Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Alumni Association (2)
American Association University Professors (AAUP); Board of Trustees (4)
College of Applied Eng, Sustainability and Tech (1)
College of Podiatric Medicine (2)
Institutional Advancement (2)
KSU Museum (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (2)
Theatre and Dance (3)
Town-Gown (3)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni Association (2)
Patch Residents Named to Kent State National Alumni Board 08/09/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Marino Appointed to Kent State Alumni Association Board 08/09/2012 Avon-Avon Lake Patch Text Attachment Email


American Association University Professors (AAUP); Board of Trustees (4)
Kent State University trustees approve three-year collective bargaining agreement (Lefton, Mintz) 08/09/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Local news briefs - Aug. 9 (Lefton) 08/09/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State ratifies 3-year pact with faculty union (Lefton, Mintz) 08/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Trustees Ratify Faculty Contract (Lefton, Diacon, Mintz) 08/09/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


College of Applied Eng, Sustainability and Tech (1)
Development board helps create investment at 2 local companies 08/08/2012 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

...referrals to PDB partners such the Ohio Small Business Development Center, Portage Workforce Connection, Northeast Ohio Trade and Economic Consortium, Kent State University College of Technology and Neighborhood Development Services. Ehrhart said the goal is to contact more than 150 companies...


College of Podiatric Medicine (2)
Kent State unveils College of Podiatric Medicine (Lefton, Melillo) 08/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State partners with Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine 08/09/2012 vtam.com Text Attachment Email


Institutional Advancement (2)
No Work Stoppage at New Kent State Hotel Downtown (Finn) 08/09/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

MUSICAL ACTIVITIES Aug. 8: Arrival, 7 p.m., the 08/08/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

MUSICAL ACTIVITIES Sept. 8: Sheryl Crow, Los Lonely Boys, O.A.R., 6-11 p.m., Dix Stadium, the Kent State U. campus.


KSU Museum (1)
'Fashion Timeline' at KSU Museum takes visitors on trip through history (Hume) 08/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (2)
Make words fun to boost child's vocabulary (Rasinski) 08/09/2012 Tennessean - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Should I get flash cards? No. There are better ways to help develop a stronger vocabulary than rote learning of random word lists, says Tim Rasinski, a Kent State professor of literacy education. Any such learning is often quickly forgotten because the words usually don’t connect to what the child...

Make words fun to boost child's vocabulary (Rasinski) 08/09/2012 Greenville News - Online Text Attachment Email

...Should I get flash cards? No. There are better ways to help develop a stronger vocabulary than rote learning of random word lists, says Tim Rasinski, a Kent State professor of literacy education. Any such learning is often quickly forgotten because the words usually don?t connect to what the child...


Theatre and Dance (3)
'Music' ends season on a high note (Kent) 08/08/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

...W. Steels Corners Road in Cuyahoga Falls. Single tickets range from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in Kent State's Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent. Tickets also are available by calling 330-672-3884...

'Music' ends season on a high note (Kent) 08/09/2012 Bedford Times Register - Online Text Attachment Email

...W. Steels Corners Road in Cuyahoga Falls. Single tickets range from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in Kent State's Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent. Tickets also are available by calling 330-672-3884...

'Music' ends season on a high note (Kent) 08/09/2012 MapleHeightsPress Text Attachment Email

...W. Steels Corners Road in Cuyahoga Falls. Single tickets range from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in Kent State's Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent. Tickets also are available by calling 330-672-3884...


Town-Gown (3)
Real work begins on extension of Kent State's Esplanade walkway 08/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Haymaker Parkway to Close Saturday for House Move 08/09/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

PHOTOS: House Demolished for Esplanade 08/09/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Patch Residents Named to Kent State National Alumni Board | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Alumni from Solon, Avon Lake, Cleveland Heights named to board

The Kent State University Alumni Association Inc. announces the following new members for its National Alumni Board of Directors:

John Garofalo, of Sagamore Hills, Ohio, continues his role as president of Kent State University's Alumni Association National Board of Directors. Garofalo is vice president of community investment for the Akron Community Foundation. He earned a Bachelor of Science in community health education in 1987 and a Master of Education in health education in 1993 from Kent State.

Maria Schneider, of Copley, Ohio, continues her role as president-elect. Schneider is managing consultant at Premier Segment, Institutional Relationships at TIAA-CREF in Westlake, Ohio. She earned a Bachelor of Business Administration in finance in 1986 from Kent State.

Brian Marino, of Avon Lake, Ohio, has been appointed vice president. Marino is financial advisor and special care planner with Skylight Financial Group/Michael Carter Group in Cleveland. He earned a Bachelor of Business Administration in business management in 2001 from Kent State.

H. Scott Westover, of Cleveland Heights, Ohio, has been appointed secretary. Westover is curator for the Progressive Art Collection in Mayfield Village. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy in 1997 from Kent State.

James Bailey, of Hudson, Ohio, has been appointed treasurer. Bailey is vice president of PNC Bank in Akron, Ohio. He earned a Bachelor of Business Administration in finance in 2003 and a Master of Science in financial engineering in 2004 from Kent State.

In addition, the following new members, all alumni of Kent State, have been appointed to serve a three-year term ending in 2015:

Joshua Jenkins, of Solon, Ohio, is partner, Assurance Services with Ernst & Young LLP in Cleveland. Jenkins earned a Bachelor of Business Administration in accounting in 1996 from Kent State.

Lori Stevic-Rust, of Chesterland, Ohio, is a board-certified clinical health psychologist for Stevic-Rust & Assoc. LLC Healthcare Consultants in Willoughby, Ohio. Stevic-Rust earned a Master of Education in community counseling in 1986 and a Ph.D. in counseling psychology in 1990 from Kent State.

For more information about the Kent State University Alumni Association, visit www.ksualumni.org.

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News Headline: Marino Appointed to Kent State Alumni Association Board | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Avon-Avon Lake Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Resident named vice president.

The Kent State University Alumni Association Inc. has announced several new members for its National Alumni Board of Directors including an Avon Lake resident.

Brian Marino, of Avon Lake has been appointed vice president.

Marino is financial advisor and special care planner with Skylight Financial Group / Michael Carter Group in Cleveland. He earned a Bachelor of Business Administration in business management in 2001 from Kent State.

John Garofalo, of Sagamore Hills continues his role as president of Kent State University's Alumni Association National Board of Directors and Maria Schneider, of Copley, continues her role as president-elect.

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News Headline: Kent State University trustees approve three-year collective bargaining agreement (Lefton, Mintz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University trustees have signed off on a three-year collective bargaining agreement for full-time, tenure-track faculty — a move that comes after more than a year of, at times, tense negotiations between administrators and faculty.

Kent State president Lester Lefton said during a special meeting today of the university's board of trustees that representatives on both sides of the bargaining table exhibited patience during the process, which began in May 2011.

“Collective bargaining negotiation is a process,” Dr. Lefton said during the meeting. “On any one day, things go well, the next day things don't go well. It takes a year or year-and-a-half sometimes to do this, and I think everybody acted in good faith on both bargaining teams.”

Under the new agreement, university faculty will receive across-the-board 2% salary increases, which will be applied retroactively to the start of the 2011-2012 academic year. Faculty members also are guaranteed 2% pay hikes for each of the following two academic years.

The contract calls for annual merit increases for faculty deemed worthy through a review process at the departmental level. For those faculty, the contract calls for 1.4% merit increases for the 2012-2013 academic year, and 1.3% merit increases for the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 academic years.

Also, university employees will pay a higher percentage of their total medical costs. In 2013, the percent of total medical costs paid through premiums will increase to 16% from 14% for employees at the median university salary level. That number will rise to 17% for calendar years 2014 and 2015.

While all parties involved appeared satisfied with the end result, tense contract negotiations at one point led some faculty members to threaten a strike and circulate petitions calling for a “no confidence” vote in Dr. Lefton's leadership.

Late last month, however, members of the Kent State chapter of the American Association of University Professors accepted the new contract by a vote of 414-31.

“With the fall semester upon us, the faculty members are looking forward to working with the administration to provide the best possible education for our students and enhancing the visibility of Kent State as an internationally recognized research university,” said Eric Mintz, an associate professor of biological sciences and chief negotiator for the union.

Kent State's trustees met to ratify the contract at the university's new College of Podiatric Medicine in Independence. Kent State agreed to acquire the institution formerly known as the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine this spring. The acquisition, which was celebrated today with a “ribbon tying” ceremony, became official July 1.

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News Headline: Local news briefs - Aug. 9 (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

Faculty contract

KENT: Kent State trustees on Wednesday unanimously approved a three-year collective bargaining pact with the faculty union.

“We enter a new academic year in s spirit of cooperation and commitment to academic excellence and student success,” KSU President Lester Lefton said in a media release.

Faculty will get a 2 percent across-the-board raise applied retroactively to 2011-2012, and 2 percent raises for each of the next three years. KSU also will distribute a merit pool of 1.4 percent for 2012-2013 and 1.3 percent for the next two years.

Medical premiums will rise from 14 percent for an employee at the median KSU salary to 17 percent by the end of the contract.

Lefton will convene a commission to develop a paid parental leave policy. Faculty can use three weeks of sick leave as paid parental leave in the meantime.

The tenure-track unit of the American Association of University Professors approved the agreement 414 to 31.

The AAUP unit covers KSU faculty with tenure or who are on track to get tenure, which means virtually lifetime employment.

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News Headline: Kent State ratifies 3-year pact with faculty union (Lefton, Mintz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University formally approved a new contract Wednesday that provides 2 percent, across the board raises to tenure-track faculty for each of the next three school years.

KSU's Board of Trustees voted unanimously to approve the agreement, which also retroactively grants a 2 percent raise to tenure-track faculty members for the 2011-12 school year.

“I'm grateful to everyone involved for the dedication they demonstrated throughout the negotiating process,” KSU President Lester Lefton said in a statement. “I am pleased that after the good faith effort from everyone on both sides of the table we can now move forward.”

The board's decision on the contract followed the ratification of the agreement by KSU's chapter of the American Association of University Professors, which voted 414-31 in favor of the contract.

Negotiations between the union and KSU's administration had been going on for about a year prior to the two sides coming to an agreement. At one point, faculty members had floated the idea of asking for a possible “no confidence” vote on Lefton's leadership.

Eric Mintz, KSU biology professor and chief negotiator for the AAUP, released a statement that the union is “pleased that a new collective bargaining agreement is now in place,” adding that union members looked forward to getting back to the business of education.

The contract also calls for the creation of pools for merit-based raises in all three years of the agreement.

Faculty members will also pay more for health care under the deal after the upcoming school year. An employee with a median salary will contribute 16 percent of their health care premiums in 2013 and 17 percent in 2014-15, as opposed to the current 14 percent rate.

The contract also requires Lefton to create a panel to recommend a new policy on paid parental leave.

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News Headline: Kent State Trustees Ratify Faculty Contract (Lefton, Diacon, Mintz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 3-year agreement includes 2 percent raises each contract year

Full-time, tenure track faculty at Kent State University have a new contract today following more than a year of negotiations with university administrators.

The Kent State Board of Trustees held a special meeting this morning at the new College of Podiatric Medicine in Independence, OH, to approve the new contract, which members of the American Association of University Professors Kent State chapter ratified in July.

The three-year contract starts Aug. 23 and expires in August 2015.

Under the terms, faculty will get an across the board 2 percent increase applied retroactively to the start of the 2011-2012 academic year. Faculty are guaranteed a 2 percent raise each remaining year of the contract.

The trustees voted unanimously to approve the contract following a closed-door meeting that lasted about 20 minutes this morning.

Jacqueline Woods, chair of the trustees board, said she didn't want people to think the brief meeting was indicative of the board's attention to the overall negotiations.

"This group of trustees has been involved with this contract since May 2011," Woods said.

The contract negotiations proved tense at times. In May, faculty members started to circulate a petition that would have led to a no confidence vote in Kent State President Lester Lefton. The petitions calling for the no-confidence vote were never actually presented to the university's faculty senate for action.

Members of Kent State's AAUP chapter voted 414-31 to approve this new three-year contract on July 19 — that's 93 percent of its members.

One university official said that margin of approval indicates only a small minority were frustrated with the lengthy negotiations process.

Eric Mintz, an associate professor of biological sciences and the chief negotiatior for the faculty union, said the AAUP members were pleased to have the contract in place.

"With the fall semester upon us, the faculty members are looking forward to working with the administration to provide the best possible education for our students and enhancing the visibility of Kent State as an internationally recognized research university," Mintz said in a statement released by the university.

At this morning's meeting, Lefton also briefly addressed the lengthy negotiations by saying such a time period is common place.

"It takes some times a year, a year and-a-half to do these things," he said.

The contract also includes annual merit increases for faculty members to be determined via reviews at the department level. The agreement calls for a 1.4 percent poll for merit awards in the first year and a 1.3 percent merit pool in the last two years.

Other highlights of the contract changes include:

Medical premiums will increase from 14 percent to 16 percent in 2013 for employees at the median university salary. Premiums will rise to 17 percent for 2014 and 2015.
Lefon's office will convene a commission to make a recommendation on a paid parental leave policy. Faculty will be allowed to use three weeks of sick leave as paid parental leave in the interim.
A new university-level handbook will be created by a committee with broad representation, including faculty.
Todd Diacon, Kent State's new provost, said he enjoyed working through the contract negotiation process with faculty.

"To me it's a fair and positive recognition of our faculty," he said of the new contract.

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News Headline: Development board helps create investment at 2 local companies | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In the first half of this year, the Portage Development Board has worked on eight projects that will generate more than $125 million in new investment in Portage County, including two in Aurora.

According to the board, these projects will keep 800 people working in Portage County, and over the next three years will create 340 new jobs. The total annual payroll for jobs retained and to be created is nearly $70 million.

"We have some exciting things happening in Portage County," said Lissa Barry, chairwoman of the Portage Development Board, "and we thank these companies for making an investment in Portage County."

Brad Ehrhart, president of the PDB, said the eight -- three new locations and five expansions -- are Rovisys and LayerZero Power Systems in Aurora, Selas Pyromics and Viking Forge in Streetsboro, Rubbermaid InSite in Brimfield, Schneller in Franklin Township, Parker-Hannifin in Ravenna and NEOMED in Rootstown.

"Collaboration is the key to each of these successful projects," Ehrhart said. "We are grateful for the assistance from each of partners."

The PDB partnered with Jobs Ohio/Team Northeast Ohio, the Ohio Department of Development, Portage Workforce Connection, Portage County Port Authority, Development Financing Authority of Summit County, Greater Cleveland Partnership, Greater Akron Chamber, Neighborhood Development Services, Maplewood Career Center, Portage County and the communities of Aurora, Brimfield, Kent, Ravenna, Streetsboro and Tallmadge.

Ehrhart said the PDB's role is to help the companies make connection with the needed resources.

"WE'RE ACTING kind of like the generalist who goes in and says, 'You need this, you need that, here's who we can bring in.' All they need to know is us, and our job is to bring all that together for them," Ehrhart said.

In addition to the project work, as of June 30 the PDB called on 74 existing companies to see what could be done to assist them to stay and grow in Portage County, Ehrhart said.

The calls generated 53 referrals to PDB partners such the Ohio Small Business Development Center, Portage Workforce Connection, Northeast Ohio Trade and Economic Consortium, Kent State University College of Technology and Neighborhood Development Services.

Ehrhart said the goal is to contact more than 150 companies this year.

Also, the development board, chambers of commerce around Portage and the city economic developers started sponsoring quarterly Industrial Round Tables to focus on major business climate issues that are being identified from the business calling program.

"Our first Industrial Round Table was April 24 at Maplewood Career Center, and it focused on local workforce development resources," Ehrhart said.

The second Industrial Round Table will be Sept. 12 at Maplewood Career Center and it will focus on the Ohio Workers Compensation System.

The Portage Development Board is a private-public partnership that is responsible for the coordination of economic development activities in Portage County.

The PDB became operational as a 501 (c) 3 non-profit Feb. 1, 2011. It is funded by the Portage County commissioners and contributions from the private sector, local institutions and local communities.

Its mission is to help companies to stay, grow, start-up, and locate in Portage County. The board's goal is job creation and retention.

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News Headline: Kent State unveils College of Podiatric Medicine (Lefton, Melillo) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University took a big step forward in the medical and health training fields Wednesday when it officially unveiled the Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine in Independence, its newest branch in northeast Ohio.

Future foot and ankle specialists will be trained at the college's main site, a large Georgian-style building located off Rockside Road in Independence in Cuyahoga County. One of only nine such colleges in the nation, the College of Podiatric Medicine becomes the only one of its kind in the nation affiliated with a public university system.

As a cleverly arranged soundtrack of foot- and walking-related songs — including Nancy Sinatra's “These Boots Are Made for Walkin',” Patsy Cline's “Walkin' After Midnight,” and Johnny Cash's “Walk the Line” — played on speakers prior to a ribbon-tying ceremony, students mingled with Kent State officials, dignitaries and alumni of the college. The fall semester at the college began Monday.

KSU President Lester Lefton, college CEO Dr. Thomas Melillo and guests tied a ceremonial ribbon linking the two institutions together before a white cloth dropped from the front of the building, revealing the words “Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine” on the facade.

For 96 years “we did our own thing and we did it well,” Melillo said. “But we are so pleased and happy to say we are the Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine.”

“This is a unique academic marriage,” Lefton said. “It brings together two wonderful families with a commitment to similar values.”

Enrollment at the four-year, graduate level college is slightly more than 400 students each year, with 75 to 100 graduates earning doctor of podiatric medicine degrees each year, according to KSU. Melillo, who was president of the college when it was the private, independent Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, said the college began its life in Cleveland in 1916 as the Ohio College of Chiropody.

It moved to Cleveland's University Circle in 1946, was renamed the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine in 1974 and moved to a location near the Cleveland Clinic in 1976. The Independence location opened in 2007, he said.

The college, now known as “KSUCPM for short,” will offer dual degree programs including master's degrees in business administration and public health and a planned doctorate degree in sports medicine, said Amy Miceli, class of 2014 and president of both the college's student association and the national American Podiatric Medical Student Association.

She said the affiliation will help the college's students by giving them access to Kent State's numerous facilities, libraries and programs, as well as NCAA Division I athletes in 14 different intercollegiate programs to give them experience in sports medicine.

The college claims 6,000 podiatrists as alumni and is affiliated with more than 50 hospitals around the world and 300 private practitioners in the United States providing training to graduates, according to Kent State. Dr. Steve Berlin, a 1966 graduate of OCPM and former president of the college's board of trustees, said those current students and his fellow alumni are looking forward to a future with Kent State.

“This allows our students to develop even a greater career and advanced degrees,” he said.

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News Headline: Kent State partners with Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: vtam.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ribbon tying to celebrate the new establishment in Independence.

(Independence)- Kent State University is celebrating the establishment of the new Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine, formerly known as the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine.

The campus is located at 6000 Rockside Woods Blvd. in Independence. Instead of a ribbon cutting ceremony, the event was a ribbon tying Wednesday to signify the two institutions- Kent State and the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine coming together.

Kent State President Lester Lefton tells Newsradio WTAM 1100 this is one of only nine accredited podiatry colleges in the U.S. and its greatly needed. He points to the Olympics where many athletes had injuries to their knees, foots, and ankles.

The marriage officially happened July 1st in a friendly acquisition that offers expanded academic options for podiatry students, including strategic partnerships with other Kent State colleges.

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News Headline: No Work Stoppage at New Kent State Hotel Downtown (Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University officials deny rumors that construction has stopped on the five-story building

Work on the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center has not stopped, a university official said Wednesday.

Rumors are swirling around town that construction on the five story, 76,000 square foot building has come to a halt.

Gene Finn, executive director of the Kent State Foundation and vice president for institutional advancement, said work has simply become less visible on the more than $15 million project.

"There is absolutely no work stoppage at the hotel," Finn said.

The new hotel and conference center is being built by Downtown Kent Hotel LLC, which is formally a partnership of the Kent State Foundation and Columbus-based The Pizzuti Companies, which is led by Kent native Ron Pizzuti.

Shannon Hamons, director of special projects at Pizzuti Cos., countered the prominent rumor that the project encountered financing problems.

"The project is fully funded by the foundation," he said. "The funding has never been an issue."

The foundation is a legally separate, not-for-profit organization that receives private gifts on behalf of Kent State University and then manages and invests those funds. It is managed by a separate board of directors and administrative staff.

The university foundation board voted in June to partner with Pizzuti and invest in the hotel.

Hamons said there has been a lull at the construction site in recent weeks for three reasons. Pace of construction slowed as some contractors finished their work and and prepared to leave while others got ready to start; minor modifications were being made to some of the hotel's interior design elements; and there was a discrepancy with some fire proofing materials that needed to be worked out with the Kent Fire Department.

Pizzuti consults the university foundation as changes are made, Hamons said.

"Those probably were the three major things that kind of slowed" the pace of construction, he said.

The site has been conspicuously devoid of construction workers in recent weeks as other surrounding downtown redevelopment sites have buzzed with activity.

But both Finn and Hamons said activity at the hotel site should pick up in the coming weeks.

Finn said the project's contractor is scheduled to start putting the roof on the building next week.

"All construction is on schedule," he said.

One other change in the project is its time table. When officials broke ground on the hotel in September they anticipated its opening in the spring of 2013.

Hamons said they determined about two months ago that the hotel won't be open until June of next year.

"We will be working through winter and we'll be open next June," he said.

The new hotel at 215 S. DePeyster St. will add close to 100 rooms and a 300-seat banquet center to downtown.

Here's the numerical rundown on the Kent State hotel, which will not be tied to a national chain.

Estimated project cost: more than $15 million
First floor: 22,780 total square feet with 11,000 square feet dedicated to the 300-seat conference area
95 guest rooms and a fitness center spread out over three upper floors; four floors total
Total building size of 76,350 square feet

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News Headline: MUSICAL ACTIVITIES Aug. 8: Arrival, 7 p.m., the | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MUSICAL ACTIVITIES

Sept. 8: Sheryl Crow, Los Lonely Boys, O.A.R., 6-11 p.m., Dix Stadium, the Kent State U. campus.

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News Headline: 'Fashion Timeline' at KSU Museum takes visitors on trip through history (Hume) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: THE KENT STATE UNIVERSITY
Museum's newest exhibit, “Fashion
Timeline,” showcases the museum's
world-class collection of historic
fashions.

The exhibit is currently available for
viewing in the Palmer and Mull Galleries
and will remain on display until June
2013.

The first gallery spans the late-18th
and early-19th centuries. This was a period
of revolutionary change that can
clearly be seen reflected in the fashions.

The American and French Revolutions
radically changed the political
landscapes while the industrial revolution
transformed how goods, particularly
clothing and textiles, were made.

The luxury and rococo excesses of the
18th century gave way to the romanticism
and neoclassicism of the early 19th
century.

“Encompassing two centuries
of fashion history, this exhibition
is designed to show
the evolution of styles and
silhouettes while contextualizing
the pieces with relevant
political, technological
and cultural developments,”
said Sarah Hume, curator of
the exhibit and for the museum.

The next room includes
the second half of the 19th
century to the dawn of World
War I. Synthetic dyes opened
up a world of color, and the
sewing machine facilitated
the application of yards of
ruffles, pleats and fringe. The
upholstered, heavy styles of
the Victorian era eventually
gave way to Edwardian froth
and lace. The final room finishes
the timeline with fashions
of the early 20th century.
While that time period may
have been a period of world
wars and depression, fashions
also reflected the heydays
of jazz and swing, the
boldness of Art Deco, and
the endless possibilities of
technology from plastics to
rockets.

In addition to the garments
on view in the Palmer
and Mull Galleries, an array
of accessories, particularly
shoes and hats, line the hallways.
The silhouettes are
the most obvious changes
that can be seen, but there
are also changes in textiles
and colors.

The display is intended to
be a permanent feature at
the museum, but the individual
pieces will be rotated
frequently so there is always
something new to see.

Kent State University Museum
is located at 515 Hilltop
Drive (corner of East Main
and South Lincoln streets) in
Kent. The museum is closed
on Mondays and Tuesdays.

Museum hours are 10 a.m.
to 4:45 p.m. on Wednesdays,
Fridays and Saturdays; 10
a.m. to 8:45 p.m. on Thursdays;
and noon to 4:45 p.m.
on Sundays.

General admission is $5.
Tickets for senior citizens
(55+ years old) are $4. Tickets
for students and children
(7-18 years old) are $3. Children
younger than 7 years
old are free. Admission to the
museum is free on Sunday.

For more information
about the Kent State University
Museum, visit www.
kent.edu/museum.

IF YOU GO
WHAT: Kent State University Museum
WHERE: 515 Hilltop Drive, Kent
WHEN: Museum open 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.
Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays; 10 a.m.
to 8:45 p.m. Thursdays; and noon to 4:45
p.m. Sundays.
COST: General admission is $5.

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News Headline: Make words fun to boost child's vocabulary (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tennessean - Online, The
Contact Name: Leanna Landsmann Universal Uclick
News OCR Text: Games such as Scrabble are a wonderful way to inspire interest in words and develop knowledge about them.

I’ve noticed that my son, Garth, a rising third-grader, doesn’t have a vocabulary as large as some of the same-age kids he’s playing with this summer. Should I get flash cards?

No. There are better ways to help develop a stronger vocabulary than rote learning of random word lists, says Tim Rasinski, a Kent State professor of literacy education. Any such learning is often quickly forgotten because the words usually don’t connect to what the child knows or is interested in. So nix the flash cards — ditto for writing words multiple times, copying definitions or filling in worksheets.

To expand vocabulary, help Garth “own” the words he loves and add those he wants to know.

For example, if he’s a “Star Wars” fan, he probably has heard the following words, but he may not know them when reading: galaxy, armored, transmissions, intercepted, smashed, reactor. So when he encounters these in “Star Wars” books, have him focus on learning two or three at a time. Have him add the words to a vocabulary notebook under a “Star Wars Words” tab, writing each word, adding a short definition and drawing a picture as a reminder. Do this with other topics he’s keen on. He’s more likely to learn words this way because they are meaningful to him.

Don’t stop there, Rasinski says: “Kids need multiple opportunities to see, write and use new words.”

So add them to conversations and Post-it notes (“Garth, I intercepted a dirty sock in the hallway!”). Encourage him to write stories with these new words.

Another approach: In the summer 2012 issue of Educational Leadership, Rasinski and co-authors Nancy Padak, Karen Bromley and Evangeline Newton make the case that primary-grade children benefit from being clued into Latin and Greek roots. So, for instance, by teaching Garth that the prefix bi- means “two” (bicycle) or sub- means “under” or “below” (submarine), you can give him a leg up. The authors’ article, “Vocabulary: Five Common Misconceptions,” concludes with a starter list of Greek and Latin roots. Find it at ascd.org.

And games can be a wonderful way to inspire interest in words and develop knowledge about them, says Rasinski. Many folks learned new words at the kitchen table with Balderdash, Boggle, Buzzword, Pictionary and Scrabble. Kids still get a kick out of these games. Add them to your family’s fun and everybody gets a chance to boost their word power.

Do you have a question about your child’s education? Email it to Leanna@aplusadvice.com. Leanna Landsmann is an education writer who began her career as a classroom teacher. She has served on education commissions, visited classrooms in 49 states to observe best practices, and founded Principal for a Day in New York City.

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News Headline: Make words fun to boost child's vocabulary (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Greenville News - Online
Contact Name: Leanna Landsmann Universal Uclick
News OCR Text: Games such as Scrabble are a wonderful way to inspire interest in words and develop knowledge about them.

I?ve noticed that my son, Garth, a rising third-grader, doesn?t have a vocabulary as large as some of the same-age kids he?s playing with this summer. Should I get flash cards?

No. There are better ways to help develop a stronger vocabulary than rote learning of random word lists, says Tim Rasinski, a Kent State professor of literacy education. Any such learning is often quickly forgotten because the words usually don?t connect to what the child knows or is interested in. So nix the flash cards ? ditto for writing words multiple times, copying definitions or filling in worksheets.

To expand vocabulary, help Garth ?own? the words he loves and add those he wants to know.

For example, if he?s a ?Star Wars? fan, he probably has heard the following words, but he may not know them when reading: galaxy, armored, transmissions, intercepted, smashed, reactor. So when he encounters these in ?Star Wars? books, have him focus on learning two or three at a time. Have him add the words to a vocabulary notebook under a ?Star Wars Words? tab, writing each word, adding a short definition and drawing a picture as a reminder. Do this with other topics he?s keen on. He?s more likely to learn words this way because they are meaningful to him.

Don?t stop there, Rasinski says: ?Kids need multiple opportunities to see, write and use new words.?

So add them to conversations and Post-it notes (?Garth, I intercepted a dirty sock in the hallway!?). Encourage him to write stories with these new words.

Another approach: In the summer 2012 issue of Educational Leadership, Rasinski and co-authors Nancy Padak, Karen Bromley and Evangeline Newton make the case that primary-grade children benefit from being clued into Latin and Greek roots. So, for instance, by teaching Garth that the prefix bi- means ?two? (bicycle) or sub- means ?under? or ?below? (submarine), you can give him a leg up. The authors? article, ?Vocabulary: Five Common Misconceptions,? concludes with a starter list of Greek and Latin roots. Find it at ascd.org.

And games can be a wonderful way to inspire interest in words and develop knowledge about them, says Rasinski. Many folks learned new words at the kitchen table with Balderdash, Boggle, Buzzword, Pictionary and Scrabble. Kids still get a kick out of these games. Add them to your family?s fun and everybody gets a chance to boost their word power.

Do you have a question about your child?s education? Email it to Leanna@aplusadvice.com. Leanna Landsmann is an education writer who began her career as a classroom teacher. She has served on education commissions, visited classrooms in 49 states to observe best practices, and founded Principal for a Day in New York City.

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News Headline: 'Music' ends season on a high note (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre's production of "The Sound of Music" was 10 years in the making.

Terri Kent, artistic director at Porthouse, said she first brought up the idea of staging the well-known musical 10 years ago, with actress Kayce Cummings in the role of Maria. However, the theater only was able to secure rights to stage the show this year, she said.

Cummings (married name Kayce Green) said that the decade-long wait had a benefit.

"I don't think I would have done as well earlier, before getting married and having a baby," she said. "I don't think I'd be able to play the range of emotions as well. It's a beautiful story on the von Trapp family, a love story with a higher power."

Kent said she agreed, adding that she and the cast "talked extensively" about the von Trapp family.

"Families are not always bonded by blood, but by faith and love," Kent said. "I understand that as a stepmom, an adopted mom and a birth mom. It's such an honor to tell this story."

"The Sound of Music," which closes Porthouse's 2012 summer season, is loosely based on the lives of the von Trapp family singers. In the play, Maria is a postulant at the Nonnberg Abbey who finds the quiet life of a nun a challenge. She is sent by the Mother Abbess (played by Marla Berg) to the household of Capt. Georg von Trapp (played by Larry Nehring), whose seven children need a new governess. Maria brings music into the house again, but the family finds they must flee the country when the Nazi party-controlled Germany invades Austria.

The audience gave the opening night show July 27 a standing ovation.

"It was fabulous, absolutely fabulous," said Shawn Gordon of Kent. "It was superbly cast and we thought the music was exceptional."

Joanne Compton, a former Stow resident who now lives in Rhode Island, said she felt the "Edelweiss song was especially emotional."

Porthouse has assembled a top-notch cast, from the leads to the ensemble. The seven children -- including Lucy Anders as Liesl, Cameron Howel as Friedrich, Courtney Nelson as Louisa, Samuel Culver as Kurt, Cameron Nelson as Brigitta, Cassidy Nelson as Marta and Carly Nelson as Gretl -- are talented individually and as an ensemble, and are utterly charming.

Lisa Kuhnen plays the wealthy Elsa Schraeder, Georg's would-be fiance, and Eric van Baars plays the quick-witted, pragmatic Max Detweiler. Lenne Snively plays Sister Berthe, Lauren Culver plays Sister Sophia and Lissy Gulick plays Sister Margaretta. Kyle Kemph plays Rolph, a telegram delivery boy infatuated with Liesl.

TICKET AND SHOW INFORMATION

Evening performances and Aug. 7 through 11 at 8 p.m., as well as 2 p.m. matinee performances Aug. 5, 11 and 12.

Porthouse Theatre is at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road in Cuyahoga Falls. Single tickets range from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in Kent State's Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent.

Tickets also are available by calling 330-672-3884 or 330-672-2497, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online. Special rates for groups of 20 or more are available, as are student rates.

For more information, visit www.porthousetheatre.com .

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News Headline: 'Music' ends season on a high note (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bedford Times Register - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre's production of "The Sound of Music" was 10 years in the making.

Terri Kent, artistic director at Porthouse, said she first brought up the idea of staging the well-known musical 10 years ago, with actress Kayce Cummings in the role of Maria. However, the theater only was able to secure rights to stage the show this year, she said.

Cummings (married name Kayce Green) said that the decade-long wait had a benefit.

"I don't think I would have done as well earlier, before getting married and having a baby," she said. "I don't think I'd be able to play the range of emotions as well. It's a beautiful story on the von Trapp family, a love story with a higher power."

Kent said she agreed, adding that she and the cast "talked extensively" about the von Trapp family.

"Families are not always bonded by blood, but by faith and love," Kent said. "I understand that as a stepmom, an adopted mom and a birth mom. It's such an honor to tell this story."

"The Sound of Music," which closes Porthouse's 2012 summer season, is loosely based on the lives of the von Trapp family singers. In the play, Maria is a postulant at the Nonnberg Abbey who finds the quiet life of a nun a challenge. She is sent by the Mother Abbess (played by Marla Berg) to the household of Capt. Georg von Trapp (played by Larry Nehring), whose seven children need a new governess. Maria brings music into the house again, but the family finds they must flee the country when the Nazi party-controlled Germany invades Austria.

The audience gave the opening night show July 27 a standing ovation.

"It was fabulous, absolutely fabulous," said Shawn Gordon of Kent. "It was superbly cast and we thought the music was exceptional."

Joanne Compton, a former Stow resident who now lives in Rhode Island, said she felt the "Edelweiss song was especially emotional."

Porthouse has assembled a top-notch cast, from the leads to the ensemble. The seven children -- including Lucy Anders as Liesl, Cameron Howel as Friedrich, Courtney Nelson as Louisa, Samuel Culver as Kurt, Cameron Nelson as Brigitta, Cassidy Nelson as Marta and Carly Nelson as Gretl -- are talented individually and as an ensemble, and are utterly charming.

Lisa Kuhnen plays the wealthy Elsa Schraeder, Georg's would-be fiance, and Eric van Baars plays the quick-witted, pragmatic Max Detweiler. Lenne Snively plays Sister Berthe, Lauren Culver plays Sister Sophia and Lissy Gulick plays Sister Margaretta. Kyle Kemph plays Rolph, a telegram delivery boy infatuated with Liesl.

TICKET AND SHOW INFORMATION

Evening performances and Aug. 7 through 11 at 8 p.m., as well as 2 p.m. matinee performances Aug. 5, 11 and 12.

Porthouse Theatre is at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road in Cuyahoga Falls. Single tickets range from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in Kent State's Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent.

Tickets also are available by calling 330-672-3884 or 330-672-2497, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online. Special rates for groups of 20 or more are available, as are student rates.

For more information, visit www.porthousetheatre.com .

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News Headline: 'Music' ends season on a high note (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: MapleHeightsPress
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre's production of "The Sound of Music" was 10 years in the making.

Terri Kent, artistic director at Porthouse, said she first brought up the idea of staging the well-known musical 10 years ago, with actress Kayce Cummings in the role of Maria. However, the theater only was able to secure rights to stage the show this year, she said.

Cummings (married name Kayce Green) said that the decade-long wait had a benefit.

"I don't think I would have done as well earlier, before getting married and having a baby," she said. "I don't think I'd be able to play the range of emotions as well. It's a beautiful story on the von Trapp family, a love story with a higher power."

Kent said she agreed, adding that she and the cast "talked extensively" about the von Trapp family.

"Families are not always bonded by blood, but by faith and love," Kent said. "I understand that as a stepmom, an adopted mom and a birth mom. It's such an honor to tell this story."

"The Sound of Music," which closes Porthouse's 2012 summer season, is loosely based on the lives of the von Trapp family singers. In the play, Maria is a postulant at the Nonnberg Abbey who finds the quiet life of a nun a challenge. She is sent by the Mother Abbess (played by Marla Berg) to the household of Capt. Georg von Trapp (played by Larry Nehring), whose seven children need a new governess. Maria brings music into the house again, but the family finds they must flee the country when the Nazi party-controlled Germany invades Austria.

The audience gave the opening night show July 27 a standing ovation.

"It was fabulous, absolutely fabulous," said Shawn Gordon of Kent. "It was superbly cast and we thought the music was exceptional."

Joanne Compton, a former Stow resident who now lives in Rhode Island, said she felt the "Edelweiss song was especially emotional."

Porthouse has assembled a top-notch cast, from the leads to the ensemble. The seven children -- including Lucy Anders as Liesl, Cameron Howel as Friedrich, Courtney Nelson as Louisa, Samuel Culver as Kurt, Cameron Nelson as Brigitta, Cassidy Nelson as Marta and Carly Nelson as Gretl -- are talented individually and as an ensemble, and are utterly charming.

Lisa Kuhnen plays the wealthy Elsa Schraeder, Georg's would-be fiance, and Eric van Baars plays the quick-witted, pragmatic Max Detweiler. Lenne Snively plays Sister Berthe, Lauren Culver plays Sister Sophia and Lissy Gulick plays Sister Margaretta. Kyle Kemph plays Rolph, a telegram delivery boy infatuated with Liesl.

TICKET AND SHOW INFORMATION

Evening performances and Aug. 7 through 11 at 8 p.m., as well as 2 p.m. matinee performances Aug. 5, 11 and 12.

Porthouse Theatre is at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road in Cuyahoga Falls. Single tickets range from $25 to $33 for adults and seniors and $17 to $20 for students. The box office is in Kent State's Music and Speech Center on the corner of Main Street and Horning Drive in Kent.

Tickets also are available by calling 330-672-3884 or 330-672-2497, Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., or by visiting www.porthousetheatre.com to purchase online. Special rates for groups of 20 or more are available, as are student rates.

For more information, visit www.porthousetheatre.com .

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News Headline: Real work begins on extension of Kent State's Esplanade walkway | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: After millions of dollars of property acquisitions and years of planning, Kent State University has begun the bulk of the work on its Esplanade walkway extension, which will connect the campus to downtown Kent.

Construction workers tore down a house located on 132 S. Lincoln St. Wednesday, and plan to raze another home at 133 S. Willow St. later this week.

The Esplanade, which runs through campus and currently ends at the intersection of South Lincoln Street and Hilltop Drive, will cross Lincoln and Willow streets through the sites of those two houses.

The walkway will completely replace the small stretch of East Erie Street between Haymaker Parkway and South Willow Street. A new street crossing will be created at the intersection of the Esplanade and Haymaker Parkway to allow pedestrians to cross the highway and arrive at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center and the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's transit center, both of which are under construction on South DePeyster Street.

The school also has filed demolitions permits with the city for houses at:

246/248 E. Erie St.
204 South Willow St.
320 E. Erie St.
330 E. Erie St.
Construction workers at the Esplanade site Wednesday said demolition on those houses could begin next week.

Kent State knocked down houses at 325 and 329 E. Erie St. in January to make room for tons of dirt removed from the PARTA site that Kent State will use to raise the grade of the Esplanade. Houses at 214 and 220 S. Willow St. were razed shortly after.

Kent State moved one Erie Street house from the path of the Esplanade, the home of the school's first female faculty member, May Prentice, in February. The house, for which KSU has not announced plans, sits at 212 S. Willow St.

The university also has allocated $40,000 to the Friends of the Kent Wells Sherman house to move another historic house from the path of the Esplanade to a temporary spot on East College Avenue.

Workers will move the house, once home to Frances Kent Wells, daughter of town founder Zenas Kent, Saturday morning.

Kent State has spent more than $7 million on properties surrounding the Esplanade extension area. Kent State officials have said it would be in the best interest of the school to continue buying properties adjacent to and surrounding the walkway in order to protect its investment in the area.

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News Headline: Haymaker Parkway to Close Saturday for House Move | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Wells-Sherman House will travel on flat-bed truck several hundred feet southwest on S.R. 59

Drivers will want to avoid Haymaker Parkway downtown Saturday morning, as the road will be closed for about two hours for the relocation of a two-story house.

Kent Police Capt. Paul Canfield said police will close the five-lane roadway between South DePeyster and South Willow streets for the relocation of the Kent Wells-Sherman House.

Canfield said the road will be closed between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m.

The house will be trucked several hundred feet southwest from its current location at the end of East Erie Street to a temporary spot at the western end of East College Avenue.

Friends and family of Kent State University students attending summer commencement ceremonies Saturday, which start at 9:30 a.m., can use East Main and Summit streets to avoid the road closure.

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News Headline: PHOTOS: House Demolished for Esplanade | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: City brings down first house Wednesday, second demolition expected today

Demolition is under way on the houses that must be removed to make way for Kent State University's Esplanade extension into downtown Kent.

The city, which is handling construction management of the project, demolished the first of eight houses Wednesday that will be immediately razed for the pedestrian pathway.

Scroll down for recent stories on the Esplanade project:

Esplanade Construction to Start Monday
Kent State Buys House for Esplanade Expansion
2 More Houses Sold for Esplanade at Kent State
Two More Kent Houses Bite The Dust
Kent State to Spend $1.42 Million on 3 More Esplanade Properties
State Approves $1.57 Million in Esplanade Land Buys for Kent State
Kent State Spending $2.2 Million to Buy 7 More Properties for Esplanade

Please click on link to view photos:
http://kent.patch.com/articles/photos-house-demolished-for-esplanade#photo-10952573

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