Report Overview:
Total Clips (26)
Alumni; Entrepreneurship; Office of the President; Students; University Bookstore (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Financial Aid (1)
History; Research (1)
Homecoming (1)
Honors College (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (3)
Journalism and Mass Communications; University Press (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
Music (2)
Regional Academic Center (1)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Safety (3)
Safety; Students (1)
Town-Gown (1)
WKSU (4)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Entrepreneurship; Office of the President; Students; University Bookstore (1)
GRAND OPENING OF KENT STATE'S BLACKSTONE LAUNCHPAD PROGRAM (Messing, Harmon) 09/20/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Sept.20 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University holds a grand opening of its Blackstone LaunchPad program...


Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Looking Back 09/21/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Studies from Kent State University in the Area of Nursing Research Published 09/21/2012 NewsRx.com Text Email

...to challenge their ability to provide cogent explanations about those effects to others." Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Especially, when it is subtle, as is the case in much of workplace bullying, the experience is emotionally confusing to its...


Entrepreneurship (1)
Innovation & Job News 09/21/2012 Fresh Water Text Attachment Email


Financial Aid (1)
The Most Economically Diverse Colleges 09/20/2012 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email

... Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 99% Texas A&M University--Kingsville Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 91% Kent State University Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 88% Texas Southern University Percent of undergraduates receiving...


History; Research (1)
Award-winning program to focus on black Native Americans 09/21/2012 CrossRoads News - Online Text Attachment Email

...a.m. to 4 p.m. “When Tribes Meet: The History of Black Native Americans” won the 2012 Virginia Hamilton and Arnold Adoff Creative Outreach Grant at Kent State University. The $1,000 grant is helping fund the event. Winley said she hopes people leave the event with an appreciation of the...


Homecoming (1)
Paul Simon's Jam Packed 1973 Homecoming in Kent State's Memorial Gym 09/21/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Honors College (1)
KSU helps Head Start with 'Tools for Learning' 09/21/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (3)
Journalists focus on honesty in political reporting (Leach) 09/20/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

Political rhetoric and misleading statistics seemingly dominate the 24-hour news cycle. But, a forum held Thursday at Kent State University focused on maintaining objectivity and honesty in political reporting. The Kent State school of journalism partnered...

Pam Strickland: Teacher lauded for courage 09/21/2012 Knoxville News-Sentinel - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...fortitude in defending freedom of the press. The co-sponsors are SPLC, the National Scholastic Press Association and the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University, which underwrites a $500 cash prize plus travel expenses for the winners. The awards will be presented on Nov. 17 at the National...

Dirty Politics: View live stream of Poynter Kent State ethics workshop 09/20/2012 Poynteronline Text Attachment Email

Poynter's eighth annual ethics workshop with Kent State University begins at 9:15 a.m. This year's theme is “dirty politics.” Speakers include: 9:15: Poynter's Kelly McBride and Ellyn Angelotti...


Journalism and Mass Communications; University Press (1)
About Books: Journalists' book follows three medical school journeys (Marino) 09/20/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Journeys through an American Medical School," a coffee-table quality book by Jacqueline Marino and Tim Harrison. It's a nonfiction text that the publisher, Kent State University Press, calls "a fascinating look at the human side of the transformation from student to doctor." "In 2005, author Jacqueline...


KSU at Stark (1)
HeldenFiles: 'Bill W.' is back, more 'Bully' news, a Waldo anniversary, more 09/21/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...but who never stopped searching for more. • More Bully News. In a previous column I mentioned that Bully director Lee Hirsch will be speaking at Kent State University at Stark on Oct. 8. But if you have not yet seen the acclaimed documentary, you will have a chance right around that time. Cinemark...


Music (2)
Solon Center for the Arts stages 'La Traviata' 09/21/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

...stage directors, Jonathon Field. The SCA Opera Orchestra will be conducted by Maria Sensi Sellner from Pittsburgh. "La Traviata" is in partnership with Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music Opera Workshop. Additional support is from Friends of Solon Center for the Arts and the Founding...

Solon Center for the Arts stages 'La Traviata' 09/20/2012 Bedford Times Register - Online Text Attachment Email

...stage directors, Jonathon Field. The SCA Opera Orchestra will be conducted by Maria Sensi Sellner from Pittsburgh. "La Traviata" is in partnership with Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music Opera Workshop. Additional support is from Friends of Solon Center for the Arts and the Founding...


Regional Academic Center (1)
Kent State University opens new campus in Twinsburg (Lefton) 09/21/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University celebrated the opening of its new Twinsburg Regional Academic Center Sept. 12 with snacks, tours and remarks about how the high-tech,...


Renovation at KSU (1)
Kent State University approves four major projects for maximum of $160 million (Lefton) 09/21/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is another step closer to fulfilling its multimillion dollar project to construct new, and modernize old, facilities on the...


Safety (3)
UPDATE: Obama to Stop in Kent (Mansfield) 09/20/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...when and where the president will make his campaign stop. "We've been informed when it's likely to be and that it's probably going to involve the (Kent State University) campus," Lillich said. "Beyond that, we don't know." Lillich said the Secret Service would coordinate the visit with Kent...

UPDATE: Obama to Stop in Kent (Mansfield) 09/21/2012 Mayfield-Hillcrest Patch Text Attachment Email

...when and where the president will make his campaign stop. "We've been informed when it's likely to be and that it's probably going to involve the (Kent State University) campus," Lillich said. "Beyond that, we don't know." Lillich said the Secret Service would coordinate the visit with Kent...

Obama to Stop at Kent State 09/20/2012 Fox Toledo News First at 10 PM - WUPW-TV Text Email

Next wednesday is a .big day in northwest ohio. Both president obama and mitt romney are planning on campaign visits here. Obama will make stops at kent state and in bowling green on wednesday.. And romney will make several stops across ohio thasame day.. Including a stop in here toledo. An important...


Safety; Students (1)
Campus preacher draws crowd 09/20/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...This morning we find few stories about impaired people behaving colorfully, but a lot of them about policies and politics. A religious protester on a Kent State campus plaza may not have nearly as many people perturbed as the question of whether students can smoke there; CSU students rise in support...


Town-Gown (1)
Former Hillel Site Unlikely Location for Wells-Sherman House (Euclide) 09/21/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


WKSU (4)
Malcolm X Abram column 09/20/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Sept. 20--There are two area festivals taking center stage this week: the longtime Kent State Folk Festival and the newbie Square Fest in Akron's Highland Square neighborhood. First up, the old man. The 46th annual Kent State...

Popular Music 09/21/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Sound Check details 09/21/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Folk Alley 'Round Town Schedule Features 39 Venues 09/21/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: GRAND OPENING OF KENT STATE'S BLACKSTONE LAUNCHPAD PROGRAM (Messing, Harmon) | Email

News Date: 09/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Sept.20 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University holds a grand opening of its Blackstone LaunchPad program on Friday, Sept.28, celebrating the establishment of the entrepreneurial initiative at the university.

The launch celebration starts at 10:45 a.m.with a formal dedication event in room 204 of the Kent Student Center.Joining Kent State President Lester A.Lefton in delivering remarks will be Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Jim Petro, Burton D.Morgan Foundation President and CEO Deb Hoover, Erik Lisher of Blackstone and Julie Messing, executive director for Entrepreneurship Initiatives at Kent State who oversees Kent State's Blackstone LaunchPad.

Later in the day, Kent State faculty, staff, students, alumni and the general public are invited to attend an open house that will take place from 1 p.m.to 4 p.m.at the Blackstone LaunchPad office on the first floor of the Kent Student Center, beside the University Bookstore.

Kent State's Blackstone LaunchPad program emphasizes entrepreneurship as a viable career path and gives Kent State students, faculty and alumni the skills, knowledge and guidance they need to start new companies.The program, which accommodates all students regardless of major, and involves local entrepreneurs as mentors, started offering services to students in late May.

"Faculty and staff should attend the open house to clearly see what Blackstone LaunchPad offers," Messing said."It is more than just advising entrepreneurs on the startup of their business.It is a safe place to discuss ideas without judgment, and receive the guidance and networking to help transform those ideas into businesses."

The Blackstone Charitable Foundation and The Burton D.Morgan Foundation, sponsors of the initiative, committed to a $3.2 million, three-year partnership with Kent State University and three other area colleges and universities to make the Blackstone LaunchPad program possible.Both foundations hope to foster entrepreneurship and job growth in Northeast Ohio through the program.

Messing said that to get started with the Blackstone LaunchPad program, Kent State faculty, staff, students and alumni can complete the personal profile form that is on the program's website, after which they get validated and invited to submit a venture form and establish meetings with venture advisors.

"We want to emphasize that the Blackstone LaunchPad program is a free and confidential service," said Kate Harmon, program manager for Kent State's Blackstone LaunchPad program."Students, faculty, staff and alumni can be reassured that their business concepts are kept completely confidential by LaunchPad staff.All LaunchPad staff, including student employees, sign nondisclosure agreements to uphold this level of confidence."

Harmon said that Blackstone LaunchPad clients can schedule meetings at their own pace with the program's venture advisors who will mentor them through the development of their businesses and introduce them to a network of leading industry entrepreneurs.One-on-one entrepreneurial guidance is also supplemented with Blackstone LaunchPad events and workshops that broadly address common start-up business concepts and highlight local entrepreneurs in specific industries.

For more information about the Blackstone LaunchPad program at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/blackstonelaunchpad.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Looking Back | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mod sculptures are popping up around Taylor Hall at Kent State University,” the
Record-Courier reported in December 1971 in a story about an environmental design project being undertaken by architecture students. Eight structures were
planned for campus sites. The first, known as “Steel Cube,” designed by George Becht,a KSU sophomore, was a three-ton steel artwork erected on the southeast side of Taylor Hall, overlooking the Commons. With Becht's creation are architecture students Dave Wozniak, Kathy Proctor, Michael Gotwald and Robert Mastriana. “Steel Cube” remained in place for nearly 40 years until it was removed in 2010 when an Ohio historical marker for the May 4, 1970 site was erected.

Click here to view photo: http://www.recordpub.com/images/media/20120921/pdf/A04.pdf

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News Headline: Studies from Kent State University in the Area of Nursing Research Published | Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2012 SEP 21 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Research findings on Nursing Research are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting originating from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Despite the increasing frequency of its reported incidence, especially in health care practice and education settings, workplace bullying seems to defy victims' clear understanding of its effects on them personally and to challenge their ability to provide cogent explanations about those effects to others."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Especially, when it is subtle, as is the case in much of workplace bullying, the experience is emotionally confusing to its victims, and its inherent behaviors often seem absurd to those who have not lived through them firsthand. Moreover, the outwardly innocuous behaviors of subtle workplace bullying can yield long-term disorder for victims' coworkers and for employing organizations."

According to the news editors, the researchers concluded: "Aptly capturing the mechanism of operation of workplace bullying, the concept of catastrophization may provide language to support understanding of victims' personal experiences of subtle workplace bullying and support administrators in recognizing bullying's paradoxical and long-term effects."

For more information on this research see: Speaking Of Workplace Bullying. Journal of Professional Nursing, 2012;28(4):247-254. Journal of Professional Nursing can be contacted at: W B Saunders Co-Elsevier Inc, 1600 John F Kennedy Boulevard, Ste 1800, Philadelphia, PA 19103-2899, USA. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Journal of Professional Nursing - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/623097)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting L.C. Dzurec, Kent State University, Coll Nursing, Kent, OH 44240, United States.

Copyright © 2012 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Innovation & Job News | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fresh Water
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: goal of new blackstone launchpad locales is 150 sustainable companies

The Blackstone LaunchPad program opened its doors on the Baldwin-Wallace College and Lorain County Community College campuses on Sept. 6 and 7 and will open at Kent State University later this month and CWRU in January.

The Burton D. Morgan Foundation in Hudson and the Blackstone Charitable Foundation announced last November that they had committed $3.2 million to open LaunchPad locations in Northeast Ohio to train area student entrepreneurs.

The LaunchPad is a venture coach program developed at the University of Miami, Florida in 2008. The program provides participants with advice and mentorship to take business ideas to fruition. Students are matched up with venture coaches to guide them through the development process.

“The real goal here is around education,” says Deborah D. Hoover, president and CEO of the Burton D. Morgan Foundation. “We're providing a strong education, it's experiential. Our key approach to the program is about networking – obviously in Northeast Ohio and venture coaches, but also in the larger community and through the national network of LaunchPad locations.”

Hoover reports that the potential is there for 150 new sustainable companies in the next five years, which could generate as many as 3,000 jobs.

Amy Stursberg, executive director of the Blackstone Charitable Foundation, says Northeast Ohio is an idea fit for LaunchPad. “We try to choose locations where we feel there is a robust entrepreneurial ecosystem and culture,” she says. “We're leveraging those assets to jumpstart the region where it already exists.”

Kent State, which had a soft launch of LaunchPad this summer, already has 70 to 80 students involved in the program.

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News Headline: The Most Economically Diverse Colleges | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name: Rebecca Harrington
News OCR Text: College is rapidly becoming an expensive proposition. Student loan debt recently topped $1 trillion dollars, and in the past several years tuition rates have risen far past the rate of inflation. Is college turning into something that is just for the rich-- like a country club or a private island?

U.S. News and World Report recently compiled a list of colleges that were bucking that trend. These schools are the most economically diverse in the country, based primarily on how many Pell Grants are awarded to students.

The Report has more:

The proportion of students on Pell grants, which are most often given to undergrads with family incomes under $20,000, isn't a perfect measure of an institution's efforts to achieve economic diversity: A college might enroll a large number of students just above the Pell cutoff, for instance, and percentages at public universities may reflect the wide variation from state to state in the number of qualified low-income students.

Still, many experts say that Pell figures are the best available gauge of how many low-income undergrads there are on a given campus.

Check out our slide show of the most economically diverse schools, and then tell us, what do you think? Weigh in below!

New Mexico State University

Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 99%

Texas A&M University--Kingsville

Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 91%

Kent State University

Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 88%

Texas Southern University

Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 84%

South Carolina State University

Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 82%

Florida Institute of Technology

Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 79%

Tennessee State University

Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 74%

Florida A&M University

Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 73%

National-Louis University

Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 70%

University of Texas--El Paso

Percent of undergraduates receiving Pell grants: 68%

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News Headline: Award-winning program to focus on black Native Americans | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: CrossRoads News - Online
Contact Name: Donna Williams Lewis
News OCR Text: Harry Belafonte, Ruby Dee and Sidney Poitier star in the 1972 film “Buck and the Preacher,” which will be screened at the library.

The history of black Native Americans will be explored on Oct. 6 at the Wesley Chapel-William C. Brown branch library.

The award-winning daylong “When Tribes Meet: The History of Black Native Americans” program is organized by youth services specialists Veronica Winley and Mia Buggs.

Winley works at the Scott Candler Library and Buggs works at the Wesley Chapel-William C. Brown branch where the program will take place 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

“When Tribes Meet: The History of Black Native Americans” won the 2012 Virginia Hamilton and Arnold Adoff Creative Outreach Grant at Kent State University.

The $1,000 grant is helping fund the event.

Winley said she hopes people leave the event with an appreciation of the connections between African-Americans and Native Americans.

“I just hope they can get fascinated,” she said. “People need to know that there was a cooperative effort between African-Americans and Native Americans. A lot of our culture has been influenced in some way by Native Americans.”

In the meantime, interested people are encouraged to loan relevant artifacts such as baskets or family pictures for display at the event, and volunteers are encouraged to help out on the day of the program.

The organizers have planned a series of events including book discussions, food-tasting, cultural dancers, a movie and crafts.

Two hours of the event will be devoted to a screening of the 1972 film “Buck and the Preacher,” starring Sidney Poitier, Ruby Dee and Harry Belafonte. The movie follows a group of former slaves traveling to the West at the end of the Civil War who meet up with Native Americans along the way.

Also at the event, Buggs will do a book discussion with youth on a book written by Virginia Hamilton called “Arilla Sundown.”

The book explores the identity crisis of 12-year-old Arilla Adams, who is part African-American and part Native American.

Winley will conduct book discussions with adults, using the following titles:

• “Proudly Red and Black: Stories of African and Native Americans” by William Loren Katz and Paula A. Franklin.

• “Our Land Before We Die: The Proud Story of the Seminole Negro” by Jeff Guinn.

• “Black Indian Genealogy Research: African-American Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes” by Angela Walton-Raji.

Walton-Raji used government documents to trace her ancestors to slaves owned by Native Americans. Read more about her at http://www.african-nativeamerican.com

/news.html.

The Wesley Chapel Library is at 2861 Wesley Chapel Road in Decatur.

To volunteer for the library program or for more information, call Winley at 404-286-6986 or Buggs at 404-286-6980.

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News Headline: Paul Simon's Jam Packed 1973 Homecoming in Kent State's Memorial Gym | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: •Saturday, Oct. 20, 1973; Paul Simon in the Kent State University Memorial Gym (now the MAC Center.)

One thing I love about this event is that it was so well-documented at the time yet so soon forgotten. This performance occurred during what was truly one of those great nights/weekends at Kent State where everything seemed to come together to perfection. From the Homecoming football game which saw the Kent State Golden Flashes beat Eastern Michigan 34-20, to Paul Simon's jam packed concert in the Memorial Gym and the brand new Student Center being officially dedicated by Kent's elite. Kent State sure burned bright for these couple of days.

Of course the unique focus in this piece is the rare and spectacular performance by a vital Paul Simon in the Kent State University Memorial Gym. This was a well publicized and well attended concert that found Paul Simon on tour for his album There Goes Rhymin' Simon, which featured some of his finest and well-known solo recordings, including "Kodachrome," "American Tune," "Loves Me Like a Rock," and "Something So Right."

The Daily Kent Stater did an extraordinary job of documenting the entire weekend with several preview pieces, a detailed review and then an additional piece by Stater reporter Jan Clark getting an exclusive interview with Paul Simon following his Memorial Gym concert — complete with an exclusive Kent Stater photo showing a bearded Paul Simon (more on how that came about later.) The Chestnut Burr (yearbook) was also on hand to document this event and published an amazing full color photo collage as well as this additional amazing image from the night.

The concert itself was put on by Kent State's All Campus Programming Board and I had the great pleasure recently to talk with Michael Solomon, who was the ACPB Concert Committee Chairman from 1972-1974 and was the chief promoter on this event. Michael was only 21 years old on the night of Saturday, Oct. 20, 1973 and this is what he told me about that evening:

"Paul Simon was awesome. Great show, packed the Memorial Gym. I remember that I got into a huge argument with one of Paul's managers because we had a deal with Paul Simon that he would get a percentage of the gate as opposed to just a flat fee, and as it turned out we had about 100 unsold tickets. Well, if you know how that gym seating is laid out, you know that the upper area is just filled with long permanent benches instead of actual seats and at times it can just turn into a general admission free-for-all. So if the gym held 7,000, and we only sold 6,000 tickets, you would never be able to tell because everything just fills out up there. So it was so packed that the manager didn't believe me that we didn't sell the last 100 tickets and he wanted his money. And I tried to explain to the guy the real situation.

"Paul Simon was great. The show was great. I remember afterwards in his dressing room, I went back there and I was near the door. Paul's brother Ed was there touring with him and they look so much alike that I remember asking him a question thinking he was Paul Simon. To which he says to me 'Why don't you ask Paul.' And I'm just like ...'oh, ok.' And I ask Paul Simon, I said 'what did you mean in that song by the lyrics 'loves me like a rock,' and he just looked at me funny and he didn't answer ... he was answering other questions and he turned back to me five minutes later and said 'That song was about Richard Nixon and he felt like he could do anything he wanted and I just attributed it to the fact that his mother really loved him.'"

There's one interesting note about the "chat" Michael Solomon had with Paul Simon. "Loves Me Like a Rock" was Paul Simon's big chart topping hit of the moment on the very night that Paul Simon performed here on campus, so it's of no surprise (to me) that it was the song that was on Michael's mind as he made his way backstage to greet Simon.

Another major player in this night at Kent State was future Pulitzer Prize winning journalist J. Ross Baughman, who was responsible for the amazing Paul Simon Kodachrome photo collage from the 1974 Chestnut Burr yearbook. Baughman also sent me these uncut transparencies as an outtake from that collage showing even more images of Paul Simon at Kent. This specific photo is my personal favorite from the newly digitized image outtakes. Baughman was the editor for the 1974 Chestnut Burr. Check out the entire Burr that he worked on. It's an incredible (and at times very candid) 400-page time capsule of Kent from that period. Also check out the Burr from the following year (which Baughman also worked on) as both books show a dense amount of details of this town and university from another time. This is what J. Ross Baughman told me about his experiences in Kent with Paul Simon on the night of Saturday, Oct. 20, 1973:

"Back in 1973 my neck of the woods at Kent State was student publications, as I had become the editor of the school yearbook, the Chestnut Burr, and if I recall this correctly, we fell under the same parent group as the All Campus Programming Board who were the ones who put on all these big concerts and other student events at the university. So because of this, there was a great deal of friendly coordination between the yearbook, the Daily Kent Stater and the the All Campus Programming Board. In fact, my friend and fellow staffer Mark Greenberg happened to have been roommates in an off-campus house with a guy who had some kind of close relationship with the Belkin Brothers, who the All Campus Programming Board collaborated with to bring in all those huge national acts to Kent State. Mark Greenberg was also my chief photographer at the yearbook, so this afforded us with very comfortable freedom and access to these events.

"So with just about every concert that came to Kent State, we would get this opportunity to shoot photos close-up, in front of and behind the stage. Several times we volunteered to escort the visiting talent down to the old Student Union Rathskeller in what is now Oscar Ritchie Hall. We got to hang out for a little while with the likes of Frank Zappa and others, and Mark Greenberg even got to get some more candid pictures of these people while they were in town.

"So when we were in these situations, Mark Greenberg made a point out of posing for kind of crazy, hand-shaking grip-and-grin (that's what we called it) photos. And then he would get an autograph from each visiting performer. But Mark always wanted each of these autographs to be a memorable conversation-piece, and so before the Paul Simon concert he had this really great idea where he had to find a little box of Kodachrome film and he wanted Paul Simon to sign this thing. And as I recall once he got this idea, it really had him hustling all over town at the last minute. But in the end he got Paul Simon to sign it.

"That night at the show when I encountered Paul Simon I found that he came off as more of a kind of nervous thoroughbred. He was a bit of a hypochondriac, and I think the article that you saw in the Stater suggested that he was always kind of worrying about 'having trouble with his sinuses' or his 'hurt finger' or whatever. He would use this as a way of psychologically saying 'Well I can't really do my best, so please don't hold me to whatever built up preconception you have about me.'

"So after Paul's concert, Mark Greenberg, Jan Clark (Stater/Burr reporter) and I were just hanging out backstage at the Memorial Gym with Paul's brother Eddie Simon and Eddie invited us to go back to the University Inn on South Water Street, which is where Paul and Eddie were staying and that's where that Kent Stater interview with Paul took place. Paul's room was on the top floor of the Inn, far left-hand corner as we face the building, but on the back face (presumably because that was a quieter side of the building.) We spent quite a few hours up there just hanging out and at one point it started getting late and everybody was getting hungry, so we wanted to convince Paul to come across the street to Jerry's Diner. At this point it must have been midnight or pretty close to that but Paul was doing his kind of hypochondriac 'What kind of place is it?' 'What kind of food?' And we were all just kind of rolling our eyes because he was being such a wet blanket.

"So eventually Eddie and I went without Paul across the street over to Jerry's and ya know Eddie was just so similar in appearance to Paul that many people mistook him for Paul. But over at Jerry's Diner, people kind of might have raised their eyebrows there and said good luck or something and they certainly were aware of the show that night but nobody really bothered him. We actually enjoyed our excursion down to Jerry's and we wound up taking food back to Paul.

"After I graduated from Kent State I kept photographing concerts in the area, whether it was in Cleveland at the Agora or at the Municipal Stadium, and we just had complete freedom in those days being able to run around up front or get up and take photos from behind or any odd angle that I needed to make work. I did the Rolling Stones shows, Paul McCartney and Wings, Queen, The Eagles, The Tubes, Patti Smith, Tom Waits and we did a lot of Springsteen. I got to photograph a lot of the major-name, quality shows at that time.

"We were really spoiled in those days because our access to these internationally known stars was so close-up and intimate that it made me presume that that was what I was going to have for the rest of my life and that's how cool it was to be a journalist. Those were the days before press agents and personal assistants you know — all these barriers that later would sort of keep you away from the artists. I used to be able to call up any venue I wanted and either claim to be from my hometown newspaper or from an organization that didn't even exist and they would just go 'Yeah sure, we'll put you on the press list.' It's certainly not like that any more. Again, in those days we had complete freedom to do whatever we wanted. Although some part of that might have been my nature because if you look later in my career my specialty is always, you know, getting inside, going behind the scenes, being close to people dying and relating to them almost as a family member rather than putting them under the microscope, which just wasn't my style.

"It was just by chance that later in life I started crossing paths with Ed Simon again. In the late 1970s I ended up in New York City and Mark Greenberg and I started a photo agency called Visions, which was located on the corner of 5th Avenue and 18th Street right above the Barnes and Noble building in the Flatiron District. This was also the time that I started teaching at the New School for Social Research where I taught several different masters classes, including Investigative Reporting, Ethics of Mass Communications and Photojournalism up until 1996. The New School (which for a long time was considered one of New York City's best kept secrets) was also only four blocks south from my photo agency. The New School is really a world class university where the best artists, performers, scientists and creative people from all over the world would come to teach. A lot of these giants in their fields would all either be living in New York or just passing through and would agree then to do a teaching gig one day a week (or something like) at the New School, so that if you wanted to take psychology from Carl Jung or music composition from Aaron Copland these kinds of courses were offered.

"So somewhere around 1979 Eddie Simon had his guitar school there and would teach Composition at the very same time that I was teaching my Investigative Reporting class, and I think we even shared the same class period in the same building on Monday nights. So when I would come up the elevator onto the floor, his kids would be gathering and I would stop and say 'hi' for a little bit, and then my class would start 10 or 15 minutes later. And so we remained good friends for several years after."

At the end of our conversation J. Ross Baughman told me to get in touch with photographer Mark Greenberg, as he would have more insight on what happened that night. Mark is responsible for this amazing Chestnut Burr photograph of Paul Simon from that concert, and after making contact this is what he told me:

"At the time that Paul Simon played on campus I was a photographer/photo editor for the Chestnut Burr yearbook. We had pretty much unrestricted access to these kinds of events and at the same time photo credentialing and so forth was not like anything you might imagine today or even 20 years ago. In those days, if you had a couple cameras around your neck you probably had carte blanche. The other thing is that we knew the people who handled security, and this allowed us to always be on stage or back stage when there were big concerts at the Memorial Gym.

"To be totally direct I remember very little about shooting photos of Paul Simon that night. I remember, however, choosing that frame because it was so early in my photographic career that we were always supposed to be paying attention to foreground and background, which helps give a photograph dimension. I liked the idea that the hands were a part of that photo because really the photo wouldn't have been much but the hands actually give the photo a ... it takes you there kind of thing. You are right there with the audience.

"In those days the girls locker room is where the bands' dressing rooms would be, and I can tell you I got to see quite some shenanigans back there. Once I got caught in the middle of a food fight back in that area for a Doobie Brothers show. I remember less about my experiences at the Paul Simon concert than I do the Duke Ellington or Bruce Springsteen shows, but I do remember I was in that main dressing room with another member of the Chestnut Burr who was all excited and I remember Paul Simon being a very quiet guy. There was another guy there who looked just like him, and it turned out to be Paul's brother Eddie and somewhere around that time Eddie owned a company called the Guitar Study Center or something like that. He actually started a whole series of Guitar Study Centers out of the New York area.

"At one point Paul had packed up and gone his way and we were kind of surprised that he and his brother Eddie had split up. Eddie had said to me that he was going back to Cleveland Hopkins Airport and I just offered him a ride, which I thought would be great fun. I had an Oldsmobile Convertible at the time and the three of us just drove up and chatted about the concert and Paul and whatever else one might chat about. That's really my greatest recollection."

A couple of other notes here...

In the Kent Stater interview and in excerpts that appear in the Chestnut Burr yearbook Paul Simon is quoted as saying "I'd really like to put out a live album of the show I did at Kent." As of this writing (and through all of my hunting) I have found no known recording of Paul Simon's performance at Kent State, though if someone reads this and is aware of one I'd LOVE to hear it. And if for some strange reason Paul Simon reads this piece, I'd love for you to search your archives for this possible Paul Simon: Live at Kent State album that you made mention of almost 40 years ago.

Following this tour Paul Simon released a great, yet rarely acknowledged, live album called Paul Simon in Concert: Live Rhymin' which you can hear in its entirety here. Some other interesting artifacts from this tour remain, including a full bootleg recording from the night before (his Kent State performance) in Ithaca New York and an extraordinary piece of a concert film from this period that made the rounds on VH1 in recent years.

Big thanks for all the help on this piece from J. Ross Baughman, Mark Greenberg, Donna Hess, Shane Hrenko, Michael Solomon, Keith Raymond and the Department of Special Collections and Archives, Kent State University Libraries.

In closing, I will leave you all with this classic track from Paul Simon...

(click to listen: •Saturday, Oct. 20, 1973; Paul Simon in the Kent State University Memorial Gym (now the MAC Center.)

One thing I love about this event is that it was so well-documented at the time yet so soon forgotten. This performance occurred during what was truly one of those great nights/weekends at Kent State where everything seemed to come together to perfection. From the Homecoming football game which saw the Kent State Golden Flashes beat Eastern Michigan 34-20, to Paul Simon's jam packed concert in the Memorial Gym and the brand new Student Center being officially dedicated by Kent's elite. Kent State sure burned bright for these couple of days.

Of course the unique focus in this piece is the rare and spectacular performance by a vital Paul Simon in the Kent State University Memorial Gym. This was a well publicized and well attended concert that found Paul Simon on tour for his album There Goes Rhymin' Simon, which featured some of his finest and well-known solo recordings, including "Kodachrome," "American Tune," "Loves Me Like a Rock," and "Something So Right."

The Daily Kent Stater did an extraordinary job of documenting the entire weekend with several preview pieces, a detailed review and then an additional piece by Stater reporter Jan Clark getting an exclusive interview with Paul Simon following his Memorial Gym concert — complete with an exclusive Kent Stater photo showing a bearded Paul Simon (more on how that came about later.) The Chestnut Burr (yearbook) was also on hand to document this event and published an amazing full color photo collage as well as this additional amazing image from the night.

The concert itself was put on by Kent State's All Campus Programming Board and I had the great pleasure recently to talk with Michael Solomon, who was the ACPB Concert Committee Chairman from 1972-1974 and was the chief promoter on this event. Michael was only 21 years old on the night of Saturday, Oct. 20, 1973 and this is what he told me about that evening:

"Paul Simon was awesome. Great show, packed the Memorial Gym. I remember that I got into a huge argument with one of Paul's managers because we had a deal with Paul Simon that he would get a percentage of the gate as opposed to just a flat fee, and as it turned out we had about 100 unsold tickets. Well, if you know how that gym seating is laid out, you know that the upper area is just filled with long permanent benches instead of actual seats and at times it can just turn into a general admission free-for-all. So if the gym held 7,000, and we only sold 6,000 tickets, you would never be able to tell because everything just fills out up there. So it was so packed that the manager didn't believe me that we didn't sell the last 100 tickets and he wanted his money. And I tried to explain to the guy the real situation.

"Paul Simon was great. The show was great. I remember afterwards in his dressing room, I went back there and I was near the door. Paul's brother Ed was there touring with him and they look so much alike that I remember asking him a question thinking he was Paul Simon. To which he says to me 'Why don't you ask Paul.' And I'm just like ...'oh, ok.' And I ask Paul Simon, I said 'what did you mean in that song by the lyrics 'loves me like a rock,' and he just looked at me funny and he didn't answer ... he was answering other questions and he turned back to me five minutes later and said 'That song was about Richard Nixon and he felt like he could do anything he wanted and I just attributed it to the fact that his mother really loved him.'"

There's one interesting note about the "chat" Michael Solomon had with Paul Simon. "Loves Me Like a Rock" was Paul Simon's big chart topping hit of the moment on the very night that Paul Simon performed here on campus, so it's of no surprise (to me) that it was the song that was on Michael's mind as he made his way backstage to greet Simon.

Another major player in this night at Kent State was future Pulitzer Prize winning journalist J. Ross Baughman, who was responsible for the amazing Paul Simon Kodachrome photo collage from the 1974 Chestnut Burr yearbook. Baughman also sent me these uncut transparencies as an outtake from that collage showing even more images of Paul Simon at Kent. This specific photo is my personal favorite from the newly digitized image outtakes. Baughman was the editor for the 1974 Chestnut Burr. Check out the entire Burr that he worked on. It's an incredible (and at times very candid) 400-page time capsule of Kent from that period. Also check out the Burr from the following year (which Baughman also worked on) as both books show a dense amount of details of this town and university from another time. This is what J. Ross Baughman told me about his experiences in Kent with Paul Simon on the night of Saturday, Oct. 20, 1973:

"Back in 1973 my neck of the woods at Kent State was student publications, as I had become the editor of the school yearbook, the Chestnut Burr, and if I recall this correctly, we fell under the same parent group as the All Campus Programming Board who were the ones who put on all these big concerts and other student events at the university. So because of this, there was a great deal of friendly coordination between the yearbook, the Daily Kent Stater and the the All Campus Programming Board. In fact, my friend and fellow staffer Mark Greenberg happened to have been roommates in an off-campus house with a guy who had some kind of close relationship with the Belkin Brothers, who the All Campus Programming Board collaborated with to bring in all those huge national acts to Kent State. Mark Greenberg was also my chief photographer at the yearbook, so this afforded us with very comfortable freedom and access to these events.

"So with just about every concert that came to Kent State, we would get this opportunity to shoot photos close-up, in front of and behind the stage. Several times we volunteered to escort the visiting talent down to the old Student Union Rathskeller in what is now Oscar Ritchie Hall. We got to hang out for a little while with the likes of Frank Zappa and others, and Mark Greenberg even got to get some more candid pictures of these people while they were in town.

"So when we were in these situations, Mark Greenberg made a point out of posing for kind of crazy, hand-shaking grip-and-grin (that's what we called it) photos. And then he would get an autograph from each visiting performer. But Mark always wanted each of these autographs to be a memorable conversation-piece, and so before the Paul Simon concert he had this really great idea where he had to find a little box of Kodachrome film and he wanted Paul Simon to sign this thing. And as I recall once he got this idea, it really had him hustling all over town at the last minute. But in the end he got Paul Simon to sign it.

"That night at the show when I encountered Paul Simon I found that he came off as more of a kind of nervous thoroughbred. He was a bit of a hypochondriac, and I think the article that you saw in the Stater suggested that he was always kind of worrying about 'having trouble with his sinuses' or his 'hurt finger' or whatever. He would use this as a way of psychologically saying 'Well I can't really do my best, so please don't hold me to whatever built up preconception you have about me.'

"So after Paul's concert, Mark Greenberg, Jan Clark (Stater/Burr reporter) and I were just hanging out backstage at the Memorial Gym with Paul's brother Eddie Simon and Eddie invited us to go back to the University Inn on South Water Street, which is where Paul and Eddie were staying and that's where that Kent Stater interview with Paul took place. Paul's room was on the top floor of the Inn, far left-hand corner as we face the building, but on the back face (presumably because that was a quieter side of the building.) We spent quite a few hours up there just hanging out and at one point it started getting late and everybody was getting hungry, so we wanted to convince Paul to come across the street to Jerry's Diner. At this point it must have been midnight or pretty close to that but Paul was doing his kind of hypochondriac 'What kind of place is it?' 'What kind of food?' And we were all just kind of rolling our eyes because he was being such a wet blanket.

"So eventually Eddie and I went without Paul across the street over to Jerry's and ya know Eddie was just so similar in appearance to Paul that many people mistook him for Paul. But over at Jerry's Diner, people kind of might have raised their eyebrows there and said good luck or something and they certainly were aware of the show that night but nobody really bothered him. We actually enjoyed our excursion down to Jerry's and we wound up taking food back to Paul.

"After I graduated from Kent State I kept photographing concerts in the area, whether it was in Cleveland at the Agora or at the Municipal Stadium, and we just had complete freedom in those days being able to run around up front or get up and take photos from behind or any odd angle that I needed to make work. I did the Rolling Stones shows, Paul McCartney and Wings, Queen, The Eagles, The Tubes, Patti Smith, Tom Waits and we did a lot of Springsteen. I got to photograph a lot of the major-name, quality shows at that time.

"We were really spoiled in those days because our access to these internationally known stars was so close-up and intimate that it made me presume that that was what I was going to have for the rest of my life and that's how cool it was to be a journalist. Those were the days before press agents and personal assistants you know — all these barriers that later would sort of keep you away from the artists. I used to be able to call up any venue I wanted and either claim to be from my hometown newspaper or from an organization that didn't even exist and they would just go 'Yeah sure, we'll put you on the press list.' It's certainly not like that any more. Again, in those days we had complete freedom to do whatever we wanted. Although some part of that might have been my nature because if you look later in my career my specialty is always, you know, getting inside, going behind the scenes, being close to people dying and relating to them almost as a family member rather than putting them under the microscope, which just wasn't my style.

"It was just by chance that later in life I started crossing paths with Ed Simon again. In the late 1970s I ended up in New York City and Mark Greenberg and I started a photo agency called Visions, which was located on the corner of 5th Avenue and 18th Street right above the Barnes and Noble building in the Flatiron District. This was also the time that I started teaching at the New School for Social Research where I taught several different masters classes, including Investigative Reporting, Ethics of Mass Communications and Photojournalism up until 1996. The New School (which for a long time was considered one of New York City's best kept secrets) was also only four blocks south from my photo agency. The New School is really a world class university where the best artists, performers, scientists and creative people from all over the world would come to teach. A lot of these giants in their fields would all either be living in New York or just passing through and would agree then to do a teaching gig one day a week (or something like) at the New School, so that if you wanted to take psychology from Carl Jung or music composition from Aaron Copland these kinds of courses were offered.

"So somewhere around 1979 Eddie Simon had his guitar school there and would teach Composition at the very same time that I was teaching my Investigative Reporting class, and I think we even shared the same class period in the same building on Monday nights. So when I would come up the elevator onto the floor, his kids would be gathering and I would stop and say 'hi' for a little bit, and then my class would start 10 or 15 minutes later. And so we remained good friends for several years after."

At the end of our conversation J. Ross Baughman told me to get in touch with photographer Mark Greenberg, as he would have more insight on what happened that night. Mark is responsible for this amazing Chestnut Burr photograph of Paul Simon from that concert, and after making contact this is what he told me:

"At the time that Paul Simon played on campus I was a photographer/photo editor for the Chestnut Burr yearbook. We had pretty much unrestricted access to these kinds of events and at the same time photo credentialing and so forth was not like anything you might imagine today or even 20 years ago. In those days, if you had a couple cameras around your neck you probably had carte blanche. The other thing is that we knew the people who handled security, and this allowed us to always be on stage or back stage when there were big concerts at the Memorial Gym.

"To be totally direct I remember very little about shooting photos of Paul Simon that night. I remember, however, choosing that frame because it was so early in my photographic career that we were always supposed to be paying attention to foreground and background, which helps give a photograph dimension. I liked the idea that the hands were a part of that photo because really the photo wouldn't have been much but the hands actually give the photo a ... it takes you there kind of thing. You are right there with the audience.

"In those days the girls locker room is where the bands' dressing rooms would be, and I can tell you I got to see quite some shenanigans back there. Once I got caught in the middle of a food fight back in that area for a Doobie Brothers show. I remember less about my experiences at the Paul Simon concert than I do the Duke Ellington or Bruce Springsteen shows, but I do remember I was in that main dressing room with another member of the Chestnut Burr who was all excited and I remember Paul Simon being a very quiet guy. There was another guy there who looked just like him, and it turned out to be Paul's brother Eddie and somewhere around that time Eddie owned a company called the Guitar Study Center or something like that. He actually started a whole series of Guitar Study Centers out of the New York area.

"At one point Paul had packed up and gone his way and we were kind of surprised that he and his brother Eddie had split up. Eddie had said to me that he was going back to Cleveland Hopkins Airport and I just offered him a ride, which I thought would be great fun. I had an Oldsmobile Convertible at the time and the three of us just drove up and chatted about the concert and Paul and whatever else one might chat about. That's really my greatest recollection."

A couple of other notes here...

In the Kent Stater interview and in excerpts that appear in the Chestnut Burr yearbook Paul Simon is quoted as saying "I'd really like to put out a live album of the show I did at Kent." As of this writing (and through all of my hunting) I have found no known recording of Paul Simon's performance at Kent State, though if someone reads this and is aware of one I'd LOVE to hear it. And if for some strange reason Paul Simon reads this piece, I'd love for you to search your archives for this possible Paul Simon: Live at Kent State album that you made mention of almost 40 years ago.

Following this tour Paul Simon released a great, yet rarely acknowledged, live album called Paul Simon in Concert: Live Rhymin' which you can hear in its entirety here. Some other interesting artifacts from this tour remain, including a full bootleg recording from the night before (his Kent State performance) in Ithaca New York and an extraordinary piece of a concert film from this period that made the rounds on VH1 in recent years.

Big thanks for all the help on this piece from J. Ross Baughman, Mark Greenberg, Donna Hess, Shane Hrenko, Michael Solomon, Keith Raymond and the Department of Special Collections and Archives, Kent State University Libraries.

In closing, I will leave you all with this classic track from Paul Simon...

click to listen: •Saturday, Oct. 20, 1973; Paul Simon in the Kent State University Memorial Gym (now the MAC Center.)

One thing I love about this event is that it was so well-documented at the time yet so soon forgotten. This performance occurred during what was truly one of those great nights/weekends at Kent State where everything seemed to come together to perfection. From the Homecoming football game which saw the Kent State Golden Flashes beat Eastern Michigan 34-20, to Paul Simon's jam packed concert in the Memorial Gym and the brand new Student Center being officially dedicated by Kent's elite. Kent State sure burned bright for these couple of days.

Of course the unique focus in this piece is the rare and spectacular performance by a vital Paul Simon in the Kent State University Memorial Gym. This was a well publicized and well attended concert that found Paul Simon on tour for his album There Goes Rhymin' Simon, which featured some of his finest and well-known solo recordings, including "Kodachrome," "American Tune," "Loves Me Like a Rock," and "Something So Right."

The Daily Kent Stater did an extraordinary job of documenting the entire weekend with several preview pieces, a detailed review and then an additional piece by Stater reporter Jan Clark getting an exclusive interview with Paul Simon following his Memorial Gym concert — complete with an exclusive Kent Stater photo showing a bearded Paul Simon (more on how that came about later.) The Chestnut Burr (yearbook) was also on hand to document this event and published an amazing full color photo collage as well as this additional amazing image from the night.

The concert itself was put on by Kent State's All Campus Programming Board and I had the great pleasure recently to talk with Michael Solomon, who was the ACPB Concert Committee Chairman from 1972-1974 and was the chief promoter on this event. Michael was only 21 years old on the night of Saturday, Oct. 20, 1973 and this is what he told me about that evening:

"Paul Simon was awesome. Great show, packed the Memorial Gym. I remember that I got into a huge argument with one of Paul's managers because we had a deal with Paul Simon that he would get a percentage of the gate as opposed to just a flat fee, and as it turned out we had about 100 unsold tickets. Well, if you know how that gym seating is laid out, you know that the upper area is just filled with long permanent benches instead of actual seats and at times it can just turn into a general admission free-for-all. So if the gym held 7,000, and we only sold 6,000 tickets, you would never be able to tell because everything just fills out up there. So it was so packed that the manager didn't believe me that we didn't sell the last 100 tickets and he wanted his money. And I tried to explain to the guy the real situation.

"Paul Simon was great. The show was great. I remember afterwards in his dressing room, I went back there and I was near the door. Paul's brother Ed was there touring with him and they look so much alike that I remember asking him a question thinking he was Paul Simon. To which he says to me 'Why don't you ask Paul.' And I'm just like ...'oh, ok.' And I ask Paul Simon, I said 'what did you mean in that song by the lyrics 'loves me like a rock,' and he just looked at me funny and he didn't answer ... he was answering other questions and he turned back to me five minutes later and said 'That song was about Richard Nixon and he felt like he could do anything he wanted and I just attributed it to the fact that his mother really loved him.'"

There's one interesting note about the "chat" Michael Solomon had with Paul Simon. "Loves Me Like a Rock" was Paul Simon's big chart topping hit of the moment on the very night that Paul Simon performed here on campus, so it's of no surprise (to me) that it was the song that was on Michael's mind as he made his way backstage to greet Simon.

Another major player in this night at Kent State was future Pulitzer Prize winning journalist J. Ross Baughman, who was responsible for the amazing Paul Simon Kodachrome photo collage from the 1974 Chestnut Burr yearbook. Baughman also sent me these uncut transparencies as an outtake from that collage showing even more images of Paul Simon at Kent. This specific photo is my personal favorite from the newly digitized image outtakes. Baughman was the editor for the 1974 Chestnut Burr. Check out the entire Burr that he worked on. It's an incredible (and at times very candid) 400-page time capsule of Kent from that period. Also check out the Burr from the following year (which Baughman also worked on) as both books show a dense amount of details of this town and university from another time. This is what J. Ross Baughman told me about his experiences in Kent with Paul Simon on the night of Saturday, Oct. 20, 1973:

"Back in 1973 my neck of the woods at Kent State was student publications, as I had become the editor of the school yearbook, the Chestnut Burr, and if I recall this correctly, we fell under the same parent group as the All Campus Programming Board who were the ones who put on all these big concerts and other student events at the university. So because of this, there was a great deal of friendly coordination between the yearbook, the Daily Kent Stater and the the All Campus Programming Board. In fact, my friend and fellow staffer Mark Greenberg happened to have been roommates in an off-campus house with a guy who had some kind of close relationship with the Belkin Brothers, who the All Campus Programming Board collaborated with to bring in all those huge national acts to Kent State. Mark Greenberg was also my chief photographer at the yearbook, so this afforded us with very comfortable freedom and access to these events.

"So with just about every concert that came to Kent State, we would get this opportunity to shoot photos close-up, in front of and behind the stage. Several times we volunteered to escort the visiting talent down to the old Student Union Rathskeller in what is now Oscar Ritchie Hall. We got to hang out for a little while with the likes of Frank Zappa and others, and Mark Greenberg even got to get some more candid pictures of these people while they were in town.

"So when we were in these situations, Mark Greenberg made a point out of posing for kind of crazy, hand-shaking grip-and-grin (that's what we called it) photos. And then he would get an autograph from each visiting performer. But Mark always wanted each of these autographs to be a memorable conversation-piece, and so before the Paul Simon concert he had this really great idea where he had to find a little box of Kodachrome film and he wanted Paul Simon to sign this thing. And as I recall once he got this idea, it really had him hustling all over town at the last minute. But in the end he got Paul Simon to sign it.

"That night at the show when I encountered Paul Simon I found that he came off as more of a kind of nervous thoroughbred. He was a bit of a hypochondriac, and I think the article that you saw in the Stater suggested that he was always kind of worrying about 'having trouble with his sinuses' or his 'hurt finger' or whatever. He would use this as a way of psychologically saying 'Well I can't really do my best, so please don't hold me to whatever built up preconception you have about me.'

"So after Paul's concert, Mark Greenberg, Jan Clark (Stater/Burr reporter) and I were just hanging out backstage at the Memorial Gym with Paul's brother Eddie Simon and Eddie invited us to go back to the University Inn on South Water Street, which is where Paul and Eddie were staying and that's where that Kent Stater interview with Paul took place. Paul's room was on the top floor of the Inn, far left-hand corner as we face the building, but on the back face (presumably because that was a quieter side of the building.) We spent quite a few hours up there just hanging out and at one point it started getting late and everybody was getting hungry, so we wanted to convince Paul to come across the street to Jerry's Diner. At this point it must have been midnight or pretty close to that but Paul was doing his kind of hypochondriac 'What kind of place is it?' 'What kind of food?' And we were all just kind of rolling our eyes because he was being such a wet blanket.

"So eventually Eddie and I went without Paul across the street over to Jerry's and ya know Eddie was just so similar in appearance to Paul that many people mistook him for Paul. But over at Jerry's Diner, people kind of might have raised their eyebrows there and said good luck or something and they certainly were aware of the show that night but nobody really bothered him. We actually enjoyed our excursion down to Jerry's and we wound up taking food back to Paul.

"After I graduated from Kent State I kept photographing concerts in the area, whether it was in Cleveland at the Agora or at the Municipal Stadium, and we just had complete freedom in those days being able to run around up front or get up and take photos from behind or any odd angle that I needed to make work. I did the Rolling Stones shows, Paul McCartney and Wings, Queen, The Eagles, The Tubes, Patti Smith, Tom Waits and we did a lot of Springsteen. I got to photograph a lot of the major-name, quality shows at that time.

"We were really spoiled in those days because our access to these internationally known stars was so close-up and intimate that it made me presume that that was what I was going to have for the rest of my life and that's how cool it was to be a journalist. Those were the days before press agents and personal assistants you know — all these barriers that later would sort of keep you away from the artists. I used to be able to call up any venue I wanted and either claim to be from my hometown newspaper or from an organization that didn't even exist and they would just go 'Yeah sure, we'll put you on the press list.' It's certainly not like that any more. Again, in those days we had complete freedom to do whatever we wanted. Although some part of that might have been my nature because if you look later in my career my specialty is always, you know, getting inside, going behind the scenes, being close to people dying and relating to them almost as a family member rather than putting them under the microscope, which just wasn't my style.

"It was just by chance that later in life I started crossing paths with Ed Simon again. In the late 1970s I ended up in New York City and Mark Greenberg and I started a photo agency called Visions, which was located on the corner of 5th Avenue and 18th Street right above the Barnes and Noble building in the Flatiron District. This was also the time that I started teaching at the New School for Social Research where I taught several different masters classes, including Investigative Reporting, Ethics of Mass Communications and Photojournalism up until 1996. The New School (which for a long time was considered one of New York City's best kept secrets) was also only four blocks south from my photo agency. The New School is really a world class university where the best artists, performers, scientists and creative people from all over the world would come to teach. A lot of these giants in their fields would all either be living in New York or just passing through and would agree then to do a teaching gig one day a week (or something like) at the New School, so that if you wanted to take psychology from Carl Jung or music composition from Aaron Copland these kinds of courses were offered.

"So somewhere around 1979 Eddie Simon had his guitar school there and would teach Composition at the very same time that I was teaching my Investigative Reporting class, and I think we even shared the same class period in the same building on Monday nights. So when I would come up the elevator onto the floor, his kids would be gathering and I would stop and say 'hi' for a little bit, and then my class would start 10 or 15 minutes later. And so we remained good friends for several years after."

At the end of our conversation J. Ross Baughman told me to get in touch with photographer Mark Greenberg, as he would have more insight on what happened that night. Mark is responsible for this amazing Chestnut Burr photograph of Paul Simon from that concert, and after making contact this is what he told me:

"At the time that Paul Simon played on campus I was a photographer/photo editor for the Chestnut Burr yearbook. We had pretty much unrestricted access to these kinds of events and at the same time photo credentialing and so forth was not like anything you might imagine today or even 20 years ago. In those days, if you had a couple cameras around your neck you probably had carte blanche. The other thing is that we knew the people who handled security, and this allowed us to always be on stage or back stage when there were big concerts at the Memorial Gym.

"To be totally direct I remember very little about shooting photos of Paul Simon that night. I remember, however, choosing that frame because it was so early in my photographic career that we were always supposed to be paying attention to foreground and background, which helps give a photograph dimension. I liked the idea that the hands were a part of that photo because really the photo wouldn't have been much but the hands actually give the photo a ... it takes you there kind of thing. You are right there with the audience.

"In those days the girls locker room is where the bands' dressing rooms would be, and I can tell you I got to see quite some shenanigans back there. Once I got caught in the middle of a food fight back in that area for a Doobie Brothers show. I remember less about my experiences at the Paul Simon concert than I do the Duke Ellington or Bruce Springsteen shows, but I do remember I was in that main dressing room with another member of the Chestnut Burr who was all excited and I remember Paul Simon being a very quiet guy. There was another guy there who looked just like him, and it turned out to be Paul's brother Eddie and somewhere around that time Eddie owned a company called the Guitar Study Center or something like that. He actually started a whole series of Guitar Study Centers out of the New York area.

"At one point Paul had packed up and gone his way and we were kind of surprised that he and his brother Eddie had split up. Eddie had said to me that he was going back to Cleveland Hopkins Airport and I just offered him a ride, which I thought would be great fun. I had an Oldsmobile Convertible at the time and the three of us just drove up and chatted about the concert and Paul and whatever else one might chat about. That's really my greatest recollection."

A couple of other notes here...

In the Kent Stater interview and in excerpts that appear in the Chestnut Burr yearbook Paul Simon is quoted as saying "I'd really like to put out a live album of the show I did at Kent." As of this writing (and through all of my hunting) I have found no known recording of Paul Simon's performance at Kent State, though if someone reads this and is aware of one I'd LOVE to hear it. And if for some strange reason Paul Simon reads this piece, I'd love for you to search your archives for this possible Paul Simon: Live at Kent State album that you made mention of almost 40 years ago.

Following this tour Paul Simon released a great, yet rarely acknowledged, live album called Paul Simon in Concert: Live Rhymin' which you can hear in its entirety here. Some other interesting artifacts from this tour remain, including a full bootleg recording from the night before (his Kent State performance) in Ithaca New York and an extraordinary piece of a concert film from this period that made the rounds on VH1 in recent years.

Big thanks for all the help on this piece from J. Ross Baughman, Mark Greenberg, Donna Hess, Shane Hrenko, Michael Solomon, Keith Raymond and the Department of Special Collections and Archives, Kent State University Libraries.

In closing, I will leave you all with this classic track from Paul Simon...

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News Headline: KSU helps Head Start with 'Tools for Learning' | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Portage Learning Centers
Head Start program recently
received a donation of school
supplies to be used at the
centers housed throughout
Portage County.
The Kent State Honors
College Freshmen and the
Alumni Chapter Service Project
hosted a “Tools for Learning”
donation drive to obtain
school supplies such as
markers, crayons, books and
more items to benefit children
in the Portage County
Head Start program.
Becky Gares, coordinator
of Advising and Alumni Relations,
helped coordinate the
drive along with the Honors
College Alumni Chapter.
The 400 Honors College
freshmen donated the school
supplies during their Welcome
Cookout in August.
The supplies donated were
valued at close to $1,000 and
will be put to use in the classrooms
as learning tools for
children ages 3 to 5.
For more information
about this donation drive or
to make a donation, contact
Valerie Fiala, Outreach coordinator
for Portage Learning
Centers, at 330-297-7795.

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News Headline: Journalists focus on honesty in political reporting (Leach) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Political rhetoric and misleading statistics seemingly dominate the 24-hour news cycle.

But, a forum held Thursday at Kent State University focused on maintaining objectivity and honesty in political reporting.

The Kent State school of journalism partnered with the Poynter Institute, a Florida-based journalism think tank, to host a media ethics workshop titled: Dirty Politics.

Jan Leach teaches journalism ethics at Kent State. She said journalists have a responsibility to consider the impact their work has on public opinion.

"The media should think about the way they make their decisions: news decisions, coverage decisions, sourcing decisions, anonymity decisions and how that affects the audience who is learning from the media because we have such a tremendous influence on the public."

Kent State Alumna and Pullitzer Prize-winning journalist Connie Schultz was the keynote speaker at the event.

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News Headline: Pam Strickland: Teacher lauded for courage | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Knoxville News-Sentinel - Online, The
Contact Name: Pam Strickland
News OCR Text: When James Yoakley spoke to the Knoxville Writers' Guild in early September about his experience of being censored by the Lenoir City School Board for standing up for student journalists' First Amendment rights, he said he thought the entire experience would make a great screenplay. As of Tuesday, the story has a Hollywood ending.

On Tuesday the Student Press Law Center in Washington, D.C., announced that Yoakley is the adult recipient of the 2012 Courage in Student Journalism Award this year.

Yoakley's story in a nutshell is that after the Lenoir City High School principal refused to allow the publication of a column by the newspaper editor on being an atheist, the News Sentinel subsequently published the column, which was later picked up by The Associated Press and run in publications throughout the country. The student is now a freshman journalism major at the University of Tennessee. Then came the nationally award-winning yearbook, which had features on a number of students, including one who lives openly as a homosexual.

The Lenoir City superintendent reassigned Yoakley, who in addition to advising the newspaper and yearbook was also chair of the Lenoir City High School English Department, to Lenoir City Middle School as seventh-grade reading teacher.

When I spoke to him Wednesday afternoon via telephone, Yoakley was thrilled that he'd been selected from 20 nominees for the SPLC honor.

"When it all happened, I didn't think I was really doing anything courageous, I was just doing what was right," he said. "I think it's wonderful to be recognized this way. And then when I read about what those kids in Kentucky did, it seems like I'm in pretty good company."

The student recipients attend a Louisville, Ky., high school and overcame administrative censorship, also over homosexual issues, by launching their own independent publication.

The annual awards are given to student journalists and school officials who have demonstrated exceptional fortitude in defending freedom of the press. The co-sponsors are SPLC, the National Scholastic Press Association and the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University, which underwrites a $500 cash prize plus travel expenses for the winners. The awards will be presented on Nov. 17 at the National High School Journalism Convention in San Antonio.

SPLC Executive Director Frank LoMonte said Wednesday that an SPLC staff Freedom of Information Act request to the Lenoir City Board of Education regarding Yoakley's transfer had returned a stack of paper a foot thick, many of them emails from the public.

"Almost every one of the emails used some variety of virulent Biblical quotation," LoMonte said in a telephone interview Wednesday.

"I'm so sad that anybody has to go to that school," LoMonte said.

Lenoir City Superintendent Wayne Miller did not return a call.

Yoakley said he is still mulling a suggestion by the SPLC that he take legal action against the Lenoir City school board.

"All it would get me is my old job back, and I don't know that I want to work with an administration that's not going to support me."

LoMonte believes that Yoakley "has quite a strong argument because if he had censured writing about gays under the law, the school board could have been sued."

Yoakley said that in his new assignment "I'm learning a lot about myself as a teacher. It's expanded my experiences so much, but I may explore other opportunities.

"I love teaching, but I have thought of finding something that's a little less political. Every year it's become less and less about the students and more and more about pleasing other people."

© 2012 Knoxville News Sentinel.

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News Headline: Dirty Politics: View live stream of Poynter Kent State ethics workshop | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Poynteronline
Contact Name: Julie Moos Published Sep
News OCR Text: Poynter's eighth annual ethics workshop with Kent State University begins at 9:15 a.m. This year's theme is “dirty politics.” Speakers include:

9:15: Poynter's Kelly McBride and Ellyn Angelotti

10: PolitiFact's Bill Adair is part of a panel on “The role of a responsible press”

11:10: “Why Can't We All Get Along?” Civility & Social Media in Politics

12:15: Best practices

12:45: Lunchtime keynote with columnist Connie Schultz

1:45: Gender and politics

3:15: Political advertising & campaign communication

4:30: Closing session

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News Headline: About Books: Journalists' book follows three medical school journeys (Marino) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Although we rely on physicians, calling on them at birth and death and every medical event in between, rarely do we consider the personal challenges faced by doctors-to-be."

So begins publicity material for "White Coats: Three Journeys through an American Medical School," a coffee-table quality book by Jacqueline Marino and Tim Harrison. It's a nonfiction text that the publisher, Kent State University Press, calls "a fascinating look at the human side of the transformation from student to doctor."

"In 2005, author Jacqueline Marino and photojournalist Tim Harrison had the unprecedented opportunity to chronicle the experiences of three students as they learned to become doctors at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine," the publisher explains. "In White Coats, Marino and Harrison bring readers into the classrooms, anatomy labs, and hospitals where the students take their first pulses, dissect their first cadavers, and deliver their first babies."

The three case studies follow a diverse set of med school student circumstances - both personal and professional.

"Marleny Franco, who moved from the Dominican Republic to Boston's Dominican projects when she was 9, must first overcome social and cultural barriers - and those she constructs herself," said publicity material. "Michael Norton, a devout Mormon, juggles the pressures of medical school along with family responsibilities and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Millie Gentry, a fashion model, tries to balance the demands of medical school with finding time to go out with friends and volunteer at the local free clinic."

Through those stories, the book discusses "significant issues in medical education," said the publisher.

"Franco, Norton, and Gentry try to master an ever-increasing load of medical science, confront problems of professionalism, and learn the importance of empathy," the publicity material explains. "Each must make personal sacrifices, including taking on crushing debt, pursuing round-the-clock work, and neglecting family, friends, and health."

The road to the doctor's office is long and arduous, full of decisions that must be made which could affect either a medical student's present life or future career.

While taking a scholarly look at medical school in their 128-page book, the authors look at the issues through the eyes of journalists. Marino is an assistant professor of journalism at Kent State University who has written articles that have appeared in such publications as Cleveland magazine and The Christian Science Monitor. Harrison, a documentary photographer in Cleveland, is an adjunct professor at Kent State who has had photographs in such publications as The Wall Street Journal and USA Today.

"The storyline is complete and coherent as the writer follows three medical students over their four years of medical school," said one online review at Amazon.com. "It begins with their admission to medical school (and continues) to the final match day ceremony. At times, the stories are both uplifting and heartbreaking."

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News Headline: HeldenFiles: 'Bill W.' is back, more 'Bully' news, a Waldo anniversary, more | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Bill W. is back.

In March, the documentary about Alcoholics Anonymous co-founder Bill Wilson was shown at Plaza Cinemas at Chapel Hill as well as Cleveland's Tower Cinemas as part of the Cleveland International Film Festival.

Around the time of that screening, Kevin Hanlon, who made the film with Dan Carracino, said they were looking at ways to distribute the film beyond festivals, possibly in independent theaters.

But it has found its way to the chain-owned Regal Independence Stadium 10, where afternoon and evening showings begin today and will continue at least through Thursday.

The film blends Wilson's own words, both from his writings and from audio recordings, with film footage, still photos, some dramatic re-enactments and segments with other alcoholics talking about their experiences. (Hanlon told me that neither he nor Carracino is an A.A. member.) Part was shot in Akron, notably in the Stan Hywet Hall gatehouse where Wilson and A.A. co-founder Dr. Bob Smith met for the first time in 1935.

While the film includes the well-known story of the founding of A.A., the film is especially interesting when it looks at Wilson's life after the group became a success. Though he was held up as an icon, Wilson himself never forgot that he was a recovering drunk. Hanlon said in March that, within a decade of A.A.'s founding, Wilson felt he had done all he could for the organization.

Moreover, Wilson felt he was not making progress in his own spiritual journey. He then began looking at other avenues - including experimentation with LSD. As I wrote back in March, the movie works very well at portraying someone who was far more complicated than some tales have made him, who found a marvelous way to help others - but who never stopped searching for more.



More Bully News. In a previous column I mentioned that Bully director Lee Hirsch will be speaking at Kent State University at Stark on Oct. 8. But if you have not yet seen the acclaimed documentary, you will have a chance right around that time. Cinemark Movies 10 in North Canton will begin showings of the movie on Oct. 5, and run it for at least a week.

As I have said before, it is a movie worth seeing - even if you do not attend Hirsch's talk. It is a harrowing look at the way the horrors of bullying break into seemingly peaceful and ordinary lives.



Toledo Hero. Wanda Butts of Toledo is one of the "top 10 heroes" CNN will honor as "individuals who are making extraordinary contributions to improve the lives of others." She is also in the running for the network's "hero of the year" title, to be announced in a Dec. 2 special.

Here's CNN's description of her efforts: "In America today, African-American and Latino children are nearly three times more likely to drown than white children. This statistic became tragically real to Wanda Butts when she lost her 16-year-old son Josh in a drowning accident six years ago. But, she turned her grief into action by giving all children in her community the opportunity to learn how to swim. In memory of her son, she created the Josh Project, a nonprofit swimming and water-safety organization that targets minorities. To date, The Josh Project has taught this life-saving skill to nearly 1,200 children in Toledo."

Butts and others in the top 10 have received a $50,000 grant to further their work, with an additional $250,000 grant going to the hero of the year. You can vote now through Nov. 28 at CNNHeroes.com. Selected heroes also receive help from the Annenberg Alchemy program, which gives guidance to nonprofit leaders.



Time Passes. Where's Waldo? is marking its 25th anniversary this year. Since the first book by Martin Handford appeared in 1987, the Waldo folks report, more than 58 million books have been sold worldwide, there are editions in 38 countries, translations into more than 30 languages and more than 6 million apps sold. There was also a 1991-92 TV cartoon series.

No stat on how many people now need glasses from squinty searches for Waldo in those pictures.

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News Headline: Solon Center for the Arts stages 'La Traviata' | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Giuseppe Verdi's opera "La Traviata" will be performed at Solon Center for the Arts Sept. 28 and Oct. 6 at 7:30 p.m., and Sept. 30 at 3 p.m.

The show stars Northeast Ohio's brightest and best talents including Marian Vogel as Violetta Valéry, Timothy M.R. Culver of Stow as Alfredo Germont, Brian Keith Johnson of Cuyahoga Falls as Giorgio Germont and Kimberly Lauritsen as Flora Bervoix. It is directed by one of America's most versatile and popular stage directors, Jonathon Field. The SCA Opera Orchestra will be conducted by Maria Sensi Sellner from Pittsburgh.

"La Traviata" is in partnership with Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music Opera Workshop. Additional support is from Friends of Solon Center for the Arts and the Founding Members of the Signature Series.

"Usually opera is experienced in a big theater with thousands of seats," said Karen Prasser, executive director of SCA. "Solon's intimate 200-seat theater brings you closer to knowing each character and the beautiful but frail Violetta, who abandons her feverish life of pleasure for the love of Alfredo, only to sacrifice her love at the persistence of Alfredo's father. I believe that the beauty of the music and the drama of the romantic tragedy in the SCA theater will bring a new meaning to one of the world's most popular opera. It is a theatrical and musical experience not to be missed!"

Tickets are $25 general admission and $20 for seniors and students. All seats are reserved and each performance includes an opera preview 45 minutes prior to curtain in the SCA Gallery and a 'Meet the Artists' reception immediately following.

Solon Center for the Arts is located at 6315 SOM Center Road on the corner of SOM and Bainbridge Roads in Solon. For more information or tickets, call 440-337-1400.

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News Headline: Solon Center for the Arts stages 'La Traviata' | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bedford Times Register - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Giuseppe Verdi's opera "La Traviata" will be performed at Solon Center for the Arts Sept. 28 and Oct. 6 at 7:30 p.m., and Sept. 30 at 3 p.m.

The show stars Northeast Ohio's brightest and best talents including Marian Vogel as Violetta ValÉry, Timothy M.R. Culver of Stow as Alfredo Germont, Brian Keith Johnson of Cuyahoga Falls as Giorgio Germont and Kimberly Lauritsen as Flora Bervoix. It is directed by one of America's most versatile and popular stage directors, Jonathon Field. The SCA Opera Orchestra will be conducted by Maria Sensi Sellner from Pittsburgh.

"La Traviata" is in partnership with Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music Opera Workshop. Additional support is from Friends of Solon Center for the Arts and the Founding Members of the Signature Series.

"Usually opera is experienced in a big theater with thousands of seats," said Karen Prasser, executive director of SCA. "Solon's intimate 200-seat theater brings you closer to knowing each character and the beautiful but frail Violetta, who abandons her feverish life of pleasure for the love of Alfredo, only to sacrifice her love at the persistence of Alfredo's father. I believe that the beauty of the music and the drama of the romantic tragedy in the SCA theater will bring a new meaning to one of the world's most popular opera. It is a theatrical and musical experience not to be missed!"

Tickets are $25 general admission and $20 for seniors and students. All seats are reserved and each performance includes an opera preview 45 minutes prior to curtain in the SCA Gallery and a 'Meet the Artists' reception immediately following.

Solon Center for the Arts is located at 6315 SOM Center Road on the corner of SOM and Bainbridge Roads in Solon. For more information or tickets, call 440-337-1400.

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News Headline: Kent State University opens new campus in Twinsburg (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name: Kyle McDonald
News OCR Text: Kent State University celebrated the opening of its new Twinsburg Regional Academic Center Sept. 12 with snacks, tours and remarks about how the high-tech, energy efficient building will cater to the next generation of Northeast Ohio workers.

The academic center, located at 2745 Creekside Drive, offers programs ranging from associate to master's degrees and executive training programs. And, with its close proximity to medical facilities including the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals, Summa Health System and more, the center is expected to serve a number of students focused on nursing and public health.

"The citizens of Northeast Ohio are the big winners, the students are the big winners," KSU President Lester Lefton said. "Ultimately (the center) will help build a workforce and a region that can compete with the best of the best."

The 44,000-square-foot building meets gold status by the United States Green Building Coalition's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design criteria, features state-of-the-art classroom technology and was possible through a public-private partnership with the Fairmount Properties development firm and the Development Finance Authority of Summit County.

KSU entered a 30-year tenant lease for the building, which becomes university property once the lease expires.

"Twinsburg is proud to be the home of such a great institution whose mission is to serve traditional and non-traditional students," said Twinsburg Mayor Katherine Procop, who attended the ribbon-cutting. "This is a place where students will pursue their dreams and achieve success. This region will be more educated, affluent and productive thanks to Kent State University's commitment to excellence in action."

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News Headline: Kent State University approves four major projects for maximum of $160 million (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name: Kyle McDonald
News OCR Text: Kent State University is another step closer to fulfilling its multimillion dollar project to construct new, and modernize old, facilities on the main campus.

The KSU Board of Trustees approved four major projects with a total funding limit of $160 million, during its meeting at the new Twinsburg Regional Academic Center Sept. 12, along with an additional $25 million campus-wide energy conservation project.

"Our students and their parents have made it very clear they want first-class facilities and that's why we're doing this," KSU President Lester Lefton said. "Everything we're doing aligns with the strategic goal of ensuring student success -- success in the classroom, success to get a job and success in life."

The projects approved Sept. 12 include an $80 million renovation and expansion of current science facilities, a $40 million building for the College of Architecture and Environmental Design on the Esplanade expansion, $25 million to go to building renovations for the art program and a $15 million building for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.

The projects are funded through a $170 million bond issue passed by the KSU trustees earlier in March, in addition to $16 million in funds awarded by Ohio.

Lefton predicted that construction could begin between six to nine months from now.

"I wish it were tomorrow, but the truth is there's a lot of work that has to get done," he said. "Architects are being hired now, we have to get approvals from the city to move electrical poles and dig up ground and there's a lot of pre-work that has to be done."

The forthcoming energy conservation project stems from a goal set by Ohio House Bill 251 to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions 20 percent by fiscal year 2014. Cost savings are expected to pay for the projects within 15 years.

"Things are just at a really good point right now at Kent State," Board of Trustees Chair Jaqueline Woods said. "I am incredibly proud of what we have accomplished."

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News Headline: UPDATE: Obama to Stop in Kent (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Both presidential candidates plan to visit Northeast Ohio next week

President Barack Obama. Obama for America

http://kent.patch.com/articles/reports-obama-coming-to-kent/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1348160106

Local officials are remaining tight-lipped about President Barack Obama's planned visit to Kent next week.

Kent Safety Director William Lillich said city officials were contacted by the president's administration Wednesday about the Democratic incumbent making a stop in the Tree City.

Lillich said he was told the visit is expected to be next Wednesday, but at this point details are unclear about exactly when and where the president will make his campaign stop.

"We've been informed when it's likely to be and that it's probably going to involve the (Kent State University) campus," Lillich said. "Beyond that, we don't know."

Lillich said the Secret Service would coordinate the visit with Kent police and fire administrators.

Officials at Kent State were even tighter-lipped.

"We can neither confirm nor deny the report," Kent State spokesperson Eric Mansfield said. "We have no information to release at this time."

The Columbus Dispatch reported earlier this morning that Republican candidate Mitt Romney also would spend time campaigning in Ohio next week.

Follow Kent Patch for updates on the president's forthcoming visit.

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News Headline: UPDATE: Obama to Stop in Kent (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Mayfield-Hillcrest Patch
Contact Name: Brandon Baker
News OCR Text: Both presidential candidates plan to visit Northeast Ohio next week

President Barack Obama. Obama for America

http://mayfield-hillcrest.patch.com/articles/update-obama-to-stop-in-kent-cb2d8ffc/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1348173404

Kent officials are remaining tight-lipped about President Barack Obama's planned visit next week.

Kent Safety Director William Lillich said city officials were contacted by the president's administration Wednesday about the Democratic incumbent making a stop in the Tree City.

Lillich said he was told the visit is expected to be next Wednesday, but at this point details are unclear about exactly when and where the president will make his campaign stop.

"We've been informed when it's likely to be and that it's probably going to involve the (Kent State University) campus," Lillich said. "Beyond that, we don't know."

Lillich said the Secret Service would coordinate the visit with Kent police and fire administrators.

Officials at Kent State were even tighter-lipped.

"We can neither confirm nor deny the report," Kent State spokesperson Eric Mansfield said. "We have no information to release at this time."

The Columbus Dispatch reported earlier this morning that Republican candidate Mitt Romney also would spend time campaigning in Ohio next week.

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News Headline: Obama to Stop at Kent State | Email

News Date: 09/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox Toledo News First at 10 PM - WUPW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Next wednesday is a .big day in northwest ohio. Both president obama and mitt romney are planning on campaign visits here. Obama will make stops at kent state and in bowling green on wednesday.. And romney will make several stops across ohio thasame day.. Including a stop in here toledo. An important stop ... Because no republican has ever won the white house without winning the swing state of ohio. Hmike tobin speaks with undecided voters in our buckeye state ... As you decide 20-12. M "Ohio just seems very important, I don't really know why." important because john f. Kennedy was the last to lose ohio and win the presidency. With rvatives coand liberals firmly entrenched emphasis falls to that small percentage of undecided votersto award ohio's 18 electoral votes. Political analyst rick robinson says most undecided voters fall into a narrowa demograph; 35-and under,

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News Headline: Campus preacher draws crowd | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Peter Zicari
News OCR Text: By Peter Zicari, The Plain Dealer

This morning we find few stories about impaired people behaving colorfully, but a lot of them about policies and politics. A religious protester on a Kent State campus plaza may not have nearly as many people perturbed as the question of whether students can smoke there; CSU students rise in support of laid-off staff; and the state is considering whether to let phone companies cut off landlines to remote customers. And also below, the state legislature is cutting back the time you have to sue over a a contract.

Bar patron: Murder suspect upset bartender wouldn't dance with him

Religious protest draws crowd in Risman Plaza

Airborne car lands on SOM Center

Delay Post's execution? Fat chance: Murder victim's son scoffs at claim killer too obese for lethal injection

The Crime Scene this morning

Tractor-trailer accident, fire closes I-480 ramp (WKYC Channel 3)

One lane of 422 ramp to I-480 WB open (WEWS Channel 5)

Estimated $416,000 worth of marijuana was found on two men pulled over for following another vehicle too closely. (Ideastream wonders why drug barons don't hire better drivers)

Lake County shelter: 'Worst case of animal abuse' (WKYC Channel 3)

Arrest made in attempted robbery in Oberlin dorm (WKYC Channel 3)

Suspected drunk driver facing felony charges (WTAM 1100AM)

Madison man faces arson charge (News-Herald)

Perkins coach suspended for offering athlete prescription medication (Morning Journal)

Additional tax fraud allegations surface against Lorain consultant (Chronicle-Telegram)

SWAT member who killed man in standoff identified (Chronicle-Telegram)

Cruel Cleveland couple charged with baby abuse (WOIO Channel 19)

Sex offender recaptured after furlough escape (Sandusky Register)

Police Blotter Week of 9-19-2012 (Call and Post)

Crimes against civility

Parma man arrested for threatening woman who would not hold open a door for him (Parma Sun Post)

Three suspects seen urinating on Waterside Drive house: Olmsted Falls Police Blotter (Sun Post-Herald)

Man does not believe free picnic table was already gone: Lakewood Police Blotter (... and cusses out homeowner. Sun Post-Herald)

Smoking and drinking and controversy

KSU not likely to ban smoking without student support (KentWired)

Cleveland State plans for smoking ban, Kent State students speak out (KentWired)

Owner: 'Nuisance' Club Was UnfairlyTargeted(MYXX in Cleveland Heights, ordered to close Oct. 1, got a bad rap, he says. WJW Channel 8)

Kent OKs measure to limit liquor licenses (Record Courier)

New arguments break out

Drop mandate to offer landline phones? (WKSU-FM. With cell service available, state would lift requirement that phone companies serve unprofitable areas.)

New runway extension plan at county airport not the same as 2010 plan, Highland Heights, Richmond Heights residents are told (Sun Messenger)

Shalersville woman sues Portage County engineer over flooding (Record Courier)

Drilling, fracking topic draws crowd (Chagrin Valley Times)

After a string of layoffs in Student Life, students speak out (CSU Cauldron)

Running battles

Issues ranging from dollars & cents to citizen rights knock out traffic cams (WKSU-FM responds after Canton's 'no' vote.)

Survey Says Ohioans Trust Their Local School Boards. So How About That Levy This November? (StateImpact Ohio)

Politics, the queen of arguments

Study: Voters tune out opposing ads (WEWS Channel 5)

Proposed law would protect call center workers (WKSU-FM)

Why President Obama Can Still Count on Ohio's Teachers (StateImpact Ohio)

In and about business

Senate Bill 224: the new eight-year limitation (Crain's points out the time you have to sue over an unpaid debt or unfulfilled contract has been shortened)

British recruiter Alexander Mann cites friendly Cleveland, tax breaks for for move to Cleveland and not North Carolina (WKSU-FM)

American Greetings enters content licensing agreement with Snapfish by HP (Crain's Cleveland Business)

greater cle firms nabbed $1B in venture capital cash in 5 years (Fresh Water Cleveland)

the 25th street shuffle: will success kill ohio city? (Fresh Water Cleveland)

Around Northeast Ohio

Metro Parks biologists capture rare bat (WOIO Channel 19)

Survey: Adults with low incomes could be at risk health-wise (Medina Gazette says study finds that low-income adults often don't have health insurance.)

the great outdoors: five public spaces vital to cleveland's well-being (Fresh Water Cleveland)

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News Headline: Former Hillel Site Unlikely Location for Wells-Sherman House (Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State has no immediate plans to swap or sell North Lincoln property
The former site of the Hillel at Kent State University on North Lincoln Street may not be the premiere alternate site for the Kent Wells Sherman House some want it to be.

Jeff Ingram, director of Standing Rock Cultural Arts, suggested this week the vacant lot at 202 N. Lincoln St. would be a better fit for the historic Kent house than the space at 247 N. Water St. — next door to SRCA.

Ingram made the suggestion at Wednesday's Kent City Council meeting and suggested university officials might be willing to work with the city to use the land for the Kent Wells Sherman House.

But that may not be entirely accurate.

Tom Euclide, Kent State's associate vice president for Facilities Planning and Operations, said Ingram may have misconstrued an email conversation they had.

"We're not making any deals with him or the Sherman House folks," Euclide said. "I told Jeff Ingram that the university is working solely with the city. The city has not asked us for any land. That's not to say we wouldn't entertain an invitation to be involved."

Euclide said the university would only entertain a request from the city — Kent State's partner in redeveloping part of downtown — to either sell the land or swap it for another piece of property and would not work directly with either non-profit organization on the issue.

Regardless, Euclide added that the university has no plans to do either.

"We did not offer the land," he said. "We said we would entertain it if a request came. He took my encouraging words and turned them into a promise."

Kent City Council took no action on Ingram's request Wednesday.

The movement of the house to 247 N. Water St. is all but a certainty, as the project already received approval from the Kent Board of Zoning Appeals, the Kent Architectural Review Board and the Kent Planning Commission.

Members of the Kent Wells Sherman House Inc. board have discounted the site as inappropriate for the house and strife with legal obstacles to such a move.

Ann Ward, a member of the KWSH board, said they never originally considered the North Lincoln Site because it's not in a commercial zoning district, which is what the house needs in order to have an upstairs business tenant.

She suggested the community accept the situation and move forward and that both Standing Rock and KWSH find a way to cooperate.

"The conflict between both of these non-profit organizations has taken its toll on many," Ward said.

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News Headline: Malcolm X Abram column | Email

News Date: 09/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Abram, Malcolm X
News OCR Text: Sept. 20--There are two area festivals taking center stage this week: the longtime Kent State Folk Festival and the newbie Square Fest in Akron's Highland Square neighborhood.

First up, the old man. The 46th annual Kent State Folk Festival begins tonight and runs through Saturday, basically taking over downtown Kent with the sound of ringing acoustic guitars, humorous stories told while tuning up and many folks in corduroy pants (relax, folkies, it's a joke).

Anyway, the folk-fueled fun starts tonight at Manchester Field at Kent State University with the interesting and international melange of Delhi 2 Dublin. As the name suggests, the Canadian quintet mixes Celtic fiddle melodies with tabla, electric sitar and Bhangra beats and percussion with a splash of dub and other global electronica.

The evening's co-headliners, who have a more traditional folk sound and will play at the Kent Stage, are New Jersey-born singer/songwriter John Gorka, who's been making records since the 1970s, and Tracy Grammer, the former partner of the late singer/songwriter Dave Carter, whose music she still performs.

Folk Alley 'Round Town fills up Friday starting at noon with local and national artists taking up almost every available stage in town with more than 40 venues, clubs, bars and community spaces participating.

Obviously, there are way too many musicians to list in this space, but whether you're looking for someone specific or are just curious, point your Google machine to www.kentstatefolkfestival.org/roundtown.php?id=artist and check out the fancy sounding 'Round Town performance matrix for more details.

On Friday, the Kent Stage will welcome back the mellow, understated, Americana sound of popular Cincinnati husband/wife duo Over the Rhine, which is still working its well-received 2011 album The Long Surrender. Opening for OTR will be Girlyman, the Brooklyn-born (so you know it's hip) now Atlanta-based quartet and self-described purveyors of "harmony-driven gender pop," which can be found on its 2012 album Supernova.

On Saturday, the festival will hold its usual free Community Workshops from noon to 5 p.m., but in an effort to spread the love and highlight some of the new construction in downtown Kent, the workshops ­-- normally at Kent State -- will be in nine downtown venues. The workshops mix music, business and educational offerings including Clogging 1 and 2, something called Chinese Meets Old Time, the always important Music Business 101 and Jug Band.

The whole shebang wraps up Saturday, with the Legends of Folk concert featuring Tom Paxton, a two-time Grammy nominee and an impressive three-time recipient of lifetime achievement awards from the Recording Academy, ASCAP and the BBC.

The septuagenarian singer-songwriter is truly old school, having been part of the Greenwich Village coffeehouse scene in the early 1960s. His songs, which include Bottle of Wine and The Last Thing on My Mind, have been covered by famous folks, including Neil Diamond, Marianne Faithfull, Johnny Cash and his buddies in Peter, Paul and Mary.

Also on the bill are the Red Clay Ramblers, celebrating four decades as a Tony Award-winning string band rooted in various strains of Americana. The band was twice nominated for Drama Desk awards for its music in the Broadway hit Fool Moon.

The grand finale is rounded out by singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist John McCutcheon, who has released more than 30 albums and has been written up in the Washington Post as "Folk Music's Rustic Renaissance Man."

Tickets for all of the shows are available at the Kent Stage, by phone at 888-718-4253 or online at http://thekentstage.com.

Square Fest

Now, we jump from one venerable middle-aged community festival to a young upstart trying to establish itself.

From noon to 8 p.m. Saturday on Market Street in Akron's Highland Square neighborhood will be Square Fest replacing the annual Art in the Square festival.

Square Fest 2012 will close down West Market between Portage Path and Casterton Avenue and will feature 41 acts including local bands, singing troubadours and street performers roaming throughout the day.

Among the many musical offerings being ... um ... offered are the Krld Ppl, the Tofu Fighters, the Bleeding Features and the Giggitys on the Highland Stage. The Conger Stage will play host to those nice young men in the Taxidermy Special, Moon of Saturn, Extra Spooky and local reggae cats Umojah Nation and more.

And, the Radio Stage will be rocked by Hayden Calling, Maid Myriad, Assassin Broadcast and the Woovs. There is of course much more music; please go to http://akronsquarefest.com for more details.

In addition to music, there will be about 60 vendors selling food, arts, crafts and other stuff, and the Highland Square branch of the Akron-Summit County Public Library will have activities for kids and families.

All jazzed up

There are also a couple of nice opportunities for jazz fans who need a live music fix.

On Saturday, local trumpeter Josh Rzepka and his quartet will play the Akron Civic Theatre's cabaret set-up, which places the audience onstage with the performers.

Rzepka will play songs from his two fine contemporary acoustic jazz albums -- Midwest Coast Blues and Into the Night -- and his quartet will feature area jazz luminaries bassist Peter Dominguez, drummer Ron Godale and pianist Roger Friedman.

Rzepka is a talented young composer and player who surrounds himself with the best that the local jazz scene has to offer, so it will be a good show.

Meanwhile, down in the Merriman Valley, Pub Bricco has added some space for live music, including jazz on Wednesday nights.

Next up will be Cleveland pianist Jackie Warren performing solo piano throughout the night.

Warren, known as Cleveland's Salsa Queen for her skill and swing with Latin rhythms and always groovy improvisation, has been a mainstay on the Cleveland jazz scene for more than 20 years and, coincidentally, has appeared on both of Rzepka's jazz albums.

These solo piano gigs are a constant for her, so be prepared to be impressed and entertained while sipping your chocolatini.

DETAILS

What: The 46th Annual Kent State Folk Festival.

When: Today through Saturday.

Where: Various venues in Kent.

Tickets: www.kentstatefolkfestival.org.

Information: 888-718-4253.

What: Square Fest.

When: 10 a.m.- 8 p.m. Saturday.

Where: Highland Square area on West Market Street, Akron.

Tickets: Free.

Information: http://akronsquare?fest.com.

What: Jazz@the Civic featuring Josh Rzepka.

When: 8 p.m. Saturday.

Where: Akron Civic Theatre, 182 S. Main St.

Tickets: $15 in advance, $20 day of show.

Information: 330-253-2488, www.akroncivic.com.

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News Headline: Popular Music | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Folk Festival: John Gorka & Tracey Grammer, 8 tonight, $21.

Kent State Folk Festival: Over the Rhine, 8 p.m. Friday, with Girlyman, $26.

Kent State Folk Festival: Tom Paxton, 8 p.m. Saturday, with Red Clay Ramblers and John McCutcheon, $30-$43.

Kent State University - Manchester Field

Kent State Folk Festival: Delhi 2 Dublin, 8 tonight, free.

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News Headline: Sound Check details | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Details

What: The 46th Annual Kent State Folk Festival.

When: Today through Saturday.

Where: Various venues in Kent.

Tickets: www.kentstatefolkfestival.org.

Information: 888-718-4253.

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News Headline: Folk Alley 'Round Town Schedule Features 39 Venues | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: See the full schedule of Friday night's shows

The 46th Annual Kent State Folk Festival continues tonight with perhaps it's biggest night of events, Folk Alley 'Round Town, when 40 venues will host different artists throughout the night — and throughout Kent.

Scroll down for the complete Folk Alley' Round Town schedule.

Click on the location links to find addresses and other information on the venues, or click on the individual business or organization's directory listing at the right of the story page.

Artist/Time Location

Abby Kondas
singer/songwriter
3 - 3:30 p.m.
Acorn Alley
154 E. Main Street

Adrienne Frailey
singer/songwriter
5 - 7 p.m.
Downtown Gallery
141 E. Main Street
330-676-1549

Anthony Doran
singer/songwriter
7:30 - 8 p.m.
Acorn Alley
154 E. Main Street

Antonio Sibbio
singer/guitarist (15)
3:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Kent Free Library
312 W. Main Street
330-673-4414

Bee String Band
Americana
1:30 - 3 p.m.
Acorn Alley
154 E. Main Street

Bethesda
folk/indie/pop
8 - 10 p.m.
Acorn Alley
154 E. Main Street

Brent Kirby and The Lost Fortunes
Americana/folk/pop
6 - 9 p.m.
Buffalo Wild Wings
227 Franklin Avenue
330-678-9464

Celtic Clan of Kent
Irish/Celtic
7 - 8:30 p.m.
Unitarian Universalist Church of Kent
228 Gougler Avenue
330-673-4247

Chris Baker/Eating Ghosts
singer/songwriter
11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Baked in the Village Cafe
123 N. Water Street
330-256-0790

Colin John
blues
8 - 11 p.m.
The Loft
112 W. Main Street
330-678-0391

Courtney Bergman
singer/songwriter
7 - 9 p.m.
157 Lounge
157 S. Water Street
330-678-1577

Dale Galgozy
Americana/folk/blues
8 - 10 p.m.
Last Exit Books
124 E. Main Street
330-677-4499

David Haydu
6 - 8 p.m.
Checkers N Trophies
352 W. Elm Street
330-673-1223

Dommminic Sansone
guitarist (12)
3:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Kent Free Library
312 W. Main Street
330-673-4414

Doubtful Sound
9:30 - 11 p.m.
Checkers N Trophies
352 W. Elm Street
330-673-1223

Eddie Doldrum
Midnight - 1 a.m.
Checkers N Trophies
352 W. Elm Street
330-673-1223

Emily Gambone
singer/songwriter
3:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Kent Free Library
312 W. Main Street
330-673-4414

Eric Hartung
singer/songwriter
3:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Kent Free Library
312 W. Main Street
330-673-4414

Free Spirit Cloggers
7 p.m.
Katie's Korner Ice Cream
1412 S. Water Street
330-677-1999

Fusion Sound - East Meets East
Japanese koto/Indian tabla/harmonium
5:30 - 7 p.m.
Kent Yoga at the Silk Mill
145 S. River Street, Suite 5
330-677-8169

Guy Pernetti
Americana/fingerstyle
8 - 11 p.m.
Riverside Wine
911 N. Mantua Street
330-677-4400

Hillbilly Idol
Americana/alt. country
8 - 11 p.m.
Venice Cafe
163 Franklin Avenue
330-677-7320

Hive Robbers
Americana/folk rock
8 - 11 p.m.
Brewhouse Pub
244 N. Water Street
330-678-2774

Ian Penter
blues
5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Zephyr Pub
106 W. Main Street
330-678-4848

Iris Isadora
singer/songwriter
3:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Kent Free Library
312 W. Main Street
330-673-4414

Jack and the Bear
folk/folk rock
9:30 p.m. - 12:30 a.m.
Ray's Place in conjunction with the KSU Alumni Association
135 Franklin Avenue
330-673-2233

Jim Casto
singer/songwriter
5 - 7 p.m.
The Pub
401 Franklin Avenue
330-678-8456

Jim Gill
singer/songwriter
1:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Anthony's Cafe and Cakes
128 N. Water Street
330-678-9520

Joe LaRose and Lynn Fredrick
traditional string band
6 - 9 p.m.
Woodsy's Music
135 S. Water Street
330-673-1525

Joey Beltram
singer/songwriter
5 - 7 p.m.
Bent Tree Coffee Roasters
313 N. Water Street
330-474-0651

Johnny and The Apple Stompers
bluegrass/folk/old time
5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Acorn Alley
154 E. Main Street

Johnny Habu
8 - 9:30 p.m.
Checkers N Trophies
352 W. Elm Street
330-673-1223

Jon Mosey
blues
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Franklin Square Deli
108 S. Water Street
330-673-2942

Ka De Dunaa Drummers with Sogbety Diorna
drumming
7 - 8:30 p.m.
Empire
135 E. Main Street
330-968-4946

Karen E. Reynolds and Kerry Kean
singer/songwriter collaboration
8 - 11 p.m.
Bistro on Main
1313 W. Main Street
330-673-9900

Last of the Red Hot Burritos
6 p.m.
Water Street Tavern
132 S. Water Street
330-677-0700

Martha's Mistake
folk
6 - 9 p.m.
The Rusty Nail
7291 State Route 43
330-673-2297

Matt Watroba
folk singer
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
Kent Presbyterian
1456 E. Summit Street
330-673-0661

May Andrews
folk/folk blues
6:30 - 8 p.m.
Kent Natural Foods Co-op
151 E. Main Street
330-673-2878

Mike Lenz
blues
8 - 10 p.m.
Zephyr Pub
106 W. Main Street
330-678-4848

Mo' Mojo
zydeco
9 p.m. - Midnight
Mugs Brew Pub
211 Franklin Avenue
330-673-7822

Moustache Yourself
gypsy jazz
3:30 - 5 p.m.
Acorn Alley
154 E. Main Street

Peggy and Brad
jazz/blues/novelty
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Acorn Alley
154 E. Main Street

Randy Horvath, Dan Socha
acoustic/folk/indie
3 - 4 p.m.
Ohio Music Shop
118 E. Main Street
330-673-4700

Reed City - Hal Walker's Harmonica Quartet
harmonica heaven
5 - 5:30 p.m.
Acorn Alley
154 E. Main Street

Roger Hoover
acoustic/folk rock/Americana
7 p.m.
Tree City Coffee and Pastry
135 E. Erie Street
330-673-5522

Rogues of Rafferty
traditional Irish folk
7 - 9 p.m.
Ray's Place in conjunction with the KSU Alumni Association
135 Franklin Avenue
330-673-2233

Shelby Bondzio
old-time banjo (17)
3:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Kent Free Library
312 W. Main Street
330-673-4414

Shivering Timbers
folk rock/experimental/blues
6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Ohio Music Shop
118 E. Main Street
330-673-4700

Silver Creek - Bob and Debbie Carothers
4 - 6 p.m.
Ohio Music Shop
118 E. Main Street
330-673-4700

Silver Creek - Bob and Debbie Carothers
9 - 11 p.m.
Ohio Music Shop
118 E. Main Street
330-673-4700

Student Showcase
3:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Kent Free Library
312 W. Main Street
330-673-4414

The Kent Shindig
open old-time jam
5 - 8 p.m.
EuroGyro
107 S. Depeyster
330-678-4976

The Mayfields
bluegrass
8 p.m.
Standing Rock Cultural Arts
257 N. Water Street
330-673-4970

The Muh Fugga Band
Folk/Blues/Hard Then Soft Folk
6 - 7:30 p.m.
Mugs Brew Pub
211 Franklin Avenue
330-673-7822

The Powder Hounds
blues/country rock
8 p.m.
Firefly
124 S. Water Street
330-673-0011

The Speedbumps
indie
8 p.m.
Water Street Tavern
132 S. Water Street
330-677-0700

The Steelheaders
Americana/roots/blues
10 p.m. - Midnight
The Pub
401 Franklin Avenue
330-678-8456

The Traveling Cats
folk/blues/bluegrass
8 p.m.
Scribbles Coffee Co.
237 N. Water Street
330-346-0337

The Uncanny Xela
singer/songwriter/indie
10:30 p.m. - 12:30 a.m.
Zephyr Pub
106 W. Main Street
330-678-4848

The Village Idiot
singer/songwriter
1 - 1:30 p.m.
Acorn Alley
154 E. Main Street

The Whiskey Lock
Americana/newgrass
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
Black Squirrel Gallery and Gifts
141 E. Main Street
330-673-5058

Thoreau Hawk
11 p.m. - Midnight
Checkers N Trophies
352 W. Elm Street
330-673-1223

Twistoffs
9 p.m.
Water Street Tavern
132 S. Water Street
330-677-0700

Ty Kellogg
singer/songwriter
2 - 4 p.m.
Last Exit Books
124 E. Main Street
330-677-4499

Weniger and Simon (aka The Smokin' J's)
eclectic electric folk age
8 - 12 p.m.
Dominick's
147 Franklin Avenue
330-677-1119

Why Not Mike
acoustic/fingerstyle
8:30 p.m.
Mike's Place
1700 S. Water Street
330-673-6501

Zach
singer/songwriter
6 - 9 p.m.
Pufferbelly LTD.
152 Franklin Avenue
330-673-1771

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