Report Overview:
Total Clips (40)
Accounting (1)
Aeronautics; KSU Airport (5)
Alumni; Art, School of (3)
Alumni; Athletics (1)
Alumni; Centennial (1)
Art, School of (1)
Centennial (2)
Centennial; Institutional Advancement (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Fashion Design (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Geography (1)
Geology (1)
Homecoming (1)
Homecoming; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
Housing in Kent (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Stark; KSU at Tuscarawas; Pan-African Studies (1)
KSU at Stark; Scholarships (1)
KSU at Stark; Students (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
KSU Foundation (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Office of the President (1)
Regional Academic Center (1)
Students (1)
Town-Gown (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Accounting (1)
What if windpower had been 'their' idea? Mark Altieri 09/09/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...aesthetic-destroying, taxpayer-subsidized, bird-killing hands off of our mountains, deserts and Great Lakes. Mark Altieri is an accounting professor at Kent State University, where he teaches advanced tax courses, and special tax counsel to the law firm of Wickens, Herzer, Panza, Cook and Batista...


Aeronautics; KSU Airport (5)
2012 Aviation Heritage Fair is set to take flight Sept. 15 (McFarland) 09/09/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

The Aeronautics Program at KSU and the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club is hosting the 16th annual fair that's scheduled for 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event...

Aviation Heritage Fair to fly Sept. 15 at KSU airport in Stow (McFarland) 09/09/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

Stow -- The 2012 Aviation Heritage Fair is set to take flight at the Kent State University Airport on Kent Road Sept. 15. The Aeronautics Program at KSU and the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club is hosting the 16th...

Aviation Heritage Fair to fly Sept. 15 at Kent State Airport (McFarlane) 09/09/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Stow -- The 2012 Aviation Heritage Fair is set to take flight at the Kent State University Airport on Kent Road Sept. 15. The Aeronautics Program at KSU and the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club is hosting the 16th...

AVIATION HERITAGE FAIR TAKES TO THE SKIES FOR ITS 16TH YEAR (McFarland) 09/08/2012 Avionics Intelligence Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio, Sept. 7 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The 16th Aviation Heritage Fair will be held Saturday, Sept. 15, from 7 a.m. until 5 p.m....

AVIATION HERITAGE FAIR TAKES TO THE SKIES FOR ITS 16TH YEAR (McFarland) 09/07/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Sept.7 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The 16th Aviation Heritage Fair will be held Saturday, Sept.15, from 7 a.m.until 5 p.m.at...


Alumni; Art, School of (3)
Two exhibits highlighted by Kent State's art program (Turner) 09/09/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

Image courtesy of Kent State University “Two Carp” is part of the “Japanese Prints & Japonisme” exhibit on display at Kent State University's School of Art Gallery,...

Two exhibits highlighted by Kent State's art program (Turner) 09/09/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Art Galleries presents In Her Closet, works by mixed media artist and Kent State alumna Clare Murray Adams,...

Two exhibits highlighted by Kent State's art program (Turner) 09/09/2012 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

Photo courtesy of Kent State University The Kent State University School of Art's Downtown Gallery presents the exhibit In Her Closet by Kent State alumna...


Alumni; Athletics (1)
Josh Cribbs catches passes and good times in town: My Cleveland 09/10/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


Alumni; Centennial (1)
Sheryl Crow rocks KSU Centennial Campaign Concert 09/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...each chorus and the crowd swayed in time as the speakers boomed. Spirits were high among the crowd gathered at Dix Stadium Saturday evening during the Kent State University Centennial Campaign Concert, where Sheryl Crow, O.A.R. and Los Lonely Boys took the stage. Students, alums and everyone in between...


Art, School of (1)
KSU's School of Art Galleries presents Japanese exhibit (Turner) 09/08/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Art Galleries present the exhibition “Japanese Prints & Japonisme,” curated by Sharon Divell, through Oct. 5 at...


Centennial (2)
Kent State University moves Sheryl Crow, Los Lonely Boys tailgating indoors (Vargo) 09/07/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is moving tailgate activities before its Centennial Campaign Concert from the Dix Stadium parking lot to the Kent State...

Tailgating for Sheryl Crow Concert Moved Indoors (Vincent) 09/08/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Threat of rain looms over potentially largest outdoor concert at Kent State's Dix Stadium Sheryl Crow will perform at Kent State Sept. 8, 2012. Courtesy Kent State University http://kent.patch.com/articles/tailgating-for-sheryl-crow-concert-moved-indoors/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1347098405...


Centennial; Institutional Advancement (1)
Sheryl Crow, O.A.R & Los Lonely Boys at Kent State 09/10/2012 Cleveland County Herald Text Attachment Email


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Professional learning academy offered at Kent State 09/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
New KSU freshman class has 'best academic profile' in history of the university (Garcia) 09/08/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Although it may not be the biggest in school history, Kent State University officials believe the freshman class that recently arrived at the Kent Campus may be the brightest. University officials...


Fashion Design (1)
Go Green in Hudson today 09/08/2012 www.woio.com Text Attachment Email

...the Park Lane Green and Veterans Way Park. There will be educational activities and more than 25 exhibits. Events include a recycling fashion show by Kent State University students at 10 a.m., Dr. Green Bee presenting "How to Green Your Life," free curbside recycling bins, pet activities and a...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Guild open to those with interest in sewing 09/09/2012 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

...National Service Project. Those interested in helping are asked to call Sandy at 330-794-0731. Dr. Linda Ohrn, associate professor of fashion design at Kent State School of Fashion will be the morning speaker for the Oct. 13 annual meeting. Ohrn will present a program on pattern making, digital embroidery...


Geography (1)
Celebrations 09/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Geology (1)
Ashland University Environmental Lecture Series to focus on 'The Ecology of Urban Living' 09/10/2012 Ashland Times-Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

Anne Jefferson, assistant professor of geology at Kent State University, will present a talk titled "The Science of Streams in the City" for the first Ashland University Environmental Lecture Series...


Homecoming (1)
Parade Float Deadline for Kent State Homecoming is Oct. 5 09/10/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

The parade is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 20 Students at Kent State carry the banner for the 2011 Homecoming Parade, which marched through the city Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. Credit Matt Fredmonsky http://o3.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/resize/273x203/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/d46ead6ef13c953c26ceaddf6bbcfc0e...


Homecoming; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
"Battle of the Decades' theme for KSU Homecoming parade 09/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University and the city of Kent invite businesses, organizations and individuals to participate in Kent State University's 2012 Homecoming...


Housing in Kent (1)
New student housing emptying old in Kent 09/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Once a rare sight on the streets surrounding campus after Kent State University's fall semester started, "for rent" signs are still standing in front of student rooming houses on streets including East College...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Schools' closed meetings in question (Smith) 09/07/2012 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...and pay. The board can't close the meeting simply because the person they're talking with is an attorney, said Tim Smith, a journalism professor at Kent State University who is also an attorney specializing in Sunshine laws. "Put simply, it isn't permitted," Smith said. In addition to closing...


KSU at Stark (2)
Business calendar -- Sept. 9 09/08/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Critical Thinking in the Workplace - 7:30-9:30 a.m., Kent State University Stark Campus, University Center, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. A panel discussion to address best practice in the workplace....

College Preparation Session for High School Students and Parents 09/08/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark is preparing high school juniors and seniors and their parents on how to choose the right college. Get Started: A Crash...


KSU at Stark; KSU at Tuscarawas; Pan-African Studies (1)
Area entertainment events beginning Sept. 7 09/07/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Crayolas," an acrylic painting by Patricia Zinsmeister Parker, is included in "Abstract Allure," a new exhibition in the University Center Dining Room at Kent State University Stark Campus. Also featured is work by a second abstract painter, David Kuntzman. The work is on display through Nov. 2. There...


KSU at Stark; Scholarships (1)
Sept. 5: GET OUT!: Scholarship fundraiser draws vehicle enthusiasts 09/09/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...other goodies. Why attend? All proceeds benefit the Automotive Technology scholarship fund at Stark State College and to a general scholarship fund at Kent State University at Stark. About the event When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Where: The parking lots of Kent State University at...


KSU at Stark; Students (1)
On the Beat: Local actress is tickled pink with 'Legally Blonde' 09/07/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...blonde hair, too, and I'm sure people don't really take me seriously either." A Jackson High School grad, she is majoring in global communications at Kent State University Stark Campus. Here are highlights of our conversation. Q. You must be pretty excited about getting this role. A. "I...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Rosenberry Foundation awards more than $215,000 in grants 09/09/2012 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

...Aqueduct Project connecting the Towpath Trail at Bolivar.  Journey's End Ministries, $29,000, to construct an addition and purchase a used forklift.  Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia, $23,995, to purchase digital radiology equipment for the veterinary technology program. ...

'Whose Line Is It Anyway' stars to perform at Kent State University... 09/07/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...television series "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" are teaming up for two performances at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. The show is suitable for all ages. Tickets range from $35 - $50 and are available at the Performing Arts Center...


KSU Foundation (1)
Kent State Adds Conference Center 09/07/2012 Meetings Focus Text Attachment Email

A unique public/private partnership will enable the Kent State University Foundation to fund a new hotel and conference center that will create 472 local jobs and spur regional tourism growth and economic...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Celebrations 09/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
RIGHT HERE IN PORTAGE COUNTY 09/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Office of the President (1)
Packed audience for Lefton presentation 09/09/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton recently spoke to a packed room at the monthly meeting of the Kent Digital Photography Club at the...


Regional Academic Center (1)
Regional Campus Dedication: This Week 09/10/2012 Twinsburg Patch Text Attachment Email

Things going on in Twinsburg this week. 2. Kent State dedicates its new Regional Academic Center. While classes have been in full swing for a few weeks, Kent State University will officially...


Students (1)
Ohioana Library Hears a 'Who' at 2nd Annual book Festival 09/10/2012 Short North Gazette Text Attachment Email

...grand open space with stage; representatives of partnering literary groups; authors with stacks of their books; the Starbucks and Barnes & Noble sellers. Kent State University sent skilled childcare workers to create a room brimming with children's activities. A cozy book corner, of course, was a feature...


Town-Gown (2)
Our View: Partners in progress creating a new Kent 09/07/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...well as a revamped Erie Street that is a vast improvement over what it replaced. Construction is progressing on three other downtown anchors: the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, PARTA's Kent Central Gateway and Acorn Corner, the revitalization of the old Kent Hotel. Work also...

Downtown development spurs hike in Kent income tax receipts 09/07/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...the results are going to be even better by year's end," Smith said. "Even temporary construction income taxes will be on the increase with all the work Kent State University has scheduled to get underway. We think for the next two or three years we'll be on a steady increase." In the last two years,...


News Headline: What if windpower had been 'their' idea? Mark Altieri | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Plain Dealer guest columnist

This starts out as a fly-fishing story. Uncle Ted and I had cut a swath through the blue ribbon trout streams of the greater Yellowstone area. The Tedder is a renowned fisherman and hunter in Idaho, and so far the highlight of the trip for me was that I was staying even with him. Now I had a new challenge for Ted. I had intrigued him with a story I had written for a fly-fishing magazine on catching common carp on the fly. I also had been periodically sending him Plain Dealer articles by D'Arcy Egan highlighting me fly fishing for carp on the Rocky River and other area streams. Now the Tedder was ready to broaden his horizons as we headed for Blackfoot Reservoir, a high mountain lake holding large numbers of carp outside of beautiful Idaho Falls.

Anyone who has driven south from Ashton, Idaho, to Idaho Falls has been struck by the beauty of the western slope of the Teton Mountains. Before heading to Idaho, I had reread Osborne Russell's classic, "Journal of a Trapper." We had just driven by Pierre's Hole, the famous scene of combat between Russell and other white trappers and their Crow Indian allies and the hated Blackfeet Indians. I was pumped. At last, we headed up the escarpment east of Idaho Falls toward the High Country.

I had never been to that area of the Rockies, and every mile became more beautiful as cattle gave way to mule deer and hawks became more prevalent in the sky. I mentioned to Ted that I thought this was one of the more gorgeous stretches of the Rockies I had ever seen, to which he replied, "Wait a few minutes." As we went around a broad mountain bend, the things started appearing on the horizon. My first impression was that we were being attacked by a horde of the mechanized dinosaur war machines in the movie "The Empire Strikes Back."

The entire aesthetics of mile after mile of High Country vista was destroyed. Ted, a retired Forest Service wildlife biologist, mentioned to me the depredation caused by the wind turbines to the hawks, owls and other raptors in the vicinity. He also mentioned that the "whoosh, whoosh, whoosh" noise of the blades was maddening to any wildlife, livestock or humans within sound of them. As concerning to the biologists was the disruption all of this had caused to the migration patterns of the elk and mule deer.

When I got home and spent just a few minutes on the Internet, I quickly verified the toll caused by wind turbines on the raptor and other bird populations. The best and an ironic example of this was the massive San Francisco Altamont Pass project. After porcupining beautiful Altamont Pass with thousands of wind turbines, legal action by the Audubon Society years later forced a multimillion-dollar replacement to more "bird-friendly" blades to address the high toll on the bird population. Anyone want to place a bet on that solving the problem?

Interspersed with the typical favorable mainstream media stories on wind power were other interesting articles noting a variety of other relevant issues, such as the fact that these wind farms would not have come into existence but for heavy federal, state and local tax subsidies. In other words, they have been too inefficient to justify their existence under such private-sector concepts as cost-benefit analysis. Other interesting facts: The damn things don't work if the wind is too low or high, thus necessitating a traditional and charged backup power grid, the removal of which was the justification for these monstrosities coming into being in the first place. Google "Scotland castles and wind farms" and you will see a U.K. Daily Mail article titled, "The View? Gone with the Wind." The pictures will make your jaw drop, and the first sentence says it all: "They are famous Scottish landmarks which have withstood wars, weather and centuries of change -- but they could not escape the Scottish Government's green agenda." And lastly were the anti-aesthetic icing-on-the-cake notations that a growing number of wind farms are simply being abandoned in Europe and North America. All of this politically-correct foolishness for a truly minuscule enhancement in power.

But what if the wind industry had evolved differently? Let's say the things were actually efficient, didn't require traditional-power-grid backup and didn't require massive taxpayer subsidies. Let's also say that because of these efficiencies, wind farms were developed by private entities such as Exxon Mobil or, better yet, Halliburton. Is there any question that the mainstream media and the intellectual elite would have destroyed the industry by now, citing the bird depredation and destruction of the natural places where these farms are typically located?

W'hen I am driving into downtown Cleveland, the existence of isolated, individual wind turbines along the highway doesn't overly bother me. When I force myself not to contemplate the taxpayer subsidies inherent in those structures, I think they are kind of cool, even though I know they provide no net enhancement to our domestic power supplies.

But as a general statement, I would beseech (even demand) that you wild-eyed Greenies, you crony capitalists and you vote-buying politicians keep your inefficient, counterproductive, aesthetic-destroying, taxpayer-subsidized, bird-killing hands off of our mountains, deserts and Great Lakes.

Mark Altieri is an accounting professor at Kent State University, where he teaches advanced tax courses, and special tax counsel to the law firm of Wickens, Herzer, Panza, Cook and Batista in Avon.

Return to Top



News Headline: 2012 Aviation Heritage Fair is set to take flight Sept. 15 (McFarland) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name: HOLLY SCHOENSTEIN
News OCR Text: The Aeronautics Program at KSU and the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club is hosting the 16th annual fair that's scheduled for 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The event celebrates Ohio's aviation history with military and general aviation educational displays, aviation activities and historical aircraft.

According to Maureen McFarland, academic program director for the aeronautics program, over the past several years about 10,000 people have attended the event each year. Al Beckwith, who operates a commercial aviation company at the airport, said he expects between 8,000 and 12,000 or more people to come this year.

"The goal of the Aviation Heritage Fair has been to not only share with others our love of aviation and our appreciation for alumni, the aviation industry and the local community, but also to raise funds which directly support scholarship efforts of the Aeronautics Program and the Kiwanis Club," McFarland said. "This year we are excited and proud to announce that in Fall [semester of] 2013 the Aeronautics Program will be able to offer the first Aviation Heritage scholarship. This endowed scholarship is made possible through the donations of all our past and current sponsors."

Organizers of the event say both the "flight enthusiast" and the "casual fan" will enjoy a variety of activities, including airplane rides, airport flyovers, vintage and contemporary aircraft displays with civilian and military planes and helicopters and carnival-style food and beverages.

New for this year is a speech by Brian Udell, who survived an ejection during a supersonic flight. The speech, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at the KIVA in the Student Center on KSU's main campus.

Admission to the fair and parking are free of charge, and attendees can tour the airport.

The Kiwanis Club is hosting a pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets are $6 per person.

The KSU Precision Flight Team will be giving airplane rides from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., weather permitting, in the University's fleet of Cessna 172s. Rides cost $30 per person or $75 for a group of three, and the proceeds will benefit Flight Team's program. Those interested in taking a ride are required to register at the sign-up tent when arriving at the fair.

Airport flyovers include a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 121st Air Refueling Wing in Columbus from 11 to 11:30 a.m. and an F-16 at 3 p.m.

Several World War II aircraft will be on display, including a B-25 "Georgie's Gal" and the Heritage Air Museum's C-123 Provider.

The Flying Black Squirrels, KSU's chapter of Women in Aviation, will be selling T-shirts and memorabilia as a fundraiser.

Return to Top



News Headline: Aviation Heritage Fair to fly Sept. 15 at KSU airport in Stow (McFarland) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name: HOLLY SCHOENSTEIN
News OCR Text: Stow -- The 2012 Aviation Heritage Fair is set to take flight at the Kent State University Airport on Kent Road Sept. 15.

The Aeronautics Program at KSU and the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club is hosting the 16th annual fair that's scheduled for 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The event celebrates Ohio's aviation history with military and general aviation educational displays, aviation activities and historical aircraft.

According to Maureen McFarland, academic program director for the aeronautics program, over the past several years about 10,000 people have attended the event each year. Al Beckwith, who operates a commercial aviation company at the airport, said he expects between 8,000 and 12,000 or more people to come this year.

"The goal of the Aviation Heritage Fair has been to not only share with others our love of aviation and our appreciation for alumni, the aviation industry and the local community, but also to raise funds which directly support scholarship efforts of the Aeronautics Program and the Kiwanis Club," McFarland said. "This year we are excited and proud to announce that in fall [semester of] 2013 the Aeronautics Program will be able to offer the first Aviation Heritage scholarship. This endowed scholarship is made possible through the donations of all our past and current sponsors."

Organizers of the event say both the "flight enthusiast" and the "casual fan" will enjoy a variety of activities, including airplane rides, airport flyovers, vintage and contemporary aircraft displays with civilian and military planes and helicopters and carnival-style food and beverages.

New for this year is a speech by Brian Udell, who survived an ejection during a supersonic flight. The speech, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at the KIVA in the Student Center on KSU's main campus.

Admission to the fair and parking are free of charge, and attendees can tour the airport.

The Kiwanis Club is hosting a pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets are $6 per person.

The KSU Precision Flight Team will be giving airplane rides from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., weather permitting, in the University's fleet of Cessna 172s. Rides cost $30 per person or $75 for a group of three, and the proceeds will benefit Flight Team's program. Those interested in taking a ride are required to register at the sign-up tent when arriving at the fair.

Airport flyovers include a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 121st Air Refueling Wing in Columbus from 11 to 11:30 a.m. and an F-16 at 3 p.m.

Several World War II aircraft will be on display, including a B-25 "Georgie's Gal" and the Heritage Air Museum's C-123 Provider.

The Flying Black Squirrels, KSU's chapter of Women in Aviation, will be selling T-shirts and memorabilia as a fundraiser.

Return to Top



News Headline: Aviation Heritage Fair to fly Sept. 15 at Kent State Airport (McFarlane) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stow -- The 2012 Aviation Heritage Fair is set to take flight at the Kent State University Airport on Kent Road Sept. 15.

The Aeronautics Program at KSU and the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club is hosting the 16th annual fair that's scheduled for 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The event celebrates Ohio's aviation history with military and general aviation educational displays, aviation activities and historical aircraft.

According to Maureen McFarland, academic program director for the aeronautics program, over the past several years about 10,000 people have attended the event each year. Al Beckwith, who operates a commercial aviation company at the airport, said he expects between 8,000 and 12,000 or more people to come this year.

"The goal of the Aviation Heritage Fair has been to not only share with others our love of aviation and our appreciation for alumni, the aviation industry and the local community, but also to raise funds which directly support scholarship efforts of the Aeronautics Program and the Kiwanis Club," McFarland said. "This year we are excited and proud to announce that in fall [semester of] 2013 the Aeronautics Program will be able to offer the first Aviation Heritage scholarship. This endowed scholarship is made possible through the donations of all our past and current sponsors."

Organizers of the event say both the "flight enthusiast" and the "casual fan" will enjoy a variety of activities, including airplane rides, airport flyovers, vintage and contemporary aircraft displays with civilian and military planes and helicopters and carnival-style food and beverages.

New for this year is a speech by Brian Udell, who survived an ejection during a supersonic flight. The speech, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at the KIVA in the Student Center on KSU's main campus.

Admission to the fair and parking are free of charge, and attendees can tour the airport.

The Kiwanis Club is hosting a pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets are $6 per person.

The KSU Precision Flight Team will be giving airplane rides from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., weather permitting, in the University's fleet of Cessna 172s.

