Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
Biological Sciences; Research (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Geology; Research (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC); Political Science (1)
Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Research (7)
Residence Services (1)
Safety; Students (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Biological Sciences; Research (1)
Research on Group II Antiarrhythmics Published by Scientists at Kent State University 08/17/2012 NewsRx.com Text Email

...fear conditioning may play in altering an animals' behavior in a repeated stress paradigm." Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Fischer rats were exposed daily to different stressors in a complex environment (context A). After four days of stressor exposure,...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Spontaneous Interventions #93 to #108 08/16/2012 Architect Online Text Attachment Email

...Mark Shepard. 93. Pop Up City Cleveland, Ohio / Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative Since 2007, the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative of Kent State University has run Pop Up City, a program that brings vacant urban space to life through fleeting interventions. Cleveland has lost half...


Geology; Research (1)
Research Results from Kent State University Update Knowledge of Geology 08/17/2012 Science Letter Text Email

...marks the collision of Laurasia with Gondwanian-affiliated terranes during the Palaeozoic." Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "The Tatric crystalline unit of the Western Tatra in northern Slovakia displays an inverted metamorphic sequence where a high-grade...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Shale opportunitiesprogram is offered 08/16/2012 Daily Jeffersonian - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...2012 1:00PM NEW PHILADELPHIA -- Small businesses that want to learn how they can benefit from the shale boom can attend a new program being offered at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. "Navigating Shale Development Opportunities" will be held Aug. 20 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Kent State...


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC); Political Science (1)
Some area companies make no bones about keeping hiring in the family (Cooper) 08/16/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...uncomfortable communication, said Chris Cooper, program coordinator of the Business Succession Planning Program of the Ohio Employee Ownership Center at Kent State University. The program's goal is to help businesses transition from one generation of ownership to the next by providing education, training,...


Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Councilman Suggests Leaving Wells-Sherman House on College Avenue 08/16/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...about," Sidoti said. "If it's done right, I think it works." Members of the non-profit groupKent Wells Sherman House Inc. worked with the city and Kent State University to relocate the house Saturday to the temporary sliver of land, which is owned by the university. The 1858 house has ties...


Research (7)
$85 million Ohio partnership to fund 'Tech Belt' 08/17/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

WKSU News: Youngstown gets national manufacturing institute 08/16/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...Touchstone Research Lab, Westinghouse Nuclear, and Wohlers Associates. 9 Research Universities: Carnegie Mellon University, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, Lehigh University, Penn State University, Robert Morris University, University of Akron, University of Pittsburgh, and Youngstown...

Youngstown gets nation's first manufacturing institute 08/16/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...Youngstown Institute will focus on "additive manufacturing," using the latest generation of 3-D printers to build products. Partners include Youngstown and Kent State universities and the University of Akron, as well as 40 companies that include Timken, Lubrizol, G-E, and Lockheed Martin.

We Can't Wait: Obama Administration Announces New Public-Private Partnership to Support Manufacturing Innovation, Encourage Investment in America 08/17/2012 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...Touchstone Research Lab, Westinghouse Nuclear, Wohlers Associates 9 Research Universities: Carnegie Mellon University, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, Lehigh University, Penn State University, Robert Morris University, University of Akron, University of Pittsburgh, Youngstown...

Obama Administration Announces New Public-Private Partnership to Support Manufacturing Innovation, Encourage Investment in America 08/16/2012 U.S. Department of Commerce Text Attachment Email

...Touchstone Research Lab, Westinghouse Nuclear, Wohlers Associates 9 Research Universities: Carnegie Mellon University, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, Lehigh University, Penn State University, Robert Morris University, University of Akron, University of Pittsburgh, Youngstown...

U.S. announces new Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute in Ohio Featured 08/16/2012 MP & P - Metalworking Production & Purchasing - Online Text Attachment Email

...University, Penn State Applied Research Laboratory, Lehigh University, Case Western Reserve University, Youngstown State University, University of Akron, Kent State, Westmoreland County Community College, Lorain County Community College, ExOne, Optomec, Stratasys, Sciaky, 3D Systems, nScript, Paramount...

LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND RAPID PROTOTYPING+MANUFACTURING PART OF NATIONAL PILOT FOR ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING 08/16/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

...in LaTrobe, PA and included significant leadership from Lorain County Community College, Case Western Reserve University, Carnegie Mellon University, Youngstown State University and as well as a network of private and public partners. "I'm pleased that we are taking steps to strengthen American...


Residence Services (1)
Looking Back 08/17/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Safety; Students (1)
William Koberna is not convicted of felony 08/16/2012 Digital Journal Text Attachment Email

...officials who responded accordingly. Due to shooting at other universities, no threat can be ignored. Deadly gunfire caused four students deaths in Kent State during May 1970, according to . Koberna was arrested at his parents' house in the Cleveland suburb of Brunswick after he posted the...


News Headline: Research on Group II Antiarrhythmics Published by Scientists at Kent State University | Email

News Date: 08/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2012 AUG 17 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Fresh data on Drugs and Therapies are presented in a new report. According to news reporting originating from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Repeated exposure to laboratory stressors often results in behavioral changes that are commonly referred to as depressive-like behaviors. Here, we examined the contribution fear conditioning may play in altering an animals' behavior in a repeated stress paradigm."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Fischer rats were exposed daily to different stressors in a complex environment (context A). After four days of stressor exposure, exploratory behavior (10min in new cage) and social interaction (5min with juvenile) were tested on day 5 in either the same environment or a new environment (context B). Rats showed decreased exploration and social interaction when tested in context A compared to control rats or rats tested in context B. Additionally, chronic infusion of propranolol (beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist that crosses the blood-brain barrier), but not nadolol (beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist that does not readily cross the blood-brain barrier), prevented the behavioral changes following repeated stressor exposure. Propranolol treatment did not affect the acute or chronic elevation of corticosterone, the decrease in body weight gain, or adrenal hypertrophy observed in animals exposed to stress. These data demonstrate that conditioned fear responses can contribute to behavioral changes in a repeated stress paradigm. Additional studies revealed, Sprague-Dawley rats do not demonstrate decreased exploration or social interaction when testing occurs in the same context as repeated stressor exposure suggesting Fischer rats may have a greater propensity to associate distal cues with aversive events in a complex environment."

According to the news editors, the researchers concluded: "This may be due to greater stress responses in Fischer animals that are known to enhance consolidation of emotionally arousing events."

For more information on this research see: Fear conditioning can contribute to behavioral changes observed in a repeated stress model. Behavioural Brain Research, 2012;233(2):536-44. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Behavioural Brain Research - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/506045)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting R.M. Camp, Kent State University, Biological Sciences Department, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, Antiarrhythmic Agents, Propranolol, United States, beta Receptors, Membrane Proteins, Blood Brain Barrier, Drugs and Therapies, Adrenergic Receptors, Cardiovascular Agents, Central Nervous System, Catecholamine Receptors, Group II Antiarrhythmics, North and Central America, Beta Adrenergic Blocking Agents.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2012 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Spontaneous Interventions #93 to #108 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Architect Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: From Pop Up City by the Cleveland Urban Design Collective to Serendipitor by Mark Shepard.

93. Pop Up City

Cleveland, Ohio / Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

Since 2007, the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative of Kent State University has run Pop Up City, a program that brings vacant urban space to life through fleeting interventions. Cleveland has lost half of its population since the 1950s, and much of its urban fabric is unused and deteriorating. Pop Up City aims to spotlight some of Cleveland's spectacular but underutilized properties, while demonstrating that vacancy can be an opportunity and an adventure, not just a liability. Past interventions have included an ice sculpture park on the banks of the Cuyahoga River; a roller-disco on a vacant floor of an old industrial building; and an inflatable music venue on top of a parking garage, demonstrating possible alternative programming for structures that are used only during certain hours of the day.

Click the "Next" button to turn to the page to see the next Spontaneous Intervention.

Return to Top



News Headline: Research Results from Kent State University Update Knowledge of Geology | Email

News Date: 08/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Science Letter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2012 AUG 17 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- Data detailed on Geology have been presented. According to news reporting originating from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The nature and style of mid-crustal assembly and exhumation during continental collision has been investigated in the Tatra Mountains of the Western Carpathians. The pre-Alpine basement of the Western Carpathians represents the easternmost exposure of the Variscan orogen in Europe, which marks the collision of Laurasia with Gondwanian-affiliated terranes during the Palaeozoic."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "The Tatric crystalline unit of the Western Tatra in northern Slovakia displays an inverted metamorphic sequence where a high-grade unit comprising migmatites with relicts of eclogite has been thrust over a lower-grade mica schist unit. New geochronological and thermochronological data together with published thermobarometry illuminate the metamorphic history of the Western Tatra. The Upper Unit eclogites with occasionally preserved omphacite record near isothermal decompression from 1.6 GPa to 1.0-1.2 GPa at 750-800 degrees C which lead to intensive re-equilibration at high-pressure granulite facies conditions, comparable to the peak metamorphic conditions of the host migmatite. Both eclogite and migmatite shared a retrograde P-T path following the insertion of the eclogite assemblage into the migmatites. The metamorphic evolution of the Lower Unit mica schist is constrained to peak P-T conditions of 0.6-0.8 GPa and 640 and 660 degrees C followed by retrogression. This suggests that different rock types of the Western Tatra metamorphic core shared only their exhumation path from mid-crustal levels. ID-TIMS Sm-Nd dating of garnet from eclogite yields a whole rock-garnet isochron age of 337 +/- 10 Ma, with an initial epsilon(Nd) isotopic composition of + 8.3. In situ U-Pb dating of monazite from a migmatite surrounding the eclogite shows one age population of c. 380 Ma whereas monazite from a migmatite away from the eclogite preserves a robust 340 11 Ma age which is indistinguishable from Sm-Nd garnet age and U-Pb age of zircons in the anatectic leucosome of the migmatite (347 7 Ma). A younger monazite age population from the migmatite of 300 +/- 16 Ma is consistent with Ar-40/Ar-39 mica ages of c. 310 Ma. This argues for a contemporaneous, and likely shared, exhumation path of the assemblage pair. In situ monazite total-Pb analyses from the Lower Unit mica schists yields xenocrystic and c. 370 Ma ages, but no geochronologic evidence for peak Variscan tectonism. Exhumation of the deep crustal root occurred most probably in a two-stage process. The timing of the high-pressure, eclogite facies metamorphism before the onset of exhumation into the mid crust, was likely between c. 380 Ma and 360 Ma. Subsequent exhumation into the middle crust was coeval with migmatite generation at c. 340 Ma and garnet diffusion modeling suggest similar to 30 degrees C/Ma cooling rates."

According to the news editors, the researchers concluded: "The exhumation was likely tectonically forced by the action of a rigid indentor, which prompted the weak lower crust to be heterogeneously extruded to mid-crustal levels at a time coeval with anatexis and subsequently extruded with mid-crustal material to the upper crust."

For more information on this research see: Heterogeneous extrusion and exhumation of deep-crustal Variscan assembly: Geochronology of the Western Tatra Mountains, northern Slovakia. Lithos, 2012;144():88-108. Lithos can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Lithos - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/503348)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y. Moussallam, Kent State University, Dept. of Geol, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, Geology, United States, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2012 Science Letter via NewsRx.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Shale opportunitiesprogram is offered | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily Jeffersonian - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Shale opportunities

program is offered

Published: August 16, 2012 1:00PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -- Small businesses that want to learn how they can benefit from the shale boom can attend a new program being offered at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. "Navigating Shale Development Opportunities" will be held Aug. 20 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Kent State University at Tuscarawas Small Business Development Center

The program features three presenters. Paul Gorgas, of Edward Jones, will present "The Entrepreneurial Equation," and discuss financial pressures, employees and tax issues. Terri Davis, of Mancan, will include information about recruitment, testing pre-employment, screenings and contract and temporary employees in her presentation, "If Anyone Can - Mancan." Liz Carter, of Carter Consulting LLC, will present "Hiring in the Oil and Gas Industry," which will include screening processes, drug testing requirements and how to select the right person for the right job.

The program fee is $20. To register or for more information, call 330-308-7522.

Return to Top



News Headline: Some area companies make no bones about keeping hiring in the family (Cooper) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 4:30 am, August 16, 2012

Family is the driving force and the corporate backbone at Javitch, Block & Rathbone.

And it's not just the families of co-managing partners Joel Rathbone and Bruce Block, who lead the Cleveland-based law firm specializing in collection and insurance subrogation. The emphasis extends to every employee, at every level.

“We embrace family, and we hire family before we will hire others,” said Mr. Rathbone, whose daughter, wife and son-in-law work at the firm. Mr. Rathbone's daughter and Mr. Block's son both are partners and have been designated in a succession plan to take over the firm.

“We ask all employees for recommendations and family members, and we pay them for referrals,” said Mr. Rathbone, who estimates 35% to 40% of his firm's 400 employees have a relative working in the business. “By embracing family and having family as part of business, it's no longer about outsider versus insider.”

That doesn't mean that bringing nonfamily members into the management ranks of a small, privately held family business isn't a delicate balancing act.

“The first one is the hardest,” said Mr. Rathbone, adding that his firm's first outside management hire was its human resources director about eight years ago. He now is the firm's chief operating officer.

“There is no question that the role of the person coming in has to be clear for them and for every family member, especially if you're in a growth mode and creating this position, possibly for the first time,” Mr. Rathbone said. “Nine times out of 10, you're outgrowing the family.”

Chris Snider, founder and president of Aspire Management Inc., a Strongsville business consulting firm that specializes in exit planning, leadership transitions and mergers and acquisitions, said his first recommendation to a small business — family run or not — is to do an assessment of the company, including a business valuation, before making any high-level hires.

“You have to know what you have and you have to know what you need. And you also want to take the emotion out of the decision,” said Mr. Snider, who also is the founder and president of the Northeast Ohio chapter of the Exit Planning Institute. “The main thing is the family business needs to operate like any other business. Family members need to understand the business is there to make money and build and preserve the family's wealth, not to provide family jobs or make everyone happy.”

For that to happen, everyone needs to have clear roles, responsibilities, goals and accountabilities. Problems arise when there are different standards established for outsiders versus family members, he said.

“We can't have the son or daughter of the father, for example, going over the COO's head to see dad because he doesn't like what the COO had to say or has him or her doing,” he said.

The only way to curb and defuse these human tendencies is through serial frank, open and possibly uncomfortable communication, said Chris Cooper, program coordinator of the Business Succession Planning Program of the Ohio Employee Ownership Center at Kent State University. The program's goal is to help businesses transition from one generation of ownership to the next by providing education, training, technical assistance and consulting services.

“The key prior to bringing the outside person in is communicating to the family members in an honest and open way. Sometimes bringing in outside experts to offer nonbiased opinions can help family members adjust to this idea of bringing someone new into the business,” he said.

From there, family members in leadership roles should do their best to be inclusive and engage the nonfamily member in the decision-making process, Mr. Cooper said.

Many times an outsider coming into a family-owned business is going to wonder about advancement opportunities and whether they fit into the long-term plans of the business, Mr. Cooper said.

“A lot of times the ownership of the business will stay in the family but the management of the business will transition outside of the family,” he said.

Enter Wallover Oil Co. in Strongs-ville, one of the oldest manufacturers of lubricants in the country.

Since its founding in 1863 there had always been a member of the Wallover family at the helm. But in January 2011, Eric Kielts, a longtime member of management, was tapped to succeed George “Hub” Marquis as president.

“We always look for the right people for the right job. If it meant a nonfamily member, fine. If it meant a family member, fine,” Mr. Marquis said. “Eric joined us a little over 20 years ago as head of our laboratory. He has done a great job and he was the best candidate to take over. I have a son in the business and a nephew in the business and none of us felt they were ready to take over the running of the company. Eric was the most qualified person, and the family is firmly behind him.”

Mr. Kielts said communication and time have been the keys to his smooth transition into a position he never expected to hold in this family company.

“Certainly there is some trepidation not knowing what the family is going to expect, and I think Hub did a fantastic job of keeping me in the loop as to what the family was talking about and thinking about and that made me feel a lot more comfortable with the transition,” Mr. Kielts said.

“It has been made perfectly clear (with the staff and family members) that Eric is in charge and he makes the decisions,” Mr. Marquis said.

For Mr. Kielts, he said in many respects it's easier to be an outsider running a family business.

“At the end of the day, I don't have to be sitting across the Thanksgiving table and having a difficult conversation,” Mr. Kielts said. “I can be the sort of bad guy and not bring it into the family. It's a bit of advantage for them and for me.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Councilman Suggests Leaving Wells-Sherman House on College Avenue | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: At-large Kent City Councilman Roger Sidoti says idea "sounds crazy."

new

The Kent Wells Sherman House near the end of its move to a temporary spot on College Avenue on Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012.

http://kent.patch.com/articles/councilman-suggests-leaving-wells-sherman-house-on-college-avenue/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1345111233

It may be highly unlikely, but a Kent City Council member has suggested leaving the Kent Wells-Sherman House on what is most likely a temporary location for the historic structure.

At-large Councilman Roger Sidoti suggested at the end of council's Wednesday meeting that the temporary location at the western end of East College Avenue might prove the best option for the house.

"I would just like to throw that out as something to think about," Sidoti said. "If it's done right, I think it works."

Members of the non-profit groupKent Wells Sherman House Inc. worked with the city and Kent State University to relocate the house Saturday to the temporary sliver of land, which is owned by the university.

The 1858 house has ties to the Kent family and other early prominent citizens. It can be stored on the lot through Dec. 1. If a permanent spot for the house can't be found by then, it will be demolished.

The non-profit group's preferred permanent location is on North Water Street between the Scribbles Coffee Company building and the Standing Rock Cultural Arts North Water Street Gallery. But last month members of the Kent Planning Commission rejected the KWSH site plan for moving the house to the vacant 247 N. Water St. parcel.

So the group is re-applying to the planning commission on Sept. 4 with a different site plan that moves the house closer to North Water Street and about 16 inches from the sidewalk.

Still, Sidoti's idea garnered some support.

Councilman Robin Turner said he would've supported Sidoti's idea had he made some kind of formal motion to take action on it. Sidoti merely made the suggestion during an open section of the meeting for council member comments.

"I know better than to make a motion," Sidoti said. "I just wanted to plant the seed."

University officials have said publicly that Kent State has no interest in housing the structure on university land — hence its move to allow construction on the Esplanade project.

The non-profit group working to save the house has two back-up locations should the new North Water Street proposal be rejected by the planning commission next month.

The first spot would be at the northeast corner of the intersection of Franklin Avenue and West College Avenue caddy corner from the Haymaker Farmers Market. The second spot would be along the Cuyahoga River on city owned land just south of the new Fairchild Avenue Bridge.

Sidoti said the house, if situated correctly on the College Avenue lot, could prove a welcoming site as visitors enter the downtown area. Though he did tell the city's service director "it sounds crazy."

"That house sitting on the corner is not an all bad thing," he said. "I think we should explore all options."

Return to Top



News Headline: $85 million Ohio partnership to fund 'Tech Belt' | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan announced Thursday
an $85 million public-private partnership
investment geared to help revitalize
the Rust Belt into the “Tech
Belt.”
The joint venture, called the National
Additive Manufacturing Innovation
Institute (NAMII), is a consortium
of businesses, universities and community
colleges from Ohio, West Virginia
and Pennsylvania. It is the first
major investment of its kind to help
revitalize American manufacturing
and encourage companies to invest
in the United States, according to a
press release.
Kent State University and Kent-based
tech company AlphaMicron will both
play a role in NAMII as part of 40 companies,
nine research universities, five
community colle

Return to Top



News Headline: WKSU News: Youngstown gets national manufacturing institute | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Senior Reporter

Mark Urycki

Additive manufactured products

Courtesy of National Institute of Standards and Technology

In The Region:

The White House today (Thurs) announced that Youngstown will be the first site in a national network of manufacturing innovation institutes. WKSU's Mark Urycki reports that the Youngstown Business Incubator will be the center of the research, with partners from Northeast Ohio universities and companies.

President Obama first announced his plan for manufacturing institutes in March in Virginia. He said universities and companies could combine to work together on the latest manufacturing techniques. And he promised to fund a pilot program as a model.

"With that pilot in place we'll keep pushing Congress to do the right thing because this is the kind of approach that can succeed. We've got to have this all across the country. I want everybody thinking about how we can make the best products, how we're harnessing new ideas and making sure they are located here in the United States. "

That pilot will be in Youngstown and it's called the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII). "Additive manufacturing" is another term for 3-D printers that can layer on coats of a material to create a solid product.

Barbara Ewing of the Youngstown Incubator, says the Defense Department is investing money for what could seem like fantasy.

"The Department of Defense interest in this is that they want to do rapid prototyping or actually produce new parts in the field of battle so that if any plane or tank or any piece of equipment is damaged out in the theater... that they would have the drawings stored right on a thumb drive and be able to do rapid prototyping right in the field."

In fact, Ewing has part of an airplane wing that was made that way. NAMII will be led by the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining in Latrobe, Pennsylvania and include these partners:

40 Companies: Allegheny Technologies, AlphaMicron, Applied Systems and Technology Transfer, Autodesk, Boeing, Catalyst Connection, Energy Industries of Ohio, ExOne, FMW Composites, General Dynamics, General Electric, Honeywell, IBM, Johnson Controls, Kennametal, Kent Displays, Laser Technology Assts, Lockheed Martin, Lubrizol, M-7 Technologies, MicroFab Technologies, Morris, Northrop Grumman, nScrypt, OSRAM Sylvania, Optomec, Oxford Performance Materials, Paramount Industries / 3D Systems, Parker Hannifin, Plextronix, POM, RTI, Ruger, Sciaky, Stratasys, Stratonics, Timken, Touchstone Research Lab, Westinghouse Nuclear, and Wohlers Associates.

9 Research Universities: Carnegie Mellon University, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, Lehigh University, Penn State University, Robert Morris University, University of Akron, University of Pittsburgh, and Youngstown State University

5 Community Colleges: Eastern Gateway Community College, Lorain County Community College, Northampton Community College, Penn College of Technology, and Westmoreland County Community College.

11 Non-Profit Organizations: Association for Manufacturing Technology, Ben Franklin Technology Partners, JumpStart Ohio, Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network, MT Connect, NorTech, National Digital Engineering and Manufacturing Consortium, Ohio Aerospace Institute, Robert C. Byrd Institute, the Youngstown Business Incubator, and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers.

Return to Top



News Headline: Youngstown gets nation's first manufacturing institute | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Geography, technology and marketing played in Youngstown's favor

by WKSU's MARK URYCKI

Senior Reporter

Mark Urycki

In The Region:

The Obama administration announced today that the nation's first national manufacturing innovation institute will be in Youngstown.

The president said in March that he wanted to establish up to 15 such institutes in the country. And rather than wait for Congress to come up with the money, the president said he would pick one pilot project to lead the way.

The chief operating officer of the Youngstown Incubator, Barbara Ewing, says Youngstown won a very competitive process.

"We're at the center of the tech belt so geographically we were proximate to both Cleveland and Pittsburgh and to the other partners, so there was an element of convenience. We have a great cross-section here between advance-materials expertise and ITcommercialization, and this grant has a specific commercialization component that requires that the project be used to commercialize new technologies and create new companies."

The Youngstown Institute will focus on "additive manufacturing," using the latest generation of 3-D printers to build products. Partners include Youngstown and Kent State universities and the University of Akron, as well as 40 companies that include Timken, Lubrizol, G-E, and Lockheed Martin.

Return to Top



News Headline: We Can't Wait: Obama Administration Announces New Public-Private Partnership to Support Manufacturing Innovation, Encourage Investment in America | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: [August 16, 2012]

Aug 16, 2012 (Commerce Department Documents and Publications/ContentWorks via COMTEX) -- THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary August 16, 2012 We Can't Wait: Obama Administration Announces New Public-Private Partnership to Support Manufacturing Innovation, Encourage Investment in America Consortium of Businesses, Universities, and Community Colleges from Ohio, West Virginia and Pennsylvania Co-Invest with Federal Government in a Manufacturing Innovation Institute WASHINGTON, DC - Following through on our We Can't Wait efforts, the Obama Administration today announced the launch of a new public-private institute for manufacturing innovation in Youngstown, Ohio as part of its ongoing efforts to help revitalize American manufacturing and encourage companies to invest in the United States. This new partnership, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII), was selected through a competitive process, led by the Department of Defense, to award an initial $30 million in federal funding, matched by $40 million from the winning consortium, which includes manufacturing firms, universities, community colleges, and non-profit organizations from the Ohio-Pennsylvania-West Virginia 'Tech Belt.' In order to create an economy built to last, America needs to make more things the rest of the world wants to buy. After losing millions of good manufacturing jobs in the years before and during the deep recession, the economy has added over 530,000 manufacturing jobs since February 2010 --the strongest growth for any 30 month period since 1989. Companies are also increasingly choosing to invest in the U.S. and bring jobs back. While there's more work to be done, steps like today's announcement build on this momentum.

"I'm pleased that we are taking steps to strengthen American manufacturing by launching a new manufacturing institute in Ohio," said President Obama. "This institute will help make sure that the manufacturing jobs of tomorrow take root not in places like China or India, but right here in the United States of America. That's how we'll put more people back to work and build an economy that lasts." On March 9, 2012, President Obama announced his plan to invest $1 billion to catalyze a national network of up to 15 manufacturing innovation institutes around the country that would serve as regional hubs of manufacturing excellence that will help to make our manufacturers more competitive and encourage investment in the United States. The President called on Congress to act on this proposal and create the National Network of Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).

As part of his Administration's We Can't Wait initiative, President Obama also announced immediate steps to launch a pilot institute to serve as a proof-of concept for the NNMI. Five federal agencies - the Departments of Defense, Energy, and Commerce, the National Science Foundation, and NASA - jointly committed to invest $45 million in a pilot institute on additive manufacturing. Today's announcement of an initial $30 million award under existing authorities is matched by $40 million from the winning consortium.

Youngstown, Ohio and the surrounding region knows what happens when manufacturing production declines. But in this area once known as the 'rust belt', investments like this new pilot institute demonstrate the potential within a region to bring together the capabilities of America's companies and universities, in partnership with the federal government, to invest in the cutting-edge technologies and skills our manufacturers need to compete. With this initiative, Youngstown is poised to become the epicenter of burgeoning new industries from its leadership in additive manufacturing or 3-D printing.

Director of the National Economic Council Gene B. Sperling, Acting Secretary of Commerce Rebecca M. Blank and Under Secretary of Defense Frank Kendall along with other Administration and local officials, will announce the award at M7 Technologies in Youngstown, Ohio. The winning consortium is led by the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining and consists of leading research universities like Carnegie Mellon and Case Western Reserve University, world-class companies like Honeywell, Boeing, and IBM, innovative small manufacturers like M7 and ExOne, and community colleges spread across Eastern Ohio and Western Pennsylvania (see full list below).

The President's proposal for a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation was endorsed by his Advanced Manufacturing Partnership Steering Committee. The AMP's final recommendations, released last month in the report Capturing Domestic Competitive Advantage in Advanced Manufacturing, outlined a set of actions to enable innovation, strengthen our workforce, and accelerate investment in America.

The President's proposal for a NNMI is part of his comprehensive plan to revitalize American manufacturing, which includes providing tax incentives to encourage manufacturers to invest in America, eliminating of tax breaks for manufacturing firms that ship jobs abroad, investing in community colleges and workforce training, supporting innovation in cross-cutting manufacturing technologies, investing in the 21st century infrastructure our manufacturers need, and leveling the playing field so American workers can compete on the merit of their hard work.

Background on the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute: The NAMII will provide the innovation infrastructure needed to support new additive manufacturing technology and products in order to become a global center of excellence for additive manufacturing. This pilot institute will bridge the gap between basic research and product development for additive manufacturing, provide shared assets to help companies, particularly small manufacturers, access cutting-edge capabilities and equipment, and create an environment to educate and train workers in advanced additive manufacturing skills.

Additive manufacturing, often referred to as 3D printing, is a new way of making products and components from a digital model, and will have implications in a wide range of industries including defense, aerospace, automotive, and metals manufacturing. Like an office printer that puts 2D digital files on a piece of paper, a 3D printer creates components by depositing thin layers of material one after another using a digital blueprint until the exact component required has been created. The Department of Defense envisions customizing parts on site for operational systems that would otherwise be expensive to make or ship. The Department of Energy anticipates that additive processes would be able to save more than 50% energy use compared to today's 'subtractive' manufacturing processes.

NAMII is led by the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining, and includes: 40 Companies: Allegheny Technologies, AlphaMicron, Applied Systems and Technology Transfer, Autodesk, Boeing, Catalyst Connection, Energy Industries of Ohio, ExOne, FMW Composites, General Dynamics, General Electric, Honeywell, IBM, Johnson Controls, Kennametal, Kent Displays, Laser Technology Assts, Lockheed Martin, Lubrizol, M-7 Technologies, MicroFab Technologies, Morris, Northrop Grumman, nScrypt, OSRAM Sylvania, Optomec, Oxford Performance Materials, Paramount Industries / 3D Systems, Parker Hannifin, Plextronix, POM, RTI, Ruger, Sciaky, Stratasys, Stratonics, Timken, Touchstone Research Lab, Westinghouse Nuclear, Wohlers Associates 9 Research Universities: Carnegie Mellon University, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, Lehigh University, Penn State University, Robert Morris University, University of Akron, University of Pittsburgh, Youngstown State University 5 Community Colleges: Eastern Gateway Community College, Lorain County Community College, Northampton Community College, Penn College of Technology, Westmoreland County Community College 11 Non-Profit Organizations: Association for Manufacturing Technology, Ben Franklin Technology Partners, JumpStart Ohio, Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network, MT Connect, NorTech, National Digital Engineering and Manufacturing Consortium, Ohio Aerospace Institute, Robert C. Byrd Institute, the Youngstown Business Incubator, and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers.

Return to Top



News Headline: Obama Administration Announces New Public-Private Partnership to Support Manufacturing Innovation, Encourage Investment in America | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: U.S. Department of Commerce
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Submitted on August 16, 2012 - 8:30am

CONTACT OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Consortium of Businesses, Universities, and Community Colleges from Ohio, West Virginia and Pennsylvania Co-Invest with Federal Government in a Manufacturing Innovation Institute

Following through on our We Can't Wait efforts, the Obama Administration today announced the launch of a new public-private institute for manufacturing innovation in Youngstown, Ohio as part of its ongoing efforts to help revitalize American manufacturing and encourage companies to invest in the United States. This new partnership, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII), was selected through a competitive process, led by the Department of Defense, to award an initial $30 million in federal funding, matched by $40 million from the winning consortium, which includes manufacturing firms, universities, community colleges, and non-profit organizations from the Ohio-Pennsylvania-West Virginia ‘Tech Belt.'

In order to create an economy built to last, America needs to make more things the rest of the world wants to buy. After losing millions of good manufacturing jobs in the years before and during the deep recession, the economy has added over 530,000 manufacturing jobs since February 2010 —the strongest growth for any 30 month period since 1989. Companies are also increasingly choosing to invest in the U.S. and bring jobs back. While there's more work to be done, steps like today's announcement build on this momentum.

“I'm pleased that we are taking steps to strengthen American manufacturing by launching a new manufacturing institute in Ohio,” said President Obama. “This institute will help make sure that the manufacturing jobs of tomorrow take root not in places like China or India, but right here in the United States of America. That's how we'll put more people back to work and build an economy that lasts.”

On March 9, 2012, President Obama announced his plan to invest $1 billion to catalyze a national network of up to 15 manufacturing innovation institutes around the country that would serve as regional hubs of manufacturing excellence that will help to make our manufacturers more competitive and encourage investment in the United States. The President called on Congress to act on this proposal and create the National Network of Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).

As part of his Administration's We Can't Wait initiative, President Obama also announced immediate steps to launch a pilot institute to serve as a proof-of concept for the NNMI. Five federal agencies - the Departments of Defense, Energy, and Commerce, the National Science Foundation, and NASA – jointly committed to invest $45 million in a pilot institute on additive manufacturing. Today's announcement of an initial $30 million award under existing authorities is matched by $40 million from the winning consortium.

Youngstown, Ohio and the surrounding region knows what happens when manufacturing production declines. But in this area once known as the ‘rust belt', investments like this new pilot institute demonstrate the potential within a region to bring together the capabilities of America's companies and universities, in partnership with the federal government, to invest in the cutting-edge technologies and skills our manufacturers need to compete. With this initiative, Youngstown is poised to become the epicenter of burgeoning new industries from its leadership in additive manufacturing or 3-D printing.

Director of the National Economic Council Gene B. Sperling, Acting Secretary of Commerce Rebecca M. Blank and Under Secretary of Defense Frank Kendall along with other Administration and local officials, will announce the award at M7 Technologies in Youngstown, Ohio. The winning consortium is led by the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining and consists of leading research universities like Carnegie Mellon and Case Western Reserve University, world-class companies like Honeywell, Boeing, and IBM, innovative small manufacturers like M7 and ExOne, and community colleges spread across Eastern Ohio and Western Pennsylvania (see full list below).

The President's proposal for a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation was endorsed by his Advanced Manufacturing Partnership Steering Committee. The AMP's final recommendations, released last month in the report Capturing Domestic Competitive Advantage in Advanced Manufacturing, outlined a set of actions to enable innovation, strengthen our workforce, and accelerate investment in America.

The President's proposal for a NNMI is part of his comprehensive plan to revitalize American manufacturing, which includes providing tax incentives to encourage manufacturers to invest in America, eliminating of tax breaks for manufacturing firms that ship jobs abroad, investing in community colleges and workforce training, supporting innovation in cross-cutting manufacturing technologies, investing in the 21st century infrastructure our manufacturers need, and leveling the playing field so American workers can compete on the merit of their hard work.

Background on the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute:

The NAMII will provide the innovation infrastructure needed to support new additive manufacturing technology and products in order to become a global center of excellence for additive manufacturing. This pilot institute will bridge the gap between basic research and product development for additive manufacturing, provide shared assets to help companies, particularly small manufacturers, access cutting-edge capabilities and equipment, and create an environment to educate and train workers in advanced additive manufacturing skills.

Additive manufacturing, often referred to as 3D printing, is a new way of making products and components from a digital model, and will have implications in a wide range of industries including defense, aerospace, automotive, and metals manufacturing. Like an office printer that puts 2D digital files on a piece of paper, a 3D printer creates components by depositing thin layers of material one after another using a digital blueprint until the exact component required has been created. The Department of Defense envisions customizing parts on site for operational systems that would otherwise be expensive to make or ship. The Department of Energy anticipates that additive processes would be able to save more than 50% energy use compared to today's ‘subtractive' manufacturing processes.

NAMII is led by the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining, and includes:

40 Companies: Allegheny Technologies, AlphaMicron, Applied Systems and Technology Transfer, Autodesk, Boeing, Catalyst Connection, Energy Industries of Ohio, ExOne, FMW Composites, General Dynamics, General Electric, Honeywell, IBM, Johnson Controls, Kennametal, Kent Displays, Laser Technology Assts, Lockheed Martin, Lubrizol, M-7 Technologies, MicroFab Technologies, Morris, Northrop Grumman, nScrypt, OSRAM Sylvania, Optomec, Oxford Performance Materials, Paramount Industries / 3D Systems, Parker Hannifin, Plextronix, POM, RTI, Ruger, Sciaky, Stratasys, Stratonics, Timken, Touchstone Research Lab, Westinghouse Nuclear, Wohlers Associates

9 Research Universities: Carnegie Mellon University, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, Lehigh University, Penn State University, Robert Morris University, University of Akron, University of Pittsburgh, Youngstown State University

5 Community Colleges: Eastern Gateway Community College, Lorain County Community College, Northampton Community College, Penn College of Technology, Westmoreland County Community College

11 Non-Profit Organizations: Association for Manufacturing Technology, Ben Franklin Technology Partners, JumpStart Ohio, Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network, MT Connect, NorTech, National Digital Engineering and Manufacturing Consortium, Ohio Aerospace Institute, Robert C. Byrd Institute, the Youngstown Business Incubator, and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers.

Return to Top



News Headline: U.S. announces new Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute in Ohio Featured | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: MP & P - Metalworking Production & Purchasing - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Latrobe, PA – The U.S. Federal Government today announced the creation of a National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII) in Youngstown, Ohio.

Frank Kendall III (Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Acquisition) along with Dr. Rebecca Blank (Acting Secretary of Commerce and Deputy Secretary of Commerce) and Gene Sperling (Director of the National Economic Council and Assistant to the President for Economic Policy) today announced the National Center for Defense Manufacturing & Machining (NCDMM) was selected to manage NAMII, the pilot institute for the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).

In March 2012, U.S. President Obama announced the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI), with up to 15 Institutes for Manufacturing Innovation located around the country. These institutes will bring together industry, universities and community colleges, federal agencies, and the states to accelerate innovation by investing in industrially relevant manufacturing technologies with broad applications. Each Institute will bridge the gap between basic research and product development, provide shared assets to help companies – particularly small manufacturers – access cutting-edge capabilities and equipment, and create an unparalleled environment to educate and train students and workers in advanced manufacturing skills. These Institutes will serve as regional hubs of manufacturing innovation, and will be known as world-class centers for applied research, technology incubation, and commercialization.

In addition, President Obama announced that immediate steps be taken to launch a pilot institute which will serve as a proof-of concept for the NNMI Institutes. To answer this call to action as part of the Administration's We Can't Wait efforts, an inter-agency team of technical experts was convened. The collaborative inter-agency team determined that the topic of Additive Manufacturing would garnish the most benefit for the defense, energy, space and commercial sectors of the nation and should be the area of concentration of the pilot institute. Additive Manufacturing, also commonly known as 3D printing, is an emerging and evolving manufacturing process that builds parts made of metal, plastic, ceramic and electronic parts using a layer-by-layer technique, precisely placing material as directed by a 3D digital file.

A competition for the pilot institute was launched through a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) in May. Organizations on the NCDMM-led Team include: Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh, Robert Morris University, Robert C. Bird Institute at Marshall University, Penn State Applied Research Laboratory, Lehigh University, Case Western Reserve University, Youngstown State University, University of Akron, Kent State, Westmoreland County Community College, Lorain County Community College, ExOne, Optomec, Stratasys, Sciaky, 3D Systems, nScript, Paramount Technologies, Morris Technologies, Thogus/RM&P, M7 Technologies, Autodesk, IBM, Timken, Kennametal, ATI, RTI, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrup Grumman, General Dynamics, Honeywell, Osram Sylvania, FMW Composite Systems, Touchstone, Parker Hannifin, Ohio Aerospace Institute, Association for Manufacturing Technology, Society of Manufacturing Engineers, NorTech, Youngstown Business Incubator, Fourth Economy, Wohlers Associates, Ben Franklin Technology Partners, JumpStart, numerous TechBelt small manufacturers and the Manufacturing Extension Partnerships of Ohio and PA.

“We are honored to be chosen to lead this significant effort and we look forward to addressing the challenge set forth by President Obama to help revitalize our nation's manufacturing industry,” said Ralph Resnick, NCDMM President and Executive Director and Acting Director for NAMII in a statement. “NCDMM feels privileged to be part of such a high quality and comprehensive collaborative team. There was keen competition for the Institute from other high quality teams and we will be reaching out to these other national assets to assist our core team in meeting the mission of NAMII.” Mr. Resnick went on to say, “For nearly a decade NCDMM has been delivering manufacturing innovation to the U.S. Defense Industry and we are enthusiastic about applying our successful, self sustaining model to the NAMII.”

SME noted in a statement that it will be heavily involved in technology transition and dissemination, and the education and training of practitioners through the institute. The Society has promoted the advancement of additive manufacturing technology since the mid-1980s, with its Rapid Technologies & Additive Manufacturing Community and as the organizer of its RAPID – Additive Manufacturing Solutions event.

Additive manufacturing was identified by the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership as the technology with the most potential to enhance American manufacturing abilities. Additive manufacturing, sometimes called “3-D printing” and previously known as “rapid prototyping,” is a group of technologies that build up objects by adding materials, usually by laying down many thin layers as opposed to traditional machining that creates objects by cutting material away.

“Through the technical expertise and passion of its members, SME has helped to move this technology forward,” said Debbie Holton, SME director of industry strategy and events. “SME's core purpose is to share manufacturing knowledge, and we look forward to supporting the NAMII by communicating the discoveries and capabilities of the institute and attracting industry support and participation. SME will also be supporting the institute's workforce development initiatives.”

Return to Top



News Headline: LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND RAPID PROTOTYPING+MANUFACTURING PART OF NATIONAL PILOT FOR ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING | Email

News Date: 08/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio, Aug.16 -- Lorain County Community College issued the following news release:

Two Lorain County entities were named partners in the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation Pilot Center announced today by the White House.The Obama Administration today announced the launch of a new public-private institute for manufacturing innovation in Youngstown, Ohio as part of its ongoing efforts to help revitalize American manufacturing and encourage companies to invest in the United States.

This new partnership, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII), was selected through a competitive process to award an initial $30 million in federal funding, matched by $40 million from the winning consortium.The proposal was led by the National Center for Defense Machining and Manufacturing, headquartered in LaTrobe, PA and included significant leadership from Lorain County Community College, Case Western Reserve University, Carnegie Mellon University, Youngstown State University and as well as a network of private and public partners.

"I'm pleased that we are taking steps to strengthen American manufacturing by launching a new manufacturing institute in Ohio," said President Obama."This institute will help make sure that the manufacturing jobs of tomorrow take root not in places like China or India, but right here in the United States of America.That's how we'll put more people back to work and build an economy that lasts."

Earlier this year, the White House summarized the planned efforts of the pilot as focusing on additive manufacturing.Additive manufacturing is the process of joining materials to make objects from 3D model data, usually layer upon layer.It has the potential to meet defense and energy challenges and support U.S.manufacturing companies of all sizes and revolutionize the way manufacturing is done.

"Lorain County's economic heritage is built on manufacturing," commented Dr.Roy Church, President of Lorain County Community College."This pilot builds on this strength by adopting emerging technologies to transform the way products are designed and built, keeping us competitive in the global environment."

Lorain County Community College's Richard Desich SMART Commercialization Center for Microsystems will serve as a prime hub in the pilot for helping companies and technologies accelerate commercialization, penetrate new markets and create jobs.The Desich SMART Center will help package and test sensors found in additive manufacturing systems, materials and products.

"The Desich SMART Center positions our community as an essential resource for companies across the Techbelt region and the country," said Church."This Center has the potential to be an economic driver for this community.Companies involved in this effort will come here to access this resource and see Lorain County's unique support system to help them grow causing some to stay here and grow good jobs here." Lorain County Community College's Fab Lab also supports the additive manufacturing industry with 3D printing capabilities open to the public and industry.

Rapid Prototyping+Manufacturing (rp+m) (Avon Lake, Ohio) is an industry leader in Ohio and the country in fostering the growth of additive manufacturing technologies.rp+m, a sister company of Thogus Products, helps companies large and small develop new products in new materials through the use of additive manufacturing technologies.Thogus and rp+m will serve as a key resource of the supplier base for emerging additive manufacturing technologies.

"Additive Manufacturing allows our engineers and designers to build parts for companies and entrepreneurs that could not be fabricated as a single part by any other manufacturing method," said Matt Hlavin, President of Thogus Products.Rp+m's vision is to continually expand capabilities by researching and purchasing new technologies, developing new materials, getting involved in new industry markets, and fostering education for the youth.

"This pilot, right here in northeast Ohio, reinforces our vision of creating 'a new way to innovate.This is an exciting opportunity for the region, Ohio and for our company," Hlavin said.

BACKGROUND ON THE NATIONAL ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING INNOVATION INSTITUTE:

The NAMII will provide the innovation infrastructure needed to support new additive manufacturing technology and products in order to become a global center of excellence for additive manufacturing.This pilot institute will bridge the gap between basic research and product development for additive manufacturing, provide shared assets to help companies, particularly small manufacturers, access cutting-edge capabilities and equipment, and create an environment to educate and train workers in advanced additive manufacturing skills.

Additive manufacturing, often referred to as 3D printing, is a new way of making products and components from a digital model, and will have implications in a wide range of industries including defense, aerospace, automotive, and metals manufacturing.Like an office printer that puts 2D digital files on a piece of paper, a 3D printer creates components by depositing thin layers of material one after another using a digital blueprint until the exact component required has been created.The Department of Defense envisions customizing parts on site for operational systems that would otherwise be expensive to make or ship.The Department of Energy anticipates that additive processes would be able to save more than 50% energy use compared to today's 'subtractive' manufacturing processes.

NAMII IS LED BY THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR DEFENSE MANUFACTURING AND MACHINING, AND INCLUDES:

* 40+ Companies: Allegheny Technologies, AlphaMicron, Applied Systems and Technology Transfer, Autodesk, Boeing, Catalyst Connection, Energy Industries of Ohio, ExOne, FMW Composites, General Dynamics, General Electric, Honeywell, IBM, Johnson Controls, Kennametal, Kent Displays, Laser Technology Assts, Lockheed Martin, Lubrizol, M-7 Technologies, MicroFab Technologies, Morris, Northrop Grumman, nScrypt, OSRAM Sylvania, Optomec, Oxford Performance Materials, Paramount Industries / 3D Systems, Parker Hannifin, Plextronix, POM, RTI, Ruger, Sciaky, Stratasys, Stratonics, Thogus, Timken, Touchstone Research Lab, Westinghouse Nuclear, Wohlers Associates

* Nine Research Universities: Carnegie Mellon University, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, Lehigh University, Penn State University, Robert Morris University, University of Akron, University of Pittsburgh, Youngstown State University

* Five Community Colleges: Eastern Gateway Community College, Lorain County Community College, Northampton Community College, Penn College of Technology, Westmoreland County Community College

* Eleven Non-Profit Organizations: Association for Manufacturing Technology, Ben Franklin Technology Partners, JumpStart Ohio, Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network, MT Connect, NorTech, National Digital Engineering and Manufacturing Consortium, Ohio Aerospace Institute, Robert C.Byrd Institute, the Youngstown Business Incubator, and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

Return to Top



News Headline: Looking Back | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (PHOTO) Tri-Towers, the largest residential complex on the
Kent State University campus, takes shape in this
1967 photo. The trio of 10-story dormitories shares
a common rotunda area. The buildings are named for Dr.
Karl Clayton Leebrick, KSU president from 1938-1943;
G. Harry Wright, chairman of the theater division of the
School of Speech from 1935-1964; and Judith E. Koonce,
a 1958 KSU graduate who died at the age of 23 while attempting
to save an 11-year old girl from drowning.
Koonce Hall is the only residence hall named for a former
student. Tri-Towers was dedicated on May 25, 1968.

Return to Top



News Headline: William Koberna is not convicted of felony | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Digital Journal
Contact Name: Melissa Horrocks
News OCR Text: Brunswick - A grand jury has decided to indict a Kent university student of less serious charges. The Kent university student posted on Twitter that he was going to shoot up the Ohio campus and was facing a felony charge.

ABC News reports, William Koberna, a 19 year old sophomore, was facing charges due to a telecommunications harassment, that usually carries a maximum sentence of six months in prison. Officials had charged him with causing panic, but the grand jury decided not to indict him of felony.

Koberna was released from prison after he paid a bond. The computer, science major was living off site and studying at the school's College of Arts and Sciences. When the tweet was posted, a university employee was monitoring social media mentions when he came across it. He then alerted school officials who responded accordingly.

Due to shooting at other universities, no threat can be ignored. Deadly gunfire caused four students deaths in Kent State during May 1970, according to .

Koberna was arrested at his parents' house in the Cleveland suburb of Brunswick after he posted the tweet. The message was sent on July 25th. Court records show that Koberna was appointed a public defender. Public records have no details of Koberna's telephone number, according to Sanluisobispo.com.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus