered for logistical reasons.

"The next couple of years, there's going to be a lot of activity on the Kent campus," Bruder said.

KSU will pay for the $160 million in academic building construction and renovation by issuing bonds, which will be paid back through new credit hour "overload" fees on students taking large course loads.

Gene Finn, KSU's vice president for institutional advancement, could not be reached for comment on how the new building for his department will be financed.

According to KSU, the department's fundraising efforts in KSU's Centennial Campaign, celebrating the school's 100th year, raised $265 million.

Return to Top



News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Bleeding Blue and Gold? (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scott Stricklin, the head men's
baseball coach for Kent State,
whose team this year ended up in
the College World Series of Baseball
in Omaha, has turned down two offers
from bigger universities and will
continue to mentor his team here.
Last year, Coach Stricklin received
an offer from Notre Dame
University, but after agonizing felt
he owed it to the young men who
were coming along to stay at Kent.
This year, after Kent State's appearance in the
College World Series of Baseball, he received a similar
offer from the University of Michigan. Again,
agony followed by a decision to remain at KSU.
“We're losing only seven seniors out of 34 players,”
the coach told Kent Rotary Tuesday. He
thanked Laing Kennedy, the retired athletic director,
for hiring him in 2004. Kennedy introduced
him Tuesday. He also expressed gratitude for KSU
President Lester Lefton and Athletic Director Joel
Nielsen for their support of the team.
Stricklin, who has been named Mideast Coach
of the Year, is a KSU graduate and played for the
Flashes from 1991 to 1993. He played professional
baseball and then in 2000 decided to join the
coaching staff on a voluntary basis of Georgia Tech
Coach Danny Hall, a former coach for the Flashes.
He later held paid assistant coaching jobs at
Vanderbilt and George Tech before being named
head coach at Kent State.
Reading through the excellent special section
that R-C Sports Editor Tom Nader and reporter
Dave Carducci put together last month to celebrate
the baseball team, it became clear that this
is a team of true student athletes, most of them
with rigorous majors such as accounting, business,
biology and other fields of study. The majority
of the team hails from small towns across
Northeastern Ohio and a few similar towns in
western Pennsylvania. That's why some named
it “Northeast Ohio's Team.”

Return to Top



News Headline: $307,000 grant awarded for liver disease research | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease of the National Institutes of Health has awarded $307,513 to Northeast Ohio Medical University in support of Yanqiao Zhang, assistant professor of integrative medical sciences in the NEOMED College of Medicine, for his research on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Zhang, a Hudson resident, serves as principal investigator for the Research Project Grant.

NAFLD is one of the most common liver diseases in humans and is often associated with obesity, insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Dr. Zhang's research focuses on how a specific nuclear hormone receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, lipid and glucose level stability and how successfully using certain enzymes to activate that receptor may result in new medication therapies for managing the disease.

"The molecular mechanism underlying the development of NAFLD has been poorly understood, making research into treatment methods that much more difficult," said Walter E. Horton Jr., vice president for research and dean for the College of Graduate Studies at NEOMED. "Dr. Zhang has developed a strong approach to addressing these challenges, which are fundamental to a disease that affects many. The importance of his work cannot be understated at NEOMED or at the national level, as evidenced by his receipt of this significant new R01 grant."

The R01 is the original and oldest grant mechanism used by the NIH and provides support for health-related research based on the mission of the NIH. Designed to support a discrete and specific project in an area representing the investigator's specific interest and competencies, the R01 can fund the salary and fringe benefits for the principal investigator and essential personnel, equipment and supplies, and facility and renovation costs, among others.

This is Zhang's second R01 grant for his work.

Zhang joined the Department of Integrative Medical Sciences at NEOMED in 2008 and also serves as a faculty member in the School of Biomedical Sciences at Kent State University. He received a master of science degree and a doctor of medicine degree from Wuhan University School of Medicine.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kasich names new member to KSU Board of Trustees | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Gov. John Kasich has named Ralph M. Della Ratta Jr. of Gates Mills to serve on the Kent State University Board of Trustees.

Della Ratta's appointment runs through May 16, 2021.

Della Ratta is founder and managing partner of Western Reserve Partners, a Cleveland-based middle-market investment bank that provides mergers and acquisitions, capital raising and other financial advisory services. He has more than 30 years of experience in investment banking and commercial banking.

Before founding Western Reserve Partners, Della Ratta managed the Investment Banking Division of McDonald Investments Inc.

Della Ratta's educational background includes a Bachelor of Arts from Duke University, a Master of Business Administration from Thunderbird School of Global Management and a graduate degree in banking from the Stonier Graduate School at Rutgers University.

He serves on the board of directors of numerous private and public companies, including Olympic Steel Inc., MAI Wealth Advisors LLC and NDI Medical. He is a past board member of McDonald & Company Securities Inc. and Hyland Software.

In addition, Della Ratta has been actively involved in various charities and nonprofit organizations.

He serves on the board of University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center and Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital National Leadership Council. He is a member of the 50 Club of Cleveland.

Return to Top



News Headline: College of Podiatric Medicine | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: INDEPENDENCE, Ohio – Kent State University will celebrate its new College of Podiatric Medicine with a ribbon-tying event on Wednesday, August 8 at 11:00 a.m.

The ribbon-tying, opposed to a ribbon-cutting, symbolizes Kent State's partnership with the former Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine to form the new college. Kent State officially acquired the college on July 1, 2012.

The event will take place on the campus located at 6000 Rockside Woods Boulevard in Independence.

For more information about Kent State's College of Podiatric Medicine, visit www.kent.edu/cpm.

Return to Top



News Headline: Gershen, Page to address KSU summer gards | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will hold its summer commencement ceremonies at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 11, at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center (MAC Center).

Kent State will confer 1,590 degrees, including 942 bachelor's degrees, 391 master's degrees, 79 doctoral degrees, 163 associate degrees and 15 educational specialist degrees.

The 9:30 a.m. ceremony is for those receiving master's and doctoral degrees. The speaker for this ceremony will be Jay Gershen, D.D.S., Ph.D., president of Northeast Ohio Medical Universit in Rootstown.

The ceremony for those receiving their bachelor's degrees is at 1:30 p.m.

The speaker for the afternoon ceremony is Herb Page, Kent State's director of golf and men's golf head coach since 1978,

The commencement ceremonies may be viewed live at www.kent.edu/commencement/webcast/live-webcast.cfm. For more information, visit www.kent.edu/commencement.>

Return to Top



News Headline: Eastern Gateway awards free-tuition grants to 16 students | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Eastern Gateway Community College has awarded the first free- tuition Gateway Grants to Mahoning Valley students for the fall term.

Sixteen grants have been presented to qualified students. Their tuition will be paid for the next four semesters at EGCC. Total savings over two years of taking classes full time will be about $7,000 per student.

This grant is not competitive and is awarded to all qualified students. It does not have to be repaid.

Ryan Fritch, a 2012 Boardman High School graduate, said that enrolling at Eastern Gateway “was not a hard choice to make” because of the Gateway Grant. “If you are going to get a four-year degree, why not get your basic courses out of the way at a reduced rate? Why spend the extra money?” he asked. “You get the same quality for a lot less cost.”

He plans to pursue his general-education courses for the next two years then transfer his credits to Kent State University to study computer science.

The grant program is making it possible for Shannon Ricketson of North Jackson to start college this fall, she said.