Rides cost $30 per person or $75 for a group of three, and the proceeds will benefit Flight Team's program. Those interested in taking a ride are required to register at the sign-up tent when arriving at the fair.

Airport flyovers include a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 121st Air Refueling Wing in Columbus from 11 to 11:30 a.m. and an F-16 at 3 p.m.

Several World War II aircraft will be on display, including a B-25 "Georgie's Gal" and the Heritage Air Museum's C-123 Provider.

The Flying Black Squirrels, KSU's chapter of Women in Aviation, will be selling T-shirts and memorabilia as a fundraiser.

Return to Top



News Headline: AVIATION HERITAGE FAIR TAKES TO THE SKIES FOR ITS 16TH YEAR (McFarland) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Avionics Intelligence
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Sept. 7 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The 16th Aviation Heritage Fair will be held Saturday, Sept. 15, from 7 a.m. until 5 p.m. at the Kent State University Airport, located at 4020 Kent Road in Stow, Ohio. The fair, a celebration of aviation education past, present and future, is presented by Kent State University's Aeronautics Program with support from the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club.

A favorite Northeast Ohio summer event, the Aviation Heritage Fair features activities for the flight enthusiast and casual fan, as well as attractions for the entire family. Highlights include airplane rides, airport flyovers and aircraft displays featuring civilian and military planes and helicopters. The Kiwanis Club will host a children's tent with arts and crafts activities for young families.

"The goal of the Aviation Heritage Fair has been to not only share with others our love of aviation and our appreciation for alumni, the aviation industry and the local community, but also to raise funds which directly support scholarship efforts of the Aeronautics Program and the Kiwanis Club," said Maureen McFarland, academic program director of aeronautics and assistant professor at Kent State. "This year, we are excited and proud to announce that, in fall 2013, the Aeronautics Program will be able to offer the first Aviation Heritage scholarship. This endowed scholarship is made possible through the donations of all our past and current sponsors. We appreciate the support they have continually provided to us over the years."

This year's displays include several World War II aircraft, including a B-25 "Georgie's Gal" and the Heritage Air Museum's C-123 Provider. There will be two airport flyovers. One will take place between 11 a.m. and 11:30 am and feature a KC-135 aircraft from the 121st Air Refueling Wing in Columbus, Ohio. The second will take place between 3 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. and will feature an F-16 jet fighter.

The fair officially begins at 7 a.m. with a pancake breakfast hosted by the Stow-Munroe Kiwanis Club. Tickets for the breakfast are $6. Airplane rides will begin at 7:30 a.m., while other aircraft will be flying in and out during the day.

The Stow-Munroe Kiwanis Club will award its annual aviation scholarship at noon, which will be immediately followed by remarks by guest speaker Jason Dowd, JetBlue first officer and Kent State alumnus. This past March, Dowd was hailed as a hero for taking control of a JetBlue flight when the pilot began acting erratically. Dowd, a co-pilot on the New York to Las Vegas flight, made a successful emergency landing in Amarillo, Texas.

The Aviation Heritage Fair, which was conceived by a Kent State student aviation club, has been through several iterations over the years. The event is now run by the faculty, staff and students of the university's Aeronautics Program, with help from the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club.

Event admission and parking are free. Airplane rides are $30 per person or $75 for three people. Those interested in airplane rides must register at the sign-up tent upon arrival. Food and beverages will be available for sale throughout the day.

The fair will take place rain or shine, although some events are subject to change due to inclement weather.

This year, the Kent State Aeronautics Program is presenting a speaker in conjunction with the Aviation Heritage Fair. On Friday, Sept. 14, at 7 p.m., Brian Udell will talk about his harrowing experience being ejected from an airplane.

Udell holds the record for surviving the highest speed ejection from a U.S. Fighter Aircraft at nearly 800 mph. He survived four grueling hours 65 miles off the Atlantic Coast in 60-degree water, 5-foot seas, and 15 mph winds at night. His story of survival and recovery will serve as an inspiration to everyone. Udell's talk will take place in the Kent Student Center Kiva. It is presented by the Kent State Student Council and is free and open to the public.

For more information on the Aviation Heritage Fair, visit www.kentstateaviationheritagefair.org .

Copyright 2012 HT Media Ltd.

Return to Top



News Headline: AVIATION HERITAGE FAIR TAKES TO THE SKIES FOR ITS 16TH YEAR (McFarland) | Email

News Date: 09/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Sept.7 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The 16th Aviation Heritage Fair will be held Saturday, Sept.15, from 7 a.m.until 5 p.m.at the Kent State University Airport, located at 4020 Kent Road in Stow, Ohio.The fair, a celebration of aviation education past, present and future, is presented by Kent State University's Aeronautics Program with support from the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club.

A favorite Northeast Ohio summer event, the Aviation Heritage Fair features activities for the flight enthusiast and casual fan, as well as attractions for the entire family.Highlights include airplane rides, airport flyovers and aircraft displays featuring civilian and military planes and helicopters.The Kiwanis Club will host a children's tent with arts and crafts activities for young families.

"The goal of the Aviation Heritage Fair has been to not only share with others our love of aviation and our appreciation for alumni, the aviation industry and the local community, but also to raise funds which directly support scholarship efforts of the Aeronautics Program and the Kiwanis Club," said Maureen McFarland, academic program director of aeronautics and assistant professor at Kent State."This year, we are excited and proud to announce that, in fall 2013, the Aeronautics Program will be able to offer the first Aviation Heritage scholarship.This endowed scholarship is made possible through the donations of all our past and current sponsors.We appreciate the support they have continually provided to us over the years."

This year's displays include several World War II aircraft, including a B-25 "Georgie's Gal" and the Heritage Air Museum's C-123 Provider.There will be two airport flyovers.One will take place between 11 a.m.and 11:30 am and feature a KC-135 aircraft from the 121st Air Refueling Wing in Columbus, Ohio.The second will take place between 3 p.m.and 3:30 p.m.and will feature an F-16 jet fighter.

The fair officially begins at 7 a.m.with a pancake breakfast hosted by the Stow-Munroe Kiwanis Club.Tickets for the breakfast are $6.Airplane rides will begin at 7:30 a.m., while other aircraft will be flying in and out during the day.

The Stow-Munroe Kiwanis Club will award its annual aviation scholarship at noon, which will be immediately followed by remarks by guest speaker Jason Dowd, JetBlue first officer and Kent State alumnus.This past March, Dowd was hailed as a hero for taking control of a JetBlue flight when the pilot began acting erratically.Dowd, a co-pilot on the New York to Las Vegas flight, made a successful emergency landing in Amarillo, Texas.

The Aviation Heritage Fair, which was conceived by a Kent State student aviation club, has been through several iterations over the years.The event is now run by the faculty, staff and students of the university's Aeronautics Program, with help from the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club.

Event admission and parking are free.Airplane rides are $30 per person or $75 for three people.Those interested in airplane rides must register at the sign-up tent upon arrival.Food and beverages will be available for sale throughout the day.

The fair will take place rain or shine, although some events are subject to change due to inclement weather.

This year, the Kent State Aeronautics Program is presenting a speaker in conjunction with the Aviation Heritage Fair.On Friday, Sept.14, at 7 p.m., Brian Udell will talk about his harrowing experience being ejected from an airplane.

Udell holds the record for surviving the highest speed ejection from a U.S.Fighter Aircraft at nearly 800 mph.He survived four grueling hours 65 miles off the Atlantic Coast in 60-degree water, 5-foot seas, and 15 mph winds at night.His story of survival and recovery will serve as an inspiration to everyone.Udell's talk will take place in the Kent Student Center Kiva.It is presented by the Kent State Student Council and is free and open to the public.

For more information on the Aviation Heritage Fair, visit www.kentstateaviationheritagefair.org.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

Return to Top



News Headline: Two exhibits highlighted by Kent State's art program (Turner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Image courtesy of Kent State University “Two Carp” is part of the “Japanese Prints & Japonisme” exhibit on display at Kent State University's School of Art Gallery, on exhibit through Oct. 5.

" onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0">

" onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0">

Photo courtesy of Kent State University The Kent State University School of Art's Downtown Gallery presents the exhibit In Her Closet by Kent State alumna Clare Murray Adams through Sept. 29.

Kent State University's School of Art Galleries presents In Her Closet, works by mixed media artist and Kent State alumna Clare Murray Adams, through Sept. 29 at the Downtown Gallery.

The title In Her Closet references the way in which individuals often keep hidden certain aspects of their personalities. The exhibit features manipulated digital prints on cotton with stitching and embellishment, as well as dresses made of silk organza with stitching and found object embellishments. This exhibit challenges the viewer to interpret the dresses, shadows and the deeper meanings that clothing can suggest.

"Ideas of family, feminist concerns, elements of time and universal emotional issues are continual themes for exploration," said Murray Adams on her website. "Earlier work was strongly rooted in quilt making and surface design. More recent work relies on the processes involved in making 3-D constructions, in collage and in encaustic painting or working with wax. My long interest and attraction to fibers is still evident in my work, if not in process, then certainly in concept."

Murray Adams currently serves as a professor of art and is former chair of the visual art department at Malone University. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art in 1993 from Kent State, and a Master of Fine Art with a concentration on fibers and mixed media from Vermont College of Norwich University in 2001.

The Kent State University School of Art's Downtown Gallery is at 141 East Main St. in Kent. Gallery hours are 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday to Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Free parking is available behind the gallery.

For additional information, visit http://art.kent.edu or contact the Downtown Gallery at 330-676-1549.

JAPANESE PRINTS & JAPONISME

Kent State University's School of Art Galleries also presents the exhibition "Japanese Prints & Japonisme," curated by Sharon Divell, through Oct. 5 at the School of Art Gallery at 400 Janik Dr. on the Kent Campus.

Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For details, call 330-672-7853.

"The exhibit features over a dozen Japanese prints and two Japanese sword guards on loan from the Kent State University Museum," said director of galleries Anderson Turner. There are also additional works that represent the influence of Japanese art on the rest of the world.

Return to Top



News Headline: Two exhibits highlighted by Kent State's art program (Turner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Art Galleries presents In Her Closet, works by mixed media artist and Kent State alumna Clare Murray Adams, through Sept. 29 at the Downtown Gallery.

The title In Her Closet references the way in which individuals often keep hidden certain aspects of their personalities. The exhibit features manipulated digital prints on cotton with stitching and embellishment, as well as dresses made of silk organza with stitching and found object embellishments. This exhibit challenges the viewer to interpret the dresses, shadows and the deeper meanings that clothing can suggest.

"Ideas of family, feminist concerns, elements of time and universal emotional issues are continual themes for exploration," said Murray Adams on her website. "Earlier work was strongly rooted in quilt making and surface design. More recent work relies on the processes involved in making 3-D constructions, in collage and in encaustic painting or working with wax. My long interest and attraction to fibers is still evident in my work, if not in process, then certainly in concept."

Murray Adams currently serves as a professor of art and is former chair of the visual art department at Malone University. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art in 1993 from Kent State, and a Master of Fine Art with a concentration on fibers and mixed media from Vermont College of Norwich University in 2001.

The Kent State University School of Art's Downtown Gallery is at 141 East Main St. in Kent. Gallery hours are 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday to Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Free parking is available behind the gallery.

For additional information, visit http://art.kent.edu or contact the Downtown Gallery at 330-676-1549.

JAPANESE PRINTS & JAPONISME

Kent State University's School of Art Galleries also presents the exhibition "Japanese Prints & Japonisme," curated by Sharon Divell, through Oct. 5 at the School of Art Gallery at 400 Janik Dr. on the Kent Campus.

Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For details, call 330-672-7853.

"The exhibit features over a dozen Japanese prints and two Japanese sword guards on loan from the Kent State University Museum," said director of galleries Anderson Turner. There are also additional works that represent the influence of Japanese art on the rest of the world.

Return to Top



News Headline: Two exhibits highlighted by Kent State's art program (Turner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Photo courtesy of Kent State University The Kent State University School of Art's Downtown Gallery presents the exhibit In Her Closet by Kent State alumna Clare Murray Adams through Sept. 29.

" onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0">

" onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0">

Image courtesy of Kent State University “Two Carp” is part of the “Japanese Prints & Japonisme” exhibit on display at Kent State University's School of Art Gallery, on exhibit through Oct. 5.

Kent State University's School of Art Galleries presents In Her Closet, works by mixed media artist and Kent State alumna Clare Murray Adams, through Sept. 29 at the Downtown Gallery.

The title In Her Closet references the way in which individuals often keep hidden certain aspects of their personalities. The exhibit features manipulated digital prints on cotton with stitching and embellishment, as well as dresses made of silk organza with stitching and found object embellishments. This exhibit challenges the viewer to interpret the dresses, shadows and the deeper meanings that clothing can suggest.

"Ideas of family, feminist concerns, elements of time and universal emotional issues are continual themes for exploration," said Murray Adams on her website. "Earlier work was strongly rooted in quilt making and surface design. More recent work relies on the processes involved in making 3-D constructions, in collage and in encaustic painting or working with wax. My long interest and attraction to fibers is still evident in my work, if not in process, then certainly in concept."

Murray Adams currently serves as a professor of art and is former chair of the visual art department at Malone University. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art in 1993 from Kent State, and a Master of Fine Art with a concentration on fibers and mixed media from Vermont College of Norwich University in 2001.

The Kent State University School of Art's Downtown Gallery is at 141 East Main St. in Kent. Gallery hours are 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday to Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Free parking is available behind the gallery.

For additional information, visit http://art.kent.edu or contact the Downtown Gallery at 330-676-1549.

JAPANESE PRINTS & JAPONISME

Kent State University's School of Art Galleries also presents the exhibition "Japanese Prints & Japonisme," curated by Sharon Divell, through Oct. 5 at the School of Art Gallery at 400 Janik Dr. on the Kent Campus.

Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For details, call 330-672-7853.

"The exhibit features over a dozen Japanese prints and two Japanese sword guards on loan from the Kent State University Museum," said director of galleries Anderson Turner. There are also additional works that represent the influence of Japanese art on the rest of the world.

Return to Top



News Headline: Josh Cribbs catches passes and good times in town: My Cleveland | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Soft-spoken and hard-charging, Josh Cribbs is a versatile threat for the Cleveland Browns, whose season starts today.

Q. Why'd a top athlete from D.C. go to Kent State?

A. When you think of a college in your mind, Kent had it all, whether the partying, the classes, the dorm rooms, the atmosphere.

Q. Was there enough to do there for a big-city guy?

A. I found a lot to do. We had a state-of-the-art recreation center just built. They had intramural basketball and swimming. Hosting incoming freshmen, we'd take them to Cleveland or Akron to party.

I found my wife, Maria, there as well. I was married in the summer after my freshman season. She's from Columbus.

Q. What do you two think of Cleveland?

A. It's a city on the rise. It's up-and-coming in its infrastructure, jobs and sports teams. It's well deserved and well overdue.

Q. What's it like raising your family here?

A. It's one of the best places for families. My kids love the snow. I've made umpteen snowmen with my daughter, had so many snow fights with her. They love sledding. They love the summer as well.

The Rock Hall, the new aquarium, every attraction is all for the family. The only thing that's for adults only is the casino. With the casino, I don't have to go to Vegas anymore. It's brought so much life to downtown.

Q. Where do you hang with the family on a day off?

A. My daughter likes to go down to the lake to watch the boats. And I take the kids to the Strongsville Recreation Center. They've got a nice swimming pool and playground.

They go to Lemonberry frozen yogurt. They add Fruity Pebbles and strawberries and the weirdest of toppings. We let them go crazy.

Q. Where else do you eat?

A. We go to XO. They have the best steaks. We get them with sauteed spinach.

They have a lot of music at Crocker and Legacy. They have food outside, barbecue. We like Shaker Square. Zanzibar Soul is a nice restaurant.

Q. As a singer and guitarist on the side, do you hit our clubs?

A. It's a great scene. You've got the House of Blues and just so much.

I had the opportunity this summer to play on "Hot in Cleveland" with Betty White. I was Kristin Chenoweth's love interest. Her voice is so awesome. It's a type of music I'm starting to get into because of her: so many older songs you see in black-and-white movies.

Q. Have you gotten used to Ohio football weather?

A. It's awesome for football, because you experience all weather. You get the heat, the cold, the rain, the mud, and that's what football is all about, prevailing in all terrains. It does help us. When teams come up here from Southern states, they're not used to playing in these temperatures. I play good when it's cold, so I think it plays to our advantage.

Q. Have you ever met fans like Browns fans?

A. I feel hands down we have the best, most loyal fans. You can't leave them. You will never not be a Browns player. I talk to them all the time on the street and they give me the motivation for every game and every season.

We're very visible around town, and we make it a point to stop and talk to the fans. We know they appreciate it. They are hard-working, and we know that our fan base, for the most part, is blue collar. They come from hard-working, 9-to-5 jobs. It means a lot to them for us to interact with them.

Q. You've often been spotted at games of other Cleveland teams.

A. Have to support the other teams. It's good for the community and the teams to see us there. When we see them at our games, that gives us extra motivation.

Q. Have you boned up on Browns history?

A. I love the winning tradition, the Jim Brown days and the Kardiac Kids. When I first came, they didn't let any rookie come without watching a 30-minute video of the tradition. It was embedded into our heads, hating Pittsburgh and knowing what the Dawg Pound stands for.

Q. Have you met some past Browns?

A. They all come back, and we talk with them. Jim Brown used to hang around here a lot. He was really influential. With my contract situation, he always told me, "Hey, if you play the game, you'll get paid." I ended up getting my new contract. It was big to have a guy like that give you instruction.

Q. Do you believe all the talk about a Cleveland curse?

A. No. It will all erase once we start winning. This is a football town. There are certain things the football team has to do for the city to regain its morale.

Return to Top



News Headline: Sheryl Crow rocks KSU Centennial Campaign Concert | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hands waved, cheers echoed, lips followed each chorus and the crowd swayed in time as the speakers boomed.

Spirits were high among the crowd gathered at Dix Stadium Saturday evening during the Kent State University Centennial Campaign Concert, where Sheryl Crow, O.A.R. and Los Lonely Boys took the stage. Students, alums and everyone in between came together in the spirit of music and in support of their favorite Ohio university.

After a swift setup and sound check, famed country/rock/pop musician Sheryl Crow graced the stage as the crowd screamed ecstatic approval and anticipation.

"This ain't no country club... this is Kent State!" Crow proclaimed before launching into her hit single "All I Wanna Do." The crowd roared.

"Y'all are too young to know this song," Crow continued, to further cheers. "Kent State ain't a party school!"

The crowd roared back in unison as if to defy the claim.

First to rock the stage was St. Angelo, Texas Chicano rock group Los Lonely Boys, known for their single "Heaven." After stirring up the growing crowd with a high-energy soul-infused rock sound, Los Lonely Boys closed their set with the hit single.

"How far is heaven?" the chorus asks.

"You know it's right here in Kent, Ohio!" cries guitarist Henry Garza from onstage, to roaring applause.

As Los Lonely Boys took a bow, many in attendance felt the concert was off to a strong start.

"We think it's great," said Tracy Winter of Medina County, who was attending with her friend Tracy Teresko. "It's local. That last song was one of my favorite songs of all time. As mothers of (KSU) students, this is a great opportunity for us to come down and enjoy fun things with the kids. Even though we're up here drinking and they're down there."

Some who were unfamiliar with the starting act found themselves pleasantly surprised.

"So far, it's really good," said Kentite Earl Klausson. "We're really enjoying it. They were a lot funkier than I thought they would be."

"I'm looking forward to OAR as well," said Sarah Malcolm, also of Kent. "I'd like to see more events like this."

At 7:30 p.m., Maryland-based alternative rock band O.A.R. took the stand, receiving a very warm and loud welcome from the audience. Lead vocalist Marc Roberge expressed gratitude to once again share a stage with Sheryl Crow before diving into his set.

By this time, the crowd had swollen and dozens danced and cheered in front of the stage. Many in the bleachers stood and sang along. The masses went wild during each sax, horn and guitar solo.

After an energetic and well recieved set, O.A.R. wrapped up and left the stage, leaving audience members to await the main attraction: Sheryl Crow.

Brian and Marie Cassidy of Aurora were excited to see the reknowned songstress take to the stage, though they said the first two acts did anything but disappoint.

"It was good to see (O.A.R.)," Brian said. "They're just as popular today, probably, as Sheryl Crow is. It was pretty cool."

As a KSU alumna, Marie is glad to contribute to the Centennial Campaign.

"I'd like to see (KSU) have a good reputation, since my MBA is from here," she said.

"We're very interested in Kent State's future and success," Brian added.

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU's School of Art Galleries presents Japanese exhibit (Turner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Art Galleries present the exhibition “Japanese Prints & Japonisme,” curated by Sharon Divell, through Oct. 5 at the School of Art Gallery at 400 Janik Drive, on the Kent campus.

Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays. For information, call 330-672-7853.

“The exhibit features over a dozen Japanese prints and two Japanese sword guards on loan from the Kent State University Museum,” said Anderson Turner, director of galleries.

There are also additional works that represent the influence of Japanese art on the rest of the world.

In the second half of the 19th century, the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists found inspiration in Japanese prints. The obvious flatness of these prints and the placement of complementary colors next to each other caught the attention of Edouard Manet and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

Depictions of the changing moods of weather influenced Claude Monet and other Impressionists. Line and shape are basic elements of all Japanese prints and as Paul Gauguin moved away from optical realism, line, shape and color came to dominate his paintings. Printmakers and painters such as Mary Cassatt and Edgar Degas created bold new compositions.

In Europe and America, all things Japanese were avidly collected and Japanese arts and crafts were admired in world fairs everywhere.

“The collection of the School of Art at Kent State University boasts a selection of pieces representing this important conversation,” Divell said. “We are excited to be able to share them with the community.”

Divell served as assistant to the curator of Asian art at the Cleveland Museum of Art under the directorship of Sherman E. Lee.

She has taught Asian art history for many years at Ursuline College and, more recently, at Kent. She earned her master's degree in art history from Case Western Reserve University.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State University moves Sheryl Crow, Los Lonely Boys tailgating indoors (Vargo) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is moving tailgate activities before its Centennial Campaign Concert from the Dix Stadium parking lot to the Kent State Fieldhouse. The warm-up event is set from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday.

According to The Weather Channel, thundershowers are called for Saturday, with a 40 percent chance of rain throughout the day. Director of Donor Services Valoree Vargo said though the rain is expected to before the tailgate, the area would not be suitable after the showers.

"The weather forecast is calling for rain and I didnt want people to be in a mud puddle so we're moving it inside," Vargo said. "I dont think were gonna have any issues in the evening, i just didnt want people setting up in the mud for a tailgate party."

The concert will feature Los Lonely Boys at 6 p.m., O.A.R. at 7:30 p.m. and Sheryl Crow at 9 p.m. Though she does not expect rain to fall on the concert itself, Vargo said attendees may want to dress appropriately just in case. Umbrellas are not permitted in the stadium, but rain ponchos will be available for purchase.

"I would suggest people bring their own rain gear," Vargo said.

Tickets for the concert can still be purchased through www.kent.edu . Chairbacks are sold out, but field access and general admission tickets are still available.

Return to Top



News Headline: Tailgating for Sheryl Crow Concert Moved Indoors (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Threat of rain looms over potentially largest outdoor concert at Kent State's Dix Stadium

Sheryl Crow will perform at Kent State Sept. 8, 2012. Courtesy Kent State University

http://kent.patch.com/articles/tailgating-for-sheryl-crow-concert-moved-indoors/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1347098405

Tailgating planned prior to the Sheryl Crow concert at Kent State University's Dix Stadium this evening has been moved indoors.

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent said the tailgating was moved to inside the Kent State Fieldhouse due to weather and potential rain.

"That goes from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and is open to the public – no ticket needed for that event," Vincent said.

The Centennial Campaign Concert features Crow, O.A.R. and Los Lonely Boys.

Related Topics: Dix Stadium, Los Lonely Boys, O.A.R., and Sheryl Crow

Return to Top



News Headline: Sheryl Crow, O.A.R & Los Lonely Boys at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland County Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: On Saturday September 8th Kent State celebrated the end of the successful Centennial Campaign by holding a concert at Dix Stadium. The Centennial Campaign fundraiser ended over the summer and raised $265 million. That money will be used for capital improvements, scholarships and other projects. The concert also represented the beginning of the Campaign for Change, a peer-to-peer student scholarship program. A percentage of Saturday's tickets sales will support the scholarship program.

Los Lonely Boys began the show around 6 pm. Many fans were still arriving at this time. It seemed like some ticket holders were unaware of the early show time. Many concerts don't begin until after sunset and I wonder if the early show time was a reason for many empty seats around 6 pm.

At 7:30 pm O.A.R appeared on stage. More fans had arrived and they immediately began to sing along with the band. O.A.R. is a fascinating band to watch perform. On stage band members included a trombone, trumpet and saxophone player. They sound great live. The band played some of their recent hits including "Shattered" and "This Town". They ended their set with a version of "That was a Crazy Game of Poker" which is my personal favorite. This was the second time that O.A.R has been on tour with Sheryl Crow. They thanked her for always being so kind to them.

When Sheryl Crow took the stage around 9 pm most of the seats had filled up and the standing room section was almost full. Crow opened the show with one of her most popular songs "All I Wanna Do". I was also happy to hear some older favorites "Can't Cry Anymore" and "My Favorite Mistake". During the entire show she chewed gum as she sang while displaying an extremely high level of confidence throughout every song. She seems so comfortable on stage. Her talent of singing and songwriting obviously comes naturally. Crow played for almost two hours to a happy and enthusiastic crowd.

Kent State did a fantastic job of putting together this flawless event. I hope they can continue to have successful events like this that are appealing to students, alumni and the general public.

Return to Top



News Headline: Professional learning academy offered at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Professional Learning Communities (PLC) Academy is being offered at Kent State University during the 2012-13 school year for teams of local educators in districts.

"The academy is designed to provide educators in northeast Ohio a unique and affordable opportunity to learn from national presenters Dr. Anthony Muhammad and Dr. Luis Cruz, who have successfully developed PLCs in their own schools," said Lisbeth Justice, Ph.D., adjunct professor and executive director of LoveLight, Inc., the nonprofit sponsor of the academy.

The academy is being held in partnership with Kent State, Youngstown State, and Solution Tree.

For more information, contact Justice at 330- 673-5839 or email to lkjusti1@kent.edu.

Return to Top



News Headline: New KSU freshman class has 'best academic profile' in history of the university (Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Although it may not be the biggest in school history, Kent State University officials believe the freshman class that recently arrived at the Kent Campus may be the brightest.

University officials are heralding the group as having "the best academic profile in university history."

The average ACT score of the new class is 22.60, while the average high school GPA is 3.27.

According to KSU records, the next highest average ACT score for a freshman class in the past five years was 22.45 in fall 2010. The next highest average high school GPA was 3.22 in 2011.

T. David Garcia, associate vice president for enrollment management, wrote in a statement that KSU intends to continue raising academic standards for incoming students.

"Our freshman class is highly academically motivated," Garcia said. "Over the past few years, we were focused on growing our freshman class. Now, rather than quantity, our focus is on the quality of our students."

While final enrollment figures have not yet been released by the university, KSU officials project this freshman class as the second largest in school history.

KSU set a new record for its largest freshman class in Fall 2011, when 4,284 full-time freshman arrived on the Kent Campus.

Return to Top



News Headline: Go Green in Hudson today | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: www.woio.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hudson's Green on the Green event is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m today on the Park Lane Green and Veterans Way Park. There will be educational activities and more than 25 exhibits.

Events include a recycling fashion show by Kent State University students at 10 a.m., Dr. Green Bee presenting "How to Green Your Life," free curbside recycling bins, pet activities and a dog pie-eating contest at 11:30 a.m., live music by high school students Lucas Kadish and Maggie Cox, geocaching and a live beehive display by Summit County Beekeepers.

There also is a farmers market scheduled from 9 a.m to 12:30 p.m.,

Green on the Green was originally the City's annual Earth Day event. This year, the event was moved to September to help promote environment education in our local schools. The Hudson Public Works Department, Hudson Parks Department, Environmental Awareness Committee, Hudson Tree Commission and Friends of Hudson Parks have worked together to invite environmental and "green" organizations to participate in the annual event.

Return to Top



News Headline: Guild open to those with interest in sewing | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Akron/Canton Chapter of the American Sewing Guild has several neighborhood groups.

September is National Sewing Month, established by President Ronald Reagan with a proclamation in 1982 in recognition of the importance of home sewers both now and throughout the country's history.

The Akron/Canton Chapter of the American Sewing Guild has set up displays in the libraries of Tallmadge, Ellet, Goodyear, Highland Square, Northwest Akron, Wooster and Wadsworth with items members have either made or with vintage sewing notions that have been inherited.

The Tallmadge neighborhood group will meet Sept. 18 at 7 p.m. at the First Congregational Church of Tallmadge, 85 Heritage Drive. Attendees are asked to take their machines and any project they may be working on for a "sew-in."

The Ellet daytime group will meet Sept. 26 at 10 a.m. at the Ellet Community Center on Wedgewood Drive. Attendees are asked to take cutting tools and machines to make blankets for the American Sewing Guild National Service Project. Those interested in helping are asked to call Sandy at 330-794-0731.

Dr. Linda Ohrn, associate professor of fashion design at Kent State School of Fashion will be the morning speaker for the Oct. 13 annual meeting. Ohrn will present a program on pattern making, digital embroidery and surface design as well as a trunk show of her latest collection. A luncheon and fashion show will follow in the afternoon. Call Jennifer at 330-688-9770 for more information.

The American Sewing Guild is a non-profit volunteer organization of home sewers. It's primary purpose is to provide information, education and programs for its members and the community.

New friends and members are always welcome as the guild is open to anyone with an interest in any technique of sewing.

Call Jennifer at 330-688-9770 or visit www.asg.org.

Return to Top



News Headline: Celebrations | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kristyn Shreve of Kent received the James and Dorothy Rinier Endowed Scholarship in Geography at Kent State. She also was inducted into Gamma Theta Upsilon, the International Geographic Honor Society, and received an honorable mention in the Graduate Research Fellowship Program competition sponsored by the National Science Foundation. She has two bachelor's degrees from KSU. She is pursuing a master's degree in environmental science on a scholarship at Miami University. She is the daughter of Gregory and Joan Shreve of Kent and Oxford, Ohio

Return to Top



News Headline: Ashland University Environmental Lecture Series to focus on 'The Ecology of Urban Living' | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Ashland Times-Gazette - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Anne Jefferson, assistant professor of geology at Kent State University, will present a talk titled "The Science of Streams in the City" for the first Ashland University Environmental Lecture Series at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20.

Return to Top



News Headline: Parade Float Deadline for Kent State Homecoming is Oct. 5 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The parade is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 20

Students at Kent State carry the banner for the 2011 Homecoming Parade, which marched through the city Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011.

Credit Matt Fredmonsky http://o3.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/resize/273x203/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/d46ead6ef13c953c26ceaddf6bbcfc0e http://o5.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/patch/f8da5a46f839748f07290d03eec07ca1

http://kent.patch.com/articles/parade-float-deadline-for-kent-state-homecoming-is-oct-5/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1347271088

Kent State University and the city of Kent invite businesses, organizations and individuals to participate in Kent State University's 2012 Homecoming Parade. The registration deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 5.

The parade is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 20. This year's theme is “Battle of the Decades.” Parade participants are encouraged to base their creative entries on any one of 10 decades in Kent State's history.

Stepping off at 10 a.m. from Midway Drive on campus, the parade will proceed west on Main Street, arriving at its conclusion at the intersection of Main Street and Franklin Avenue in downtown Kent at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Entrants are reminded that they are responsible for securing their own parade mobility, whether on foot or by vehicle. Signs and banners are also the responsibility of the entrant. Parade entrants are welcome to pass out promotional items and candy to all parade spectators. All entries should be in good taste and should not make any reference to alcohol, drugs or other distasteful or offensive behaviors.

All entries must be postmarked by Oct. 5 for consideration of acceptance into the Homecoming Parade. Each entry will be confirmed upon receipt of the registration form. Parade registration, staging and disbanding location, parade map and additional information will be sent to the entry's contact person by Oct. 15.

For more information or to ask specific questions about the parade, contact Kent State's Center for Student Involvement at 330-672-2480. Registration materials are available at www.kent.edu/csi/upload/parade-registration2012.pdf.

Return to Top



News Headline: "Battle of the Decades' theme for KSU Homecoming parade | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University and the city of Kent invite businesses, organizations and individuals to participate in Kent State University's 2012 Homecoming Parade.

The parade is scheduled for Oct. 20. This year's theme is "Battle of the Decades." Parade participants are encouraged to base their creative entries on any one of 10 decades in KSU's history.

Stepping off at 10 a.m. from Midway Drive on campus, the parade will proceed west on Main Street, arriving at its conclusion at the intersection of Main Street and Franklin Avenue in downtown Kent at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Entrants are reminded that they are responsible for securing their own parade mobility, whether on foot or by vehicle. Signs and banners are also the responsibility of the entrant. Parade entrants are welcome to pass out promotional items and candy to spectators.

All entries should be in good taste and should not make any reference to alcohol, drugs or other distasteful or offensive behaviors.

All entries must be postmarked by Oct. 5 for consideration of acceptance into the Homecoming Parade.

Each entry will be confirmed upon receipt of the registration form. Parade registration, staging and disbanding location, parade map and additional information will be sent to the entry's contact person by Oct. 15.

For more information or to ask specific questions about the parade, contact Kent State's Center for Student Involvement at 330-672-2480.

Registration materials are available at

www.kent.edu/csi/upload/parade-registration2012.pdf. >

Return to Top



News Headline: New student housing emptying old in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Once a rare sight on the streets surrounding campus after Kent State University's fall semester started, "for rent" signs are still standing in front of student rooming houses on streets including East College Avenue, Sherman Street and University Drive.

Anne Moneypenny, office manager and Realtor for Jack Kohl Realty in Kent, said this year has been unique in her 12 years managing properties on the streets off of East Main Street between Linden Road and North Lincoln Street.

"This year I have two rooming houses that have not rented yet, and I've never had that happen," Moneypenny said. "The big houses usually go the quickest."

Three new apartment complexes opened in Kent before school started this year, which could explain the lack of interest in rentals in some of Kent's most popular neighborhoods for off-campus living. The Province on South Lincoln Street, University Edge on Rhodes Road and University Oaks off of Horning Road brought more than 1,700 new units of student housing to the city.

Moneypenny said the volume of new housing opening in the area makes it tougher for small renters to compete.

"Something new's in town," Moneypenny said. "They offer a lot of amenities, but you're going to pay for those, too."

Bridget Susel, Kent's acting community development director, said city workers have not made an official count of vacant rooming houses, but added that the amount seems greater than in previous years.

Susel said the competition between landlords and large apartment complexes could lead to a positive outcome for the city if it leads landlords to improve their properties to attract students back to the neighborhoods.

"It may be that market forces will work to the city's benefit to improve some of the housing stock that has grown aged and that is basically not up to code," Susel said. "Competition does push people to make improvements."

In a development that would be less beneficial for the city, Susel said the houses could also sit vacant.

Moneypenny said another option, if the student renters continued to shy away from rooming houses, would be to convert the properties to single-family rentals. She said families and seniors often have a hard time finding places to rent near KSU, and houses her firm manages that have made the transition from student to family housing have been snapped up quickly.

Jim Hauch, whose company Hauch Housing LLC owns more than a dozen rental properties between campus and downtown, said he's seen the rental business slow "just a little" this year, but added he did not have trouble filling his properties located between KSU and downtown.

He said he's not worrying too much about the new apartments because living in a house near KSU will always be a goal for many of the university's students.

"I have a feeling that there always will be the students that want to live in a house and experience the full atmosphere of college," he said. "‘Animal House' would not have taken place in an apartment."

Return to Top



News Headline: Schools' closed meetings in question (Smith) | Email

News Date: 09/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Bush, Bill
News OCR Text: The Columbus Board of Education and other district officials have gone into super-secret mode since news broke in June that employees have altered millions of attendance records.

The board has closed meetings under a novel and untested legal theory, and district officials have found questionable ways to deny access to public records. Some experts say the district is stretching the law, if not breaking it, when it comes to Ohio's requirement to conduct public business in public.

Three experts on Ohio's Open Meetings Act say the explanation that the board has used to close meetings and keep information from the public is legally suspect at best and blatantly illegal at worst.

The school board has closed public meetings repeatedly to talk with a private attorney, Robert "Buzz" Trafford, concerning unspecified topics related to data-rigging allegations. The district says it is closing the meetings to discuss "matters required to be kept confidential by federal law or regulations or state statutes."

Pressed to explain, the attorney said the board is closing meetings for reasons of "attorney-client privilege." However, a federal court ruling on this issue did not include attorney-client privilege as an exception. And the experts say it isn't an exception allowed under the Ohio Open Meetings law.

Individuals have the right to meet with an attorney in private, and public bodies have the right to keep certain legal documents private, but experts say the open-meetings law does not give public bodies the blanket right to a closed meeting anytime they want to talk with a lawyer.

Yet the Columbus Board of Education has used that excuse to close five meetings since Aug. 7.

The reason is sufficient to close the meetings, said Larry Braverman, the district's general counsel, in an email to The Dispatch.

Attorney Mark Weaver disagrees. While with the state attorney general's office from 1995 to 1999, Weaver wrote eight editions of the state's Open Government Resource Manual, widely viewed as the bible of public meetings and records laws.

"Under Ohio law, attorney-client discussions are not required to be kept confidential," Weaver said. "It's permissive, not mandatory."

In fact, the board did partially waive its attorney-client privilege in early August so it could turn over evidence in the data-rigging investigation by the state auditor. That makes the district's argument even weaker, Weaver said.

The board went into a closed meeting -- citing attorney-client privilege -- to discuss waiving that privilege for documents concerning the data scandal produced before Aug. 3.

The Dispatch requested those documents after the board waived attorney-client protection. A month later, Trafford refused to release them unless the newspaper agreed in writing not to challenge the board's action to close the meeting.

If a court were to find that the board closed the meeting illegally, he said, it could automatically void any actions taken as a result of the illegal meeting. In this case, the only action was to waive attorney-client privilege. The board emerged from that closed session with a two-page resolution already in hand, and it approved the waiver with little debate.

The Dispatch refused to agree to Trafford's request and demanded the records be released immediately.

The district released them late Wednesday.

Told of Trafford's attempt to leverage an agreement for the release of public documents, Ohio University professor Thomas Hodson said, "That's sort of incredible."

The usual way a board is allowed to meet with its attorney in private is to discuss "pending or imminent court action," said Hodson, who is a visiting trial judge for the Ohio Supreme Court and an expert in the state's Sunshine laws. But there is no pending court case. In fact, the board has never said why it hired Trafford, or what he's doing for it. Thus far, it hasn't released the contract guiding his work and pay.

The board can't close the meeting simply because the person they're talking with is an attorney, said Tim Smith, a journalism professor at Kent State University who is also an attorney specializing in Sunshine laws.

"Put simply, it isn't permitted," Smith said.

In addition to closing meetings, district officials also have denied public-records requests on documents that they did have, according to the information released Wednesday by Trafford:

* When The Dispatch requested emails between the now-reassigned data chief, Steve Tankovich, and principals, a data analyst retrieved them and sent them to district spokesman Jeff Warner, emails show.

But Warner emailed back to the analyst asking whether there was "a way to isolate only those emails" that Tankovich sent to the entire principal staff in one message, because that's what the newspaper had technically requested. There weren't any that met that narrow definition, and the district informed the newspaper that none was found.

When a reporter asked Warner to check for emails to individual principals, Warner agreed, but he never responded.

Warner yesterday took full responsibility for failing to deliver the documents, saying they became lost in the volume of records requests.

"I just missed it," Warner said. "It certainly was not intentional."

* When The Dispatch asked for "severance packages" given to former employees, the district said there was only one. But when the request was resubmitted to include "any separation agreement," district officials said they did have more of those -- but they still haven't provided them.

* When The Dispatch asked on Aug. 1 whether any employee -- and specifically general counsel Braverman -- had been subpoenaed by the state auditor, the district said no. Yet documents released on Wednesday show that Braverman had been subpoenaed on July 18.

Braverman said the request had asked about district employees who were subpoenaed "to be interviewed." The subpoena released on Wednesday shows that it required Braverman to appear in person unless he produced the requested documents by Aug. 1, which he did.

Return to Top



News Headline: Business calendar -- Sept. 9 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Critical Thinking in the Workplace - 7:30-9:30 a.m., Kent State University Stark Campus, University Center, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. A panel discussion to address best practice in the workplace. Panelists include: John Geib, Ph.D., dean of the Logos Institute; Dwight Jellison, director of the Global Services Delivery Team at Diebold; and Tim Miller, plant scheduler at Ohio Packaging Corrugated. $25 per person. Registration: 330-244-3508 or www.YourCorporateU.com .

Return to Top



News Headline: College Preparation Session for High School Students and Parents | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark is preparing high school juniors and seniors and their parents on how to choose the right college. Get Started: A Crash Course in College Planning, a no-cost information session designed to facilitate a smooth transition from high school to college, will take place on Thursday, Sept. 27, from 6 – 7:45 p.m. in Kent State Stark's Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township. This event is applicable for students preparing to attend any higher education institution and is not limited to Kent State Stark.

Get Started will guide the process of choosing the right college by breaking down preferences, needs, resources, academic program offerings, scholarships and other aspects that give the student the best chance for a successful college career. Session topics include questions to ask on a college visit; choosing a major; the typical college class; comparing institutions and tuition costs; how to apply for scholarships; and on-campus jobs, relationships and commitments, among others.

This comprehensive event will equip high school students with the correct questions to ask when they attend the upcoming Stark County College Fair, to be held on Tuesday, Oct. 2, from 6 - 8 p.m. at the Canton Memorial Civic Center.

Please make your reservations to attend Get Started by Monday, Sept. 24 at www.stark.kent.edu/admissions/events/get-started.cfm or contact Amanda Paulus at 330-244-3289 or apaulus3@kent.edu.

http://northcanton.patch.com/announcements/college-preparation-session-for-high-school-students-and-parents/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1347090650

Return to Top



News Headline: Area entertainment events beginning Sept. 7 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Through Nov. 2

ABSTRACT ALLURE

"My Crayolas," an acrylic painting by Patricia Zinsmeister Parker, is included in "Abstract Allure," a new exhibition in the University Center Dining Room at Kent State University Stark Campus. Also featured is work by a second abstract painter, David Kuntzman. The work is on display through Nov. 2. There will be a free opening reception Sept. 19 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the center.

Sept. 15

IMPROV LAUGHTER

Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood, who honed their improv-comedy skills on TV's "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" will appear in concert at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sept. 15 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus in New Philadelphia. Tickets, $35, $40 and $50, may be ordered at 330-308-6400 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.

Oct. 10

Steppin' Out

Tony Award-winning performer Ben Vereen and his band will perform his one-man show "Steppin' Out With Ben Vereen" at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 10 at Kent State University's E. Turner Stump Theatre.

The show includes "The Lady is Tramp," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Way," "Ol' Black Magic" and "Mr. Bojangles,"  plus songs from "Jesus Christ Superstar" and "Hair." Tickets, $50 gold circle, $25 reserved, $20 for seniors 60 and older, and $10 for students, will go on sale Sept. 10 at 330-672-2787.

Return to Top



News Headline: Sept. 5: GET OUT!: Scholarship fundraiser draws vehicle enthusiasts | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Event highlights

• Started in 1992 as the Timken Vehicle Display and Special Interest Show for Timken Co. employees, the Canton Carnival of Wheels has evolved into a non-profit, community event that draws hundreds of vehicle entries and thousands of spectators every year.

• Don't expect just classic cars. Any vehicle with wheels is invited to join, including tractors, motorcycles and race cars. Vehicles can be displayed for a $10 fee. Dash plaques will be awarded to the first 400 vehicles registered.

• Participants will vie for the People's Choice Award and sponsor awards.

• New cars will be up for perusal, as well, as the Stark County Automobile Dealers Association will show 2013 models of selected vehicles.

• Spectators also can get an eyeful of miniature "cars" during the show's unique valve-cover race. The competition is reminiscent of the Boy Scouts' Pinewood Derby, with the vehicles made from the valve covers from internal combustion car engines instead of wood. The little machines are powered by gravity rather than engines.

• Live music will provide a backdrop for all the car gazing. The John Berecek and Friends Band and the Bandog Band will supply the tunes.

• Ten food vendors will be on hand to help keep hunger at a minimum. Available eats will include gyros, pizza, doughnuts, barbecued foods, hot dogs and other goodies.

Why attend? All proceeds benefit the Automotive Technology scholarship fund at Stark State College and to a general scholarship fund at Kent State University at Stark.

About the event

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

Where: The parking lots of Kent State University at Stark and Stark State College in Jackson Township.

Tickets: Free to spectators, $10 fee to display a vehicle.

Info: Call Dan Thoma at 330-493-9202 or Dick Mautz at 330-837-3878, or visit www.cantoncarnivalofwheels.com . Registration forms are available online.

Return to Top



News Headline: On the Beat: Local actress is tickled pink with 'Legally Blonde' | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Taylor Marie Scott, who stars as bubbly, happy-go-lucky Elle Woods in the Players Guild's upcoming "Legally Blonde: The Musical," was so bubbly and happy-go-lucky on the phone that I felt as if Elle herself had called.

"I really do identify with Elle," said Scott, 21. "I have blonde hair, too, and I'm sure people don't really take me seriously either."

A Jackson High School grad, she is majoring in global communications at Kent State University Stark Campus.

Here are highlights of our conversation.

Q. You must be pretty excited about getting this role.

A. "I am SO excited! I think I'm still kind of processing it. I'm tickled pink!" (Laughs)

Q. Have you done lots of theater before this?

A. "I used to do a lot of theater at the Guild when I was little, then I took a five-year break to focus on school, before I just randomly showed up at �Legally Blonde' auditions."

Q. What other shows have you done at the Players Guild?

A. "I was in �Christmas Carol' for a few years, �Ragtime,' �Annie, Jr.' In �Beauty and the Beast' I was the enchanted flower pot in the back row. I just waved my arms!" (Laughs)

Q. Are you a big fan of the "Legally Blonde" movie?

A. "I loved the movie! I can remember always watching it when I was little. I'm a really big fan of all girl-power movies."

Q. Like "Mean Girls" and "Clueless"?

A. "Yes! I can quote �Mean Girls.' And �Spice World,' too - but that might be really embarrassing to put!" (Laughs)

Q. Elle is a huge part, right?

A. "I'm in every single scene. I'm never offstage. I sing in almost every number. Tons of dancing. It kind of feels like being in a marathon."

Q. It sounds very challenging.

A. "The thing is, I'm not a trained singer. I'm really not a dancer, I have two left feet. But it's like, Elle has to go to Harvard Law School and prove herself, and I'm not really trained in musical theater, and I'm in this huge lead role and maybe I can succeed in it. I've been trying to use that."

Q. Who's playing the hairdresser? I love that character in the movie.

A. "Paulette is played by Lisa Belopotosky-Knight, who in real life is MY Paulette! She's my best friend, and she was my very first musical-theater teacher when I was 16. Now we're acting off each other, and it is so fun! We cried when we saw the cast list because we're supernerds, and this is our dream!"

Q. Have you been having fun rehearsing?

A. "Yes! Everyone is amazingly talented. It's INSANE the people I get to work with! Plus, everyone gets along really, really well."

Q. Elle is obsessed with the color pink. How about you?

A. "I actually look good in pink and soft corals. I do own a lot of pink, and I own a lot of sparkles, and if I could bedazzle everything I would! Plus, I'm real short. I'm probably 5-foot-1 on a good day. I look like a sparkly garden gnome."

Loading commenting interface...

Thank you for the abuse report. We will review the report and take appropriate action.

On Stage

Translations Art Gallery is at 331 Cleveland Ave. NW. Hours are noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday.

Return to Top



News Headline: Rosenberry Foundation awards more than $215,000 in grants | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: About a dozen charitable organizations in Tuscarawas County recently received a combined $215,818 in grants from the Harold C. and Marjorie Q. Rosenberry Tuscarawas County Foundation.

The late Harold C. Rosenberry of Dover established the charitable trust to provide financial assistance to qualified charities in Tuscarawas County.

Organizations receiving grants use the money to buy equipment and for capital improvements. Huntington National Bank serves as trustee. The Foundation distributes grants semi-annually to charities selected by the trust's selection committee, which is comprised of area civic leaders.

These organizations received the latest Rosenberry gifts:

 Newcomerstown Emergency Rescue Squad $6,240, to purchase a fire gear washer.

 Buckeye Career Center, $18,502, toward the purchase of a CAT hydraulic excavator simulator to teach operation and safety to students.

 Tuscarawas County YMCA, $10,000, to purchase and install a new telephone system.

 Claymont, Dover, Indian Valley, New Philadelphia and Tuscarawas Valley school districts, $10,000 to each school for Project Lead the Way to buy hardware and equipment.

 Friends of Tuscarawas County, $10,000, toward the local match for the Tusc/Stark Parks Aqueduct Project connecting the Towpath Trail at Bolivar.

 Journey's End Ministries, $29,000, to construct an addition and purchase a used forklift.

 Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia, $23,995, to purchase digital radiology equipment for the veterinary technology program.

 Tuscarawas County JFS, $10,000, toward the purchase of playground equipment.

 Tuscarawas County Council for Church and Community (T-4-C), $3,400, to replace telephone system and upgrade a printer.

 City of Uhrichsville, $10,999, to buy and install a new telephone system.    

 United Way of Tuscarawas County, $10,288, toward repair and repaving parking lots.

 Personal & Family Counseling Services of the Tuscarawas Valley, $24,292, to upgrade computer work stations and servers to process electronic health records.

 Trinity Hospital Twin City in Dennison, $9,100 to fund half of the purchase cost for a new Complete Video Microscope.

The Harold C. and Marjorie Q. Rosenberry Tuscarawas County Foundation has distributed $5.64 million since it began in 1994. Only organizations that qualify under section 501(c)(3) of the federal tax code are eligible for funds.

Distributions are on a semi-annual basis. Deadline for applications for the next distribution is Dec. 31. To obtain an application, call Larry Gibbs, Foundation grant administrator, at 330-260-3948, write to the Rosenberry Foundation, Huntington Bank Building, Suite 322, 232 W. Third St., Dover, OH 44622, or email rosenberry@wilkshire.net.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Whose Line Is It Anyway' stars to perform at Kent State University... | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TUSCARAWAS -

Comedians Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood, two stars of the Emmy-nominated improvisational television series "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" are teaming up for two performances at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

The show is suitable for all ages. Tickets range from $35 - $50 and are available at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400 . The box office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Dr. NE, New Philadelphia.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Adds Conference Center | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Meetings Focus
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A unique public/private partnership will enable the Kent State University Foundation to fund a new hotel and conference center that will create 472 local jobs and spur regional tourism growth and economic development.

The new 95-room hotel—which is slated to open next Spring— is part of a larger $100 million redevelopment project in downtown Kent that will offer retail, office and residential space. The 5,400-square-foot conference center will feature a ballroom for up to 300 guests.

"There are no comparable hotels in the immediate area," said Joel S. Pizzuti, president of The Pizzuti Companies. "There will be significant impact on the local economy including small business growth, job creation and additional development."

Return to Top



News Headline: Celebrations | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sarah Meghan Harper of Akron, an associate professor of library science at Kent State, was appointed co-chair of the Virginia Hamilton Conference on Multicultural Literature for Youth, the longest-running event in the United States to focus exclusively on multicultural literature for children and young adults, and as a member of the American Library Association Council.

Return to Top



News Headline: RIGHT HERE IN PORTAGE COUNTY | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Displays
Industry: Liquid crystal display.
■ Location: 343 Portage Blvd. in
Kent.
■ What they do: A world leader in
the research, development and manufacture
of liquid crystal displays for
unique and sustainable applications.
... Is a joint venture between Kent
State University and Manning Ventures.
■ What makes them unique: Their
LCD screens, which makes use of a
trademarked design called Reflex, are
revolutionary because they retain an
image without power and offer superior
optical characteristics including
sunlight-readability and wide viewing
angles. ... Installed a new roll-to-roll
production line in October of 2008.
It is the first of its kind in the entire
world. ... Produce displays with incredible
durability and flexibility, while
also setting new standards in environmentally
friendly production.
■ History: Founded in 1993.
■ Website: www.kentdisplays.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Packed audience for Lefton presentation | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton recently spoke to a packed room at the monthly meeting of the Kent Digital Photography Club at the Kent Free Library.

A photographer of note, Lefton presented examples of his work and discussed the technique of High Dynamic Range Photography, which uses a computer program to combine several separate exposures of the same image, saving the lightest and darkest parts of a scene, and thereby creating an image with full tonal information.

"He is a great teacher," said professional photographer and artist Jerry Jividen, who leads the Kent Digital Photography Club. "His dynamic color, texture and composition gave us much to admire, and when we asked questions, he did not hesitate to show us how he did his magic."

Jividen said that Lefton uses High Dynamic Range Photography to express his artistic interpretations of the many places he has visited all over the world. The presentation was very inspiring for many club members, according to Jividen. "The Kent Digital Photography Club is a way to get people together to share their vision and talents, which Dr. Lefton did wonderfully."

Examples of Lefton's work can be seen at his website, http://lesterlefton.com .

The Kent Digital Photography Club is free and open to photographers of all ages and skill levels and meets from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on the last Tuesday of each month at the Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St.

Kent Digital Photography Club leader Jerry Jividen, at right, invited Dr. Lester A. Lefton, Kent State University president, to speak at the club's August meeting.

Return to Top



News Headline: Regional Campus Dedication: This Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Patch
Contact Name: Mitch Cooper
News OCR Text: Things going on in Twinsburg this week.

2. Kent State dedicates its new Regional Academic Center. While classes have been in full swing for a few weeks, Kent State University will officially dedicate the new Regional Academic Center on Creekside Drive, Wednesday at noon.

Kent State President Lester Lefton will speak at the event, in addition to remarks by Jacqueline Woods, chair of the Kent State Board of Trustees; Mayor Katherine Procop, Randy Ruttenberg, principal of Fairmount Properties, the private partner and developer of Kent State's Regional Academic Center; and David Mohan, dean of Kent State University at Geauga and the Regional Academic Center. Guided tours of the campus will follow.

Return to Top



News Headline: Ohioana Library Hears a 'Who' at 2nd Annual book Festival | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Short North Gazette
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Underground comic book writer Harvey Pekar signs his work.

Who? Ohio writers, musicians and other artists _ those born in the state and those who have lived in the state for five or more years. Where? The Ohioana Library, just a few short blocks east of the Short North at 274 East First Ave. at the site of the former Jeffrey Manufacturing. Linda Hengst, director of the Ohioana Library, tells the story well of her first involvement with the site: "They told me this would be our main room _ as I was looking at greasy, oily railroad tracks and a debacle of debris everywhere." The Ohioana Library and the State Library share the same site, both having moved from the newly restored Supreme Court Building downtown.

Child reading by the Jeffrey exhibit.

On May 10 of 2008 was the Second Ohioana Book Festival. I was honored to participate as the representative of the Aldus Society. You will find no greasy railroad tracks now _ but shelves and displays of Ohio-authored material, meeting rooms, large spaces for gatherings _ all pristine and white, with photo displays of the former use of the site. All the participants in May's Festival had published work within the last two years. The authors ranged from fiction writers (such as Karen Harper and Donald Ray Pollock) to true-life narrator Harvey Pekar, to Ian Adams' color photography, to Michelangelo Altiere's three-dimensional novel in a box. Children's writers and illustrators were also on hand.

The rooms were bustling with activity: the grand open space with stage; representatives of partnering literary groups; authors with stacks of their books; the Starbucks and Barnes & Noble sellers. Kent State University sent skilled childcare workers to create a room brimming with children's activities. A cozy book corner, of course, was a feature of the room. Will Hillenbrand, children's author and illustrator, spent time in the room entertaining the children as well. Simultaneous readings and discussions and browsing gave everyone plenty to do _ the buzz might have been heard by Horton the Elephant or over on High Street and in the Governor's Residence.

First Lady Frances Strickland presented the Robert Fox awards for Young Writers. She also showed off the new book about the Governor's Residence, Our First Family's Home. In the State Library and in the meeting rooms were discussions of topics such as "The Book That Changed My Life," "Writing For the Young Audience," "Copyright Law and Publishing," "Reviewing in the Internet Age" with Bill Eichenberger and Kassie Rose.

Michael Duffy and Connie Schultz presented, "People, Politics, Power, and Prose." Every ten minutes from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. was an author reading from his or her work. Featured authors had lengthier readings and question and answer sessions. Harvey Pekar and Mary Doria Russell spoke on "Transmuting Life Into Art."

Marilou Suszko, author and chef.

Candice Watkins and Arnett Howard had learned from the pages of Harvey's American Splendor that he was a resource on Cleveland's jazz culture. Candice and her team of experts ran the logistics of the Ohioana Book Festival; Arnett provided the music, a trip through Ohio's musical heritage as well as music inspired by his recent trip to New Orleans. Harvey brightened up when he saw Arnett. In his research for Jazz Ohio, a 1999 Ohio Historical Society touring show, Arnett had met Harvey when the famed life-into-graphics author was a mail clerk at Cleveland's VA hospital. Harvey related their past adventure in searching out the sites of jazz clubs in Cleveland. One wonders whether the Ohioana Festival will appear in one of Harvey's future works.

The lunchtime crowd also enjoyed outdoor music provided by Eugene Beer, the Piano Peddler (bike with piano). It was a beautiful day for dining al fresco. Jeni's ice cream completed the literary picture, complete with literary-named flavors: Kryptonite Karamel (Superman's creator is from Ohio); Goosebumps Berry Lavender (after RL Stine); Cooper's Cocoa (after Martha Cooper, founder of the Ohioana Library); Strawberry Girl (the title of a Lois Lenski book).

I handed out every one of my Aldus Society leaflets, and talked to dozens of people. Some of the other partners who had materials for the gathering were Columbus Metropolitan Library, Experience Columbus, Ohio Center For The Book, Ohio University Press, the Thurber House, the Short North Arts District, the Institute for Collaborative Research and Public Humanities, the State Library of Ohio, The OSU Colleges of the Arts and Sciences, and The OSU University Libraries. We got to stuff bags _ bright red ones _ for all the authors with our

Donald Ray Pollock reads from his debut story collection, Knockemstiff.

literature, and stuff the festival browsers' hands with them, too. As if all the paper information disseminated wasn't enough, the authors all gave personal time at local schools, on the radio with Fred Andrle, or in other community service. The festival was, and future ones will be, free and open to the public.

The big plus was that I was able to attend the reception at the Governor's Residence later that evening as a partner in the festival. Flags like those of an embassy and really cool sunglass-wearing bodyguards in dark suits lent an air of authority to the evening. The peacefulness and beauty both inside and outside the house were stunning. Ohio plants and Ohio artists were featured. All the food came from Ohio (a great spread hosted by Honda) under an onion-domed tent and a pergola. I was pleased to see Queen Brooks' artwork on display along with the Alice Schille and the Howard Chandler Christy.

Frances Strickland spoke again as did David Weaver of the Ohioana Library.

I took the tour of the downstairs of the house led by Mary Alice, of the well-rounded tones and enthusiasm for the anecdotes of the artifacts. You can take the same tour in the pages of the new book! In summation of the day, we heard the "Who" of the Ohio authors, musicians, artists _ and they are legion _ saw the plethora of material in the Ohioana, the treasures in the Residence, heard the Ohio birds chirping in the wildlife area outside the Residence, (not seeming like it is in the heart of Bexley), heard the musical history of Ohio, and couldn't help but feel proud and satisfied. Also, just a little bit jealous _ must get my own book done! The pages of the Ohioana Quarterly are full of the new books brought out by Ohio authors. A goal for me, to be included in there someday.

Return to Top



News Headline: Our View: Partners in progress creating a new Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Downtown Kent has gained two major corporate tenants -- and nearly 200 jobs in the process -- as the revitalization of the business district continues to take shape.

Ametek Inc. and the Davey Resource Group have moved into their new offices in the Fairmount Properties block on South Water Street, bringing with them about 90 employees each.

Both firms have longstanding roots in Kent. Both are to be commended for choosing to make a major investment in the downtown area, in the process choosing Kent over other locations available to them.

The Fairmount site has taken shape in a little more than a year -- ground was broken in August 2011 -- and it's an impressive anchor to what some are calling 21st Century Kent. In addition to the two corporate tenants, the two buildings spanning South Water between Erie Street and Haymaker Parkway also will house 14 retail establishments. Two of those -- Insomnia Cookies and Yogurt VI -- will be in operation this week in the Fairmount/College Town Kent block.

The new businesses are among 30 that have opened in downtown Kent in the past two years, including those in the Acorn Alley developments. Another 20 are planned to open in the year to come.

The addition of 50 business establishments in the midst of the worst economic times in memory makes the Kent revitalization initiative even more impressive. Every new business means new jobs, which translates into new revenue for the city and those who have invested in it.

In addition to the new buildings in the Fairmount block, the city also has gained a much needed public parking area as well as a revamped Erie Street that is a vast improvement over what it replaced.

Construction is progressing on three other downtown anchors: the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, PARTA's Kent Central Gateway and Acorn Corner, the revitalization of the old Kent Hotel. Work also has begun in earnest on the Esplanade, the Kent State University project that will link the campus with the downtown area.

The "Kent story," which is attracting national attention, is proof of what can happen when public and private partners work together with a focus on progress.

State Sen. John Eklund, who recently toured the revitalization site with U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan and other officials, put it well when he described what is happening in Kent as "fantastic." He said, "The idea is collaboration between institutions, the private sector and government with a good plan and a cooperative effort to get things done."

Much has gotten done in Kent. And even more is coming.

Return to Top



News Headline: Downtown development spurs hike in Kent income tax receipts | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The city of Kent's income tax receipts are on the upswing this year, propelled by the downtown redevelopment project.

According to city records, Kent has collected more than $6.8 million in income taxes from the start of 2012 through the end of July. This represents a 6.96 percent increase compared to the same time period last year, when the city had collected about $6.4 million.

The city has budgeted for $10.9 million in income tax returns in total for 2012. If the city meets those expectations, it would represent a second consecutive year of income tax growth.

The city took in more than $10.7 million in 2011 representing a 2.48 percent increase from the year before and the second highest total in the last six years behind 2008. In 2009 and 2010, the city took in less than the year before.

Dan Smith, Kent's economic development director, said he expects the income tax numbers will continue to improve as downtown construction continues and new businesses continue to open.

"I think the results are going to be even better by year's end," Smith said. "Even temporary construction income taxes will be on the increase with all the work Kent State University has scheduled to get underway. We think for the next two or three years we'll be on a steady increase."

In the last two years, more than 30 businesses have opened in downtown Kent, with another 20 expected to open by the end of 2013.

A majority of those 20 will be retail and restaurants scheduled to open this fall in the Fairmount Properties block, bordered by East Erie Street, Haymaker Parkway and South Water Street. They will join anchor tenants Davey Tree and Ametek, companies that have already moved workers into offices in the mixed-use project.

Smith noted that the income tax funds are helping to fill a hole left by a reduction in state funding, about $900,000 last year and an expected $1 million this year.

"Without the state reductions we'd be in pretty good shape, but as it turns out we're replacing those funds," he sad. "But, a lot of communities don't have a project like this to replace those funds. We feel pretty fortunate."

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus