Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown; University Facilities Management (2)
Art, School of; Town-Gown; WKSU (1)
Board of Trustees (1)
Continuing and Distance Education (1)
Institutional Advancement; KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (2)
Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum (1)
KSU at Stark; Students; Study Abroad (1)
KSU at Stark; Town-Gown (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Music (1)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Sustainability (1)
Town-Gown (3)
Town-Gown; WKSU (1)
WKSU (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Architecture and Environmental Design; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Kent State officials outline plans for renovations in Kent, other campuses (Lefton, Euclide) 09/05/2012 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent -- In its "Foundations of Excellence" showcase Aug. 29, Kent State University offered a glimpse of the many renovations and construction projects planned for the main and regional campuses to bring the...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown; University Facilities Management (2)
$186 million in facilitiesplanned at Kent State (Lefton, Euclide) 09/05/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

Auto Jobs Kent State University President Lester Lefton speaks Aug. 29 about the construction projects planned to transform the campus during a showcase previewing...

Kent State officials outline plans for renovations in Kent, other campuses (Lefton, Euclide) 09/05/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email


Art, School of; Town-Gown; WKSU (1)
Welcome to the 19th annual Art in the Park 09/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Board of Trustees (1)
Movers and Shakers 09/04/2012 SmartBusiness - Online Text Attachment Email

...R. Kasich announced that Western Reserve Partners LLC's founder and managing partner, Ralph Della Ratta, has been appointed to serve as a member of the Kent State University Board of Trustees. Della Ratta's term began July 13, 2012, and will end May 16, 2021. Aside from his involvement with Kent...


Continuing and Distance Education (1)
A concise guide to online etiquette 09/04/2012 BenefitsPro.com Text Attachment Email

...Internet-reared students who occasionally forget that other people's opinions are indeed just as important as theirs, no matter how loudly you yell. Kent State in Ohio has a good one, and the basics it outlines are once we all could stick by: Avoid language that may come across as strong or...


Institutional Advancement; KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (2)
Public/Private Partnership Builds New Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center (Finn) 09/04/2012 PR Newswire - Online Text Attachment Email

Public/Private Partnership Builds New Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center Opens the Door to 472 Jobs, Economic Growth KENT, Ohio , Sept. 4, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- A unique...

Kent State University Foundation Developing 95-Room Hotel (Finn) 09/04/2012 Lodging - Online Text Attachment Email

...$9 million in New Markets Tax Credits (NMTC) from Finance Fund, and $6.5 million from Development Fund of the Western Reserve (DFWR), will enable the Kent State University (KSU) Foundation to fund an important new hotel and conference center that will create 472 local jobs and spur regional tourism...


Institutional Advancement; KSU Museum (1)
On With The Show 09/05/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...Beach," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques" and "Collectors and Collecting," the Kent State Museum, front campus at KSU, E. Main St.


KSU at Stark; Students; Study Abroad (1)
Small Business Development Center Announces the 2012-13 Scholarship Recipient 09/04/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

...college. This fall, a $500 SBDC scholarship, administered by the Stark Community Foundation, is assisting the academic goals of Kavitha Bagavandoss, a Kent State University at Stark economics major. When she took a finance course at Canton's GlenOak High School, Bagavandoss was hooked. She admits...


KSU at Stark; Town-Gown (1)
Bras being collected for battered women's shelters 09/04/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...Aerie #141, Ladies Super Fitness, Mercy Medical Center's Mercy Boutique, The Repository. Hartville: Hartville News. Jackson Township: Ms. E's Place, Kent State University Stark Campus. Louisville: Bud's Corner. North Canton: Curves, Studio Arts and Glass. Portage County Aurora: Curves....


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Arts Beat: Performing Arts Center has variety on schedule 09/04/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Music and Comedy and Dance….Oh My! Have you checked the schedule for the upcoming season of the Kent State University Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center? What a great variety of shows to pick from! The new season kicks off this Thursday, Sept....


Music (1)
New fall classes and performances are offered at Solon art center 09/04/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Maria Sensi Sellner, the production will star Marian Vogel, Timothy Culver, Brian Johnson and Kimberly Lauritsen. The opera opens is in partnership with Kent State University Hugh A. Glauser School of Music Opera Workshop. Then it's time to strike up the band with SCA Spotlight Youth Theater's production...


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Business news briefs - Sept. 4 09/05/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Sustainability (1)
Job growth predicted in Ohio's solar energy industry 09/05/2012 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (3)
Like Art in the Park? Thank a volunteer 09/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent panel approves Kent Wells Sherman House relocation 09/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Wells-Sherman House gets OK to Move to North Water Street 09/05/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...citizen planning boards in recent months as members of the non-profit worked to save it from demolition. The house had to be moved recently to make way for Kent State University's Esplanade extension, which saw the demolition of several of the house's former neighbors. The relocation plan has proven...


Town-Gown; WKSU (1)
Contributors to Art in the Park thanked 09/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


WKSU (1)
Ohio limiting ownership of exotic animals 09/04/2012 United Press International (UPI) Text Email

Owners of exotic animals in Ohio are trying to figure out how to comply with strict new state rules. The new law takes effect Wednesday, the Kent State University station, WKSU-FM, reported. It was adopted after police killed dozens of exotic animals in Zanesville, many of them potentially...


News Headline: Kent State officials outline plans for renovations in Kent, other campuses (Lefton, Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent -- In its "Foundations of Excellence" showcase Aug. 29, Kent State University offered a glimpse of the many renovations and construction projects planned for the main and regional campuses to bring the university into the 21st century.

"For the next few years, you'll see our campuses transformed," Kent State President Lester Lefton said, speaking to a crowd of more than 300 people.

Renderings of regional campus projects, the city's downtown development, energy conservation methods and hints of main campus construction surrounded the Student Center Ballroom, while architects and administrators casually answered questions from the public.

Kent State has about $186 million of construction planned to take place over the next few years, including new buildings and major technological and infrastructure renovations to existing buildings.

"We will build a home for our College of Architecture and Environmental Design, we will complete major renovations to the Art Building and Art Annex, we will build a home for our progressive College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology," Lefton said.

"The projects we've chosen to do are going to keep us a leader in campus safety, accessibility and sustainability."

The Kent State trustees will meet Sept. 12, to consider approving the bulk of the planned projects.

In March, trustees authorized the university to issue $170 million in 30-year general revenue bonds, the primary source of project funding

Renderings of renovations and new buildings at the Kent campus were not available for viewing yet, though a map indicated that the new architecture building will be constructed on the Esplanade extension near Hilltop Drive and South Lincoln Street.

TOM EUCLIDE, the university's executive director of facilities planning and operations, said renderings aren't likely to be ready until spring.

"We're barely into the vision phase," he said. "A lot of work is being done to figure how the buildings will be situated," he said.

He added the new technology building likely will be placed in the science corridor, across from Henderson Hall.

Lefton said the new development is just one piece of a major regional growth effort, offering praise to the city of Kent's like-minded development, along with the many private and public partners involved.

"We're making contributions that will have a regional ripple effect," he said. "Kent State is becoming a lever that is spurring hundreds of millions of dollars of regional economic development."

A few of Kent State's projects already are underway, including the extension of the Esplanade planned to link the university and city's downtown via a large green space and pathway on top of Erie Street. While the Esplanade work is expected to be complete next spring, work on the large student green space between Risman Plaza and Summit Road is expected to wrap up in time for homecoming on Oct. 20.

Lefton said each and every Kent State student will benefit from the projects in one way or another.

"The truth is, this is really about students, this is about creating a learning environment, this is about creating an educational experience that will be unparalleled in Northeast Ohio and perhaps all of Ohio," he said.

"We are creating a 21st century campus, we are creating a 21st century community."

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News Headline: $186 million in facilitiesplanned at Kent State (Lefton, Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Auto

Jobs
Kent State University President Lester Lefton speaks Aug. 29 about the construction projects planned to transform the campus during a showcase previewing the works.

In its "Foundations of Excellence" showcase Aug. 29, Kent State University offered a glimpse of the many renovations and construction projects planned for the main and regional campuses to bring the university into the 21st century.

"For the next few years, you'll see our campuses transformed," KSU President Lester Lefton said, speaking to a crowd of more than 300 people.

Renderings of regional campus projects, the city's downtown development, energy conservation methods and hints of main campus construction surrounded the Student Center Ballroom, while architects and administrators casually answered questions from the public.

KSU has about $186 million of construction planned to take place over the next few years, including new buildings and major technological and infrastructure renovations to existing buildings.

"We will build a home for our College of Architecture and Environmental Design, we will complete major renovations to the Art Building and Art Annex, we will build a home for our progressive College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology," Lefton said. "The projects we've chosen to do are going to keep us a leader in campus safety, accessibility and sustainability."

The KSU Board of Trustees will meet on Sept. 12 to consider approving the bulk of the planned projects. In March, trustees authorized the university to issue $170 million in 30-year general revenue bonds, the primary source of project funding

Renderings of renovations and new buildings at the Kent campus were not available for viewing yet, though a map indicated that the new architecture building will be constructed on the Esplanade extension near Hilltop Drive and South Lincoln Street.

Tom Euclide, the university's executive director of facilities planning and operations, said renderings aren't likely to be ready until spring.

"We're barely into the vision phase," he said. "A lot of work is being done to figure how the buildings will be situated," he said.

He said the new technology building likely will be placed in the science corridor, across from Henderson Hall.

Lefton said the new development is just one piece of a major regional growth effort, offering praise to the city of Kent's like-minded development, along with the many private and public partners involved.

"We're making contributions that will have a regional ripple effect," he said. "Kent State is becoming a lever that is spurring hundreds of millions of dollars of regional economic development."

A few of KSU's projects already are under way, including the extension of the Esplanade planned to link the university and city's downtown via a large green space and pathway on top of Erie Street. While the Esplanade work is expected to be complete next spring, work on the large student green space between Risman Plaza and Summit Road is expected to wrap up in time for homecoming on Oct. 20.

Lefton said each and every KSU student will benefit from the projects in one way or another.

"The truth is, this is really about students, this is about creating a learning environment, this is about creating an educational experience that will be unparalleled in Northeast Ohio and perhaps all of Ohio," he said. "We are creating a 21st century campus, we are creating a 21st century community."

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News Headline: Kent State officials outline plans for renovations in Kent, other campuses (Lefton, Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent -- In its "Foundations of Excellence" showcase Aug. 29, Kent State University offered a glimpse of the many renovations and construction projects planned for the main and regional campuses to bring the university into the 21st century.

"For the next few years, you'll see our campuses transformed," Kent State President Lester Lefton said, speaking to a crowd of more than 300 people.

Renderings of regional campus projects, the city's downtown development, energy conservation methods and hints of main campus construction surrounded the Student Center Ballroom, while architects and administrators casually answered questions from the public.

Kent State has about $186 million of construction planned to take place over the next few years, including new buildings and major technological and infrastructure renovations to existing buildings.

"We will build a home for our College of Architecture and Environmental Design, we will complete major renovations to the Art Building and Art Annex, we will build a home for our progressive College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology," Lefton said.

"The projects we've chosen to do are going to keep us a leader in campus safety, accessibility and sustainability."

The Kent State trustees will meet Sept. 12, to consider approving the bulk of the planned projects.

In March, trustees authorized the university to issue $170 million in 30-year general revenue bonds, the primary source of project funding

Renderings of renovations and new buildings at the Kent campus were not available for viewing yet, though a map indicated that the new architecture building will be constructed on the Esplanade extension near Hilltop Drive and South Lincoln Street.

TOM EUCLIDE, the university's executive director of facilities planning and operations, said renderings aren't likely to be ready until spring.

"We're barely into the vision phase," he said. "A lot of work is being done to figure how the buildings will be situated," he said.

He added the new technology building likely will be placed in the science corridor, across from Henderson Hall.

Lefton said the new development is just one piece of a major regional growth effort, offering praise to the city of Kent's like-minded development, along with the many private and public partners involved.

"We're making contributions that will have a regional ripple effect," he said. "Kent State is becoming a lever that is spurring hundreds of millions of dollars of regional economic development."

A few of Kent State's projects already are underway, including the extension of the Esplanade planned to link the university and city's downtown via a large green space and pathway on top of Erie Street. While the Esplanade work is expected to be complete next spring, work on the large student green space between Risman Plaza and Summit Road is expected to wrap up in time for homecoming on Oct. 20.

Lefton said each and every Kent State student will benefit from the projects in one way or another.

"The truth is, this is really about students, this is about creating a learning environment, this is about creating an educational experience that will be unparalleled in Northeast Ohio and perhaps all of Ohio," he said.

"We are creating a 21st century campus, we are creating a 21st century community."

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News Headline: Welcome to the 19th annual Art in the Park | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Parks and Recreation,
support from, WKSU
and the Record-Courier, is
pleased to present the 19th
Annual Art in the Park fine
arts festival in Fred Fuller
Park in Kent. The 2012
show will be held on Saturday
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
and Sunday from 11 a.m.
to 5 p.m.

Art in the Park, always
held the weekend after Labor
Day, has become a premier
community event for
Kent. The show is a family
event that attracts residents
from Northeast Ohio
communities. The park
is a picturesque setting
in late summer and early
fall, with majestic trees
and scenic walking trails
along the Cuyahoga river.
This year's event features
99 artists who express their
creative talents through
photography, paintings, artful
apparel, ceramics and
pottery, drawings, jewelry,
glasswork, metal, wood
and sculpture.

“Free Flowing Art” will
be the focus for this years
children's area. Young artists
are invited to create art
in our Free Children's Art
Area surrounded and inspired
by the beauty of nature.
Art is one of the first
expressions we expose children
to, sharing with them
music, colors, textures in
fabrics, shapes and even
dance as babies. Their first
paint or clay is probably
their dinner but they soon
move on to create, view, interpret,
and appreciate art
in many forms.

There will be numerous
demonstrations throughout
the two day event. Watch
ice & fruit carving by the
University of Akron and free
flow paint demo by Renee
Volchko, local artist from
Kent, Fused Glass by Marianne
Hite and potters from
Kent State University's Ceramics
Club. The Society of
Creative Anachronism will
recreate the arts and skills
of Medieval Europe. The
Snow Flake Tea Room of
Stow will perform a Japanese
tea ceremony, providing
observers an opportunity
to gain an understanding
of the language, manners,
and etiquette behind its
principals. And don't forget
to visit the Tree City
Woodcarvers, The Live Alpacas,
and Merle Mollenkopf,
strolling poet.

The 10th annual Sylvia
Coogan Silent Auction will
be located next to the information
booth, stocked with
donated items from exhibitors.
Bidding ends on Sunday
at 4 p.m.

In addition to the wonderful
visual art experiences,
music will be performed
on the stage throughout
both days.

Many of the regions favorite
performers will delight
attendees with a wide variety
such as jazz, country,
folk music as well as children's
interactive music.

Back again this year, with
the help of Jeff Ingram from
Standing Rock Cultural
Arts, a second stage has
been added. Listen to indie
and classic rock, country,
bluegrass, siltar and tabla,
folk, African drumming,
and African storytelling.

Visit the variety of food
vendors while walking
through the park. They include
Byers Concession,
Mediterranean Cuisine,
Hot Soss Don, Bubba's
Smokin' BBQ, Wild West
Kettle Korn, Aunt Annie's
Ice Cream, The Almond
Shop, Scrumptious, Pierogies
of Cleveland and the
Boy Scout troop No. 257
will be selling pizza.

Come prepared to engage
in all the sights, sounds and
tastes that make any outdoor
show enjoyable. Many
months of planning go into
this event and it would not
be successful without the
dedication of the staff, volunteers
and sponsors who
believe in family oriented
programs for the entire
community.

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News Headline: Movers and Shakers | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: SmartBusiness - Online
Contact Name: thunder
News OCR Text: Ralph Della Ratta, Founder and Managing Partner, Western Reserve Partners LLC

Governor John R. Kasich announced that Western Reserve Partners LLC's founder and managing partner, Ralph Della Ratta, has been appointed to serve as a member of the Kent State University Board of Trustees.

Della Ratta's term began July 13, 2012, and will end May 16, 2021. Aside from his involvement with Kent State, Della Ratta is also active in numerous local and national organizations, including University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital National Leadership Council, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the 50 Club of Cleveland. He is also a board member of Olympic Steel Inc., MAI Wealth Advisors LLC and NDI Medical.

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News Headline: A concise guide to online etiquette | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: BenefitsPro.com
Contact Name: Andy Stonehouse
News OCR Text: As the information revolution continues in full swing, with Apple recently taking a page from Microsoft by suing its way into total domination of a portion of the business – nice move, Apple – I guess I'd kind of had stronger hopes for humankind than all of this electronic democratization has produced.

Not unlike the wildly unpleasant experience one gets while driving the nation's road-rage-infected highways – motorists now mimicking the early days of the Morton Downey Jr. show as a matter of course – I continue to be astounded how the promise of an interconnected online world has gone off the rails, so quickly.

This is of particular interest to professionals in the retirement planning community, not just all 330 million of us in the country with keyboards on the smartphones in our pockets. Your job, your reputation, your ability to liaise with bigger clients and larger contracts and more influential people – continues to ride on your ability to be civil when you type.

A few of us old-school ink-stained wretches who came up in the pre-electronic journalism world (I'm 43 but I manage to feel as curmudgeonly as Andy Rooney on occasion) remember the day when the letter to the editor was the way of the world.

A letter to the editor, as you may remember from that arcane time, required forethought and a bit of planning, even if it was written quickly and angrily in ballpoint pen (you could tell they were really, really angry if they ripped holes in the paper in the process) and shoved through the mail slot of your local newspaper.

You didn't have to agree with the editor or the writer, but a few important standards were upheld – or surgically edited into your response – suggesting that civility overrule name-calling, slander and maybe just pure mean-spiritedness. And the process had the delicious element of time on its side. How romantic.

Nowadays, the Web allows us to respond before we've thought things out. Or, frequently, before we've absorbed the content, considered some context, let the whole thing roll around in our heads for a while.

We all know it's at its most explosive in the comment sections of websites very much like this one here – I encourage the response, and the enthusiasm, but … as I say, I sometimes yearn for that 24 hour cooling-off period.

In a business setting, it's your email and your social media where your opinion is going to get you into trouble. Email, tweets and Facebook posts are great to quickly get your point across or share a joke, but that immediacy can also get you into deep trouble. And the glowing electronic page is a terrible place to try to glean nuance and depth and meaning. Especially as they keep coming at you, all day long.

I was fascinated to discover that colleges are now offering courses for their students on the basics of online etiquette, probably a necessary tool for Internet-reared students who occasionally forget that other people's opinions are indeed just as important as theirs, no matter how loudly you yell.

Kent State in Ohio has a good one, and the basics it outlines are once we all could stick by:

Avoid language that may come across as strong or offensive.

Keep writing to a point and stay on topic.

Read first – other people's posts and comments – and write later.

Review, review … then send.

The University of Wisconsin has some interesting suggestions for its online behavior, mentioning that people avoid humor and sarcasm (some of our favorite tools) as they have no facial or tone-of-voice cues to help explain the post's intentions. I disagree with that one, by the way.

The most concise statement on the core rules of netiquette go back nearly three decades when the earliest forms of the Internet (like the mainframe I used for a chat room in 1990) were first developed. They remain true. Share expert knowledge, respect other people's time and bandwidth (I think that may have been more literal than figurative during the days of dialup) and … adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life. Pretty simple, really.

About the Author

Andy Stonehouse

Andy Stonehouse is the Retirement Advisor channel manager for BenefitsPro.com. He is the former editor of Agent's Sales Journal magazine, and has also worked with Senior Market Advisor and LifeHealthPro.com.

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News Headline: Public/Private Partnership Builds New Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center (Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: PR Newswire - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Public/Private Partnership Builds New Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center

Opens the Door to 472 Jobs, Economic Growth

KENT, Ohio , Sept. 4, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- A unique public/private partnership, that includes $9 million in New Markets Tax Credits (NMTC) from Finance Fund, and $6.5 million from Development Fund of the Western Reserve (DFWR), will enable the Kent State University (KSU) Foundation to fund an important new hotel and conference center that will create 472 local jobs and spur regional tourism growth and economic development.

(Photo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120904/CL67477 )

Project partners in the $15.6 million Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center in downtown Kent include the Kent State University Foundation, The Pizzuti Companies of Columbus , City of Kent , DFWR, which is controlled by the Development Finance Authority of Summit County , and Finance Fund. 

"The partnership that is now making downtown redevelopment in Kent a reality has been a team effort of many committed organizations and individuals," said Gene Finn , Kent State 's vice president for advancement and executive director of the KSU Foundation.

The new 95-room hotel is part of a larger $100 million redevelopment project in downtown Kent that will offer retail, office and residential space. Construction of the hotel, slated to open in the spring 2013, will generate 430 construction jobs. When complete, the hotel and conference center will result in 42 permanent jobs in a community that has a 29 percent poverty rate.

"There are no comparable hotels in the immediate area," said Joel S. Pizzuti , president of The Pizzuti Companies. "There will be significant impact on the local economy including small business growth, job creation and additional development."

The new hotel and conference center will serve university visitors and support area tourism overall. In addition, Kent and Akron -area employers are expected to hold corporate conferences and special events in the 5,400-square-foot, 300-seat ballroom/conference center. The hotel will also serve as a learning space for students, particularly for those enrolled in KSU's hospitality management degree program.

"This project hits all of our hot buttons," said Finance Fund CEO James R. Klein . "It drives jobs and economic development as well as spill-over benefits as it provides education for students building skills for future employment." Finance Fund is investing $8 million in federal and $1 million in state New Markets Tax Credits.

Chris Burnham of the Development Finance Authority of Summit County remarked, "We are delighted to have the opportunity to partner with the Kent State University Foundation, the Pizzuti Companies of Columbus , and Finance Fund to bring about this investment in downtown Kent . We also thank members of the Ohio Congressional delegation for their foresight and vision to enable investments like this to occur in our communities using the New Markets Tax Credit program."

Thousands of campus visitors are attracted to the area each year. KSU is now the second largest public university in Ohio with total student enrollment of more than 41,000. "A driving force behind the hotel is to provide a home base for our returning alumni and to overnight prospective students and keep them downtown," Finn said.

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News Headline: Kent State University Foundation Developing 95-Room Hotel (Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Lodging - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio—A unique public/private partnership, that includes $9 million in New Markets Tax Credits (NMTC) from Finance Fund, and $6.5 million from Development Fund of the Western Reserve (DFWR), will enable the Kent State University (KSU) Foundation to fund an important new hotel and conference center that will create 472 local jobs and spur regional tourism growth and economic development.

Project partners in the $15.6 million Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center in downtown Kent include the Kent State University Foundation, The Pizzuti Companies of Columbus, City of Kent, DFWR, which is controlled by the Development Finance Authority of Summit County, and Finance Fund.

"The partnership that is now making downtown redevelopment in Kent a reality has been a team effort of many committed organizations and individuals," said Gene Finn, Kent State's vice president for advancement and executive director of the KSU Foundation, in an announcement.

The new 95-room hotel is part of a larger $100 million redevelopment project in downtown Kent that will offer retail, office and residential space. Construction of the hotel, slated to open in the spring 2013, will generate 430 construction jobs. When complete, the hotel and conference center will result in 42 permanent jobs in a community that has a 29 percent poverty rate.

"There are no comparable hotels in the immediate area," said Joel S. Pizzuti, president of The Pizzuti Companies. "There will be significant impact on the local economy including small business growth, job creation and additional development."

The new hotel and conference center will serve university visitors and support area tourism overall. In addition, Kent and Akron-area employers are expected to hold corporate conferences and special events in the 5,400-square-foot, 300-seat ballroom/conference center. The hotel will also serve as a learning space for students, particularly for those enrolled in KSU's hospitality management degree program.

"This project hits all of our hot buttons," said Finance Fund CEO James R. Klein. "It drives jobs and economic development as well as spill-over benefits as it provides education for students building skills for future employment." Finance Fund is investing $8 million in federal and $1 million in state New Markets Tax Credits.

Thousands of campus visitors are attracted to the area each year. KSU is now the second largest public university in Ohio with total student enrollment of more than 41,000. "A driving force behind the hotel is to provide a home base for our returning alumni and to overnight prospective students and keep them downtown," Finn said.

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News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MUSICAL ACTIVITIES

Sept. 8 -- Sheryl Crow, Los Lonely Boys, O.A.R., 6-11 p.m., Dix Stadium, Kent St. U. campus.

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES

Currently -- "On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life," "A Day at the Beach," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques" and "Collectors and Collecting," the Kent State Museum, front campus at KSU, E. Main St.

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News Headline: Small Business Development Center Announces the 2012-13 Scholarship Recipient | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Canton Small Business Development Center's (SBDC) mission is focused on fostering the region's economic development through valuable programs, services and events that benefit small business owners and entrepreneurs. For the second consecutive year, events, such as the nonprofit organization's upcoming Entrepreneur Experience, have allowed the SBDC to utilize its proceeds to provide a scholarship to a deserving student pursuing a business, finance or economics degree at an accredited Stark County university or college.

This fall, a $500 SBDC scholarship, administered by the Stark Community Foundation, is assisting the academic goals of Kavitha Bagavandoss, a Kent State University at Stark economics major.

When she took a finance course at Canton's GlenOak High School, Bagavandoss was hooked. She admits to being the first person among her family and friends to be interested in financial education, becoming passionate about many aspects of finance, including credit versus debit, investments, saving for retirement, hedge funds and green energy stock.

“I started looking at investment opportunities for my parents and telling friends to start saving their money while they were still young,” she says. Even though retirement is many years away for Bagavandoss, she took the initiative to protect her future by starting a Roth IRA at the age of 18. She hopes to be an example, letting others her age know that they can have financial security if they start preparing for it now.

Looking back, Bagavandoss credits her high school drama teacher, Carla Derr, for encouraging her career aspirations. “She recognized my enthusiasm,” she says. When Derr expressed confidence in her ability to pursue a future in the financial field, Bagavandoss started planning her college education toward that goal.

She attended Kent State Stark as a post-secondary student while still in high school and is currently ranked as a junior. Bagavandoss is happy to be a student at the Kent State regional campus and feels that she is receiving a great academic foundation. “At the Stark Campus, I'm able to connect with my professors. In my courses, both in-person and online, I've had high-quality instruction,” she says.

In the spring semester, she will take advantage of Kent State University's Study Abroad program and continue her education in South Korea for a semester. Bagavandoss says she is excited about the opportunity of going away to school in a foreign country. The independent, self-motivated teenager enjoys being challenged and active. She is currently employed as a zumba instructor, peer mentor and a Kent State Student Ambassador. “When I come back from South Korea, I want to find an internship that would give me the training to be a financial advisor,” she says. Her long-term goals include earning a master's degree in financial engineering.

Her suggestion for fellow students is to apply for several scholarships, just as she does. “There isn't a good reason not to apply for scholarships – especially the local ones,” Bagavandoss says. Although she is surprised to learn that money often remains unclaimed simply because students do not apply for it, she is grateful to be benefitting from generous organizations, such as the SBDC, that see the value of a college education. Always mindful of fiscal responsibility, Bagavandoss realizes that the scholarships she receives are a smart investment in her own education that will pay off through her successful career.

For more information regarding the SBDC's services or programs, visit www.cantonsbdc.org. Applications for the 2013-14 SBDC Scholarship are currently being accepted through May 1, 2013. Visit the Stark Community Foundation's website at www.starkcf.org/scholarships.asp to download an application.

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News Headline: Bras being collected for battered women's shelters | Email

News Date: 09/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sept. 04--A multi-county effort to raise awareness of breast cancer and collect bras for battered women's shelters is under way, with donations being accepted at more than 50 sites in Stark, Summit, Portage and Medina counties.

The third annual Bras Across the Crooked River, sponsored by the Celtic Club, will culminate with three displays in October.

Donated bras will be hung across the new MetroParks Bike and Hike pedestrian bridge over Interstate 271 near Brandywine Falls in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Northfield Center Township on Oct. 6.

On Oct. 13, bras will decorate the Cuyahoga River bridge in downtown Kent.

Details will be announced later for a third display, in Stark County.

After the displays, the clothing will be distributed among the Domestic Violence Project (Stark County), the Battered Women's Shelter of Summit and Medina County and Safer Futures (Portage County).

Over the past two years, the Celtic Club has collected more than 3,700 bras.

New and gently worn bras are being accepted through the end of September.

Summit County

Akron: Akron Firefighters Credit Union, B.G. Bree's, Blimp City Bike and Hike, COS Blueprint, Summit County Executive Russ Pry's office, Summit Federal Credit Union, Akron FOP Auxiliary No. 1, VFW Main Post 1070.

Barberton: Barberton Herald, Mayor William Judge's office.

Coventry: Akron Area Alumnae of Theta Phi Alpha, Coventry Curves.

Cuyahoga Falls: Connecting Touch Therapy and Wellness Center, Planet Scott, Rubber City Harley-Davidson, Sarah's Vineyard.

Fairlawn: Fitness 19.

Green: The Suburbanite.

Hudson: Life Center Plus.

Peninsula: Century Cycles.

Stow: Mayor Sara Drew's office.

Tallmadge: Mayor David Kline's office, Tallmadge Recreation Center, Tallmadge Hair Service and Spa.

Twinsburg: Mayor Katherine Procop's office.

Stark County

Canton: Arcadia Grille, Canton Eagles Aerie #141, Ladies Super Fitness, Mercy Medical Center's Mercy Boutique, The Repository.

Hartville: Hartville News.

Jackson Township: Ms. E's Place, Kent State University Stark Campus.

Louisville: Bud's Corner.

North Canton: Curves, Studio Arts and Glass.

Portage County

Aurora: Curves.

Brimfield: Curves.

Kent: Kent Area Chamber of Commerce, Kent Mayor Jerry Fiala's Office, Kent State Student Recreation and Wellness Center, Kent State Student Center, McKay Bricker Framing, Pufferbelly Restaurant, the Record-Courier.

Mantua: Carlton Harley-Davidson, Jake's Restaurant.

Ravenna: Portage County Board of Commissioners, Ravenna Athletic Center, Curves.

Streetsboro: Mayor Glenn Broska's office.

Medina County

Medina: Century Cycles, Elegant Essentials.

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News Headline: Arts Beat: Performing Arts Center has variety on schedule | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Jeannine Kennedy
News OCR Text: Music and Comedy and Dance….Oh My! Have you checked the schedule for the upcoming season of the Kent State University Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center? What a great variety of shows to pick from!

The new season kicks off this Thursday, Sept. 6, with a performance by the rock band Red Wanting Blue and just seems to pick up steam from there. The schedule is absolutely chock full of performances that offer something for everyone…young, mature, country, classical, funny, serious, local, national and international. I for one never thought that I'd have the chance to see the Blue Man Group (performance artists) in my own back yard…the type of show that I would usually catch after an expensive plane ride somewhere…like Las Vegas! (Not to mention all of the other expenses associated with a trip out there.)

Check the website www.tusc.kent.edu/pac for a complete listing of shows that includes everything from Tap Dogs to Mannheim Steamrollers to Fiddlers on Roofs…and on and on.

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News Headline: New fall classes and performances are offered at Solon art center | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Joan Rusek
News OCR Text: SOLON - Solon Center for the Arts begins a new fall semester with a line up of offerings for students of all ages in music, theater, dance and art.

Register now for classes or private lessons to further your skills or just for fun and enjoyment. In addition to arts education, SCA also offers several performing opportunities.

The Solon Philharmonic Orchestra is about to embark on its fifth season with a kick off concert and benefit for the orchestra Nov. 3. This concert will also feature Metropolitan Opera soprano Kelly Cae Hogan. An additional concert will be performed on Sunday, November 4.

SPO is looking for instrumentalists, high school age and older, to perform with the ensemble under the direction of Maestro Vincent Danner and Associate Conductor Brian Thornton.

Also on stage will be Giuseppe Verdi's beloved opera, "La Traviata" 7:30 p.m. Sept. 28, 3 p.m. Sept. 30 and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 6. Directed by Jonathon Field and conducted by Maria Sensi Sellner, the production will star Marian Vogel, Timothy Culver, Brian Johnson and Kimberly Lauritsen. The opera opens is in partnership with Kent State University Hugh A. Glauser School of Music Opera Workshop.

Then it's time to strike up the band with SCA Spotlight Youth Theater's production of "The Music Man Jr." by Meredith Willson and Franklin Lacey. Performances are Oct. 25- 28.

In October the SCA Gallery will display a celebration of Italian Heritage Month. Painter Judy Takacs' exhibit “The Solon Senior Project” will open Nov. 9 and run through December 14.

Solon Center for the Arts is located at 6315 SOM Center Road. Call 440-337-1400.

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News Headline: Business news briefs - Sept. 4 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Business succession series

The Green Chamber of Commerce has announced a business ownership succession planning series beginning Sept. 11.

The programs — geared to small- and medium-sized businesses — will address the following topics:

• Sept. 11: What is your company worth to a buyer, your family, and you?

• Sept. 25: Exit Strategies: Which one should you choose?

• Oct. 11: Separating personal wealth and strength from your business.

The Sept. 11 event will be at Summa Health Center's Green campus at 3838 Massillon Road with Chris Cooper of Kent State University's Ohio Employee Ownership Center as the facilitator. Speakers will include Steve Goykhberg and Tom Kotick, associate directors of SS&G; Greg McDermott, president of FirstMerit Insurance Group; and Jason Haupt, director of Krugliak, Wilkins, Griffiths & Dougherty LPA.

Registration and breakfast begins at 7:15 a.m. followed by the program and roundtable discussion at 7:30.

Chamber members pay $50 per session or $100 for all three; nonmembers, $65 per session or $150 for all three. Multiple key contributors from the same company pay $30 per seminar or $75 for all three.

For more information, please email lori.howerton@greencoc.org.

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News Headline: Job growth predicted in Ohio's solar energy industry | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A strong history in old manufacturing means new jobs in the state

Ohio is 2nd in the nation in producing solar panels. And, 200 companies in the state are now making equipment for renewable energy. WKSU's Tim Rudell reports on how this new-tech/high-tech manufacturing surge came to be…and what it may mean for jobs and the future.

Please click on link for audio:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/32956

Project chief Bob Misbrener talks over the sound of a half-a-million kilowatts of Sun generated power moving from seventeen-hundred solar panels newly installed on Kent State University's field house roof. The dark blue array covering an acre of light blue roof, is part of Kent's master plan for sustainable energy projects on its eight campuses.

Misbrener and boss Steve Storck say this first solar project on the main Campus—a million-and-a-half dollar project--came to be because the economics worked.

There was still some government funding—despite termination last year of the biggest federal support program for solar. And, there's money to be made with “RENEWABLE ENRGY CREDITS” from the state…called “recs”… or “S”-recs in the case of solar. “Utilities have to buy or generate 12.5% of the power with renewable energy. So, First Energy, for example, goes out and buys up these S-recs because they're not capable of generating all of their own renewable energy. Its like a stock, and there actually brokers who deal in these. And they're a big part of the economics of it is selling the S-recs to help play for this investment.”

There is more to the current “economics” of solar power.

Howard Learner of the non-profit Environmental Law and Policy Center says advances in renewable energy equipment and manufacturing are moving the industries toward cost competitiveness with fossil generation.

And, he says, unlike conventional power plants a typical solar array doesn't cost a lot when idle. So, solar may fill the key niche of augmentation of the power grid at peak load. To the benefit of our economy, that may be especially true here. “Solar power is available at the time the power is most needed most. On the host summer day, and it's 3:00 in the afternoon, and everybody is cranking up their air conditioning. So it's a very important resource at the point when the power generation market is at its height.

The Solar industry has also created jobs in Ohio. There are no specific figures, but in the Toledo suburb of Perrysburg alone there are five solar panel manufactures. One recently ran aground financially--the state pulled its loans—but the area is otherwise growing in panel production. Learner says that's because of the expertise and workforce from the glass industry in northwest Ohio.

Alamgir Karim of University of Akron Polymer Engineering says the same thing can happen in Northeast Ohio. …Partly because of a problem with a Rare Earth element called Indium means solar cells are going to have to made...with polymers. “Indium; that's what all the silicon based solar cells are using but there is not enough Indium in the world to support this next huge plethora of solar cells being planned.

Karim says sorting out manufacturing will be the key to polymer solar cell and flexible electronics production. And, he says, leading research programs in those fields at Kent State and the University of Akron and other area institutions, and the quality of work force favor Northeast Ohio.

“We have all the partners here to just go twenty or thirty miles out of town and find a company and say, have you thought about making solar cells, now that we have the technology. These discussions are already ongoing.”

Karim and Learner predict significant economic development in solar getting underway in Ohio in the three to five years

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News Headline: Like Art in the Park? Thank a volunteer | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Each year Art in the Park continues to grow
and improve because of the hard work of volunteers
and staff.

Volunteers include Lois Orlando, Volunteer
Coordinator; Kent Parks & Recreation Board
Members, Info Booth & Booth Sitters; Kent Retiree
Association, greeters; Kent State University
Super Saturday students; Garfield High School
art students; Mary Lou Kennelly and Sue Gibbons,
Sylvia Coogan Auction helpers.

Staff includes Judy Taylor, artist liaison /children's
activities; Cathy Ricks, children's activities;
Karen Magilavy, artist registration/communication;
Nancy Rice, recreation supervisor; Megan
Johns, recreation specialist; Kim Pischera, event
coordinator; Jeff Ingram, consultant; Sam Tuttle,
park grounds; John Idone, parks and recreation
director and the Kent Parks and Rec park crew.

Volunteers are always needed at the children's
area, the information booth, for parking and as
greeters. Those interested in volunteering for
Art in the Park next year should contact Kent
Parks and Recreation at 330-673-8987. Planning
begins in January.

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News Headline: Kent panel approves Kent Wells Sherman House relocation | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Planning Commission voted Tuesday to allow a historic home to move to a lot on North Water Street, reversing its original decision to prevent the house's relocation.

The commission voted 3-2 in July against approving the site plan for the Kent Wells Sherman House's move to 247 N. Water St., siding with opponents of the plan who wanted to maintain the green space at the site, currently used by the neighboring Standing Rock Cultural Arts.

Preservationists have been seeking a new location for the home, built in 1858 as a residence for city namesake Marvin Kent's sister, Frances Kent Wells.

Representatives of both groups made passionate arguments for and against the house's relocation. After the board made its decision, a Standing Rock Cultural Arts supporter told planning commissioners, “I hope your children forgive you,” as she walked out.

Commission chairman Anthony Catalano switched his vote Tuesday, siding with board members Melissa Long and Gregory Balbierz to approve the house's revised site plan. Board members Peter Paino and John Gargan Jr. voted against the move.

Catalano said after reviewing the case again, he felt the house did meet the standards of a “permitted use” of the property under the city's zoning code as a “cultural, educational or religious facility.”

He asked other board members to “stay within the bounds of their (authority)” when they made their decision on the site.

Roger Thurman, vice chairman of Kent Wells Sherman House Inc., previously said that he thought the commission overstepped its authority by ruling against the site plan. He said board members had been swayed by testimony from Standing Rock Cultural Arts proponents about how they were using the land, which they do not own.

Thurman said his group tried to compromise with the arts group by offering it shared use of the lot after the house moves, as well as continuing to search for alternate locations.

“We have tried,” Thurman said about the search for another location for the house. “Believe me, we have tried.”

Gargan said he did not believe the lot was an appropriate site for a historic house, which he said would look weird “squeezed in” on Water Street.

“I think you're doing the house a disservice by locating it there,” he said.

Jeff Ingram, executive director for Standing Rock Cultural Arts, said the community would lose children's theater, rain and organic garden and green space if the Kent Wells Sherman House moved onto the lot.

“Let's consider what we're losing along with what we're gaining,” Ingram said.

Thurman said he agreed that the arts group had done a good job utilizing the site, but questioned why it had not made any attempt to purchase the site in the nearly 20 years it used the space.

The Greek Revival-style house, slated for demolition as part of the Kent State University Esplanade Walkway project, was rediscovered by historic preservationists last year. Since then, the group has moved the home from East Erie Street to a temporary location on East College Avenue as it awaited a permanent home.

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News Headline: Wells-Sherman House gets OK to Move to North Water Street | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Planning commission approves site plan for house at 247 N. Water St.

After months of debate, members of the non-profit Kent Wells Sherman House Inc. have the OK to move a historic house with ties to the city's namesake family to the lot at 247 N. Water St.

The Kent Planning Commission voted 3-2 Tuesday to approve a site plan for the lot that situates the house 13.5 feet back from the sidewalk. The lot is the green space between the Standing Rock Cultural Arts gallery and the Scribbles Coffee Company building downtown.

The issue has appeared before several of the city's citizen planning boards in recent months as members of the non-profit worked to save it from demolition. The house had to be moved recently to make way for Kent State University's Esplanade extension, which saw the demolition of several of the house's former neighbors.

The relocation plan has proven controversial because the green space at 247 N. Water St. has been used and maintained for about 20 years by members of SRCA with permission of the landowner.

Roger Thurman, vice president of the Kent Wells-Sherman House board, said the group pledges to be good neighbors to SRCA by making the house and lot available to the arts group.

"We're going to be the best neighbors possible to Standing Rock because they're really good people in that organization," he said.

Thurman said they have a purchase agreement with the landowner, Arthur Properties Management LLC, to buy the land for $20,000.

The non-profit group can essentially start prepping the site and move the house once they have ownership, the necessary permits are isssued and moving arrangements — such as temporarily moving utilities and traffic signals — are made.

When asked about future collaboration, Standing Rock Cultural Arts Director Jeff Ingram said after the meeting he plans to try and find another location for the house while preparations are made for its move.

"It's not over," Ingram said.

University officials have said the house must be moved from its temporary location on East College Avenue by Dec. 1 or it will be razed.

Kent Planning Engineer Jennifer Barone said the group could always return to the planning commission if another location is deemed suitable.

A close vote

The site plan for North Water Street passed by one vote. Planning commission members Gregory Balbierz, Anthony Catalano and Melissa Long voted to approve the site plan. Members Peter Paino and John Gargan voted against approving the site plan.

In casting their votes, members of the planning commission tried to carefully articulate their reasoning. Although even Paino conceded the house's planned use as commercial and public space is a legally permitted use in the city's commercial downtown district.

Paino said that while he had to adhere to city code requirements in making his decision he also had to consider public input.

"Which was a compelling argument to keep the green space, and reasons why," Paino said. "I would really like to see this building put on another lot."

Catalano said his decision was based primarily on the fact the house is a permitted use on the lot within the downtown zoning district.

"This is a final vote on this motion," Catalano said.

The planning commission voted in July to reject a site plan that set the house 15 feet back from the sidewalk. So members of the Kent Wells Sherman House board changed the site plan to propose setting the house 16 inches back from the sidewalk in order to present the issue to the commission again for consideration.

A divisive issue

Excluding Thurman, 19 people spoke to the planning commission about the site plan proposal Tuesday night. Three of those who spoke supported moving the house to the North Water Street site while the remaining 16 favored keeping the green space whole.

Balbierz said that, despite the overwhelming public opposition, the Kent community appeared split evenly over the issue.

"One of the items that is perplexing to me is we have numerous letters from the public … It is 50-50 between strong support for the Kent Wells-Sherman House Inc. group as well as an equal amount for Standing Rock," Balbierz said.

Supporters of the relocation plan who spoke Tuesday often suggested that both groups could find a win-win situation with the house on the lot.

Kent resident Doug Fuller said the house only occupies about one-third of the site and leaves two thirds available for use.

"There's still tremendous opportunity for the cultural arts to thrive on that site … and for these two things to work very nicely together," Fuller said.

But many supporters of the green space insisted the best situation for SRCA's programming and activities is to leave the lot fully devoid of structures.

Ian Broadhead, a history major at Kent State, said he believes there's a fundamental disagreement between the two groups about what a compromise would be.

"For us a win-win doesn't mean we get some of the lot," he said.

Kent attorney John Plough said his father, a curator for the Portage County Historical Society, taught him as a child that preserving history is important.

"But he didn't teach me to preserve history at the expense of destroying something that's so precious to so many people," Plough said. "I think that's what we've got here."

Future use

Thurman said they can't just provide unfettered use of the lot to SRCA because of insurance concerns, and he said they would need a formal agreement in place for the arts group to use the lot.

"We have a tenant for the upstairs," Thurman said. "We've got to defray costs and earn some money to pay for the sustenance of the building. It's kind of like the Pufferbelly model where they have used the restaurant to pay for the maintenance and longevity of the building."

Members of the Kent Wells Sherman House Inc. estimate the costs to move the house to the site and make it compliant with city code requirements is about $190,000. The estimated cost to renovate the interior and exterior is about $100,000.

Kent State has agreed to make $40,000 available towards the house's relocation. Kent City Council voted to make a $15,000 loan available. The non-profit plans to obtain financing from Hometown Bank for the bulk of the initial costs while also relying on donations to pay for the nearly $200,000 estimated cost to move the house and make it a functioning structure.

Thurman said they plan to do as little excavation as possible on the site to set down the house.

"We've offered (Standing Rock) use of the first floor for some of their activities," he said. "And we believe a tiny, tiny fraction of Standing Rock's overall activities will be effected by this house and will add to their potential activities by being there and being a good neighbor."

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News Headline: Contributors to Art in the Park thanked | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Parks and Recreation
Department wishes
to extend a heartfelt thank
you to all individuals and
businesses who have made
contributions, large and
small, that have made this
event a reality.

Major Sponsors include
the Jo Woodard Solem
Foundation, radio advertising
and promotion; WKSU
FM 89.7, radio advertising
and promotion;Record
Publishing Co., newspaper
tab and advertising; Sylvia
Coogan auction, general
support

Other sponsors include
Home Savings Bank, artist
awards first, second, third
place awards; the Kent Jaycees,
children's area demonstrator;
Ohio Ceramics,
children's activities; Sue
Nelson Design, children's
activities; Habitat For Humanity
ReStore, children's
activities; All Media Art
Supply, youth artists; Ross
Haffey, parking lot accommodations;
and Woodsy's
Music Inc., sound system
for performers

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News Headline: Ohio limiting ownership of exotic animals | Email

News Date: 09/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: United Press International (UPI)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Owners of exotic animals in Ohio are trying to figure out how to comply with strict new state rules.

The new law takes effect Wednesday, the Kent State University station, WKSU-FM, reported. It was adopted after police killed dozens of exotic animals in Zanesville, many of them potentially dangerous predators, when their owner freed them before killing himself.

Most operators of exotic animal farms and refuges say Ohio's previous laissez faire attitude was a mistake, but they believe the new law goes too far in the other direction. Cindy Huntsman of Stump Hill Farm in Massillon told WKSU she believes the state could have ordered all exotic animal owners to get licenses from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and to carry insurance.

"It doesn't cost the taxpayers a dime with that type of regulation," she said.

Huntsman said she is unsure if her farm can stay open because she supported it by bringing in visitors to see the animals and taking them to schools and fairs. The new rules ban those activities.

Copyright © 2012 United Press International

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