“The Gateway Grant is the main reason I chose Eastern Gateway,” she said. “This grant makes it possible for me to go to school this fall; otherwise, I would have to take the year off and save money to pay for college.”

Ricketson graduated last spring from Jackson-Milton High School and will pursue the associate of arts degree at EGCC.

“I plan to get my core classes completed then transfer for a bachelor's degree in nursing at Kent State University,” she said. The Gateway Grant also is making it easier for Cameron Stankick of Youngstown to attend college. “My parents are moving away from the area, so I will be living on my own,” he said in the news release. “This grant really helps out. I will be studying in the teacher education program with the goal of eventually teaching in high school.”

Close to 50 percent of all college-bound students start higher education at a community college, according to the American Association of Community Colleges.

Class of 2012 graduates from high schools in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana counties who meet the qualifications may attend Eastern Gateway tuition-free this fall. Students will be responsible for fees, books and supplies.

For information about the Gateway Grant and classes that begin Aug. 20, call 330-744-8967.

Return to Top



News Headline: Free Training for High School Teachers | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Web Newswire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One hundred seventy-five teachers will be selected to attend the 2011 Reynolds High School Journalism Institute. The deadline for applications is March 1.

There is no cost to the teacher or high school. Students, especially those who take part in journalism classes or clubs are the ultimate beneficiaries, emerging as stronger readers, writers, critical thinkers and communicators. Teachers from high schools that lack online student media or have struggling journalism programs are especially encouraged to apply.

Transportation, lodging, meals, materials, tuition and continuing education credits are covered by a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

The Institute will take place at five accredited journalism schools:

Arizona State University, Phoenix

University of Texas at Austin

Kent State University, Ohio

University of Nevada, Reno

University of Missouri, Columbia

Details and an online application form are available at: http://hsj.org/reynolds

Read Institute testimonials at: http://hsj.org/testimonials

The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation is a national philanthropic organization founded in 1954 by the late media entrepreneur for whom it is named. Headquartered in Las Vegas, Nevada, it is one of the largest private foundations in the United States.

Return to Top



News Headline: Big changes result in short summer at ATI | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily Record - Online, The
Contact Name: LINDA HALL Published
News OCR Text: WOOSTER -- It may be "the shortest summer on record," Frances Whited said as she monitored ATI's all-encompassing calendar change.

The Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute joined the entire university system in switching from quarters to semesters, a much more labor-intensive process than may be imagined.

The last week of classes was the first week of June, said Whited, ATI's public relations coordinator.

Because of the scheduling change, "we start a full month earlier (this year). But we didn't get out a full month earlier, like we will next year (when the system is already in place)," Whited pointed out.

Among the consequences of the crunched time frame are "fit(ting) in all the orientation sessions and plan(ning) for Welcome Days," Whited said.

But her "fun facts" are even more illustrative of all that is affected by the switch to semesters throughout the OSU system -- 12,000 courses, 750 programs, 14 colleges, six OSU campuses," she said, with just three years to make those changes from the time the OSU faculty voted in June 2009 to make the conversion.

What is even more "overarching," Whited said, is the Ohio Board of Regent's push for a statewide university system, meaning "everybody on quarters in Ohio is converting to semesters" to allow for a seamless transition from one university to another.

"Everybody (will be) counting everything the same way," Whited said.

Making it just a little more challenging for ATI are changes in leadership.

ATI Director Stephen Nameth is resigning from his post this summer to become the dean of Kent State University's Columbiana County regional campuses in East Liverpool and Salem.

Bobby Moser, vice president for agricultural administration and dean of OSU's College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, is also retiring.

"One of the very positive things (about the conversion) for us is that we were required to take a look at every single course we (teach) and every program we have," providing the opportunity to re-evaluate everything, Whited said.

As part of the transition and accompanying revisions, "a lot of courses (were) renamed," Whited said.

For example, beef production and management and swine production and management became livestock production and management, "with different tracks," she said.

Again, the goal is a smooth transition for students who will complete their bachelor's degrees on the main campus in Columbus.

Ushered in with the overhaul at ATI are new programs -- agricultural systems management, biochemical sciences, construction systems management, renewable energy and sustainable agriculture.

"Community leadership is still going through the pipeline," Whited said.

"Renewable energy is brand-new," she said, supported by funding through the National Science Foundation. "We'll have the first students in that program this fall."

"The whole process has been a lot of work," said Royce Thornton, an ATI instructor who helped mastermind it as chairman of the semester conversion working group and part of the academic affairs committee.

Even so, "it was an exciting time for us to look at all of our programs and all of our courses," Thornton said, examining ways to improve them.

"We re-evaluated every program we had," he said, stressing for those unfamiliar with the process, "You just can't take a program and automatically say it's a semester."

While some could be altered in small ways merely through dividing them differently, such was the case for chemistry, "there weren't very many of those kinds of courses at ATI," he said.

Also part of the re-evaluation were courses without formally documented learning outcomes -- studied to "determine the process how we were going to measure them," Thornton said, noting that process will continue.

Some classes were combined to avoid students being overwhelmed by too many of them. Under quarters, students may have taken four or five classes; under semesters, they will tackle five or six, Thornton said. Had classes not been combined, students may have had to take eight or nine to end up with the number of credits they needed.

"They just can't manage (eight or nine)," he said.

In the course of working through the conversion, "I read over 200 course outlines and over 25 program reports," Thornton said.

"I also had to coordinate all (of the changes) with what Columbus was doing," he said, noting he and other staff members spent quite a bit of time teleconferencing.

"We already (thought) we were busy," he quipped.

Thornton stressed the massive overhaul will not end with the beginning of the school year.

"We really don't know whether (it is all) going to work," he said.

The different format and different structure will have to be overseen for "what worked and what didn't work. I anticipate a one to three-year refinement."

New to the staff at ATI is Ruth Montz, joining the team as the coordinator of student services -- "a new position as well as a new person," Whited said. Her job will be to "pay attention to retention rates," making sure students are "succeeding and graduating."

ATI Welcome Days will be held Aug. 19-21. The semester will begin Aug. 22.

Reporter Linda Hall can be reached at 330-264-1125, Ext. 2230, or lhall@the-daily-record.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Entrepreneur Experience' Features Women Business Leaders | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Series of events and seminars kicks off Sept. 25 with featured speakers Monica Cornetti and Jennifer Downey.

Monica Cornetti, owner of the business training and consulting firm, EntrepreNow!, will be the keynote speaker for the Sept. 25 "Entrepreneur Experience" presented by Kent State University at Stark's Small Business Development Center and the Stark Development Board. Kent State University at Stark

http://northcanton.patch.com/articles/entrepreneur-experience-features-women-business-leaders/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1344247303

Kent State University at Stark's Small Business Development Center and the Stark Development Board are again presenting the "Entrepreneur Experience," a series of events and seminars to encourage the professional practices of entrepreneurs at all levels.

The first event in the series will be held 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sept. 25 at Kent State Stark's The University Center featuring Monica Cornetti, owner of the business training and consulting firm, EntrepreNow!, and Jennifer Downey, president of Ambiance Inc.

Attendees will be motivated by the knowledge and expertise of these women as they share how to achieve positive results through customer service, confident communication and other aspects to build and maintain a successful business.

Registration fee for the "Entrepreneur Experience" is $49 per person. The Small Business Development Center is providing a $100 endowment per person, reducing the regular fee of $149. Proceeds will benefit the SBDC Scholarship Fund.

The registration fee includes breakfast, break stations, lunch and keynote speaker Cornetti's book, "Your Face Isn't Finished Until Your Lipstick is On: Rules of the Women's Success Game."

Payment is accepted with MasterCard, Visa or Discover. Registration is limited to 75.

Event Agenda

Check-in and continental breakfast: 7:45 to 8:15 a.m.

Morning keynote session: 8:15 to 11:15 a.m. "Your Face Isn't Finished Until Your Lipstick is On: Rules of the Women's Success Game" presented by Monica Cornetti.

A senior small business development specialist and the owner of EntrepreNow!, Cornetti is a highly sought after speaker and trainer because of her spunkiness and emphasis on fun while learning. With more than 20 years experience in the corporate, non-profit and academic sectors, her expertise is in bringing excellence to organizations through leadership and training.

She delivers high-energy, high-content training, along with a plan for application in the real world. Having been featured on the cover of "Bloomberg Businessweek," Cornetti has been designated one of the best entrepreneurial training experts and is one of the few professionals to have earned a combined master's of science degree in economic development and entrepreneurship.

Cornetti is the author of the acclaimed book, "Your Face Isn't Finished Until Your Lipstick Is On: Rules of the Women's Success Game," and the forthcoming book, "What Were You Thinking?"

Based on her top-selling book, Cornetti gives straight-forward lessons that empower women to make their own choices and bend or even break the rules where necessary on their journey to success. Event participants will learn that:

Your worth is not based on your physical looks.

There is no “one shoe fits all” formula, and you can create your own formula for success.

Once you determine what it really is you want to do, it's time to identify the fears that are holding you back.

You can decide to take charge of your destiny when you let your heart guide you.

The world needs you and it's up to you to decide what you want.

Lunch session: 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. featuring Jennifer Downey, president of Ambiance Inc.

Downey has been a successful retailer for the past 30 years. As Ambiance, the Store for Lovers' pioneering president and CEO, she has garnered numerous awards and accolades as one of the region's top female executives.

Among them, she has been an Athena Awards finalist, named Small Business Person of the Year runner-up by the U.S. Small Business Administration and Retail Rainmaker by "Northern Ohio Live" magazine.

Most recently, her company was honored for the sixth year in a row for its world class customer service and took home the Best Customer Experience award. She is an active member of COSE, the Cleveland Chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners and founding board member of Plexus, as well as several other organizations.

Afternoon keynote session: 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. "Let's Talk! – The Secret of Powerful Communication Skills for Women" presented by Cornetti

In this session, participants will learn how to avoid the major communication mistakes that damage women's careers and how to master confident and credible communication. This program includes high-impact techniques that will help you:

Communicate assertively to get what you want – without seeming pushy.

Communicate with greater authority and credibility.

Resolve conflict and handle confrontation professionally.

Be seen as a capable, credible, poised professional woman … who earns respect from all!

For more information regarding the "Entrepreneur Experience" call the Small Business Development Center at 330-244-3290, send an email to info@cantonsbdc.org or visit www.cantonsbdc.org.

Return to Top



News Headline: Sunshine state of dress; Today's beach fashions too revealing for you? | Email

News Date: 08/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: National Post
Contact Name: MacInnis, Tara
News OCR Text: The Victorian era may be what you're after

With the rise of Brazilian bikinis and similar ensembles that are barely a square inch of material away from a thong, today's beachgoers aren't fazed by borderline nudity. A hundred and fifty years ago, vacationers wore more to the seaside than we do to black tie balls today.

A Day at the Beach, Kent State University Museum's current fashion installation of bygone summer tourism garments, represents a time when modesty, rather than moxie, reigned at the beach. The exhibit's 15-piece collection is comprised of mostly American garments from 1865 to 1915 and includes the bustled gowns, frilly parasols and wool bathing suits that society mavens of the turn of the last century deemed appropriate. They're a far cry from the skimpy snaps of beachside celebrities in the latest summer tabloids.

The installation was inspired by beach scenes captured by the Impressionists, specifically those displayed at the Akron Art Museum's recent exhibition, Landscapes From the Age of Impressionism. Like those depicted in the paintings of Claude Monet and John Singer Sargent, the ladies of the era took to the beach for long walks, protecting their skin from the sun with veils and parasols. Sunbathing was not an option - anything but fair skin was a signifier of the working class. For walking and taking in the sights, a white linen or cotton dress did the trick - accompanied by three layers of undergarments (a chemise, a corset and a corset cover), of course.

While this layered garb may sound like a nautical nightmare, exhibition curator Sarah Hume assures that the dresses are less impractical than they appear, especially relative to velvet daytime dresses worn in the city. "One of the things that is remarkable about some of the pieces is that they are very sheer and incredibly lightweight," says Hume.

Walking the beach in dresses like these was a popular activity, but when it came to getting in the water, the wardrobe change involved a navy wool suit, including bloomers, a long shirt, shoes and a cap.

Dark colours overcame the problems that pale material presents when wet, and wool was chosen because it quickly dries from the skin out, although, the latter feature was not always important: "They would get in cabins that would wheel into the water and change into their bathing suits, and then get back into their clothes when they were done," says Hume of Victorian women. "They didn't just lay on the beach or parade around in their wet suits."

A little Victorian modesty would be an interesting change at the beach, but unless the high street starts selling wool playsuits, it is likely that these trends will remain in the past.

A Day at the Beach runs until Oct. 7 at Kent State University Museum in Kent, Ohio (kent.edu/ museum)

Joanne Arnett, Kent State University Museum / White cotton eyelet dress, U.S., late 1880s; Joanne Arnett, Kent State University Museum / Navy blue wool and cotton bathing suit, U.S., 1910-19 and a boy's white cotton sailor suit, U.S., early 20th century; Joanne Arnett, Kent State University Museum / Blue and white striped dress, U.S., circa 1905.;

Copyright © 2012 National Post

Return to Top



News Headline: Going Places: Aug. 6, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Find out who's climbing Cleveland's corporate ladder.

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Tomas A. Lipinski to director, School of Library and Information Science.

Return to Top



News Headline: Developing Clarity | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio Third Frontier program grants and awards finally are flowing again, the money funding investments in high-tech ventures that hold the promise of accelerating growth and creating new jobs. Yet at a time when Gov. John Kasich says speed is of the essence in economic development, his administration has opened the Third Frontier spigot just part way, with funding delays and a lack of clarity creating unnecessary obstacles for entrepreneurs across the state.

The Third Frontier Commission ended its fiscal year June 30 having left unspent most of the $190 million it had available, thus rolling the money over into the next year. In July, the panel picked up the pace, allocating $21 million, with several million flowing in grants to business-university partnerships in Northeast Ohio. Kent State received $3 million to work with four local companies on polymer and liquid crystal technologies.

As welcome as the investments are, the Third Frontier Commission, over which Kasich has gained greater control than Bob Taft and Ted Strickland, is still at work revisiting the Entrepreneurial Signature Program, conduit for tens of millions that support agencies such as Akron's Global Business Accelerator. These operations fulfill a crucial role providing support and early-stage funding to start-up businesses, fulfilling the Third Frontier's mission of serving as a catalyst for new products and technologies.

A meeting this month is expected to bring long-awaited focus to the administration's plans for the Entrepreneurial Signature Program and other items. The governor and his top jobs and investment adviser, Mark Kvamme, a Silicon Valley venture capitalist, have made clear they lean in the direction of loans instead of grants, of job development over support for basic research.

Worth remembering is what the Taft administration, and voters, had in mind when conceiving, approving and supporting the Third Frontier program. Jobs were an important part of the message, to be sure, but the program had the first purpose of rekindling the creative energy that once drove the state's industrial might.

In other words, a strategy of loans to companies ready to ramp up hiring isn't enough. For the state to yield successes in the long run (beyond, say, the governor's re-election), there must be steady support for the risk-takers just getting started on the road to commercialization. Otherwise, the state risks finding the pipeline empty - the Third Frontier indistinguishable from its other economic development programs.

Return to Top



News Headline: Wadsworth and Akron Students Participate in Kent State University's 2012 Piano Institute | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stefanie Wyszkowski of Wadsworth and Carter Carlos of Akron, recently participated in Kent State University's 2012 Piano Institute. Stefanie's parents are Andrew and Frances Wyszkowski. Carlos' parents are David and Denise Carlos.

The Piano Institute is a highly intensive festival for talented piano students in grades 7-12 and is in association with the Piano Division of the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University.

Fourteen students from all over the world attended the 2012 Piano Institute, which offers a unique combination of lessons, master classes and performance opportunities. The students received four hours of one-on-one lessons daily; attended master classes taught by Kent State pianists; studied sight-reading, technique, practicing and audition/competition preparations, while living on the Kent Campus.

Along with the classes, they also had the unique opportunity to share in the Kent/Blossom Music program, which is a premiere summer institution for summer collegiate level study of solo, chamber and orchestral literature.

At the end of the classes, the students performed in a Gala concert at Severance Hall's Reinberger Chamber Hall in Cleveland, Ohio.

Instructors of the Piano Institute included Donna Lee, Ph.D., associate professor and coordinator of the Piano Division at Kent State, and Jerry Wong, Ph.D., associate professor of piano at Kent State. Guest artists for this year's Piano Institute were Sandra Shapiro, concert pianist and preparatory and continuing education dean at the Cleveland Institute of Music, and Joela Jones, principal keyboardist with The Cleveland Orchestra.

For more information about Kent State's Piano Institute, visit www.kent.edu/pianoinstitute .

Return to Top



News Headline: Hudson Library Events: "An Introduction to Childhood Anxiety and Its Treatment" | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Hudson Library and Historical Society will present "An Introduction to Childhood Anxiety and Its Treatment" with Dr. Christopher Flessner Aug. 14 at 7 p.m. Flessner will discuss what scientists know about anxiety disorders in children, potential signs of anxiety in a child, different types of anxiety disorders and treatment options for children and their families.

Flessner is an assistant professor in the department of psychology at Kent State University and director of the Child Anxiety Research Program -- a specialty clinic at KSU offering evaluation and treatment services for anxious children. He earned his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and completed his clinical internship and postdoctoral training at Brown Medical School.

His clinical and research interests focus on understanding what causes anxiety and related problems (e.g., obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette's Syndrome, hair pulling) in children and how this information can be used to develop better treatments. Flessner is the youngest member ever nominated to the Trichotillomania Learning Center-Scientific Advisory Board. He is also a member of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and the International Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Foundation.

There is no registration for this program. For more information, call the reference desk at 330-653-6658 ext. 1010 or email askus@hudson.lib.oh.us.

Return to Top



News Headline: Felony charges dropped against Kent State student over Twitter threat , indicted on misdemeanor | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Michael Sangiacomo
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A Kent State University sophomore arrested and charged with inducing panic for threatening the school in a public Twitter message, will not face felony charges.

Portage County Prosecutor Victory Vigluiccisaid the grand jury determined that William Koberna, 19, of Brunswick, not be charged with felony counts of aggravated menacing and inducing a panic.

The grand jury had indicted Koberna on a misdemeanor charge of telecommunications harassment, which carries a maximum sentence of six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

Koberna was arrested Sunday at his home after Kent State officials said on July 25 in a tweet he threatened to "shoot up the campus" and directed profanity at the university president.

Koberna may face suspension or dismissal from the university.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State student accused of threat won't face felony | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, OHIO: A Kent State University student accused of posting on Twitter that he would be "shooting up" the Ohio campus is no longer facing a felony charge.

Prosecutors say a grand jury refused to indict the student on a felony charge of inducing panic. Instead, William Koberna now faces a lesser charge of telecommunications harassment.

The 19-year-old was in court Friday for a preliminary hearing. He was arrested nearly a week ago near Cleveland after the university contacted police about the tweet.

Kent State officials say the profanity-laced July 25 tweet included a threat that he would be "shooting up" the school.

The university said earlier this week that the student would be on an interim suspension. A judge told him to stay away from the school.

Return to Top



News Headline: Felony charge dropped in KSU threat incident (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University sophomore accused of threatening violence against the university and its president is no longer facing a felony charge.

Instead, a Portage County grand jury on Thursday indicted William L. Koberna, 19, of Brunswick, on one count of telecommunications harassment, a first-degree misdemeanor, according to Portage County Prosecutor Victor Vigluicci.

By issuing a "no bill" on the felony charge, grand jurors said they did not find sufficient evidence to charge Koberna with inducing panic, a fifth-degree felony. A charge of aggravated menacing, a first-degree misdemeanor, also was dropped.

Arraigned Friday morning in Portage County Municipal Court in Kent on the charge of telecommunications harassment, Koberna pleaded not guilty. The bond he posted in the prior case was applied to the new charge and he was freed by Judge Barbara Oswick on the condition he have no contact with KSU or President Lester Lefton.

Court records indicate a pretrial hearing is set for 1:15 p.m. Sept. 18 in Oswick's courtroom. First-degree misdemeanors carry a maximum sentence of up to six months in jail and $1,000 in fines under Ohio law.

The newest charge accuses Koberna of using the website Twitter to post a comment "with purpose to abuse, threaten or harass another person," according to Ohio law. In a July 25 tweet, Koberna allegedly threatened to "shoot up" the KSU campus "ASAP" and made a threat against Lefton.

Koberna was arrested July 29 at his parents' home in Brunswick, about 25 miles west of Kent, following an investigation by KSU police. He was immediately suspended by the university pending the resolution of his case.

On Friday, university spokeswoman Emily Vincent said Koberna, a computer science major, remains on interim suspension pending a student conduct court hearing to determine his status.

Return to Top



News Headline: Charges Dropped, Reduced in Kent State Twitter Threat Case | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: William Koberna taken off court ordered GPS monitoring device

The Kent State University student at the center of a Twitter threat controversy is no longer facing a felony charge in the case following a court hearing this morning.

Portage County Municipal Court Judge Barbara Oswick this morning reduced a first-degree felony charge of inducing panic originally filed Monday against William Koberna, 19, of Brunswick, to a first-degree telecommunications harrassment charge.

The lesser charge stemmed from an indictment issued on the telecommunications charge Thursday by a Portage County grand jury.

Kent State Police charged Koberna Monday with inducing panic, a fifth-degree felony, and aggravated menacing, a first-degree misdemeanor, after Koberna reportedly posted a message on Twitter in which he threatened to use a fire arm on campus.

Oswick dropped the charge of aggravated menacing this morning.

The judge also removed a condition of Koberna's release on bond earlier this week that had required him to wear a GPS monitoring bracelet. That decision was made at the request of Koberna's attorney, Paul Cristallo.

Koberna's attorney argued, in part, that the GPS monitoring would potentially limit his client's ability to apply to other colleges.

"He doesn't own a gun," Cristallo said. "There are no weapons in his home."

Cristallo said his client was a 2010 honors graduate from Brunswick High School and also made the dean's list during his time at Kent State.

The tweet, posted late last month, reportedly included profanity directed at Kent State President Lester Lefton and also stated "I'm shooting up your school ASAP," according to Ohio.com.

Oswick continued Koberna's bond with the other two requirements that he be barred from setting foot on any Kent State campus and that he have no contact with Kent State President Lester Lefton intact.

Koberna, who appeared in court wearing black dress slacks and a dark blue polo shirt, said little to the judge other than "Yes, mam" and "No, mam" in response to her questions.

After the hearing, Koberna left the courthouse with his parents and attorney celebrating the fact the felony charge had been dropped.

Portage County Prosecutor Victor Vigluicci issued a press release this morning stating that because Koberna still faces the telecommunications harrassment charge his case will remain in Portage County Municipal Court for further adjudication.

If found guilty, the telecommunications charge carries a maximum sentence of six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

The sophomore has been placed on interim suspension by Kent State "pending due process of criminal charges," according to university officials

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State student accused of threat won't face felony | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: KENT -- A Kent State University student accused of posting on Twitter that he would be "shooting up" the Ohio campus is no longer facing a felony charge.

Prosecutors say a grand jury refused to indict the student on a felony charge of inducing panic. Instead, William Koberna now faces a lesser charge of telecommunications harassment.

The 19-year-old was in court Friday for a preliminary hearing. He was arrested nearly a week ago near Cleveland after the university contacted police about the tweet.

Kent State officials say the profanity-laced July 25 tweet included a threat that he would be "shooting up" the school.

The university said earlier this week that the student would be on an interim suspension. A judge told him to stay away from the school.

Return to Top



News Headline: Felony charge dropped for Kent St. student accused of tweeting he'd be 'shooting up' school | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Washington Post
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TOLEDO, Ohio — A Kent State University student accused of posting on Twitter that he would be “shooting up” the Ohio campus won't face a felony charge after a grand jury decided to indict him on a less serious charge.

William Koberna, a 19-year-old sophomore, was arraigned Friday on a misdemeanor charge of telecommunications harassment, which carries a maximum sentence of six months in jail. Authorities earlier had charged him with inducing panic, but a grand jury on Thursday decided against indicting him on the felony.

School officials suspended the student, and he was ordered by a judge to stay away from the campus and the university's president.

Koberna was arrested nearly a week ago at his parents' home in the Cleveland suburb of Brunswick after university officials contacted police about the tweet.

Kent State officials say the profanity-laced message sent July 25 included a threat that he would be “shooting up” the school.

Court records show that Koberna was appointed a public defender. A message seeking comment was left Friday with the public defender's office in Portage County. Public records also do not list a phone number for Koberna.

He was released from jail after posting bond.

Koberna, a computer science major, is studying at the school's College of Arts and Sciences. He was living off campus and wasn't taking any summer classes.

University officials say an employee was monitoring social media mentions of the school in northeast Ohio when the tweet was discovered.

A Kent State spokesman said the university can't ignore any threat to the school in the wake of shooting at other schools, including at a nearby northeast Ohio high school where three students were killed and three others were injured in February.

Kent State was the scene of deadly gunfire in May 1970, when Ohio National Guardsmen opened fire during an anti-war protest. Four students were killed and nine others were wounded.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

Return to Top



News Headline: Tweet threat nets lesser charge | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gazette, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT — A Portage County grand jury declined to bring felony charges against a 19-year-old Brunswick man accused of posting a Twitter message saying he would be “shooting up” Kent State University.

The grand jury did indict William Koberna on a charge of telecommunications harassment — a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

Koberna initially was charged with inducing panic, a fifth-degree felony, and aggravated menacing, a first-degree misdemeanor, when arrested Sunday afternoon at his parent's home on Pennys Drive in Brunswick.

Had he been convicted of the felony, Koberna faced a maximum punishment of a year in jail and a $2,500 fine.

In addition to facing greater penalties, those convicted of felonies are barred from many occupations and professions.

Neither Koberna nor his parents could be reached for comment.

Koberna was arraigned on the lesser charges Friday in Portage County Municipal Court. He has been free since Tuesday after posting a $50,000, 10 percent, bond.

The case was presented to the grand jury Thursday, according to a news release from the Portage County Prosecutor's Office.

“The result was a return of a ‘no bill' or no indictment on any felony charges,” the release said.

County Prosecutor Victor Vigluicci could not be reached for comment.

A spokeswoman for Kent State University declined to comment.

University officials said earlier that investigators concluded Koberna did not have access to weapons, after his interrogation and interviews with his parents and people close to him.

No weapons or search of the house was mentioned in the Brunswick police report of the arrest.

Koberna, a sophomore computer science major, lived in off-campus housing during the spring semester, but moved home to Brunswick over the summer, university officials said.

The university suspended Koberna on Tuesday, pending the outcome of the criminal case.

He already was barred from campus as a condition of his bond.

Municipal Judge Mark Frankhauser also required Koberna to wear a GPS tracking device and ordered him to have no contact with Kent State President Lester A. Lefton, who specifically was threatened in the tweet.

Koberna's 17-word Twitter message ended with “I'm shooting up your school” and signed “# A$AP,” according to a police report.

All but three words of the rest of the message were profanities.

University officials said an employee monitoring social media noted the tweet July 27 — two days after it was posted — and police were called in.

The case has drawn national attention coming so soon after the July 19 mass shooting in a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., that left 12 people dead and 58 wounded.

Return to Top



News Headline: Black Squirrel Adventure Race is this Weekend | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Triathlon combines paddling, biking and running

The second annual Black Squirrel 5K takes place Saturday starting at 8 a.m. at Kent State University. The race begins and ends in front of the university's Student Recreation and Wellness Center. Kent State University

The Black Squirrel Adventure Triathlon, the second race in the Crooked River Adventure Race series, is Saturday in Kent.

Registration remains open and is available the day of the race. See the attached registration form (a .pdf file) for more information.

The three-stage race features a 2 mile canoe or kayak leg on the Cuyahoga River, a 5 mile bike ride on The Portage Hike and Bike Trail and a 2 mile run that ends in downtown Kent.

Racers can enter as individuals, a team or a relay.

Kent Parks and Recreation Director John Idone said if racers need a canoe or kayak, they can call Ernie's Bike Shop & Canoe Livery at 330-832-5111 and they will deliver a boat to the Tannery Park starting line and pick it up for you at the Middlebury landing after the race.

Fore more information, see the attached registration form.

Return to Top



News Headline: Pet Place: From bad boy to canine hero | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two weeks ago, Jennifer Yost of Springfield Township and her dog, Dizzy, participated in Hudson Safety Town's Dog Safety program. On July 19, the pair demonstrated to children and their folks what to do if they are caught in a fire. Together, the pair showed the kids how to escape through a window after crawling under a layer of smoke on their bellies through a fire safety house.

Evidently, Dizzy, a 4-year-old black Labrador retriever/German shepherd mix, learned his lesson from the demonstration better than his mistress did. Yost, 20, admits she fell short. When fire struck her home the following morning, Dizzy resorted to something he had never done before: He bit her, but it may have saved her life.

But that is only part of this amazing story about the pair who have traded places, blurring the roles of hero and victim through their mutual love and devotion.

As with many good stories, the heroine (Yost) saved the unfortunate and misunderstood victim (Dizzy) from certain death. Three years ago, Dizzy had an aggression problem. Trainers and veterinarians agreed he should be put down because he was too mean to be rehabilitated.

Yost, who was only 17 at the time, disagreed. She saw a young dog with lots of energy that needed a job. So Yost, who knew very early in life that she was fated to be an animal advocate, adopted the pup and enrolled him in Paul Pollack's Sit Means Sit dog training program in Copley Township.

"When I showed up at Jen's house to meet Dizzy for his evaluation, Jen had to hold him back from attacking me when I knocked on the door," Pollack remembered.

"I asked Jen to put his muzzle on and bring him out on a leash. When he came out of the house, he was growling and lunging at me. If he was not muzzled, I definitely would have been bitten.

"I was able to get him calmed down and looking to me for direction in about 10 minutes."

Dizzy's schooling was so successful that now Yost and Dizzy work for Sit Means Sit training other dogs and their owners.

He also is such a model canine citizen that Pollack feels comfortable using him for Safety Town demonstrations.

"Through the course of the [Hudson] program, Dizzy played and was petted by hundreds of children," Pollack said. "He has zero aggression now and enjoys being around people and playing with other dogs. When we tell people about Dizzy's history, most people simply don't believe it."

A student at Kent State University in pre-veterinary medicine, Yost founded Bird Nerd Rescue/Sanctuary seven years ago in her home. The business is dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and adoption of domestic parrots. A year ago, she moved Bird Nerd to a 3,000-square-foot facility in Canton. Add to that, Yost teaches veterinary technician classes, bird handling and grooming along with her job at Sit Means Sit.

Just listing her schedule is exhausting, so it's no wonder that sometimes, she is, too. Friday is the only day that Yost, who lives with her mother, Debbie Yost, three dogs, five exotic rescued birds and four cats, gets to sleep in.

She described the events leading up to the fire.

"I got in late [Thursday] night after the demonstration. I then had to go back to the training facility and take care of the dogs who are here for boarding," Yost said.

When she got home she said, she thought she smelled something "weird," so thinking it was coming from the air conditioner, she unplugged it and went to bed.

She was still in bed when her mother left for work Friday morning, Yost said, but Dizzy started licking her face, trying to make her get up. She thought he was just being a pain and wanted her to let him outside.

Next, "He started barking and I pushed him away," she said.

Then, Dizzy bit her hand hard enough to draw blood. That got her attention.

"No way did you just bite me," she said as she jumped out of bed and realized the house was on fire and filled with smoke. The source was a fluorescent light in an aquarium in another bedroom, firefighters later determined.

"[A] fireman told me if I had slept another 20 minutes, I would have died from the smoke," Yost said.

Pollack said Dizzy's actions escalated in aggression because he had to "wake his mom. He went from trying to wake her up by crying and barking to biting her because he had to," he said.

Yost ran back inside eight times to remove animals from the burning home, Dizzy by her side. She scooped up handfuls of birds and carted them to an outdoor aviary.

"I did absolutely everything that I was not supposed to do," she said.

A scarlet macaw was the only animal left behind, but after being treated for smoke inhalation by an emergency veterinarian, the parrot is doing fine today.

Yost and her mother were staying in a hotel last week, waiting for the damage to be repaired, her menagerie temporarily with rescue groups and friends. All in all, things could be much, much worse, she said.

And so the story ends, with the rescued being the rescuer.

Other animals in the news:

• One of a Kind Pet Rescue is sponsoring a feral cat seminar from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Aug. 11 at 1929 W. Market St., Akron, where participants will be taught how to humanely manage feral cat colonies by trapping, neutering and returning them to where they were trapped. There is no charge for the workshop, but donations to the OOAK Feral Fund will be accepted.

• Men, women, children and their pets are invited to the third annual Charity Walk and Wag Against Abuse 1-4 p.m. Aug. 18 at Hardesty Park, 1615 W. Market St., Akron. Admission is $12 for adults, free for children and pets. Proceeds to benefit the Battered Women's Shelter of Summit and Medina Counties. Tickets may be purchased at www.scmcbws.org/3rd_annual_walk_wag_against_abuse.asp . They will be available at the event for cash or check, only.

Event forms may be printed at www.scmcbws.org or requested at 330-860-5635.

• The third annual Pet Expo will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday at Summit Mall, sponsored by the Medina County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. It will feature exhibits from veterinary hospitals, animal trainers, pet groomers and more. Agility and obedience demonstrations and an "Ask a Vet" center will be featured. The expo will be set up in the mall's center court. The mall is at West Market Street and Ghent Road in Fairlawn.

• One of a Kind Pet Rescue is sponsoring a One of a Kind Country Barbecue 5-9 p.m. Aug. 25 at the Elms Athletic Fields, 3220 Ira Road, Bath Township, featuring a barbecue dinner (with vegetarian option), beer, wine and nonalcoholic beverages. Tickets are $75, patron tickets are $125 and may be purchased at OOAK, 1929 W. Market St., Akron. Proceeds benefit One of A Kind Pet Rescue and Low Cost Spay and Neuter Clinic. Reservations must be made by Aug. 17.

Return to Top



News Headline: Pet Place: From bad boy to canine hero | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Chicago Tribune - Online
Contact Name: Kathy Antoniotti Akron Beacon Journal
News OCR Text: Two weeks ago, Jennifer Yost of Springfield Township and her dog, Dizzy, participated in Hudson Safety Town's Dog Safety program. On July 19, the pair demonstrated to children and their folks what to do if they are caught in a fire. Together, the pair showed the kids how to escape through a window after crawling under a layer of smoke on their bellies through a fire safety house.

Evidently, Dizzy, a 4-year-old black Labrador retriever/German shepherd mix, learned his lesson from the demonstration better than his mistress did. Yost, 20, admits she fell short. When fire struck her home the following morning, Dizzy resorted to something he had never done before: He bit her, but it may have saved her life.

But that is only part of this amazing story about the pair who have traded places, blurring the roles of hero and victim through their mutual love and devotion.

As with many good stories, the heroine (Yost) saved the unfortunate and misunderstood victim (Dizzy) from certain death. Three years ago, Dizzy had an aggression problem. Trainers and veterinarians agreed he should be put down because he was too mean to be rehabilitated.

Yost, who was only 17 at the time, disagreed. She saw a young dog with lots of energy that needed a job. So Yost, who knew very early in life that she was fated to be an animal advocate, adopted the pup and enrolled him in Paul Pollack's Sit Means Sit dog training program in Copley Township.

"When I showed up at Jen's house to meet Dizzy for his evaluation, Jen had to hold him back from attacking me when I knocked on the door," Pollack remembered.

"I asked Jen to put his muzzle on and bring him out on a leash. When he came out of the house, he was growling and lunging at me. If he was not muzzled, I definitely would have been bitten.

"I was able to get him calmed down and looking to me for direction in about 10 minutes."

Dizzy's schooling was so successful that now Yost and Dizzy work for Sit Means Sit training other dogs and their owners.

He also is such a model canine citizen that Pollack feels comfortable using him for Safety Town demonstrations.

"Through the course of the [Hudson] program, Dizzy played and was petted by hundreds of children," Pollack said. "He has zero aggression now and enjoys being around people and playing with other dogs. When we tell people about Dizzy's history, most people simply don't believe it."

A student at Kent State University in pre-veterinary medicine, Yost founded Bird Nerd Rescue/Sanctuary seven years ago in her home. The business is dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and adoption of domestic parrots. A year ago, she moved Bird Nerd to a 3,000-square-foot facility in Canton. Add to that, Yost teaches veterinary technician classes, bird handling and grooming along with her job at Sit Means Sit.

Just listing her schedule is exhausting, so it's no wonder that sometimes, she is, too. Friday is the only day that Yost, who lives with her mother, Debbie Yost, three dogs, five exotic rescued birds and four cats, gets to sleep in.

She described the events leading up to the fire.

"I got in late [Thursday] night after the demonstration. I then had to go back to the training facility and take care of the dogs who are here for boarding," Yost said.

When she got home she said, she thought she smelled something "weird," so thinking it was coming from the air conditioner, she unplugged it and went to bed.

She was still in bed when her mother left for work Friday morning, Yost said, but Dizzy started licking her face, trying to make her get up. She thought he was just being a pain and wanted her to let him outside.

Next, "He started barking and I pushed him away," she said.

Then, Dizzy bit her hand hard enough to draw blood. That got her attention.

"No way did you just bite me," she said as she jumped out of bed and realized the house was on fire and filled with smoke. The source was a fluorescent light in an aquarium in another bedroom, firefighters later determined.

Return to Top



News Headline: Pet Place: From bad boy to canine hero | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Baltimore Sun - Online
Contact Name: Kathy Antoniotti Akron Beacon Journal
News OCR Text: Two weeks ago, Jennifer Yost of Springfield Township and her dog, Dizzy, participated in Hudson Safety Town's Dog Safety program. On July 19, the pair demonstrated to children and their folks what to do if they are caught in a fire. Together, the pair showed the kids how to escape through a window after crawling under a layer of smoke on their bellies through a fire safety house.

Evidently, Dizzy, a 4-year-old black Labrador retriever/German shepherd mix, learned his lesson from the demonstration better than his mistress did. Yost, 20, admits she fell short. When fire struck her home the following morning, Dizzy resorted to something he had never done before: He bit her, but it may have saved her life.

But that is only part of this amazing story about the pair who have traded places, blurring the roles of hero and victim through their mutual love and devotion.

As with many good stories, the heroine (Yost) saved the unfortunate and misunderstood victim (Dizzy) from certain death. Three years ago, Dizzy had an aggression problem. Trainers and veterinarians agreed he should be put down because he was too mean to be rehabilitated.

Yost, who was only 17 at the time, disagreed. She saw a young dog with lots of energy that needed a job. So Yost, who knew very early in life that she was fated to be an animal advocate, adopted the pup and enrolled him in Paul Pollack's Sit Means Sit dog training program in Copley Township.

"When I showed up at Jen's house to meet Dizzy for his evaluation, Jen had to hold him back from attacking me when I knocked on the door," Pollack remembered.

"I asked Jen to put his muzzle on and bring him out on a leash. When he came out of the house, he was growling and lunging at me. If he was not muzzled, I definitely would have been bitten.

"I was able to get him calmed down and looking to me for direction in about 10 minutes."

Dizzy's schooling was so successful that now Yost and Dizzy work for Sit Means Sit training other dogs and their owners.

He also is such a model canine citizen that Pollack feels comfortable using him for Safety Town demonstrations.

"Through the course of the [Hudson] program, Dizzy played and was petted by hundreds of children," Pollack said. "He has zero aggression now and enjoys being around people and playing with other dogs. When we tell people about Dizzy's history, most people simply don't believe it."

A student at Kent State University in pre-veterinary medicine, Yost founded Bird Nerd Rescue/Sanctuary seven years ago in her home. The business is dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and adoption of domestic parrots. A year ago, she moved Bird Nerd to a 3,000-square-foot facility in Canton. Add to that, Yost teaches veterinary technician classes, bird handling and grooming along with her job at Sit Means Sit.

Just listing her schedule is exhausting, so it's no wonder that sometimes, she is, too. Friday is the only day that Yost, who lives with her mother, Debbie Yost, three dogs, five exotic rescued birds and four cats, gets to sleep in.

She described the events leading up to the fire.

"I got in late [Thursday] night after the demonstration. I then had to go back to the training facility and take care of the dogs who are here for boarding," Yost said.

When she got home she said, she thought she smelled something "weird," so thinking it was coming from the air conditioner, she unplugged it and went to bed.

She was still in bed when her mother left for work Friday morning, Yost said, but Dizzy started licking her face, trying to make her get up. She thought he was just being a pain and wanted her to let him outside.

Next, "He started barking and I pushed him away," she said.

Then, Dizzy bit her hand hard enough to draw blood. That got her attention.

"No way did you just bite me," she said as she jumped out of bed and realized the house was on fire and filled with smoke. The source was a fluorescent light in an aquarium in another bedroom, firefighters later determined.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Sound of Music' is alive at Porthouse Theatre | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CUYAHOGA FALLS: The classic Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The Sound of Music is bursting with heart at Porthouse Theatre in a joyful production directed by artistic director Terri Kent.

Every detail — from a massive, beautifully hand-painted mountain mural to the thrilling harmonies reverberating from the nuns' sacred music — shows this production has been mounted with loving care. The excellent cast is led by Porthouse favorite Kayce Cummings, who has returned from Nashville to assume the role of Maria.

She brings an emotionally nuanced performance and supple voice to the famous role of the postulant-turned-governess. Through Cummings, we see that Maria is a young woman brimming with love who can't help but sing and frolic, no matter how much she desires to conform to the strict rules of the abbey.

Enter the von Trapp family, whose children fall in love with her and she with them. Complications ensue when Capt. von Trapp, betrothed to the sophisticated Elsa (Lisa Kuhnen), becomes drawn to Maria, who is confused by her new feelings of love.

The 1959 musical, which starred Mary Martin and Theodore Bikel, is based on The Story of the Trapp Family Singers, the memoir of the real Maria von Trapp. The musical was Rodgers and Hammerstein's final collaboration before Hammerstein's death. It was followed by the beloved 1965 film starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer.

Porthouse's production team for the massive show is made up of all Kent State grads, including scenic designer Nolan O'Dell, lighting designer T.C. Kouyeas Jr., costume designer Sarah Russell and sound designer Brian Chismar.

Assistant artistic director MaryAnn Black creates playful choreography, especially in Sixteen Going on Seventeen, where sweethearts Rolf (Kyle Kemp) and Liesl (the fresh, pretty Lucy Anders) chase each other up, down and around some lovely steps.

Real-life sisters Courtney, Cameron, Cassidy and Carly Nelson are cuties as Louisa, Brigitta, Marta and Gretl von Trapp, joined by Anders as well as Samuel Culver as Kurt and Cameron Howell as Frederick. The von Trapp children's harmonies are beautiful and their dancing is snappy.

Larry Nehring is elegant and brings the necessary vehemence to the captain's hatred of the Nazis and their approaching Anschluss (union) with Austria. At the other extreme, Eric van Baars brings humor and levity to his character, Max, even in his blindness.

Susan Murphy yells too much as servant Frau Schmidt, Lissy Gulick is lovable as the irrepressible Sister Margaretta and Marla Berg steals the show with her incredible vocals as the Mother Abbess in Climb Ev'ry Mountain.

Kent has chosen well to cut some of the musical's lesser-known, original numbers and substitute them with some favorites from the movie, including I Have Confidence and Something Good. Audience members can't go wrong attending this beautiful show, full of charming acting, stellar singing and fun dancing

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Music' ends season on a high note (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre's production of "The Sound of Music" was 10 years in the making.

Terri Kent, artistic director at Porthouse, said she first brought up the idea of staging the well-known musical 10 years ago, with actress Kayce Cummings in the role of Maria. However, the theater only was able to secure rights to stage the show this year, she said.

Cummings (married name Kayce Green) said that the decade-long wait had a benefit.

"I don't think I would have done as well earlier, before getting married and having a baby," she said. "I don't think I'd be able to play the range of emotions as well. It's a beautiful story on the von Trapp family, a love story with a higher power."

Kent said she agreed, adding that she and the cast "talked extensively" about the von Trapp family.

"Families are not always bonded by blood, but by faith and love," Kent said. "I understand that as a stepmom, an adopted mom and a birth mom. It's such an honor to tell this story."

"The Sound of Music," which closes Porthouse's 2012 summer season, is loosely based on the lives of the von Trapp family singers. In the play, Maria is a postulant at the Nonnberg Abbey who finds the quiet life of a nun a challenge. She is sent by the Mother Abbess (played by Marla Berg) to the household of Capt. Georg von Trapp (played by Larry Nehring), whose seven children need a new governess. Maria brings music into the house again, but the family finds they must flee the country when the Nazi party-controlled Germany invades Austria.

The audience gave the opening night show July 27 a standing ovation.

"It was fabulous, absolutely fabulous," said Shawn Gordon of Kent. "It was superbly cast and we thought the music was exceptional."

Joanne Compton, a former Stow resident who now lives in Rhode Island, said she felt the "Edelweiss song was especially emotional."

Porthouse has assembled a top-notch cast, from the leads to the ensemble. The seven children -- including Lucy Anders as Liesl, Cameron Howel as Friedrich, Courtney Nelson as Louisa, Samuel Culver as Kurt, Cameron Nelson as Brigitta, Cassidy Nelson as Marta and Carly Nelson as Gretl -- are talented individually and as an ensemble, and are utterly charming.

Lisa Kuhnen plays the wealthy Elsa Schraeder, Georg's would-be fiance, and Eric van Baars plays the quick-witted, pragmatic Max Detweiler. Lenne Snively plays Sister Berthe, Lauren Culver plays Sister Sophia and Lissy Gulick plays Sister Margaretta. Kyle Kemph plays Rolph, a telegram delivery boy infatuated with Liesl.

TICKET AND SHOW INFORMATION

Evening performances and Aug. 7 through 11 at 8 p.m., as well as 2 p.m. matinee performances Aug. 5, 11 and 12.

Porthouse Theatre is at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road in Cuyahoga Falls. Single tickets range from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in Kent State's Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent.

Tickets also are available by calling 330-672-3884 or 330-672-2497, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online. Special rates for groups of 20 or more are available, as are student rates.

For more information, visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

E-mail: ahelms@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3153

Return to Top



News Headline: 'T-shirt diplomacy' underscores Kent-KSU partnership (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TEAM EFFORT BY CITY, UNIVERSITY
BUILDING A MORE VIBRANT TREE CITY

KENT STATE UNIVERSity
President Lester Lefton's exercise
in T-shirt diplomacy with
Kent City Council this past week had an
important message.
President Lefton thanked
the council for working with
the university to rebuild the
community's downtown.
At the same time, he was
saying, look what this good
partnership can accomplish.
Let's keep working
together.
He's right, of course, and
any member of council who
thinks otherwise is missing
what is obvious.
Ron Burbick, the businessman and philanthropist
who bet his personal fortune
on the future of Kent, was the catalyst
for the positive downtown rejuvenation
efforts, but without the subsequent commitment
of Kent State there'd be no new
hotel going up. The PARTA multi-modal
transportation center might not have
been built. The Esplanade would not be
under way. Fairmount Properties would
have passed Kent by.
Obviously a good working relationship
with Kent State is extremely important
to the city of Kent. The KSU payroll accounts
for nearly a third of the city's income
tax revenues. The university is the
city's major employer and one of Northeastern
Ohio's largest employers. The
university is a major customer for numerous
local businesses, its hundreds of millions
of dollars in annual operations recycling
through the community providing
jobs in the private sector.
Most communities would do whatever
it takes to land a plum like Kent State
and most would continue to work hard to
be a hospitable to such an employer. The
current Kent-KSU relationship of mutual
trust has been painstakingly nurtured by
City Manager David Ruller, without whose
efforts much of the positive that has happened
would not have occurred.
Strong, trusting relationships are not
built overnight. They take time and commitment
and without that an atmosphere
of understanding can quickly unravel.
We do not mean to imply that Kent
State University should be Kent's only
concern. Neighborhood improvement,
good city services provided efficiently at
a good rate of return for the taxpayers,
well-maintained streets and sidewalks,
good zoning and planning with an eye to
the future, economic development and
the recruitment and retention of industry
are all important.
But how much easier it is to address
those concerns when the city has strong
partnerships with its major players such
as KSU, Ametek, the Davey Tree Expert
Co. and other employers.
Mayor Jerry Fiala has repeatedly reminded
everyone how much better things
go when people team up and pull in the
same direction. It's an insightful observation
and underscores the importance of
the town-gown partnership.
The mayor's message was the same
one that President Lefton was voicing
to Kent council members this past week
when he visited and handed out those
nifty Kent State College World Series of
Baseball T-shirts.

Return to Top



News Headline: Esplanade Construction to Start Monday (Vincent, Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Demolition of houses, grading work scheduled to start

This architectural rendering shows the planned path for the Esplanade, which will extend from Kent State's campus through the neighborhood on its western edge and into downtown Kent. The university is at right in the image with downtown Kent at left and Haymaker Parkway slashing at an angle between the two. Kent State University

http://kent.patch.com/articles/esplanade-construction-to-start-monday/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1344160831

Construction on Kent State University's Esplanade, the pathway that will link campus to downtown Kent, is scheduled to start Monday.

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent said the work will include excavation of Erie Street, tearing down house plus relocating underground utilities.

"And spreading the stockpiled soil (that is currently on the north side of Erie Street) to raise the grade for the new esplanade extension," she said in an email.

The wide, sweeping pedestrian pathway will link the campus to the major redevelopment projects under way downtown, including the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center.

The Esplanade extension will travel directly west from the atrium of the Kent State Museumto Haymaker Parkway, where it will meet a new stop light at the intersection of Erie Street, the new Kent State hotel and PARTA's Kent Central Gatewaytransit center.

"You will be looking at Franklin Hall when you walk out of the hotel," Kent State University President Lester Lefton told Kent State trustees in June. "There will be this big, park-like setting with tall gates that read 'Kent State University' on them."

The project has been in the works for several years as the university bought properties in the neighborhood so its on-campus leg of The Portage Hike and Bike Trail could link to downtown Kent.

The university spent more than $8 million buying land in the neighborhood west of campus since 2007.

As of early June, the university owned 33 properties in the neighborhood that have been bought in the past five years. Seven more properties were pending transfer of ownership to the university or state approval for the expenses.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus