Report Overview:
Total Clips (30)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Athletics (1)
American Association University Professors (AAUP) (1)
Athletics (1)
Financial Aid (1)
Housing in Kent (1)
Justice Studies; Safety (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Trumbull (3)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Safety; Students (2)
Small Business Development (1)
Students (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (6)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Cassie Schumacher's 3000 Mile Race Across America 08/12/2012 Briefingwire.com Text Attachment Email

...help them heal from the effects of war." Prior to forming Wheels4Change.org, Schumacher received her Master's Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from Kent State University. Her biography is available online at www.Wheels4Change.org. The March 10 fundraising event will be held at the First Congregational...


Alumni; Athletics (1)
Washington Redskins wide receiver Samuel Kirkland motivated to work hard 08/11/2012 Washington Post - Online Text Attachment Email

...underdog. With a stable of veterans ahead of him on the depth chart, he was being quite precise. But, that doesn't faze Kirkland. The rookie out of Kent State said it's been that way his whole life. “You have to come out here every day with a chip on your shoulder and ready to work,” Kirkland...


American Association University Professors (AAUP) (1)
The Week: Aug. 6-12, 2012 08/13/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

What they bargained for Kent State University trustees signed off on a three-year collective bargaining agreement for full-time, tenure-track faculty. University faculty...


Athletics (1)
Kent State's Natalie Goodson captures Cleveland Women's Golf Association's district title 08/13/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


Financial Aid (1)
Changes in federal laws affect Pell grant recipients' college funding (Strickland) 08/13/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Housing in Kent (1)
Rezoning for student housing heading to Franklin Twp. trustees 08/13/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...complex at their Tuesday meeting. The board will consider a rezoning request for 20.59 acres on the corner of Cline Road and Summit Road across from Kent State University's Dix Stadium at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Franklin Township Hall, at 218 Gougler Ave. in Kent. Campus Crest Communities, a North...


Justice Studies; Safety (1)
Retired Kent State assistant police chief facing gun, drug charges (Mansfield) 08/10/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

A retired assistant chief of police at Kent State University has been indicted by a Portage County grand jury on felony drug and weapons charges resulting from a traffic stop by the Ohio...


KSU at Stark (2)
Audition list for Aug. 10 and beyond 08/10/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's Stark Campus. Fine Arts Building's Theater, off Frank Ave., Canton. Sam Shepard's "Buried Child." Roles available for five...

Sheaffer-Polen to lead Corporate University at KSU Stark 08/10/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark has appointed Faith Sheaffer-Polen as the new director of The Corporate University. Sheaffer-Polen, formerly a senior...


KSU at Trumbull (3)
Police at Two-Day Training Seminar 08/10/2012 First News at 5 PM - WKBN-TV Text Email

...safe. Today the officers learned techniques for street survival. Tomorrow the seminar will focus on courthouse tactics. The seminar is taking place at the Kent State Trumbull Campus. Officials say the seminar is designed to show officers how to avoid mistakes when dealing with criminals so that they...

Police at Two-Day Seminar 08/10/2012 33 News at 5:30 PM - WYTV-TV Text Email

Police across Trumbull County today began a two-day seminar on keeping themselves safe. It's taking place at the Kent State Trumbull campus. Today they techniques for street survival. Tomorrow it's courthouse tactics. The seminar is designed to show police how...

Trumbull Law Enforcement Gets Safety Refresher 08/10/2012 fox30jax.com Text Attachment Email

... On Friday, the officers learned techniques for street survival and Saturday, the seminar will focus on courthouse tactics. The seminar took place at Kent State's Trumbull Campus. Officials said the seminar is designed to show officers mistakes to avoid when they are dealing with criminals so...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Area entertainment events beginning August 10 08/10/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Tony Butala. Tickets, $30, may be ordered at 330-339-1132. In case of inclement weather, the concert will move to the nearby Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus.


KSU Museum (1)
'Fashion Timeline' at KSU Museum takes visitors on trip through history (Hume) 08/10/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Museum's newest exhibit, "Fashion Timeline," showcases the museum's world-class collection of historic fashions. The exhibit...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
Going Places: Aug. 6-10, 2012 08/12/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Tomas A. Lipinski to director, School of Library and Information Science.

ONE FOR THE BOOKS (Wicks) 08/13/2012 Cleveland Business Connects Text Attachment Email


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Ohio (Aug. 10) 08/10/2012 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

[Kent State University Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., Aug. 10 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, has been assigned a patent (8,237,910)...


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Keeping it in the family (Cooper) 08/13/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...uncomfortable communication, said Chris Cooper, program coordinator of the Business Succession Planning Program of the Ohio Employee Ownership Center at Kent State University. The program's goal is to help businesses transition from one generation of ownership to the next by providing education, training,...


Safety; Students (2)
Freeman of the Press: Instructor absorbs punishment to help women stay safe 08/12/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...-- A man must truly love his work to take more than 100 hits to the groin in order to help women remain safe. Instructor Lt. Chad Cunningham of the University of Akron Police Department, who has taught self-defense for 10 years, was still smiling at the end of one of his self-defense classes Aug....

Self-defense instructor absorbs punishment to help women stay safe 08/12/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

A man must truly love his work to take more than 100 hits to the groin in order to help women remain safe. Instructor Lt. Chad Cunningham of the University of Akron Police Department, who has taught self-defense for 10 years, was still smiling at the end of one of his self-defense classes Aug....


Small Business Development (1)
New business start-up class set 08/12/2012 Coshocton Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...Chamber of Commerce will host a new business start-up class from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Coshocton Progress Center. Jeannie Keenan, from the Kent State Small Business Development Center, will be the instructor. Topics will be the chance of success of opening a new business, business planning...


Students (1)
Dog goes from bad boy to canine hero 08/13/2012 Red Bluff Daily News - Online Text Attachment Email

...enjoys being around people and playing with other dogs. When we tell people about Dizzy's history, most people simply don't believe it." A student at Kent State University in pre-veterinary medicine, Yost founded Bird Nerd Rescue/Sanctuary seven years ago in her home. The business is dedicated to...


Theatre and Dance (1)
REVIEW: 'The Sound of Music' ever wonderful @ Porthouse Theatre 08/13/2012 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (6)
CONSTRUCTION OF ESPLANADE TO BEGIN IN DOWNTOWN KENT (Bruder) 08/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Kent State University and city officials have talked about connecting downtown to the campus for at least 20 years. That dream is finally being...

Haymaker Parkway to close today for house move 08/13/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent landmark rolls to temporary new home 08/12/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Revival home was built in the 1850s for the family of Frances Kent Wells, sister of the city of Kent's namesake, Marvin Kent. The house was purchased by Kent State University, along with the rest of the homes on the stretch of East Erie Street between Haymaker Parkway and Willow Street, so the school...

Kent City Issues Demolition Permits to KSU 08/13/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Temporary Move of Wells-Sherman House Complete 08/13/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Wells-Sherman House Moved to Stave Off Demolition 08/12/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...East College Avenue. The 1858 house has ties to the Kent family and other early prominent citizens. It can be stored on the lot, which is owned by Kent State University, through Dec. 1. If a permanent spot for the house can't be found by then, it will be demolished. That's why Roger Thurman,...


University Press (1)
Guilty By Popular Demand Veteran reporter revisits case derailed by false truths 08/12/2012 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...Guilty By Popular Demand is more than a good story. It's good journalism, well-told. * Guilty By Popular Demand: A True Story of Small-Town Injustice (Kent State University, 192 pages, $24.95) by Bill Osinski Copyright © 2012 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH and may not be republished without permission.


News Headline: Cassie Schumacher's 3000 Mile Race Across America | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Briefingwire.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Wheels4Change Founder to Bicycle an Average of 300 Miles a Day. Race Across America to Hold Spaghetti Dinner and Silent Auction to Benefit Warriors Journey Home

BriefingWire.com, 8/12/2012 - Cassie Schumacher is doing something most people can't even image in an effort to raise awareness for Warriors Journey Home Ministry. She is riding a bicycle solo for 3,000 miles in the Race Across America and is dedicating her ride to a charitable veteran's organization that helps veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other veterans' issues.

he 3,000 mile race is 30% longer than the Tour De France and solo racers such as Cassie, take no rest days. It's an average of 300 miles per day.

Funds raised from the spaghetti dinner, auction and raffle will be used for the Warriors' Journey Home Ministry and to fund Schumacher's Race Across America.

"By riding my bicycle across the United States this June, I wanted to bring attention to the organizations who are helping veterans," explained Schumacher, who founded Wheels4Change.org. "As a child of a Vietnam veteran, I know how the effects of war on the members of a family. The after-effects of the Viet Nam war have severely altered my life and the lives of those significant others who are so very important to me and I feel that it is my responsibility as someone who has benefited from the sacrifices made by our soldiers to welcome them home and help them heal from the effects of war."

Prior to forming Wheels4Change.org, Schumacher received her Master's Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from Kent State University. Her biography is available online at www.Wheels4Change.org.

The March 10 fundraising event will be held at the First Congregational Church at 85 Heritage Drive in Tallmadge, Ohio. The silent auction will be held from 4:30 to 6:30 pm and the spaghetti dinner has two seatings on March 10, one at 5 pm and the other at 6pm. Raffle prizes include a 32 inch LG Flat Panel LCD TV and monitor. Gold Star parents Denis and Shelia Nowacki, whose son Andy was killed by a road side bomb in 2005 while on active duty in the Middle East, will offer words of hope and recovery as the evening's keynote speakers. Music will be provided by the Stewart Freeman Jazz Band.

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News Headline: Washington Redskins wide receiver Samuel Kirkland motivated to work hard | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Washington Post - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An undrafted wide receiver, Samuel Kirkland labeled himself an underdog. With a stable of veterans ahead of him on the depth chart, he was being quite precise.

But, that doesn't faze Kirkland. The rookie out of Kent State said it's been that way his whole life.

“You have to come out here every day with a chip on your shoulder and ready to work,” Kirkland said. “You can't have too many off days, you have to find some source of motivation, something to get you going every day.”

The source of that mind-set was roughly 6,000 miles away on Saturday afternoon. The son of a Naval officer, Kirkland said it was his parents who instilled in him a strong work ethic and sense of discipline.

His father, Samuel, is stationed in Japan, but Kirkland said his parents will be able to attend his last two preseason games.

“That'll be cool,” Kirkland said.

Born in St. Petersburg, Fla., Kirkland moved throughout his life between Florida and Chesapeake, Va. He said the movement wasn't too bad as his father did a good job of making sure he and his younger sister, Shaterra, were able to stay in the same school.

“I learned that anything I need or want in life can only come through hard work,” Kirkland said.

In his senior season at Kent State, Kirkland served as a team captain and finished sixth in the program's history with 113 career catches. He wasn't invited to the NFL combine, but was able to impress at his pro day with a 4.47 time in the 40-yard dash.

After Saturday's practice, Kirkland was one of the last players to retreat to the locker room as he signed autographs and posed for pictures with fans.

“I knew how it was when I was young, looking up to guys like myself now,” he said. “You can take two or three minutes out of your day and make an impact on somebody's life like that.”

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News Headline: The Week: Aug. 6-12, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: What they bargained for

Kent State University trustees signed off on a three-year collective bargaining agreement for full-time, tenure-track faculty. University faculty will receive across-the-board 2% salary increases, which will be applied retroactively to the start of the 2011-2012 academic year. Faculty members also are guaranteed 2% pay hikes for each of the following two academic years.

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News Headline: Kent State's Natalie Goodson captures Cleveland Women's Golf Association's district title | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AVON, Ohio -- After 35 holes, two weather-related suspensions, four days of fighting off challengers and one great big scare, vindication for Natalie Goodson was 10 feet away.

Not wanting a repeat of last year's loss in the finals, Goodson rolled in her putt on the 18th hole at Avon Oaks Country Club to win the Cleveland Women's Golf Association's district championship with a 1-up victory over Laurel Friesen on Friday.

"The last putt was nerve-wracking," said Goodson, a sophomore at Kent State and a member of the women's team. "It was straight in but I had left it in a good spot."

Goodson and Friesen, a senior chemistry major at Northwestern who limits most of her golf to recreational rounds, put one another through a day-long ringer during the 36-hole final the endured two downpours. In the morning round, Friesen made back-to-back birdies to go 2-up. Goodson, the daughter of Lake Forest pro John Goodson, won three holes in a row to go 1-up and increased her lead by winning the 16th.

Friesen refused to buckle. She birdied the 17th hole and pulled even with a par on the second hole in the afternoon. Goodson, from Hudson, birdied the par-3 12th from about four feet to regain the lead.

That's how things remained but not without some late drama. Both made terrific par saves on the 365-yard 16th hole, escaping sand trap trouble and they halved the penultimate hole with routine pars.

Both hit the final fairway off the tee but Goodson's second shot came to rest about six inches above the bunker that guards the left-front portion of the green. She had a terrible stance and hit what appeared to be a great recovery shot, only to have her ball check up about 10 feet below the hole.

"I thought it would release a little more but it didn't," said Goodson. "I thought I had hit a good shot but it just stopped."

Needing to win the hole to extend the match, Friesen's second shot was short of the green and her chip went 15 feet past. She missed the putt, settled for par and watched as Goodson ended the match.

"It was an honor and a privilege this week and I had so much fun," said Friesen, who defeated 11-time champion Mary Ann Bierman in Thursday's semifinals and opened with a win over CWGA veteran Lynn Gross, both by scores of 1-up.

"I love competition but I don't play too much because college takes up most of my time. I play for pleasure and I was happy to come home and be able to play so well this week."

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News Headline: Changes in federal laws affect Pell grant recipients' college funding (Strickland) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Natasha Ervin is oh-so-close to getting her bachelor's degree in social work.

But changes in financial aid mean she no longer qualifies for the free Pell grant. Without it, she doesn't have a way to pay for her final semester this fall at the University of Akron.

“I'm surprised and heartbroken,” she said. “This roadblock is hitting me right at the end of my education.”

Ervin, 31, is among thousands of students nationwide for whom changes in federal financial aid bode disaster. The revised rules that rolled out in July tighten eligibility in many ways.

For instance, students now must have high school diplomas or the equivalent to get aid. Recipients of new subsidized — or discounted — Stafford loans must pay interest during the six-month “grace period” after they leave school. And graduate and professional students are no longer eligible for subsidized Stafford loans.

But it might be the change to the Pell grant that has the most immediate impact, especially on students close to graduation.

Perhaps more than 100,000 students across the country were left without funding when the federal government reduced the eligibility for Pell grants from 18 to 12 semesters, according to the nonprofit Project on Student Debt.

While the maximum amount of the need-based grant — $5,550 — didn't change, the lifetime limit affects all students, even those just a semester away from graduating.

Black students affected

The change hits African-American students especially hard, as they often take more than the new lifetime limit of six years to graduate, the Project on Student Debt said. While African-Americans made up 24 percent of those receiving Pell grants in 2007-08, they made up more than 41 percent of those who received it for more than six years.

Also, 40 percent of all Pell recipients must take developmental — or remedial — courses to ramp up to college-level work, according to the student debt project. These courses don't count toward the students' degrees, yet eat up some of their Pell grant eligibility.

At Kent State, 246 students have exhausted their Pell eligibility and another 532 will get a reduced amount because they're close to their limit, said Anissa Strickland, associate director of student financial aid.

“When they lose their Pell grant, they don't have other resources to fall back on,” she said. “Some students told us they won't be able to return.”

At Ohio State, 117 students no longer are eligible for Pell grants and another 344 are close to losing their eligibility, said Diane Stemper, executive director of financial aid.

“It does not leave students with a lot of good options other than loans,” she said.

At UA, 148 students have reached their Pell limit, including 119 seniors. Another 176 students, including 113 seniors, have less than a year left of Pell funding, said Cora Moretta, senior associate director of financial aid.

She said these students are only the most recent to be affected by tightened Pell grant eligibility in recent years.

Formerly, students were able to get Pell grants for any number of semesters until they graduated. In 2007, the number of semesters was reduced to 18.

Pell popular at UA

Along the way, the number of students receiving the aid has exploded.

At UA, for example, about 7,000 students claimed almost $17 million in Pell grants in 2006.

Four years later, almost 10,000 students received more than $34 million in Pell grants, according to the Project on Student Debt.

With less than two weeks to go until the start of the fall semester, UA senior Ervin is among those scrambling for a solution.

She already has tapped her lifetime limit of $57,500 in federal loans. She took out a $3,000 private loan this summer for college and does not want to ask her mother to co-sign for another loan for fall.

She said she hasn't been able to find a full-time job.

“Where I'm applying, there are 100 other people applying,” she said in frustration.

She acknowledges she could have been speedier getting her bachelor's degree.

“I have to take responsibility for myself, but life does take its toll,” she said. She got pregnant shortly after beginning college at Stark State.

Still, she has bigger goals: earning a master's degree and launching her own business. If she can find a way to pay for this last semester, that is.

“Honestly, I don't know what I'm going to do,” she said. “This is leaving a ton of students in a pickle.”

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News Headline: Rezoning for student housing heading to Franklin Twp. trustees | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Franklin Township's trustees could decide the fate of a proposed 584-bed student apartment complex at their Tuesday meeting.

The board will consider a rezoning request for 20.59 acres on the corner of Cline Road and Summit Road across from Kent State University's Dix Stadium at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Franklin Township Hall, at 218 Gougler Ave. in Kent.

Campus Crest Communities, a North Carolina-based developer, is requesting the land be rezoned from low-density residential to multi-family residential to allow for its planned apartment complex.

The trustees will review rulings by the Portage County Regional Planning Commission, which recommended the zoning change, and the township's zoning commission, which recommended against the change.

Zoning commission members said they worried developers may be planning too much student housing for Kent and Franklin Township, which could result in abandoned or blighted properties. With more than 1,700 new beds of student housing opening in the city this fall, Kent City Manager Dave Ruller expressed similar concerns and proposed conducting a study of the area's student housing needs with KSU.

While Portage County's planning board backed the zoning change, Planning Commission director Todd Peetz said Franklin Township's trustess might want to wait for Kent and KSU to conduct that study before approving the zoning change.

Public comment from Franklin Township residents so far on the potential development has been almost completely negative. Residents have cited traffic and safety concerns for opposing the project.

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News Headline: Retired Kent State assistant police chief facing gun, drug charges (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A retired assistant chief of police at Kent State University has been indicted by a Portage County grand jury on felony drug and weapons charges resulting from a traffic stop by the Ohio Highway Patrol on Christmas Day 2011.

Daniel P. FitzPatrick, 57, of 9428 Griffith Road, Paris, was indicted July 2 on one count each of carrying a concealed weapon, a fourth-degree felony, improper handling of a firearm in a motor vehicle and possession of drugs, both fifth-degree felonies, and two counts of operating a vehicle while intoxicated, both first-degree misdemeanors.

FitzPatrick retired as an assistant police chief for the Kent State University Police Department in 2008, according to a university spokesman, and as recently as this spring was an adjunct justice studies professor.

According to FitzPatrick's indictment and court records, on Dec. 25, 2011, an Ohio Highway Patrol trooper conducted a traffic stop on FitzPatrick.

The trooper found a loaded Glock 9mm handgun and a substance that tested positive for pentedrone, a controlled substance found in the illegal synthetic hallucinogens commonly known as bath salts.

FitzPatrick was not arrested at the time of the stop, but evidence was presented to a grand jury after laboratory testing on the suspected bath salts was completed. Pentedrone is a psychoactive substance found in the drugs, which were banned by Ohio law in 2011.

Bath salts are known to cause aggressive, paranoid or suicidal tendencies in users. A urine test also detected marijuana in FitzPatrick's system, according to his indictment.

FitzPatrick was booked Tuesday at the Portage County jail and arraigned Wednesday in Portage County Common Pleas Court.

He pleaded not guilty, and Judge John Enlow released him on a personal recognizance bond pending trial on Nov. 28, according to court records. FitzPatrick has no prior criminal record in Portage County.

Portage County Prosecutor Victor Vigluicci confirmed the secret indictment in FitzPatrick's case, but had no further comment.

While with Kent State police, FitzPatrick also served as an administrator for the multi-agency Western Portage Drug Task Force, the precursor to the current Portage County Drug Task Force. The KSU Police Department was a member agency.

Kent State spokesman Eric Mansfield said that following his retirement, FitzPatrick was re-hired as a consultant on safety issues for Kent State's regional campus system, a position he held from 2008 to 2011.

Most recently, he taught a justice studies class at KSU during the spring semester 2012. Mansfield said he did not know when FitzPatrick was initially hired at Kent State.

Follow Dave O'Brien on Twitter at @RCCrimeWatch

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1128 or dobrien@recordpub.com

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News Headline: Audition list for Aug. 10 and beyond | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Stark Campus. Fine Arts Building's Theater, off Frank Ave., Canton. Sam Shepard's "Buried Child." Roles available for five men and two women. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4 and Wednesday, Sept. 5. Come prepared to read from script. Performances: Nov. 2-11. Details: call theater director Brian Newberg at 330-244-3352 or email bnewberg@kent.edu. Also seeking backstage crew. Call theater specialist Louis Williams at 330-244-3375. Additional information, go to stark.kent.edu/theatre.

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News Headline: Sheaffer-Polen to lead Corporate University at KSU Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark has appointed Faith Sheaffer-Polen as the new director of The Corporate University.

Sheaffer-Polen, formerly a senior consultant for the talent-coaching firm, Career Curve, will manage operations at The Corporate University, which works with organizations in Stark and surrounding counties to provide training, consulting and interventions that align with each company's unique strategies. She will also oversee the Small Business Development Center.

"I look forward to educating companies and individuals on the strategies that will help them attract and retain talent, compete in this globalized economy and adjust to a constantly changing market," she said.

Kent State University at Stark has appointed Faith Sheaffer-Polen as the new director of The Corporate University.

Sheaffer-Polen, formerly a senior consultant for the talent-coaching firm, Career Curve, will manage operations at The Corporate University, which works with organizations in Stark and surrounding counties to provide training, consulting and interventions that align with each company's unique strategies. She will also oversee the Small Business Development Center.

"I look forward to educating companies and individuals on the strategies that will help them attract and retain talent, compete in this globalized economy and adjust to a constantly changing market," she said.

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News Headline: Police at Two-Day Training Seminar | Email

News Date: 08/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: First News at 5 PM - WKBN-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Trumbull County Sheriff Deputies, as well as law enforcement officials across Trumbull County, are taking part in a training seminar today and tomorrow to help keep them safe. Today the officers learned techniques for street survival. Tomorrow the seminar will focus on courthouse tactics. The seminar is taking place at the Kent State Trumbull Campus. Officials say the seminar is designed to show officers how to avoid mistakes when dealing with criminals so that they don't get injured. The deputies also gave a 5-hundred dollar scholarship to Bobby Creatore, whose finishing up at the police academy. Creatore says he's very thankful and is excited to begin working.

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News Headline: Police at Two-Day Seminar | Email

News Date: 08/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: 33 News at 5:30 PM - WYTV-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Police across Trumbull County today began a two-day seminar on keeping themselves safe. It's taking place at the Kent State Trumbull campus. Today they techniques for street survival. Tomorrow it's courthouse tactics. The seminar is designed to show police how to avoid mistakes when dealing with criminals. The deputies also gave a 5-hundred dollar scholarship to Bobby Creatore, who is finishing up at the police academy.

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News Headline: Trumbull Law Enforcement Gets Safety Refresher | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: fox30jax.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Trumbull Law Enforcement Gets Safety Refresher

Law enforcement officials from across Trumbull County are taking part in a training seminar Friday and Saturday to help keep them safe.

On Friday, the officers learned techniques for street survival and Saturday, the seminar will focus on courthouse tactics. The seminar took place at Kent State's Trumbull Campus.

Officials said the seminar is designed to show officers mistakes to avoid when they are dealing with criminals so that they don't get injured.

"It's a great training tool. It is bringing awarenes to what's going on in modern day law enforcement and how to be safe on the street," said Trumbull County Sheriff's Lt. Pete Lucic. "In the blink of an eye, things can change so we always have to be in an alert state. Most people in their daily lives walk around and are totally oblivious to what is going on around them. We call them the sheep, we are the sheep dog, we have to be alert and ready at all times."

The deputies also gave a $500 scholarship to Bobby Creatore, who is finishing up at the police academy.

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News Headline: Area entertainment events beginning August 10 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Aug. 30 NIGHT OF ROMANCE

Popular vocal trio The Lettermen, whose many hits include "Goin' Out of My Head/Can't Take My Eyes Off You," "Hurt So Bad" and "Put Your Head On My Shoulder," will appear in concert at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 30 at Schoenbrunn Amphitheatre in New Philadelphia, home of "Trumpet in the Land." The group includes founding member Tony Butala. Tickets, $30, may be ordered at 330-339-1132. In case of inclement weather, the concert will move to the nearby Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus.

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News Headline: 'Fashion Timeline' at KSU Museum takes visitors on trip through history (Hume) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Museum's newest exhibit, "Fashion Timeline," showcases the museum's world-class collection of historic fashions.

The exhibit is currently available for viewing in the Palmer and Mull Galleries and will remain on display until June 2013.

The first gallery spans the late-18th and early-19th centuries. This was a period of revolutionary change that can clearly be seen reflected in the fashions.

The American and French Revolutions radically changed the political landscapes while the industrial revolution transformed how goods, particularly clothing and textiles, were made.

The luxury and rococo excesses of the 18th century gave way to the romanticism and neoclassicism of the early 19th century.

"Encompassing two centuries of fashion history, this exhibition is designed to show the evolution of styles and silhouettes while contextualizing the pieces with relevant political, technological and cultural developments," said Sarah Hume, curator of the exhibit and for the museum.

The next room includes the second half of the 19th century to the dawn of World War I. Synthetic dyes opened up a world of color, and the sewing machine facilitated the application of yards of ruffles, pleats and fringe. The upholstered, heavy styles of the Victorian era eventually gave way to Edwardian froth and lace. The final room finishes the timeline with fashions of the early 20th century. While that time period may have been a period of world wars and depression, fashions also reflected the heydays of jazz and swing, the boldness of Art Deco, and the endless possibilities of technology from plastics to rockets.

In addition to the garments on view in the Palmer and Mull Galleries, an array of accessories, particularly shoes and hats, line the hallways. The silhouettes are the most obvious changes that can be seen, but there are also changes in textiles and colors.

The display is intended to be a permanent feature at the museum, but the individual pieces will be rotated frequently so there is always something new to see.

Kent State University Museum is located at 515 Hilltop Drive (corner of East Main and South Lincoln streets) in Kent. The museum is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.

Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays; 10 a.m. to 8:45 p.m. on Thursdays; and noon to 4:45 p.m. on Sundays.

General admission is $5. Tickets for senior citizens (55+ years old) are $4. Tickets for students and children (7-18 years old) are $3. Children younger than 7 years old are free. Admission to the museum is free on Sunday.

For more information about the Kent State University Museum, visit

www.kent.edu/museum. >

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News Headline: Going Places: Aug. 6-10, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Tomas A. Lipinski to director, School of Library and Information Science.

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News Headline: ONE FOR THE BOOKS (Wicks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Business Connects
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's School of Library and Information Science prepares students to organize data and even create websites for schools, corporations, and government

If you still think of a librarian as a bespectacled woman who incessantly “shushes” chatty patrons as she shelves Shakespeare and Shelley, boy, is your perception outdated. Today's librarians are just as likely to be creating sophisticated digital databases for businesses, such as Domino's Pizza, than to be dabbling in the Dewey Decimal System at a downtown library.

Schools, such as Kent State University's School of Library and Information Science, are making sure aspiring librarians are prepared for the challenges of this ever-changing profession.

“Information is seen as necessary by a variety of corporations, the government, not-for-profits organizations, and society as a whole,” Don Wicks, the school's interim director, says. “With all the technology available, people have become more aware that there is information out there that they can obtain more easily than in the past, but they also may discover that they need help getting at it or organizing it.”

Among the many organizations that have hired KSU graduates are the Columbus Dispatch, Cleveland Clinic, OverDrive, LexisNexis, and NASA Glenn.

“Organizations need people to get their information under control in some fashion,” Wicks says. “Often, when they add print or digital resources for their (employees) to work with, things start getting out of hand and they say, ‘Oh, my, we need to structure this.' They may call upon us to help them, or they'll hire a student part-time and it may grow into something larger.”

Some companies, he says, need help with research and development of their product or market base. Librarians well versed in technological fact-seeking realize how and where to find pertinent information.
“We're training (students) in traditional skills, such as how the literature is structured—no matter what format (that literature) is in,” Wicks says.

Library science students also learn interviewing skills designed to pinpoint an employer's needs so, ultimately, the librarian can deliver relevant information in the appropriate format. Aspiring librarians are taught how to market their libraries within a company or organization, design effective websites, convert physical archives into digital archives, and other high-tech pursuits.

“We require all students to take a course in information technology for information professionals,” Wicks says. “Even traditional jobs in the (library) field have become more technological.”

Although many of KSU's graduates find employment in academic or public libraries, a growing number will work as special librarians. These professionals work to attain information necessary to meet the specific goals of their organizations. According to the 31st edition of the Directory of Special Libraries and Information Centers, there are approximately 34,750 special libraries around the world. The American Library Association estimates there are 122,105 libraries in the United States. This number represents traditional and special libraries.

As the only school in Ohio accredited by the American Library Association, KSU's library school opened its doors in 1946 as part of the College of Education, offering undergraduate classes. Graduate classes were added three years later. The accredited master's degree program — graduate degrees are now the industry standard — began in 1963. In the last decade, the school has seen a trend toward younger students enrolling in the program directly after completing their undergraduate degree.

“It used to be that the majority of students were people seeking a second career,” Wicks says. “They might have been teachers who liked teaching but were tired of the social work aspect of teaching and thought being a librarian would allow them to exercise their desire to teach without managing a classroom. A lot of people did that or came from other fields.”

Of the current crop of 600 students, approximately two-thirds are women and two-thirds attend part-time. The program requires students to complete 36 credit hours, including a culminating experience, such as a practicum or research paper. Full-time students generally finish in one or two years while part-timers may stretch it to four or six years.

In addition to the Master of Library and Information Science program, KSU offers a Master of Science in information architecture and knowledge management. This covers knowledge management, user experience design (formerly known as information architecture), and health infomatics. Graduates can expect to find employment with titles such as knowledge manager, chief information officer, health information officer, or user-experience design technician.

For more information: kent.edu/slis and slisinform@kent.edu This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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News Headline: U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Ohio (Aug. 10) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: [Kent State University Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., Aug. 10 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, has been assigned a patent (8,237,910) developed by Enkh-Amgalan Dorjgotov, Kent, Ohio, Philip J. Bos, Hudson, Ohio, and Achintya K. Bhowmik, Milpitas, Calif., for a "polarization independent liquid crystal-based etalon and devices using same." The abstract of the patent published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office states: "A liquid crystal etalon includes a chiral nematic material contained in a liquid crystal cell having alignment surfaces configured to bias the chiral nematic material toward a twisted liquid crystal configuration with a twist less than 360.degree.. Electrodes are arranged to apply an operative electrical bias to the liquid crystal cell. Mirrors disposed about the chiral nematic material define a resonant optical cavity. At a first electrical bias the etalon is transmissive for light of a first wavelength via a selected liquid crystal twist angle and cavity thickness at which different non-equal eigenmodes reach resonance conditions simultaneously. In a projector embodiment, a projection system with a field sequential image projection light source is coupled with the liquid crystal etalon, the etalon electrodes are patterned into pixels defining a display area, and the projector is operated in a field sequential illumination mode." The patent application was filed on April 30, 2008 (12/112,219). The full-text of the patent can be found at http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=8,237,910&OS=8,237,910&RS=8,237,910 Written by Satyaban Rath; edited by Hemanta Panigrahi.

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News Headline: Keeping it in the family (Cooper) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some area companies make no bones about hiring those most familiar, though experts warn against pitfalls of treating insiders, outsiders differently

Family is the driving force and the corporate backbone at Javitch, Block & Rathbone.

And it's not just the families of co-managing partners Joel Rathbone and Bruce Block, who lead the Cleveland-based law firm specializing in collection and insurance subrogation. The emphasis extends to every employee, at every level.

“We embrace family, and we hire family before we will hire others,” said Mr. Rathbone, whose daughter, wife and son-in-law work at the firm. Mr. Rathbone's daughter and Mr. Block's son both are partners and have been designated in a succession plan to take over the firm.

“We ask all employees for recommendations and family members, and we pay them for referrals,” said Mr. Rathbone, who estimates 35% to 40% of his firm's 400 employees have a relative working in the business. “By embracing family and having family as part of business, it's no longer about outsider versus insider.”

That doesn't mean that bringing nonfamily members into the management ranks of a small, privately held family business isn't a delicate balancing act.

“The first one is the hardest,” said Mr. Rathbone, adding that his firm's first outside management hire was its human resources director about eight years ago. He now is the firm's chief operating officer.

“There is no question that the role of the person coming in has to be clear for them and for every family member, especially if you're in a growth mode and creating this position, possibly for the first time,” Mr. Rathbone said. “Nine times out of 10, you're outgrowing the family.”

Chris Snider, founder and president of Aspire Management Inc., a Strongsville business consulting firm that specializes in exit planning, leadership transitions and mergers and acquisitions, said his first recommendation to a small business — family run or not — is to do an assessment of the company, including a business valuation, before making any high-level hires.

“You have to know what you have and you have to know what you need. And you also want to take the emotion out of the decision,” said Mr. Snider, who also is the founder and president of the Northeast Ohio chapter of the Exit Planning Institute. “The main thing is the family business needs to operate like any other business. Family members need to understand the business is there to make money and build and preserve the family's wealth, not to provide family jobs or make everyone happy.”

For that to happen, everyone needs to have clear roles, responsibilities, goals and accountabilities. Problems arise when there are different standards established for outsiders versus family members, he said.

“We can't have the son or daughter of the father, for example, going over the COO's head to see dad because he doesn't like what the COO had to say or has him or her doing,” he said.

The only way to curb and defuse these human tendencies is through serial frank, open and possibly uncomfortable communication, said Chris Cooper, program coordinator of the Business Succession Planning Program of the Ohio Employee Ownership Center at Kent State University. The program's goal is to help businesses transition from one generation of ownership to the next by providing education, training, technical assistance and consulting services.

“The key prior to bringing the outside person in is communicating to the family members in an honest and open way. Sometimes bringing in outside experts to offer nonbiased opinions can help family members adjust to this idea of bringing someone new into the business,” he said.

From there, family members in leadership roles should do their best to be inclusive and engage the nonfamily member in the decision-making process, Mr. Cooper said.

Many times an outsider coming into a family-owned business is going to wonder about advancement opportunities and whether they fit into the long-term plans of the business, Mr. Cooper said.

“A lot of times the ownership of the business will stay in the family but the management of the business will transition outside of the family,” he said.

Enter Wallover Oil Co. in Strongs-ville, one of the oldest manufacturers of lubricants in the country.

Since its founding in 1863 there had always been a member of the Wallover family at the helm. But in January 2011, Eric Kielts, a longtime member of management, was tapped to succeed George “Hub” Marquis as president.

“We always look for the right people for the right job. If it meant a nonfamily member, fine. If it meant a family member, fine,” Mr. Marquis said. “Eric joined us a little over 20 years ago as head of our laboratory. He has done a great job and he was the best candidate to take over. I have a son in the business and a nephew in the business and none of us felt they were ready to take over the running of the company. Eric was the most qualified person, and the family is firmly behind him.”

Mr. Kielts said communication and time have been the keys to his smooth transition into a position he never expected to hold in this family company.

“Certainly there is some trepidation not knowing what the family is going to expect, and I think Hub did a fantastic job of keeping me in the loop as to what the family was talking about and thinking about and that made me feel a lot more comfortable with the transition,” Mr. Kielts said.

“It has been made perfectly clear (with the staff and family members) that Eric is in charge and he makes the decisions,” Mr. Marquis said.

For Mr. Kielts, he said in many respects it's easier to be an outsider running a family business.

“At the end of the day, I don't have to be sitting across the Thanksgiving table and having a difficult conversation,” Mr. Kielts said. “I can be the sort of bad guy and not bring it into the family. It's a bit of advantage for them and for me.”

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News Headline: Freeman of the Press: Instructor absorbs punishment to help women stay safe | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hudson -- A man must truly love his work to take more than 100 hits to the groin in order to help women remain safe.

Instructor Lt. Chad Cunningham of the University of Akron Police Department, who has taught self-defense for 10 years, was still smiling at the end of one of his self-defense classes Aug. 1 at Barlow Community Center in Hudson and delivered on his promise to have fun.

The 53 women who attended the self-defense class enjoyed kicking butt as they practiced different moves on Cunningham and each other.

Cunningham protected himself with a strategically placed extra thick pad. However, he did wince a time or two as some women were extremely aggressive in their attacks.

But that was the point. Attackers aren't going to wait while you pull up a self-defense app or try to recall what to do. They surprise you. They grab you. They scare you. Your reaction has to be loud, quick and automatic.

Cunningham and Summit County Prosecutor Sherri Bevan Walsh shared different techniques the women can use to frighten away or escape an attacker.

"It's important to be educated," Walsh said. "If you don't think about what to do, you're less prepared."

She stressed that as many crimes happen during the day as do at night.

I needed to hear that. I often go places alone during the day and needed to be reminded not to let my guard down. It was not my first self-defense class, but I had forgotten some of the things I learned before. A refresher course is always helpful.

Moves need to be practiced because they have to be quick and take the attacker by surprise.

If an attacker gets you down on the ground, we learned that by bringing your legs in, you get the leverage to throw off an attacker and get away.

The ground escape was something special for the self-defense class aimed at young women. If a woman is attacked and falls to the ground, she should bring her knees up and use her hands and arms to protect her face. She can push up with her hips and use her legs to knock her attacker off balance, kick him in the groin and run away.

One of the first lines of defense is screaming and making a lot of noise -- yelling "fire" will draw the most attention.

Women practiced saying phrases in a loud and menacing way to frighten off an attacker and to draw attention. The women of Hudson didn't have to practice though. They had the tone and volume right on the first try.

Many of the women at the class were high school and college students -- the target group.

Kelly Cannon, a senior at Kent State University, said she takes many night classes and talks on the phone when she walks across the campus.

Cunningham said that's a common mistake. The person on the phone can't save you from an attack.

Our minds can be on the conversation and not on the surroundings when talking on the phone, Cunningham warned. He said if you have to talk on the phone, keep your head up and look around. Make eye contact with others.

He told the women to practice looking at someone and then turning away and describing them to someone else.

"It's important to be able to describe an attacker," Cunningham said. "Criminals don't like to be identified."

Walsh said 3,000 adults were prosecuted for felony crimes in Summit County last year, crimes that include murder, rape, burglary and drug offenses.

Katie Ptacek, a senior at Kent State University, read about the self-defense class being in the Hudson Hub-Times and thought it was a good idea to attend.

"I've never taken a self defense class before," she said.

"[Danger] is always in the back of your mind walking around campus, but I never felt threatened," she said. "I want to prepare in case that moment ever comes."

Katie's mother, Linda Ptacek, said she wanted her daughter to take a self-defense course and attended the free one at Case Barlow Center with her.

"I don't lose sleep over [being attacked], but never say never," Linda said. "I know to be aware of my surroundings and know what to do."

Women demonstrated some of the moves on Cunningham. Just learning how to shove someone out of the way with a quick push against the hip when facing someone or a push on the upper arm from behind gives someone enough time to get past them.

There were soft techniques aimed at weak points like the wrist and thumb, trachea notch push off, finger twist and pinching the skin on the inside of the thigh or upper arm.

Hard techniques included kicking an attacker on the ankle or shin, kicking the groin or stomping on the instep. Cunningham told the women not to stick around for an extra kick. Run away!

He also demonstrated escaping from a choke hold from the front and back and told them to practice with a partner.

Husbands and boyfriends may have learned some of the lessons the hard way when the women in the class practiced a self-defense move on them.

Hey, you want her to be safe. Be thankful it was only one hit to the groin.

Email: lfreeman@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3150

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News Headline: Self-defense instructor absorbs punishment to help women stay safe | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A man must truly love his work to take more than 100 hits to the groin in order to help women remain safe.

Instructor Lt. Chad Cunningham of the University of Akron Police Department, who has taught self-defense for 10 years, was still smiling at the end of one of his self-defense classes Aug. 1 at Barlow Community Center in Hudson and delivered on his promise to have fun.

The 53 women who attended the self-defense class enjoyed kicking butt as they practiced different moves on Cunningham and each other.

Cunningham protected himself with a strategically placed extra thick pad. However, he did wince a time or two as some women were extremely aggressive in their attacks.

But that was the point. Attackers aren't going to wait while you pull up a self-defense app or try to recall what to do. They surprise you. They grab you. They scare you. Your reaction has to be loud, quick and automatic.

Cunningham and Summit County Prosecutor Sherri Bevan Walsh shared different techniques the women can use to frighten away or escape an attacker.

"It's important to be educated," Walsh said. "If you don't think about what to do, you're less prepared."

She stressed that as many crimes happen during the day as do at night.

I needed to hear that. I often go places alone during the day and needed to be reminded not to let my guard down. It was not my first self-defense class, but I had forgotten some of the things I learned before. A refresher course is always helpful.

Moves need to be practiced because they have to be quick and take the attacker by surprise.

If an attacker gets you down on the ground, we learned that by bringing your legs in, you get the leverage to throw off an attacker and get away.

The ground escape was something special for the self-defense class aimed at young women. If a woman is attacked and falls to the ground, she should bring her knees up and use her hands and arms to protect her face. She can push up with her hips and use her legs to knock her attacker off balance, kick him in the groin and run away.

One of the first lines of defense is screaming and making a lot of noise -- yelling "fire" will draw the most attention.

Women practiced saying phrases in a loud and menacing way to frighten off an attacker and to draw attention. The women of Hudson didn't have to practice though. They had the tone and volume right on the first try.

Many of the women at the class were high school and college students -- the target group.

Kelly Cannon, a senior at Kent State University, said she takes many night classes and talks on the phone when she walks across the campus.

Cunningham said that's a common mistake. The person on the phone can't save you from an attack.

Our minds can be on the conversation and not on the surroundings when talking on the phone, Cunningham warned. He said if you have to talk on the phone, keep your head up and look around. Make eye contact with others.

He told the women to practice looking at someone and then turning away and describing them to someone else.

"It's important to be able to describe an attacker," Cunningham said. "Criminals don't like to be identified."

Walsh said 3,000 adults were prosecuted for felony crimes in Summit County last year, crimes that include murder, rape, burglary and drug offenses.

Katie Ptacek, a senior at Kent State University, read about the self-defense class being in the Hudson Hub-Times and thought it was a good idea to attend.

"I've never taken a self defense class before," she said.

"[Danger] is always in the back of your mind walking around campus, but I never felt threatened," she said. "I want to prepare in case that moment ever comes."

Katie's mother, Linda Ptacek, said she wanted her daughter to take a self-defense course and attended the free one at Case Barlow Center with her.

"I don't lose sleep over [being attacked], but never say never," Linda said. "I know to be aware of my surroundings and know what to do."

Women demonstrated some of the moves on Cunningham. Just learning how to shove someone out of the way with a quick push against the hip when facing someone or a push on the upper arm from behind gives someone enough time to get past them.

There were soft techniques aimed at weak points like the wrist and thumb, trachea notch push off, finger twist and pinching the skin on the inside of the thigh or upper arm.

Hard techniques included kicking an attacker on the ankle or shin, kicking the groin or stomping on the instep. Cunningham told the women not to stick around for an extra kick. Run away!

He also demonstrated escaping from a choke hold from the front and back and told them to practice with a partner.

Husbands and boyfriends may have learned some of the lessons the hard way when the women in the class practiced a self-defense move on them.

Hey, you want her to be safe. Be thankful it was only one shot to the groin.

Email: lfreeman@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3150

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News Headline: New business start-up class set | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Coshocton Tribune - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COSHOCTON -- The Coshocton County Chamber of Commerce will host a new business start-up class from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Coshocton Progress Center.

Jeannie Keenan, from the Kent State Small Business Development Center, will be the instructor. Topics will be the chance of success of opening a new business, business planning and financing.

Cost is $20. Walk-ins are welcome or reserve by calling the chamber at 740-622-5411 or the development center at 330-308-7434.

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News Headline: Dog goes from bad boy to canine hero | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Red Bluff Daily News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AKRON, Ohio (MCT) - A few weeks ago, Jennifer Yost of Springfield Township, Ohio, and her dog, Dizzy, participated in Hudson Safety Town's Dog Safety program. On July 19, the pair demonstrated to children and their folks what to do if they are caught in a fire. Together, the pair showed the kids how to escape through a window after crawling under a layer of smoke on their bellies through a fire safety house.

Evidently, Dizzy, a 4-year-old black Labrador retriever/German shepherd mix, learned his lesson from the demonstration better than his mistress did. Yost, 20, admits she fell short. When fire struck her home the following morning, Dizzy resorted to something he had never done before: He bit her, but it may have saved her life.

But that is only part of this amazing story about the pair who have traded places, blurring the roles of hero and victim through their mutual love and devotion.

As with many good stories, the heroine (Yost) saved the unfortunate and misunderstood victim (Dizzy) from certain death. Three years ago, Dizzy had an aggression problem. Trainers and veterinarians agreed he should be put down because he was too mean to be rehabilitated.

Yost, who was only 17 at the time, disagreed. She saw a young dog with lots of energy that needed a job. So Yost, who knew very early in life that she was fated to be an animal advocate, adopted the pup and enrolled him in Paul Pollack's Sit Means Sit dog training program in Copley

Township, Ohio.

"When I showed up at Jen's house to meet Dizzy for his evaluation, Jen had to hold him back from attacking me when I knocked on the door," Pollack remembered.

"I asked Jen to put his muzzle on and bring him out on a leash. When he came out of the house, he was growling and lunging at me. If he was not muzzled, I definitely would have been bitten.

"I was able to get him calmed down and looking to me for direction in about 10 minutes."

Dizzy's schooling was so successful that now Yost and Dizzy work for Sit Means Sit training other dogs and their owners.

He also is such a model canine citizen that Pollack feels comfortable using him for demonstrations.

"Through the course of the (Hudson, Ohio) program, Dizzy played and was petted by hundreds of children," Pollack said. "He has zero aggression now and enjoys being around people and playing with other dogs. When we tell people about Dizzy's history, most people simply don't believe it."

A student at Kent State University in pre-veterinary medicine, Yost founded Bird Nerd Rescue/Sanctuary seven years ago in her home. The business is dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and adoption of domestic parrots. A year ago, she moved Bird Nerd to a 3,000-square-foot facility in Canton. Add to that, Yost teaches veterinary technician classes, bird handling and grooming along with her job at Sit Means Sit.

Just listing her schedule is exhausting, so it's no wonder that sometimes, she is, too. Friday is the only day that Yost, who lives with her mother, Debbie Yost, three dogs, five exotic rescued birds and four cats, gets to sleep in.

She described the events leading up to the fire.

"I got in late that night after the demonstration. I then had to go back to the training facility and take care of the dogs who are here for boarding," Yost said.

When she got home she said, she thought she smelled something "weird," so thinking it was coming from the air conditioner, she unplugged it and went to bed.

She was still in bed when her mother left for work Friday morning, Yost said, but Dizzy started licking her face, trying to make her get up. She thought he was just being a pain and wanted her to let him outside.

Next, "He started barking and I pushed him away," she said.

Then, Dizzy bit her hand hard enough to draw blood. That got her attention.

"No way did you just bite me," she said as she jumped out of bed and realized the house was on fire and filled with smoke. The source was a fluorescent light in an aquarium in another bedroom, firefighters later determined.

"(A) fireman told me if I had slept another 20 minutes, I would have died from the smoke," Yost said.

Pollack said Dizzy's actions escalated in aggression because he had to "wake his mom. He went from trying to wake her up by crying and barking to biting her because he had to," he said.

Yost ran back inside eight times to remove animals from the burning home, Dizzy by her side. She scooped up handfuls of birds and carted them to an outdoor aviary.

"I did absolutely everything that I was not supposed to do," she said.

A scarlet macaw was the only animal left behind, but after being treated for smoke inhalation by an emergency veterinarian, the parrot is doing fine today.

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News Headline: REVIEW: 'The Sound of Music' ever wonderful @ Porthouse Theatre | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Sound of Music, tuneful as ever, thrilled the crowd Thursday night at the Porthouse Theatre in (not so far away) Cuyahoga Falls. Director Terri Kent created space for the classic musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein to blossom and the talented performers to shine. Especially effective was the simple set by designed by Nolan O'Dell; it magically became a mountain meadow, a church, an estate with just a few shifts of a block here and a screen there.

It's tough to sing music that most of the audience already knows by heart and make it sound fresh, but the appealing cast did a terrific job of it. Kayce Cummings projected all the bounce and beauty that made Maria unfit for life as a nun. Her interactions with the children were believable (especially when the children all flocked to her bed during a thunderstorm). The adorable, scene-stealing von Trapp children — Lucy Anders (Liesl), Samuel Culver (Kurt), Cameron Andrew Howell (Friedrich) and sisters Courtney Anne Nelson (Louisa), Cameron Danielle Nelson (Brigitta), Cassidy Josephine Nelson (Marta) and Carly Marie Nelson (Gretl) acted like real children (albeit children who could charm and sing like nobody's business).

Among several highlights were the choreographed duet (“Sixteen Going on Seventeen”) between a lyric Anders and an earnest Rolph (Kyle Kemph) that involved at one point riding a bicycle around stage and singing in tune at the same time. Awesome. Kemph's restrained gesture of love when he didn't give them away in the last scene was also touching. Larry Nehring's Captain von Trapp was elegant, but at times a little too distinguished to seem smitten with Maria.

And, of course, the nuns played a huge role in making the show work. The large ensemble trooped up and down the aisles and set the mood for the show's opening and closing scenes. Lissy Gulick as Sister Margaretta, the nun who claimed “Maria made her laugh,” also made us laugh with her wide smile.

Jennifer Korecki played the keyboard and led a small ensemble of eight musicians that nicely filled the intimate setting with music.

Although Barry Manilow drew huge crowds right next door at Blossom that night, the Porthouse provided a back-roads route so theatre goers could avoid most of the crush. The Porthouse Theatre itself offers a very pleasant setting for picnics before the show with shady spaces and entertainment provided by strolling and singing Kent State summer music camp students.

Final remark: Summer is almost over, but there's till time to enjoy a first-rate show in a charming site.

FACTS: The Sound of Music, 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays through next Sunday, Aug. 12. Special 2 p.m. family matinee, Saturday, Aug. 11. Where: Porthouse Theatre, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. Tickets: $17-$37, available at the box office and by phone at 330-929-4416 or 330-672-3884, or online at tix.com.

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News Headline: CONSTRUCTION OF ESPLANADE TO BEGIN IN DOWNTOWN KENT (Bruder) | Email

News Date: 08/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Schleis, Paula
News OCR Text: Kent State University and city officials have talked about connecting downtown to the campus for at least 20 years.

That dream is finally being realized, as work got under way this week on the Esplanade, a wide pedestrian walk meant to draw students and faculty to dozens of shops and restaurants that are part of downtown's $100 million makeover.

Crews are removing homes and relocating utilities to prepare the land for the brick and concrete walk.

Meanwhile, other phases of downtown's rebirth - three entire blocks are being remade - are winding down.

Monday is moving day for the Davey Resource Group, the consulting arm of the Davey Tree Expert Co., which is taking over the top of a new three-story building at Haymaker and South Water Street. A handful of corporate personnel will also move from Davey's headquarters on North Mantua Street.

"Everyone's very excited about the move," spokeswoman Jennifer Lennox said as she walked through the empty offices, filled with work spaces shaped like honeycombs. "We have more space, and we have room to grow."
THE ESPLANADE

The Esplanade is cutting through a residential neighborhood, where KSU has been purchasing property for a couple of years.

A home on Lincoln Street was removed this week, another on Willow is targeted for demolition, and a third historic home that is being saved will be moved out of the way on Saturday.

Once the route is clear, a large pile of soil stockpiled off Haymaker will be used to create an "attractive and comfortable grade for pedestrians," said Michael Bruder, KSU's director for design and construction.

That dirt came from the excavation of the new transportation center being built by the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority (PARTA).

"PARTA had a lot of soil they needed to lose off the site, and we needed a lot to make some of the grades work, so we both saved money," Bruder said.

The campus has been separated from downtown since the Haymaker bypass (state Route 59) was built decades ago, and rejoining the two areas will only strengthen the city, he said.

"There are things that make a great college town, and one is engaging students with the town, not just the university," Bruder said. The Esplanade "will engage the students and bring them to restaurants and shops, and it will do the same for faculty and staff."

The Esplanade is expected to be open to foot traffic in March.
DAVEY TREE

Davey Tree, an iconic Kent business for more than 100 years, is keeping its headquarters and 200 employees in the northern end of town, Lennox said.

"There's a lot of confusion because people think we're leaving our headquarters," Lennox said.

What's moving downtown is the company's army of consultants, currently housed in a leased building in Stow, and a handful of corporate personnel - 90 employees, altogether. They will share a 13,000-square-foot office.

Vice President Joe Paul called the move "historic" because it returns part of Davey to downtown, where it was founded before growing into a $646 million company with 7,000 employees around the world.

"Furthermore, it speaks to Davey Tree's commitment to the city of Kent," he said.

The new third-floor office at Haymaker and South Water Street has a bird's-eye view of the city center and features a conference room named "Aquarium" because two walls of windows give an open view of the busy intersection below.

A second three-story building will greet another corporate anchor, Ametek Lamb Electric Co., after Labor Day.

Workers are still busy finishing the lower floors of both buildings, which will become home to several businesses that are all new to Kent.

Expected to open in September and October are the restaurants Panini's Bar and Grill, El Fresco Mexican Grill, Bricco, Dave's Cosmic Subs, Newdle Bar, Yogurt Vi, Georgio's Pizza and Bar 142. Retailers include Palmieri Salon, UniversiTees, Shop 42 and the gift shops Gracy Lane and the Market Path.
THE REST

Kent Economic Development Director Dan Smith provided an update on the rest of the downtown development:

Acorn Alley II, with about a dozen restaurants and retailers, is nearly complete. More than half of the tenants have already moved in.

Erie Street, with new pavement and sidewalks, will reopen to traffic next week. Depeyster Street, undergoing similar renovations, will be finished in the fall.

Facade work on the former Franklin Hotel, which has been rechristened Acorn Corner, is nearly complete, and attention is now focused on the interior. The first floor and mezzanine should be completed by the end of the year and will be occupied by Buffalo Wild Wings (BW3), which is moving from its Franklin Street location.

When finished, a financial institution and the local business chamber will move onto the third floor, the Kent Cycle bike shop will move into the basement, and the upper three floors will be turned into luxury apartments.

The new Kent Municipal Court will go before the Planning Commission for final approval this month. By October or November, the former Jimmy John's on the property will be demolished and construction of the $9 million courthouse will get under way. Jimmy John's has moved to East Main Street.

Crews are working on the third and fourth stories of the new PARTA transportation center. It is expected to be complete in March.

Work on the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center continues, with hopes for a spring opening.

Copyright © 2012 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Haymaker Parkway to close today for house move | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Haymaker Parkway in downtown Kent will close briefly this morning to allow workers to move the Kent Wells Sherman House from East Erie Street to East College Avenue.

The historic house, once home to Zenas Kent's daughter, Frances Wells Kent, will begin moving at 7 a.m. The City of Kent expects the stretch of Haymaker Parkway between DePeyster Street and Willow Street will be closed for about 15 minutes.

The house will sit at the dead end of East College Avenue until a permanent location can be found

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News Headline: Kent landmark rolls to temporary new home | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: While most residents of the city of Kent were sleeping or sitting down at their breakfast tables Saturday, a historic house was rolling down Haymaker Parkway to its temporary new location a block away on East College Avenue.

Stein House Movers began moving the Kent Wells Sherman House from its East Erie Street location west on a closed section of S.R. 59 just before 7 a.m. About 40 minutes later, Haymaker Parkway between DePeyster Street and Willow Street was open again, after the house had crossed the sidewalk between Haymaker and East College Avenue.

The Greek Revival home was built in the 1850s for the family of Frances Kent Wells, sister of the city of Kent's namesake, Marvin Kent. The house was purchased by Kent State University, along with the rest of the homes on the stretch of East Erie Street between Haymaker Parkway and Willow Street, so the school could build its Esplanade walkway extension through the area.

KSU initially planned to demolish all of the homes on that portion of East Erie Street, until a non-profit known as the Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc. began its efforts to save the historic property after its to the city's founding family and a subsequent owner, Dr. Aaron Sherman, became know.

Kent State agreed to spend $40,000 to relocate the home, let the house sit on its property on East College Avenue until December and sell the house to the group for $1 once a new site for the home can be secured.

Group members trying to save the house thought they had found a new location for the house on a lot at 246 N. Water St. next to the Standing Rock Cultural Arts Gallery, but controversy followed. Kent's Board of Zoning Appeals approved variances needed for the move, but Kent's Planning Commission turned down the group's site plan after SRCA members and allies implored the board to save the lot for use as garden and green space.

Roger Thurman, vice chair of the Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc., said the group is on the agenda for Planning Commission's Sept. 4 with a new site plan for review. He said the group also will continue looking for alternatives to the Water Street lot.

"We're trying to find as many possible locations as we can," Thurman said.

Thurman said other potential locations for the house include the northeast corner of Franklin Avenue and College Avenue, on property adjacent to the Kent branch of the Portage County Municipal Courthouse, among other sites.

Thurman said Stein House Movers originally offered to move the home to North Water Street for $18,000. With that location off limits thanks to the Planning Commission's ruling, the Trumbull County-based movers agreed to both move the home to the temporary site on College Avenue and return to relocate it again to whatever new site the group finds for $18,500.

Thurman said the nonprofit was thankful to the city of Kent, KSU and Stein House Movers for their support, but added that a lot of work and money is still needed to complete the project. He said a banner will be placed on the house to advertise the group and inform people how to get involved with the project.

If the house moves again from College Avenue to a new site, it will be for the third time in the building's history. The house was located on South Water Street at Erie Street before it was moved to the Erie Street extension in 1924, according to historical accounts.

With the house off of East Erie Street, KSU can continue its efforts in constructing its Esplanade walkway extension, which will stretch from the entrance of Hilltop Drive on the northwest edge of campus to the new, downtown KSU Hotel and Conference Center currently being constructed on South DePeyster Street.

KSU has filed permits to demolish the rest of the homes they own on East Erie Street for the Esplanade project, which is expected to be completed in the spring. The park-like walkway will cross South Lincoln Street, South Willow Street and replace the small stretch of East Erie Street before intersecting with Haymaker Parkway.

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News Headline: Kent City Issues Demolition Permits to KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: All information is according to the Kent Community Development Department

The city also recently issued eight demolition permits to Kent State University to bring down houses in the path of the Esplanade extension. The addresses for the houses slated for immediate demolition are:

•324 E. Erie St.
•246, 248 E. Erie St.
•320 E. Erie St.
•330 E. Erie St.
•204 S. Willow St.
•133 S. Willow St.
•132 S. Lincoln St.

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News Headline: Temporary Move of Wells-Sherman House Complete | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stein House Movers Inc. trucked the pre Civil War era house down Haymaker Parkway Saturday morning.

Stein House Movers, Inc., trucked the pre Civil War era Kent Wells Sherman House down Haymaker Parkway Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012. The house was moved to a temporary location on East College Avenue to save it from demolition.

The first of two moves necessary to save the historic Kent Wells-Sherman House from demolition took place this morning.

Stein House Movers, Inc., trucked the two-story Greek revival style house from Erie Street, down Haymaker Parkway to a temporary spot on East College Avenue this morning.

The non-profit group Kent Wells Sherman House Inc. is working to find a permanent location for the house.

Check Kent Patch Sunday morning for full video from this morning's move.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Wells-Sherman House Moved to Stave Off Demolition | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Non-profit group has until Dec. 1 to find a permanent location for the historic structure

Stein House Movers trucked the historic Kent Wells Sherman House down Haymaker Parkway Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012 to save the structure from demolition. The non-profit Kent Wells Sherman House group is working to find a permanent location for the house. For now, it will stand temporarily at the western end of East College Ave.

Credit Matt Fredmonsky http://o2.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/resize/273x203/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/a65292b8bff3ada92e1e25a172bba9a7

http://kent.patch.com/articles/video-wells-sherman-house-moved-to-stave-off-demolition/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1344768266

As most of Kent slept, a pre- Civil War era house quickly and quietly rolled down Haymaker Parkway Saturday morning.

For the Kent Wells-Sherman House, Saturday's move was the second time movers lifted the Greek revival style structure from its foundation and set it somewhere new.

And if the stars align, there's a third move yet in this house's future.

Members of the non-profit groupKent Wells Sherman House Inc. gathered just before 7 a.m. Saturday to watch as Stein House Movers, Inc. trucked the house from its last permanent address at 250 E. Erie St. to a temporary spot at the western end of East College Avenue.

The 1858 house has ties to the Kent family and other early prominent citizens. It can be stored on the lot, which is owned by Kent State University, through Dec. 1. If a permanent spot for the house can't be found by then, it will be demolished.

That's why Roger Thurman, vice president of the Kent Wells Sherman House Inc. board, wasn't exactly beaming over Saturday's early morning move.

“It feels semi-good because this is a temporary location,” Thurman said. “It feels just OK. It's good the house is saved to this point, but this is not the final resting place.”

Exactly where that final resting place should be has been a contentious point in the Kent community the past several months.

The non-profit group's preferred permanent location is on North Water Street between the Scribbles Coffee Company building and the Standing Rock Cultural Arts North Water Street Gallery.

But last month members of the Kent Planning Commission rejected the KWSH site plan for moving the house to the vacant 247 N. Water St. parcel.

So the group is re-applying to the planning commission on Sept. 4 with a different site plan that moves the house closer to North Water Street and about 16 inches from the sidewalk.

Thurman said the group has two back-up locations should the new North Water Street proposal be rejected.

The first spot would be at the northeast corner of the intersection of Franklin Avenue and West College Avenue caddy corner from the Haymaker Farmers Market. The second spot would be along the Cuyahoga River on city owned land just south of the new Fairchild Avenue Bridge.

"Right now it's fenced off and they've got all the construction equipment there," Thurman said. "We would sync up with the (River Edge Park) trail and face Gougler Avenue."

That river front site comes with a caveat: the cost. Thurman said the estimated cost to move utility lines in order to get the house there is $50,000.

"It would be real expensive to move there," he said.

Fortunately for the group, numerous entities have pitched in thus far to help save the house.

The city has helped with in-kind donations of engineering, service and police staff to help orchestrate Saturday's move. Kent State University, which still owns the house, agreed to store it temporarily on its land and pledged $40,000 towards moving costs. The city also agreed to loan $15,000 to the effort.

And Stein House Movers, a third-generation family owned business, won't charge extra for the second move if a permanent location can be found, Thurman said. They also removed a 1924 addition from the back of the house that had to go before it could be moved.

"The original estimate was to move it down to North Water and not store it here temporarily," Thurman said. "This is the type of help we're getting and we're extremely grateful for it. Stein House Movers has bent over backwards to help us save this house. It's unbelievable."

Carla Stein, whose husband moved dozens of houses during his career, was one of those early risers who watched as her son, Matt, moved the Wells Sherman House Saturday.

"I always come out for these," she said.

Jessie Humenik, a spokesperson for Stein House Movers, said they like to think of the business, which is a member of the International Association of Structural Movers, as preserving history by keeping houses out of landfills.

"We consider ourselves part of the recycling industry," she said.

The houseoriginally stood at the corner of Erie and South Water streets downtown where 157 Lounge stands today before it was moved to the Erie Street Site.

Thurman said the house stood through the Civil War, the era of abolition, the Gilded Age, World War I and World War II.

"This house is a sentinel for our history," he said. "That's the point we're getting across on this house. It's not just an old house. It's a symbol of continuous history."

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News Headline: Guilty By Popular Demand Veteran reporter revisits case derailed by false truths | Email

News Date: 08/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Ludlow, Randy
News OCR Text: Almost three decades after the torsos were fished from the Hocking River and the heads and limbs unearthed from the cornstalks, you can still find a few folks in Logan who insist that Dale Johnston is guilty.

Johnston was convicted of the horrific 1982 dismemberment murders of his teenage stepdaughter and her boyfriend and sent to Death Row, only to be freed in 1990 when the house-of-cards case against him toppled on appeal.

Author Bill Osinski covered Johnston's 1984 trial as a reporter for the Akron Beacon Journal. He was stunned when a three-judge panel convicted Johnston in a case built on theory rather than evidence, fear rather than fact.

In the resurrection of a manuscript he set aside about 20 years ago, Osinski takes us back to the hysteria in Hocking County after the butchering of the couple and shows how a flawed system convicted an innocent man.

The true-crime narrative is an interesting read and should rivet Ohioans who recall the brutal murders and the stunning headlines of 2008, when the actual culprits were belatedly brought to justice.

Johnston, who now lives in Grove City, finally was exonerated beyond any doubt. But he has received neither an apology nor one penny for the wrongful imprisonment.

With townspeople clamoring for an arrest and peace of mind, police forged a motive in claims that a jealous Johnston had an incestuous affair with his stepdaughter and that her relationship with her boyfriend led Johnston to kill.

Osinski produces a persuasive case that police and prosecutorial misconduct led to a laser focus on Johnston and the astonishing disregard of other leads and suspects that didn't fit their manufactured version of the "truth."

The book is jammed with "oh-no-they-didn't" moments that will leave readers shaking their heads in disbelief as the chapters roll by and the implausibility of both the state's case and Johnston's guilt emerges.

As a Dispatch reporter, I covered the arrests and convictions of the true killer, Chester "the Molester" McKnight, and his accomplice. I wrote a story detailing the case and how investigators blew repeated chances to crack it early on.

I critically read Osinski's book with firsthand interest, looking for factual missteps and unsupported statements. None surfaced.

With the skills befitting a veteran reporter, Osinski's research is meticulous, his interviews revealing, his conclusions rock solid.

Guilty By Popular Demand is more than a good story. It's good journalism, well-told.

* Guilty By Popular Demand: A True Story of Small-Town Injustice (Kent State University, 192 pages, $24.95) by Bill Osinski

Copyright © 2012 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH and may not be republished without permission.

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