Report Overview:
Total Clips (19)
Aeronautics; KSU Airport (2)
Alumni; Art, School of (1)
Board of Trustees (1)
Enrollment (8)
Higher Education (1)
Information Services (1)
Institutional Advancement (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Physiology (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics; KSU Airport (2)
Aviation Heritage Fair to fly Sept. 15 (McFarland) 09/11/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Stow — The 2012 Aviation Heritage Fair is set to take flight at the Kent State University Airport on Kent Road Sept. 15. The Aeronautics Program at KSU and the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club is hosting the 16th...

Aviation Heritage Fair to fly Sept. 15 (McFarland) 09/11/2012 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

Stow — The 2012 Aviation Heritage Fair is set to take flight at the Kent State University Airport on Kent Road Sept. 15. The Aeronautics Program at KSU and the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club is hosting the 16th...


Alumni; Art, School of (1)
Two exhibits highlighted by Kent State's art program (Turner) 09/12/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Art Galleries presents In Her Closet, works by mixed media artist and Kent State alumna Clare Murray Adams,...


Board of Trustees (1)
Kent State Wants to Enhance Education, Sports to 'Distinguish' Itself (Lefton, Diacon, Nielsen) 09/12/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Enrollment (8)
Kent State University enrollment at all-time high (Lefton) 09/12/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Enrollment at KSU sets record; UA's dips slightly (Lefton) 09/11/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Enrollment at Kent State University edged up to another record, while the University of Akron lost students this fall. Those are two early reports on how...

Kent State reports enrollment record, again (Garcia) 09/12/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Enrollment Records Keep Falling at Kent State (Lefton, Garcia) 09/11/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

42,513 students enrolled across 8-campus system for fall 2012 Enrollment figures released by Kent State University show the eight-campus system has yet again set a record for the largest-ever student body. A total 42,513 students are enrolled...

KSU posts record fall enrollment 09/12/2012 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State enrollment at all-time high 09/11/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has increased enrollment, surpassing last year's record and reaching a new all-time high with the release of the university's...

Kent State Enrollment Reaches New All-Time High (Lefton) 09/11/2012 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

KSU Students walking to class Kent State University Enrollment at Kent State University is at an all-time high. University officials are saying 42, 513 students are...

Kent State sets all-time enrollment record (Lefton) 09/12/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT -- Enrollment at Kent State University has reached an all-time high. According to KSU officials, 42,513 students are enrolled for the Fall 2012 semester throughout...


Higher Education (1)
Statewide collaboration to assign operating dollars for higher education (Mansfield) 09/11/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...governor wants to tweak the formula to consider hot-button subjects such as cost control, commercialization, graduation rates and student remediation. University of Akron President Luis Proenza said the new process - while as yet unclear - is a welcome change. "The most positive sign I see is...


Information Services (1)
New Apple iPhone 5 expected to offer 4G LTE - so what is it? (Bues) 09/12/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...announce a new iPhone. One new feature with many new phones is the LTE network. This stands for Long Term Evolution. What does that really mean? Kent State Information Technology Manager Christopher Bues said 4G LTE offers phone speeds as fast as your home computer. The networks are crowded...


Institutional Advancement (1)
Sheryl Crow's Music Takes on New Meaning at Kent State Show 09/11/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Sheryl Crow has played venues such as the Forum in Los Angeles, but on Saturday night, Kent State University got a huge does of her, as the Centennial Concert --an event that marked the end of a fundraising campaign which exceeded its...


KSU at Stark (2)
Kent Stark Scholarships Established for Students with Strong Work Ethics (Folk) 09/11/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Through a newly established scholarship available to Kent State University at Stark students, clients who chose to host their corporate meetings, training sessions or special events at The University...

Kent Stark Presents Lectures to Honor Constitution Day 09/11/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

...http://northcanton.patch.com/announcements/kent-stark-presents-lectures-to-honor-constitution-day/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1347391989 Kent State University at Stark will present informational lectures on Monday, Sept. 17 to honor Constitution Day, which recognizes the adoption of...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
School of Library and Information Science at Kent State welcomes three new faculty 09/11/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The School of Library and Information Science at Kent State University has added three new faculty members to its ranks this fall, giving a boost to its areas of study in youth services librarianship...


Physiology (1)
Things that make you dumber 09/12/2012 Illawarra Mercury Text Attachment Email

...viewers are significantly more misinformed than consumers of news from other sources," a 2010 University of Maryland study showed. Obesity A 2010 Kent State University study tested more than 100 obese individuals before and after they had bariatric surgery. Men's Health reports that "before...


News Headline: Aviation Heritage Fair to fly Sept. 15 (McFarland) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: HOLLY SCHOENSTEIN
News OCR Text: Stow — The 2012 Aviation Heritage Fair is set to take flight at the Kent State University Airport on Kent Road Sept. 15.

The Aeronautics Program at KSU and the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club is hosting the 16th annual fair that's scheduled for 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The event celebrates Ohio's aviation history with military and general aviation educational displays, aviation activities and historical aircraft.

According to Maureen McFarland, academic program director for the aeronautics program, over the past several years about 10,000 people have attended the event each year. Al Beckwith, who operates a commercial aviation company at the airport, said he expects between 8,000 and 12,000 or more people to come this year.

“The goal of the Aviation Heritage Fair has been to not only share with others our love of aviation and our appreciation for alumni, the aviation industry and the local community, but also to raise funds which directly support scholarship efforts of the Aeronautics Program and the Kiwanis Club,” McFarland said. “This year we are excited and proud to announce that in fall [semester of] 2013 the Aeronautics Program will be able to offer the first Aviation Heritage scholarship. This endowed scholarship is made possible through the donations of all our past and current sponsors.”

Organizers of the event say both the “flight enthusiast” and the “casual fan” will enjoy a variety of activities, including airplane rides, airport flyovers, vintage and contemporary aircraft displays with civilian and military planes and helicopters and carnival-style food and beverages.

New for this year is a speech by Brian Udell, who survived an ejection during a supersonic flight. The speech, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at the KIVA in the Student Center on KSU's main campus.

Admission to the fair and parking are free of charge, and attendees can tour the airport.

The Kiwanis Club is hosting a pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets are $6 per person.

The KSU Precision Flight Team will be giving airplane rides from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., weather permitting, in the University's fleet of Cessna 172s. Rides cost $30 per person or $75 for a group of three, and the proceeds will benefit Flight Team's program. Those interested in taking a ride are required to register at the sign-up tent when arriving at the fair.

Airport flyovers include a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 121st Air Refueling Wing in Columbus from 11 to 11:30 a.m. and an F-16 at 3 p.m.

Several World War II aircraft will be on display, including a B-25 “Georgie's Gal” and the Heritage Air Museum's C-123 Provider.

The Flying Black Squirrels, KSU's chapter of Women in Aviation, will be selling T-shirts and memorabilia as a fundraiser.

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News Headline: Aviation Heritage Fair to fly Sept. 15 (McFarland) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name: HOLLY SCHOENSTEIN
News OCR Text: Stow — The 2012 Aviation Heritage Fair is set to take flight at the Kent State University Airport on Kent Road Sept. 15.

The Aeronautics Program at KSU and the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club is hosting the 16th annual fair that's scheduled for 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The event celebrates Ohio's aviation history with military and general aviation educational displays, aviation activities and historical aircraft.

According to Maureen McFarland, academic program director for the aeronautics program, over the past several years about 10,000 people have attended the event each year. Al Beckwith, who operates a commercial aviation company at the airport, said he expects between 8,000 and 12,000 or more people to come this year.

“The goal of the Aviation Heritage Fair has been to not only share with others our love of aviation and our appreciation for alumni, the aviation industry and the local community, but also to raise funds which directly support scholarship efforts of the Aeronautics Program and the Kiwanis Club,” McFarland said. “This year we are excited and proud to announce that in fall [semester of] 2013 the Aeronautics Program will be able to offer the first Aviation Heritage scholarship. This endowed scholarship is made possible through the donations of all our past and current sponsors.”

Organizers of the event say both the “flight enthusiast” and the “casual fan” will enjoy a variety of activities, including airplane rides, airport flyovers, vintage and contemporary aircraft displays with civilian and military planes and helicopters and carnival-style food and beverages.

New for this year is a speech by Brian Udell, who survived an ejection during a supersonic flight. The speech, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at the KIVA in the Student Center on KSU's main campus.

Admission to the fair and parking are free of charge, and attendees can tour the airport.

The Kiwanis Club is hosting a pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets are $6 per person.

The KSU Precision Flight Team will be giving airplane rides from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., weather permitting, in the University's fleet of Cessna 172s. Rides cost $30 per person or $75 for a group of three, and the proceeds will benefit Flight Team's program. Those interested in taking a ride are required to register at the sign-up tent when arriving at the fair.

Airport flyovers include a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 121st Air Refueling Wing in Columbus from 11 to 11:30 a.m. and an F-16 at 3 p.m.

Several World War II aircraft will be on display, including a B-25 “Georgie's Gal” and the Heritage Air Museum's C-123 Provider.

The Flying Black Squirrels, KSU's chapter of Women in Aviation, will be selling T-shirts and memorabilia as a fundraiser.

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News Headline: Two exhibits highlighted by Kent State's art program (Turner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Art Galleries presents In Her Closet, works by mixed media artist and Kent State alumna Clare Murray Adams, through Sept. 29 at the Downtown Gallery.

The title In Her Closet references the way in which individuals often keep hidden certain aspects of their personalities. The exhibit features manipulated digital prints on cotton with stitching and embellishment, as well as dresses made of silk organza with stitching and found object embellishments. This exhibit challenges the viewer to interpret the dresses, shadows and the deeper meanings that clothing can suggest.

"Ideas of family, feminist concerns, elements of time and universal emotional issues are continual themes for exploration," said Murray Adams on her website. "Earlier work was strongly rooted in quilt making and surface design. More recent work relies on the processes involved in making 3-D constructions, in collage and in encaustic painting or working with wax. My long interest and attraction to fibers is still evident in my work, if not in process, then certainly in concept."

Murray Adams currently serves as a professor of art and is former chair of the visual art department at Malone University. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art in 1993 from Kent State, and a Master of Fine Art with a concentration on fibers and mixed media from Vermont College of Norwich University in 2001.

The Kent State University School of Art's Downtown Gallery is at 141 East Main St. in Kent. Gallery hours are 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday to Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Free parking is available behind the gallery.

For additional information, visit http://art.kent.edu or contact the Downtown Gallery at 330-676-1549.

JAPANESE PRINTS & JAPONISME

Kent State University's School of Art Galleries also presents the exhibition "Japanese Prints & Japonisme," curated by Sharon Divell, through Oct. 5 at the School of Art Gallery at 400 Janik Dr. on the Kent Campus.

Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For details, call 330-672-7853.

"The exhibit features over a dozen Japanese prints and two Japanese sword guards on loan from the Kent State University Museum," said director of galleries Anderson Turner. There are also additional works that represent the influence of Japanese art on the rest of the world.

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News Headline: Kent State Wants to Enhance Education, Sports to 'Distinguish' Itself (Lefton, Diacon, Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The board of trustees held an informal meeting to discuss the future at the new Twinsburg Regional Academic Center.

Kent State University President Lester Lefton thinks the university has the product in place, now he wants to focus on how to attract even more students to it.

“We have to distinguish ourselves in unique ways,” Lefton said Tuesday, addressing the university's Board of Trustees at the new Twinsburg Regional Academic Center.

“You can create product all day long but that's not gonna' convince people,” Lefton said. “They've got to believe in you.”

The board of trustees held an informal meeting to discuss visions for the university's future and ways to establish these ideas.

Lefton said creating a successful sports program mixed with new developments in education and facilities will propel the university into the next decade.

Provost Todd Diacon agrees, and said by changing how the university looks at students can make it a "destination university."

“The purposes of a college education are two: To form the worker and to form the person,” Diacon said.

Diacon said people know the economical reasons to go to college, but he doesn't want students to be subordinated to their work, but to be “masters of their own domain” and change the world around them.

His plans to implement such a mindset include creating an "unparalleled residential campus experience" with a robust and high-quality online education program and living up to its promises.

By looking at the universities strategic plan, Diacon said there are several areas the university can improve, helping both current and prospective students.

A significant way to do that is by creating new buildings to give the campus a better look to campus and draw students in by using state-of-the-art facilities.

Diacon said he doesn't like the idea of just using the buildings you have, which don't match the university's hope for the future.

One example is the new $24 million, 44,000-square-foot Twinsburg Regional Academic Center, which opened this fall.

Academically, one challenge is to identify academic policies that are hurting the university in student success. While they may have been implemented with good intentions, some rules can be a barrier for students.

“Usually for unintended reasons, academic policies sometimes harm student success,” Diacon said.

Diacon also wants to see Kent State become more of an international university, become "more narrow but deep" in research and better recognize the faculty members.

Lefton also believes a strong athletic standing is key in attracting people to a rising university. Many universities can be distinguished based on their collegiate sports alone.

“They [students] get that the whole school is wrapped up in athletics, and they go to it because of it,” Lefton said, mentioning schools like Ohio State and Notre Dame.

Athletic Director Joel Nielson said that as far as success goes, Kent State sports are on top.

Over the last five years Kent State had 46 MAC Championships, including eight last year.

“The athletic department at Kent State is in great shape,” Nielson said, adding they are solid academically, competitive, and socially responsible.

Nielson noted that on the athletics front, new and remodeled facilities are vital to success.

“We've fallen behind and fallen behind in a big way,” Nielson said. “We need to have more buildings that have the “wow” factor.”

The athletic department currently has a $50 million master plan with with priority projects including the field house team locker rooms, gymnastics locker room, the baseball stadium, and renovating the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.

Nielson said winning is a big help too, especially in football, and thinks the right people are in place to make sure that happens.

For the future, Lefton feels like the university is heading the right way.

“We've got the product, now we've got to create the stuff that goes around it.”

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News Headline: Kent State University enrollment at all-time high (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's enrollment has hit an all-time high, with 42,513 students reporting for class this fall throughout the eight-campus system.

The systemwide enrollment increase represents less than a 1% hike over last year's numbers, but enrollment at the university's main campus in Kent climbed by 2.85% to 27,706 students. Enrollment at the university's regional campuses hovers at 14,807 students.

Aside from an increase in enrollment, the Kent campus also has seen improved retention rates and an increase in student quality as the incoming freshman class has the best academic profile in university history. The average high school grade point average of a Kent State freshman is 3.27.

“We're attracting more academically motivated students,” Kent State president Lester Lefton said in a news release. “The efforts on campus being made by our faculty and staff to help our students succeed are making a difference. We're also offering more tutorial services and doing more student outreach.”

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News Headline: Enrollment at KSU sets record; UA's dips slightly (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Enrollment at Kent State University edged up to another record, while the University of Akron lost students this fall.

Those are two early reports on how Ohio's colleges and universities are doing attracting new students and retaining the ones they have.

The eight-campus KSU system posted a record enrollment of 42,513, less than 1 percent, or 328 students, higher than fall 2011.

Meanwhile, UA reported enrollment of 28,771, down 3 percent from the previous year, in part because the university referred about 125 underqualified applicants elsewhere.

Both UA and KSU reported they were attracting better-qualified students.

UA said the average ACT test score for bachelor's degree-seeking students edged up to 22.4 from 21.2 in 2008 and that the average grade-point average of high school students was 3.2.

Enrollment was strong in some UA colleges, among them Engineering and Polymer Science/Polymer Engineering, both of which grew 10 percent.

KSU said the average grade-point average of its new freshmen rose to a record 3.27.

"We're attracting more academically qualified students," KSU President Lester Lefton said in a media release. University efforts to help students succeed "are making a difference."

Kent campus retention is up 2 percent, to 77 percent. That means that three out of four of last year's freshmen came back for a second year.

Meanwhile, a record number of 27,706 students are enrolled at the main Kent campus, up 2.85 percent from the previous year.

How UA and KSU compare with other colleges and universities statewide isn't clear.

The University of Toledo reported a 5 percent drop in students, to 21,500, in part because it too is seeking better-qualified students.

All colleges and universities face the same issues: the high school population is shrinking and higher education might have plumbed the depths of the unemployed seeking new training, so heady growth probably will not be as likely.

The Ohio Board of Regents won't have final enrollments for all tax-supported universities and colleges until Oct. 1. The institutions report their 15-day enrollments as their official numbers and not all begin fall semester on the same dates.

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News Headline: Kent State reports enrollment record, again (Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: There are now more students attending Kent State University than at any time in the school's 102-year history.

KSU's 42,513 students across its eight campuses and 27,706 students at its Kent campus, announced Tuesday, are both record highs. Enrollment at the Kent campus increased by 2.85 percent from fall 2011, while overall enrollment grew by under 1 percent in that time period.

The freshman class is the second-largest in school history, with 4,076 full-time freshmen enrolled compared to 4,284 last year -- down about 5 percent.

KSU officials have said the focus is on increasing the quality of each freshman class, rather than the size.

KSU President Lester Lefton and other school officials credited increased efforts at student retention in part for the recent growth of the university.

"With highly academically motivated students, we're improving retention and persistence to graduation," said T. David Garcia, KSU's associate vice president for enrollment management, in a statement. "Under President Lefton's leadership, we're doing what we've been asked to do on a state and national level. And, if we continue on this path of focusing on student quality, our hope is to have a retention rate higher than 80 percent in the next one to three years."

Two key areas of enrollment growth for KSU were among graduate student and international students. The international student population grew by more than 19 percent, while graduate student enrollment increased by more than 10 percent.

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News Headline: Enrollment Records Keep Falling at Kent State (Lefton, Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: 42,513 students enrolled across 8-campus system for fall 2012

Enrollment figures released by Kent State University show the eight-campus system has yet again set a record for the largest-ever student body.

A total 42,513 students are enrolled for classes this fall at Kent State, according to 15th day census data released by the university.

That record surpasses the previous all-time high, set in fall 2011, of 42,185 across all eight campuses. The previous record had been set just one year earlier, in fall 2010, at 41,365 students.

In January, the university set a record for spring enrollment with 39,936 students. That number compares with 38,196 in spring 2010 — the previous record for spring enrollment.

Kent State President Lester Lefton attributed the growth to improved retention rates, including among last year's largest-ever freshman class.

"Kent campus retention is 77 percent, up 2 percent from last year," Lefton said in prepared remarks. "There are other factors contributing to our growing enrollment. We're attracting more academically motivated students. The efforts on campus being made by our faculty and staff to help our students succeed are making a difference. We're also offering more tutorial services and doing more student outreach."

Retention of undergraduate students rose 4.3 percent compared with last year, according to the university.

At the Kent campus, a total 27,706 students are enrolled — a 2.85 percent increase — in classes this fall. And 14,807 students are enrolled at the university's seven regional campuses.

A total 21,736 people applied to attend the Kent campus this fall. The university's admission rate this fall was 83.1 percent. University officials say this year's freshman class has the highest academic profile of any class in Kent State history.

T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management, said the university is moving towards quality rather than quantity in terms of the student body.

"We're improving retention and persistence to graduation," Garcia said in prepared remarks. "And, if we continue on this path of focusing on student quality, our hope is to have a retention rate higher than 80 percent in the next one to three years."

Other enrollment-related figures released by the university today include:

Enrollment at Kent State University at Geauga (Twinsburg Campus) is up 3.34 percent. Kent State Geauga reported 1,548 students for Fall 2012 compared to 1,498 in the previous year.

Enrollment of international students is up 19.1 percent to 2,217 students compared to 1,862 in the previous year.

Graduate enrollment has increased 10.05 percent.

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News Headline: KSU posts record fall enrollment | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT — Kent State University has increased enrollment, surpassing last year's record and reaching a new all-time high with the release of the university's official 15th day census data.

For the eight-campus system, Kent State reports enrollment of 42,513 students for the fall 2012 semester, according to a news release from the University. In fall 2011, overall enrollment was 42,185 students. The unduplicated head count at the Kent campus increased by 2.85 percent to 27,706 students with the number of full-time equivalent students up 3.16 percent, so students are taking more hours.

The unduplicated headcount for the regional campuses is 14,807 students. Students are counted only once at the campus at which they hold a majority of their course load.

Some of the highlights of the Kent campus include increased enrollment, improved retention and better student quality with the freshman class having the highest academic profile in Kent State history, the release said. The average high school grade point average of a Kent State freshman is 3.27. It also is the second largest freshman class in university history.

Retention of students in undergraduate studies increased 4.3 percent alone compared to last year due to strategies that members of undergraduate studies employed encouraging students to persist to their second year.

Kent State also experienced a significant increase in freshman applications, the release said. Applications received by the Kent campus for fall 2012 numbered 21,736. This represents an increase of 68.3 percent in a five-year span compared to 12,916 freshman applications for fall 2008.

Highlights from the fall 2012 enrollment numbers also include:

• Enrollment of international students is up 19.1 percent to 2,217 students.

• Enrollment at Kent State University at Geauga is up 3.34 percent.

• Graduate enrollment has increased 10.05 percent.

• Enrollment in Kent State's College of Public Health has increased to 676 students, showing a 428-percent growth since the college's launch with 128 students in fall of 2010.

For the full fall enrollment report, go to www.kent.edu/rpie/enrollment.

Kent State University has increased enrollment, surpassing last year's record and reaching a new all-time high with the release of the university's official 15th day census data.

For the eight-campus system, Kent State reports enrollment of 42,513 students for the fall 2012 semester, according to a news release from the University. In fall 2011, overall enrollment was 42,185 students. The unduplicated head count at the Kent campus increased by 2.85 percent to 27,706 students with the number of full-time equivalent students up 3.16 percent, so students are taking more hours.

The unduplicated headcount for the regional campuses is 14,807 students. Students are counted only once at the campus at which they hold a majority of their course load.

Some of the highlights of the Kent campus include increased enrollment, improved retention and better student quality with the freshman class having the highest academic profile in Kent State history, the release said. The average high school grade point average of a Kent State freshman is 3.27. It also is the second largest freshman class in university history.

Retention of students in undergraduate studies increased 4.3 percent alone compared to last year due to strategies that members of undergraduate studies employed encouraging students to persist to their second year.

Kent State also experienced a significant increase in freshman applications, the release said. Applications received by the Kent campus for fall 2012 numbered 21,736. This represents an increase of 68.3 percent in a five-year span compared to 12,916 freshman applications for fall 2008.

Highlights from the fall 2012 enrollment numbers also include:

• Enrollment of international students is up 19.1 percent to 2,217 students.

• Enrollment at Kent State University at Geauga is up 3.34 percent.

• Graduate enrollment has increased 10.05 percent.

• Enrollment in Kent State's College of Public Health has increased to 676 students, showing a 428-percent growth since the college's launch with 128 students in fall of 2010.

For the full fall enrollment report, go to www.kent.edu/rpie/enrollment.

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News Headline: Kent State enrollment at all-time high | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: Ken Lahmers
News OCR Text: Kent State University has increased enrollment, surpassing last year's record and reaching a new all-time high with the release of the university's official 15th day census data.

For the eight-campus system, Kent State reports a strong enrollment of 42,513 students for the fall 2012 semester. In Fall 2011, overall enrollment was 42,185 students.

The unduplicated (or preponderant) headcount at the Kent campus increased by 2.85 percent to 27,706 students, with the number of full-time equivalent students, or FTEs, up 3.16 percent, so students are taking more hours.

The unduplicated headcount for the regional campuses is 14,807 students. Students are counted only once at the campus at which they hold a majority of their course load.

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News Headline: Kent State Enrollment Reaches New All-Time High (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Aaron Coleman
News OCR Text: KSU Students walking to class Kent State University

Enrollment at Kent State University is at an all-time high.

University officials are saying 42, 513 students are enrolled for the Fall 2012 semester throughout the eight-campus system.

This year's figure narrowly edged last year's enrollment figure of 42.815. The Kent Campus saw a nearly 3 percent increase with over 27,000 students on campus with the number of full-time equivalent students up 3.16 percent.

KSU also takes pride in the smarts of its freshman class.The average high school grade point average of a Kent State freshman is 3.27.

Kent State University President Lester Lefton says part of the university's growth is the retention of last year's freshman class.

“Kent Campus retention is 77 percent, up 2 percent from last year," Lefton said.

Kent State's eight campuses are located in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.

Enrollment of international students is up 19.1 percent to 2,217 students compared to 1,862 in the previous year.

Enrollment at Kent State University at Geauga is up 3.34 percent. Kent State Geauga reported 1,548 students for Fall 2012 compared to 1,498 in the previous year.

Graduate enrollment has increased 10.05 percent.

Enrollment in Kent State's College of Public Health has increased to 676 students (553 undergraduate and 123 graduate students), showing an impressive 428 percent growth since the college's launch with 128 students in Fall 2010.

Kent State's newest school, the School of Digital Sciences, which started last fall with three students, now has 97 students (69 undergraduate and 28 graduate students) this year, representing an outstanding 3,133 percent growth.

Enrollment in Kent State's College of Podiatric Health, the university's newest college, has 430 students.

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News Headline: Kent State sets all-time enrollment record (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Ryan Haidet
News OCR Text: KENT -- Enrollment at Kent State University has reached an all-time high. According to KSU officials, 42,513 students are enrolled for the Fall 2012 semester throughout the eight-campus system. That tally narrowly beats last Fall's enrollment of 42,185 students.

At the Kent campus, enrollment increased by 2.85 percent to 27,706 students with the number of full-time equivalent students up 3.16 percent.

Students are counted only once at the campus in which they hold a majority of their course load.

"Part of our impressive growth at the Kent campus is the retention of our largest class, which was last year's freshman class," Kent State University President Lester Lefton said. "Kent Campus retention is 77 percent, up 2 percent from last year."

KSU also touts that this Fall's freshmen are the smartest new batch of students in the school's history with the average high school grade point average of 3.27.

Highlights from the Fall 2012 enrollment numbers also include:

- Enrollment of international students is up 19.1 percent to 2,217 students compared to 1,862 in the previous year.

- Enrollment at Kent State University at Geauga is up 3.34 percent. Kent State Geauga reported 1,548 students for Fall 2012 compared to 1,498 in the previous year.

- Graduate enrollment has increased 10.05 percent.

- Enrollment in Kent State's College of Public Health has increased to 676 students (553 undergraduate and 123 graduate students), showing a 428 percent growth since the college's launch with 128 students in Fall 2010.

- Kent State's newest school, the School of Digital Sciences, which started last fall with three students, now has 97 students (69 undergraduate and 28 graduate students) this year, representing a 3,133 percent growth.

- Enrollment in Kent State's College of Podiatric Health, the university's newest college, has 430 students.

Kent State's eight campuses are located in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.

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News Headline: Statewide collaboration to assign operating dollars for higher education (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio Gov. John Kasich wants the state's public colleges and universities to work together to decide how to divvy up higher education dollars in the next state budget.

He announced Tuesday that Ohio State President Gordon Gee would lead a statewide collaboration to assign operating dollars for the two-year budget in 2014-15.

The nine presidents will attempt to duplicate a February achievement - a commission headed by Gee that allocated $350 million of state money for construction and permanent improvements.

"It was a remarkable achievement," Kasich said at a news conference, flanked by university presidents. "We're back at round two."

Currently the state apportions funds for operations at tax-supported colleges and universities on a complex metric. The State Share of Instruction, or SSI, is based on the kind of course, the kind of student, enrollment, course completion and many other factors.

At $1.5 billion, the total SSI - the main operating subsidy to state colleges and universities - reflects about three-quarters of the budget of the Ohio Board of Regents, the coordinating body for higher education statewide.

Now the governor wants to tweak the formula to consider hot-button subjects such as cost control, commercialization, graduation rates and student remediation.

University of Akron President Luis Proenza said the new process - while as yet unclear - is a welcome change.

"The most positive sign I see is that he was so happy with the capital projects budget that he is turning to the universities for help with the operating budget, not just imposing it," Proenza said. "This truly is an opportunity, a breath of fresh air."

Bruce Johnson, president of the Inter-University Council, which represents public colleges before the state legislature, applauded Kasich's suggestion that the formula be directed to outcomes, such as graduation, not just enrollment or course completion.

"I think the governor's point is a correct one, that the way to get more money is to improve your performance," he said.

Kent State spokesman Eric Mansfield said that the university is "committed to working with [Kasich] corroboratively, and with our sister institutions to do what is going to work."

OSU's Gee has promised that his hand-picked commission would have a draft of the new policy on the governor's desk by Thanksgiving for possible assimilation into the biennial budget.

Members include Jerry Sue Thornton, president of Cuyahoga Community College; Roderick McDavis, president of Ohio University; and David Hopkins, president of Wright State.

Johnson, the president of the IUC, said the biggest obstacle to the success of the funding commission "will be keeping the group together when they realize that everyone won't get more money. Not everyone can be happy."

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News Headline: New Apple iPhone 5 expected to offer 4G LTE - so what is it? (Bues) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mobile downloads as fast as a computer

Rumors are rampant that Apple (AAPL) will announce the iPhone 5 on September 12, with a release date soon after that.

CLEVELAND - There is a lot of anticipation on Wednesday, as Apple is expected to announce a new iPhone.

One new feature with many new phones is the LTE network. This stands for Long Term Evolution.

What does that really mean? Kent State Information Technology Manager Christopher Bues said 4G LTE offers phone speeds as fast as your home computer.

The networks are crowded as more and more users use more and more data.

“The carriers want to get to LTE as fast as they can because it allows them to get to more subscribers on their network and to offer better data speeds and services,” Bues said.

Verizon and AT&T are leading the pack on this service. RootMetrics and PC Magazine recently ran nationwide speed tests.

"Verizon is the speed champ right now. I mean, they really have the biggest coverage area by far. AT&T is probably second, but in some areas first," Bues said.

Many users we spoke with were skeptical about the speed of LTE because they haven't seen much difference between 3G and 4G other than their battery dying more quickly. However, Bues said 3G to 4G was an evolutionary change, and 4G LTE is revolutionary.

Patricia Blakemore loves her iPhone, but admits it struggles to keep up with her fast pace.

"I don't find it's quick enough for everything, for all the applications I'm using, so I'm looking for something to have a little more pop to it and to be faster," Blakemore said.

Many new phones offer you faster speeds with their ability to connect to the 4G LTE network. Apple's new iPhone is expected to offer this capability. You currently need a new phone because this technology is so  different compared to the changes with 4G service.

“It's new hardware for all the cellular providers. It's new chips in the phone. It's a lot of new plumbing behind the scenes to really give you those fast data speeds,” Bues said.

So how fast is LTE? We ran a consumer test with demo phones from AT&T to find out. There is some margin of error because we had to use two different phones due to the advanced technology. We used the Apples iPhone 4S and the Samsung Galaxy SIII.

Overall, the download speeds were at least 2 to 3 seconds faster on the LTE network. We also noticed it in a speed test we ran through an app called Ookla, which measures the download speeds. The LTE phone registered speeds significantly higher.

“I think it's amazing,” Blakemore said. “I have an iPhone and I wish I had this new network on it.”

Brandon Gubacz wasn't as eager to make the switch after seeing the difference between the two phones.

"It's faster no doubt, but I think I'm not that incredibly impressed that I have to have it," Gubacz said.

Experts say all phones will have this technology in the next few years. Deciding whether to buy one now depends on how much you want to spend, and what you do with your phone.

"If you are looking at basic email, basic web browsing, no, you're not going to see much of a difference," Bues explained.

LTE is marketed for heavy data users -- which typically are iPhone users.

The big catch – LTE is not available on the Sprint network in the Cleveland-Akron area. The carrier announced plans to add it to 100 cities in the coming months. Several cities were mentioned, but Cleveland was not named. This does not mean we will not be included as all 100 cities were not mentioned.

If you are in a 4G LTE area and drive to an area where it is not available, your phone will roll back to 4G or 3G service. Also, this new technology is supposed to diminish the battery drain that so many users experienced with 4G service upgrades.

“I haven't noticed much difference between the 3G and 4G. I noticed a big difference with this new one,” Blakemore said.

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News Headline: Sheryl Crow's Music Takes on New Meaning at Kent State Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sheryl Crow has played venues such as the Forum in Los Angeles, but on Saturday night, Kent State University got a huge does of her, as the Centennial Concert --an event that marked the end of a fundraising campaign which exceeded its goal of raising $250 million by over six million on Saturday night-- had the nine time Grammy winner as its headliner.

Crow had the crowd on their feet especially when she walked out on stage and screamed "How ya all doing Kent State" before going into All I Want to Do is have Some Fun to start her set.

The Missouri native, who has performed duets with the Rolling Stones and also Michael Jackson also sung Can't cry no More, and her hit, Soak up the Sun, as part of her set.

There was also a personal side to being in the Northeast Ohio area for Crow. A breast cancer survivor, she spoke for the first time about being diagnosed with a benign brain tumor, something she discussed more on Monday during the Katie Couric show.

Instead of being a downer, the 50-year-old rocker praised the Cleveland Clinic for everything they have done for her.

"The doctors there told me I would be fine. They do real miracles up there," she said, garnering perhaps the loudest roar of the night, except for when she told the crowd, "Kent ain't no party school."

Always the political activist, Crow also had a chance to send a message out to all the young people in the crowd.

"This is your chance to vote, don't be discouraged, you can make a change." She  then got the crowd moving and grooving once again with her version of Cat Stevens song, The first cut is the deepest.

O.A.R really put the crowd in a rocking spirit prior to Crow taking stage. It was the main reason Terry Costello of Cleveland made the trek to Kent.

"They are a cult favorite in Ohio," said Costello. "Their music really rocks."

The group, who hails from Rockford Maryland, but all went to Ohio State, was terrific especially when they closed the night with their hit That was one Crazy game of Poker.

Singer/guitarist Marc Roberge didn't miss a beat the entire set, which also included one of their new songs, Shattered.

The “Centennial Campaign” concert was kicked off by Los Lonely Boys, a band from Texas whose debut single, Heaven, won the Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal in 2005.

More important than the music though was what some of the proceeds from the concert went to.

Kent State's Campaign for Change Scholarship Fund, the university's student philanthropy initiative,which enlists student volunteers and encourages students to “pay it forward”  by supporting an endowed scholarship fund, was the real winner of the evening.

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News Headline: Kent Stark Scholarships Established for Students with Strong Work Ethics (Folk) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Through a newly established scholarship available to Kent State University at Stark students, clients who chose to host their corporate meetings, training sessions or special events at The University Center in Jackson Township will be directly contributing to the education of deserving college students.

This year, 40 students will be awarded $1,000 per semester, for a total of $80,000 through The University Center's Work Ethic Matters Scholarship.

According to the center's general manager, Joe Folk, the cornerstone theme for this scholarship is to recognize how important students' work ethic is in achieving success. “This is an incentive for our students to value and practice good work ethics which will continue to benefit them long after they graduate from this university,” says Folk.

The Work Ethic Matters Scholarship is funded by The University Center and will be available, based on the facility's financial success, to Stark Campus students. “Kent State Stark Dean Walter Wagor is very supportive of The University Center's desire to give back to the community that we serve by assisting with the education of tomorrow's leaders,” says Folk. “We greatly appreciate the support we receive from local businesses and organizations. They have allowed us the opportunity to recognize and reward Kent State Stark's student employees and incoming freshmen who put forth the effort to work hard in and out of the classroom.”

The University Center at Kent State Stark, one of Northeastern Ohio's most technologically advanced facilities, opened in 2000 and serves approximately 45,000 clients each year. Accredited under the stringent guidelines of the International Association of Conference Centers, it is among an elite few to receive this distinction. With its distraction-free environment, elegant cuisine and attentive event specialists, The University Center has become a favorite location for meetings, conferences and special occasions. The facility was voted as the Canton-Stark County Convention and Visitor's Bureau “Best Place to Host a Meeting” by area residents for four consecutive years.

To learn more about The University Center, visit YourUniversityCenter.com or call 330-244-3300.

http://northcanton.patch.com/announcements/kent-stark-scholarships-established-for-students-with-strong-work-ethics/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1347402653

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News Headline: Kent Stark Presents Lectures to Honor Constitution Day | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The North Canton Rotary Club kicked off its Fly the Flag program, which costs $25 to fly a flag for six holidays each year. Bobby Mikul

http://northcanton.patch.com/announcements/kent-stark-presents-lectures-to-honor-constitution-day/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1347391989

Kent State University at Stark will present informational lectures on Monday, Sept. 17 to honor Constitution Day, which recognizes the adoption of the United States Constitution and those who have become U.S. citizens.

Following a flag ceremony, held at the campus flagpole near the Frank Avenue entrance, two lectures, led by Kent State Stark faculty, will take place in the Main Hall building, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township. These events are free and open to the public.

The schedule is as follows:

9 a.m. Flag Ceremony

Kent State Stark Flagpole Circle

10 – 11 a.m. The Presidency and Public Opinion

Professor Timothy Gray, Main Hall room 315

3 – 4 p.m. Roberts and the Health Care “Tax”  -  Making Sense of National Federation of Independent Business vs. Sebelius

Professor Andrew Povtak, Main Hall Auditorium

For more information about Kent State Stark's recognition of Constitution Day, contact Dr. Joel Carbonell at330-244-3429 or jcarbon2@kent.edu.

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News Headline: School of Library and Information Science at Kent State welcomes three new faculty | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The School of Library and Information Science at Kent State University has added three new faculty members to its ranks this fall, giving a boost to its areas of study in youth services librarianship and in health informatics.

Marianne Martens, Ph.D., has joined the faculty as an assistant professor to teach and conduct research in youth services librarianship, an area for which SLIS at Kent State is ranked 13th in the United States, according to U.S. News & World Report. Martens' interdisciplinary research, at the intersection of publishing and librarianship, is grounded in Library and Information Science and Media Studies, and focuses on how digital technologies are changing books and the reading experience for young people-in comparison to historical precedents in the field of cultural production for young people. Since 2007, Martens has taught at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, while working on a Ph.D. in library and information science. Also at Rutgers, she assisted in launching an interdisciplinary minor in Digital Communication, Information, and Media studies. Previously, Martens had served as Carole Barham Scholar at The Center for International Scholarship in School Libraries (CISSL) at Rutgers. Prior to launching her academic career, Martens worked in publishing in New York. Read more about Martens at http://www.kent.edu/news/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=B13ADF25-0560-903A-A06C2833EE450274 .

* * *

Christine A. Hudak, Ph.D., RN-BC, CPHIMS, of Cleveland, Ohio, has joined the faculty as professor of Health Informatics (HI) in the school's Information Architecture and Knowledge Management (IAKM) program. Kent State offers both master's degree and graduate certificate options in the HI concentration, which was launched in 2011 under the leadership of Michael O. Bice, a health care administrator whose experience includes academic medical centers and multi-state health systems. Hudak will take over as concentration coordinator when Bice retires at the end of this year. Hudak brings to the position more than 30 years of experience in the health care field, including numerous teaching and instructional development roles. She was involved in the first information system implementation at Cleveland's MetroHelth Medical Center in 1985 and continued to advance professionally and academically in that field. Most recently she served as associate professor, director of the MSN in Nursing Informatics Program and director of Nurseweb™ at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) in Cleveland. Read more about Hudak at http://www.kent.edu/news/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=B141907F-D52A-8D81-AF293E9C0C5FD82E .

* * *

Rebecca A. Meehan, Ph.D., of Hudson, Ohio, joins the faculty as assistant professor of Health Informatics in the school's Information Architecture and Knowledge Management (IAKM) program. Meehan brings to the position an extensive background in research related to health care and health informatics, particularly focused on aging services technology and clinical analytics. Her interests center on optimizing health outcomes and the doctor-patient relationship by improving the user experience of health technology. Since 2004 she has operated Meehan Group, LLC, providing consultation services in health informatics research, user experience and educational material with a focus on health care, long-term care and technology. Her previous experience also includes senior research roles with Intuit, Inc., in Highland Hills, Ohio, as well as Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Department of Sociology. She also has served as senior research scientist at Myers Research Institute of Menorah Park Center for Senior Living in Beachwood, Ohio, and senior research associate at Innovative Designs in Environments for an Aging Society (I.D.E.A.S., Inc.), in Kirtland, Ohio. Read more about Meehan at http://www.kent.edu/news/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=B148EAB3-A892-A97D-6828F5DB3B596878 .

The School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at Kent State University has the only American Library Association-accredited Master of Library and Information Science degree program in Ohio, offering courses in Kent, Columbus (State Library of Ohio) and through a fully online option. SLIS also offers a Master of Science in Information Architecture and Knowledge Management and participates in an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in the College of Communication and Information. The school is recognized by U.S. News and World Report as one of the nation's top 20 LIS graduate programs, with a youth librarianship program that is ranked 13th. It is one of the largest library schools in the country, with more than 650 students enrolled. For more information, visit www.kent.edu/slis .

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News Headline: Things that make you dumber | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Illawarra Mercury
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With all the talk about self-improvement these days, people don't pay enough attention to self-worsening. In fact, there are many common behaviours that have been shown in one or more studies to make people stupider.

We've compiled a list of things that decrease intelligence or IQ or cause neurological decline, and you can start by turning off most TV shows.

Watching reality TV

An Austrian study showed participants a reality-like show and asked them to take a knowledge test immediately afterward. Those participants fared worse than those who had not seen the reality show beforehand.

Sugar

Multitasking

Research conducted at Stanford University in 2009 shows that multitaskers "who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information do not pay attention, control their memory or switch from one job to another as well as those who prefer to complete one task at a time."

Chewing gum

A series of three experiments conducted by Cardiff University in Wales determined that chewing gum "impairs short-term memory for both item order and item identity."

Watching FOX News

A 2011 study by Fairleigh Dickinson University found that people who watch Fox News are less likely to be knowledgeable about the political landscape than those who watch MSNBC, Jon Stewart's The Daily Show or NPR.

"Fox News viewers are significantly more misinformed than consumers of news from other sources," a 2010 University of Maryland study showed.

Obesity

A 2010 Kent State University study tested more than 100 obese individuals before and after they had bariatric surgery. Men's Health reports that "before the surgery, most subjects showed below-average memory skills. But 12 weeks after surgery...their memory test scores had improved to within the average range for all adults."

Jet lag

Researchers at Cal Berkeley changed the sleep schedule for hamsters every three days for a month and the hamsters produced 50 per cent fewer neurons than they did on a normal sleep schedule.

Fluoride

A recent study performed by Environmental Health Perspective, a journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, concluded that "children in high-fluoride areas had significantly lower IQ scores than those who lived in low-fluoride areas." Fluoride is commonly added to most drinking water.

Meetings

In businesses around the world, it's fairly common to toss ideas around at meeting to help stimulate creative and productive activity. But a Virginia Tech study revealed that "group settings can diminish expressions of intelligence, especially among women." Social feedback in settings ranging from jury deliberations to cocktail parties "had a significant effect" on the subjects' problem-solving abilities.

Being spanked as a child

A wide-ranging study by the University of Manitoba found that more than five per cent of all mental disorder is caused by being spanked or other forms of childhood physical abuse. "This type of punishment was associated with poor mental outcomes and several mental disorders almost uniformly across the board," said Tracy Afifi, the founder of the study, according to WebMD.

PowerPoint

If you believe the US Army, PowerPoint presentations are making us stupid. Commanders in the Army told the New York Times in 2010 that the Microsoft program "stifles discussion, critical thinking and thoughtful decision-making."

Watching SpongeBob

A 2011 study by the journal Pediatrics showed that children who watched fast-paced cartoons like SpongeBob performed poorer at a mental test than those who watched an educational show or those who drew. "Children who watched 9 minutes of a fast-paced cartoon," SpongeBob, in the study's case, "had impairment in their executive function compared with children who were assigned a drawing task and those who watched educational television."

Secondhand smoke

In addition to the numerous other harmful effects secondhand smoke causes, children who are exposed to enough of it could end up with lower IQs and lower achievement in school and on test scores, according to Central Michigan University.

Stress

The Yale Stress Centre concluded this year that stressful situations "can reduce the number of connections between neurons in the brain and impair the ability of managing tense events in the future," as reported by The Morning Call. Cumulative stress, Yale found, can cause a decrease of gray matter in the brain's prefrontal cortex and "can impair the brain's ability to store information and respond to the environment."

Ambien and Xanax

If you're an older individual, taking Ambien (a sleeping pill) and Xanax (used to ease stress and anxiety) could become extremely harmful, according to doctors at AARP. These drugs could cause "memory loss (even amnesia), dementia and suicidal thoughts" among users and "both Xanax and Ambien slow down the central nervous system."

Lack of iodine

You don't need much iodine in your system, but it's crucial to have before you're born. In the prenatal stage, an iodine deficiency "can lead to serious physical and mental disorders," according to Steady Health. In fully developed adults, an iodine deficiency can lead to a 13 point decrease in IQ.

Smoking weed

Smoking weed consistently from adolescence causes "neuropsychological decline broadly across domains of functioning, even after controlling for years of education," according to research from Duke University. Even stopping the habit for a long period of time "did not fully restore neuropsychological functioning among adolescent-onset cannabis users. Findings are suggestive of a neurotoxic effect of cannabis on the adolescent brain."

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