Report Overview:
Total Clips (10)
Alumni; Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Athletics (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU Museum (1)
May 4 (1)
Student Involvement, Center for (1)
United Way at KSU (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
OCLC Research Software Architect Jeff Young Honored as Kent State University SLIS Alumnus of the Year (Wicks) 11/02/2012 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...Ohio, Oct. 31 -- The Online Computer Library Center issued the following news release: Jeff Young, Software Architect, OCLC Research, has been honored as Kent State University's Library and Information Science Alumnus of the Year. Mr. Young received the award during the Kent State University...


Athletics (1)
Hazell, Nielsen focus on present success as KSU coach's stock rises (Nielsen) 11/02/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Entrepreneurship (1)
Midsize companies don't hold much promise for job creation ahead (Messing) 11/02/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (2)
Oil and gas education event rescheduled 11/02/2012 Repository, The Text Email

Stark State: We Are Not Behind Solicitations for Wounded Warrior Project Fundraiser 11/01/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

This statement is issued on behalf of Stark State College, Kent State University at Stark and Malone University: Stark State College has received reports of fundraising solicitations, claiming to be on...


KSU Museum (1)
On With The Show 11/01/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...Day at the Beach," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques" and "Fashion Timeline," the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State campus, E. Main Street in Kent.


May 4 (1)
New KSU May 4 Visitors Center brings back memories for Clevelander 11/02/2012 Cleveland Jewish News Text Attachment Email


Student Involvement, Center for (1)
5 things to know for Friday, November 2 11/02/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Janna Ryan will attend a rally in West Chester, while President Barack Obama stops in Hilliard and Springfield on Friday. The band Tenacious D will be at Kent State University stumping for the President. 3. Cleveland APL in the dark The Cleveland APL is still without power and heat, and is in...


United Way at KSU (1)
Kent State cornhole tourney helps United Way 11/02/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Press (1)
The Story of a Serial Killer: Strongsville Author Writes Book about Anthony Sowell (Cash) 11/01/2012 Strongsville Patch Text Attachment Email

...bodies. A few hundred people braved the first winds of Hurricane Sandy Oct. 29 to gather at Old Town Hall for the party. The book was published by Kent State University Press, which has a large true-crime history series, according to Susan Cash, marketing director. "This fits right in," Cash...


News Headline: OCLC Research Software Architect Jeff Young Honored as Kent State University SLIS Alumnus of the Year (Wicks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: [November 01, 2012]

(Targeted News Service Via Acquire Media NewsEdge) DUBLIN, Ohio, Oct. 31 -- The Online Computer Library Center issued the following news release: Jeff Young, Software Architect, OCLC Research, has been honored as Kent State University's Library and Information Science Alumnus of the Year.

Mr. Young received the award during the Kent State University School of Library and Information Science Alumni and Friends Honors and Awards Program held October 23 at OCLC in Dublin, Ohio. He was selected for his significant accomplishments using Linked Data to increase the presence and discoverability of library data and materials on the Web.

"Jeff has played a major role in many important Web services, protocols, and innovations that have impacted all library services in the digital age," said Don Wicks, Interim Director, School of Library and Information Science, Kent State University, in his introduction.

Mr. Young was the Team Leader for projects such as Bookmarklets, which is used in WorldCat Local; PURL (Persistent URLs), a naming and resolution service for general Internet resources; WorldCat Registry, a Web-based directory for libraries and library consortia, to name just a few. Most recently he has been recognized for his work in projects related to Linked Data, for example in the Virtual International Authority File service that virtually combines many library authority files from many nations into a single name authority service; in WorldCat Linked Data; and in the W3C Linked Library Data Incubator Group reports.

"Your libraries and the Web are better able to meet your information needs today because of the work of people like Jeff Young," Dr. Wicks told the group of mostly library professionals.

Mr. Young earned his Master of Library Science degree from Kent State's School of Library and Information Science in 2002.

More information about the Kent State School of Library and Information Science is available at www.kent.edu/slis.

Return to Top



News Headline: Hazell, Nielsen focus on present success as KSU coach's stock rises (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Joel Nielsen knows it's coming.

Kent State's Director of Athletics will some day soon field his first phone call from some big-name program seeking a new football coach, inquiring about the man behind the Golden Flashes' stunning football turnaround in 2012.

After leading Kent State to a 7-1 start, including a 35-23 upset victory over 18th-ranked Rutgers last Saturday, Darrell Hazell's stock is shooting through the roof. He is without question — at the very least — on the radar of prominent programs with coaching issues.

But while Nielsen knows that keeping his coach beyond this season could become an issue, it's one he won't be discussing with Hazell or anyone else any time soon.

“(Hazell and I) haven't talked about it,” said Nielsen. “I don't see anything coming up until the end of the year unless something unusual happens.”

Hazell is 12-8 in his second season at Kent State, after winning 11 of his past 13 games. His winning percentage (.600) currently ranks first in KSU football history, and Hazell is the first Flashes coach to crack .500 since Glen Mason (12-10 from 1986-87).

Hazell originally signed a five-year contract in 2011, but the deal includes a wide variety of incentives. One is for victories in a season, which he has likely already reached, that would tack on another year to the original contract.

But contract specifics are the least of Nielsen's concerns as the Flashes prepare for their annual backyard battle with Akron on Saturday at Dix Stadium.

“Typically when coaches are going good, they just want to focus on what's going good, and that's the way Darrell has been throughout this process,” said Nielsen. “(Reporters) try every week to get him looking down the road, and he just won't do it. I'm that same way. I'm just gonna continue to support him and continue this ride, and hope that these young men continue to do the things they're doing.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Midsize companies don't hold much promise for job creation ahead (Messing) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Midsize companies — those with annual revenues of $10 million to $1billion — are the biggest drivers of job creation, but they're not doing much hiring these days.

So says Fortune in a story that includes data compiled by Ohio State University.

“As big companies brace for tougher times ahead, the niche market of midsized firms expect trouble, too, as a blast of tax hikes and spending cuts threaten to weigh on earnings, according to a survey by the National Center for the Middle Market at Ohio State University,” Fortune reports.

This suggests “another piece of bad news for the job market, given that in the years following the Great Recession, midsize companies created more jobs than most other companies,” the magazine adds.

The Ohio State center reports that hiring at midsize companies “grew by 2.2% to about 950,000 employees during the past 12 months, outpacing jobs created by the overall economy that grew employment by 1.7%.” Profits for these companies grew even faster, at 5.5% — more than three times higher than growth across the 500 companies listed on Standard and Poor's.

But during the next 12 months, hiring is expected to grow at a slower pace of 1.3%, according to the Ohio State center's survey of 1,000 executives of midsize companies. Revenue growth is also forecast to slow to 3.7% over the next year, compared with 5.2% predicted earlier this year.

Your ship has come in

Shipping costs are one of the biggest expenses for many small businesses, but resourceful entrepreneurs — including Fred DuBois, owner of Laptop Battery Express in Cleveland — “are finding ways to reduce the sting,” according to this story from Reuters.

The news service says cutting shipping costs has been a goal of Mr. DuBois since he started the business in 2007.

“Free delivery service for about 50 battery orders a day was costing him as much as $500,” the news service says. “He had been relying almost exclusively on FedEx Ground, but this summer, he realized that varying his carriers and using the U.S. Postal Service would cut shipping costs in half. Today, he says, he ships about half his orders with FedEx and the other half with the post office, saving about $250 a day.”

Reuters offers 10 tips for cutting shipping costs:

Negotiate with multiple carriers

Get suppliers to use your shipping account number

Use packaging provided by your carrier

Consider a regional carrier

Use online shipping

Invest in prepaid shipping

Buy insurance from a third party

Factor in all shipping fees before billing customers

Consider hybrid services

Ask about association discounts

The daily grind

Gypsy Beans café is expanding its West Side presence with the opening of a shop on the Beck Center for the Arts campus in Lakewood.

The new Gypsy Beans opened today, Nov. 1, at 7 a.m in the space formerly occupied by Beck Café.

It's the second location for Gypsy Beans owner Nicole Gillota. The original café is in the Gordon Square Arts District at West 65th Street and Detroit Avenue.

“I was beginning the search to expand the Gypsy brand when the opportunity at Beck Center presented itself,” Ms. Gillota said in a statement. “I'm pleased to be located in Lakewood, especially within another arts community.”

She describes Gypsy Beans as a traditional European coffee house and bistro. It features locally roasted coffees, a variety of pastries and desserts, and a signature Bistro Menu that focuses on fresh, local and seasonal ingredients made daily at the Gordon Square location.

Let's get it started

Kent State University plans to mark Global Entrepreneurship Week with a series of events Nov. 13-15 for students, alumni and the community.

“Global Entrepreneurship Week is a recognition and celebration of entrepreneurial activities worldwide,” says Julie Messing, executive director of entrepreneurship initiatives at Kent State. “We saw this as the perfect opportunity for Kent State's Blackstone LaunchPad to plan events and programming, as our services are available to all majors at Kent State. This also gives us the opportunity to highlight entrepreneurial activities that are already happening across the university.”

The Blackstone LaunchPad program “emphasizes entrepreneurship as a viable career path and gives Kent State students, faculty and alumni the skills, knowledge and guidance they need to start new companies,” according to the university.

The program, which accommodates all students regardless of major and involves local entrepreneurs as mentors, started offering services to students in late May and celebrated its official grand opening on Sept. 28.

Among the presentations from Nov. 13-15 are “Global Entrepreneurship: Starting Locally/Expanding Globally,”“Developing a Fashion-able Product,” “Mobile, Social and Other Emerging Channels: Designing Solutions to Meet the New Business Reality” and “Finding Ideas & Following Your Passion.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Oil and gas education event rescheduled | Email

News Date: 11/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. — The first event of the Oil and Gas Education Series at Kent State University Stark campus, “The Regulation of Oil and Gas,” which was originally scheduled for Thursday, has been postponed to Nov. 29.

The Canton Small Business Development Center and Kent State University at Stark, in conjunction with the attorneys at the Roetzel & Andress law firm, are presenting a four-part Oil and Gas Education Series. The public presentations, delivered by attorneys at Roetzel & Andress, are designed to provide education to members of the community.

Each event in the series will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Kent State Stark's Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. Register online for $10 per person or $15 per couple at www.cantonsbdc.org.

The first event of the Oil and Gas Education Series at Kent State University Stark campus, “The Regulation of Oil and Gas,” which was originally scheduled for Thursday, has been postponed to Nov. 29.

The Canton Small Business Development Center and Kent State University at Stark, in conjunction with the attorneys at the Roetzel & Andress law firm, are presenting a four-part Oil and Gas Education Series. The public presentations, delivered by attorneys at Roetzel & Andress, are designed to provide education to members of the community.

Each event in the series will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Kent State Stark's Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. Register online for $10 per person or $15 per couple at www.cantonsbdc.org.

Return to Top



News Headline: Stark State: We Are Not Behind Solicitations for Wounded Warrior Project Fundraiser | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This statement is issued on behalf of Stark State College, Kent State University at Stark and Malone University:

Stark State College has received reports of fundraising solicitations, claiming to be on behalf of the College, for the Wounded Warrior Project.

Stark State officials said that the college is not affiliated with this activity and that campus security is investigating.

Stark State contacted officials at Malone University and Kent State University at Stark, who also said their institutions were not participating in this solicitation.

Return to Top



News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES

Currently -- "A Day at the Beach," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques" and "Fashion Timeline," the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State campus, E. Main Street in Kent.

Return to Top



News Headline: New KSU May 4 Visitors Center brings back memories for Clevelander | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Jewish News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Harold Greenberg of Cleveland was a 25-year-old graduate teaching assistant at Kent State University and a reporter for the student newspaper, The Daily Kent Stater, on May 4, 1970. He also had a premonition of what was to come on that day.

“The very sad part for me was at about 10 o'clock that morning when I was in the Stater office in Taylor Hall overlooking the commons and our wire editor came in,” recalled Greenberg, 68. “I told him that I feel something bad is going to happen. Somebody is going to get killed.”

Greenberg returned to the campus Oct. 20 for the opening of the new May 4 Visitors Center, which coincided with homecoming. He recalled the tragic 13 seconds in which 76 members of the Ohio National Guard fired 67 shots at students. When the bullets stopped flying, four students were dead and nine were injured. Jeffrey Miller of New York, Allison Krause of Maryland, Sandra Scheuer of Youngstown – all Jewish – and William Schroeder of Lorain were killed.

Until Oct. 20, the university had paid tribute to the day with a walking tour and four posts that mark the location where the students died.

The three-gallery, multi-media exhibit in Taylor Hall, overlooking the hill where the shootings occurred, holds special meaning for Greenberg, a member of Congregation Shaarey Tikvah in Beachwood. A story he wrote for the student newspaper on April 23, 1970, hangs inside the museum. He wrote that hundreds assembled in front of the campus Hub to show that they were “willing to prevent a dog from being napalmed but won't do anything to stop human beings in Vietnam from receiving the same treatment.”

Greenberg was surprised to see his story included.

“When I went through the center, I was completely astounded and humbled and overcome that they had chosen to put that story in there, and I suddenly became part of this whole terrible event,” he said. “Maybe that highlighted a paradox, if you will, to what we were willing to do and not willing to do. It was a numbing experience that was going to bring to your front door what happens when you napalm an animal.”

Donations of $1.1 million from veterans groups, the public, the university and the National Endowment for the Humanities funded the 1,900-square-foot museum on the ground floor of the former student newspaper office.

The center has galleries about the social movements of the 1960s, the Vietnam War and the shootings and their aftermath. A map shows the 132 college campuses where protests happened between April 30 and May 4 after President Richard Nixon announced an escalation of the war. A timeline and film help recreate the May 4 events.

“It is an absolutely amazing museum,” said Greenberg, who became a financial services specialist for American National Insurance Co. in Canton after working for newspapers in Canton and Dayton. “It is really astonishing. A tremendous amount of work and care went into putting this together. It is really, really moving and special.”

Greenberg's sons Daniel and Ethan graduated from KSU in the mid-1990s, when he started to attend annual May 4 events.

Greenberg was born in Liverpool, England, and grew up in London. He came to the United States after his bar mitzvah, living in Houston before moving to Cleveland in 1958. He is a Cleveland Heights High School graduate.

“In 2000, I pretty much spearheaded a reunion of Kent Stater and Chestnut Burr (yearbook) staffs, and the staffs hadn't been together since May 4, to bring closure,” he said, “but I found out it's not really possible to have closure. It's always there.”

bjacob@cjn.org

WHAT: May 4 Visitors Center

WHERE: Taylor Hall, Kent State University

WHEN: Mondays through Thursdays and Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m. Group tours by appointment, 330-672-4660

ADMISSION: Free

More Coverage
Dean Kahler on KSU's May 4 Visitors Center

Return to Top



News Headline: 5 things to know for Friday, November 2 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Jen Steer
News OCR Text: 1. Power outage estimates

FirstEnergy and Cleveland Public Power are still working to restore power to several northeast Ohio communities. For a list of The Illuminating Company bulk restoration dates, click here: http:// 5.wews.com/eXwZ5

2. Campaigns in Ohio

Mitt Romney, Ann Romney, Paul Ryan and Janna Ryan will attend a rally in West Chester, while President Barack Obama stops in Hilliard and Springfield on Friday. The band Tenacious D will be at Kent State University stumping for the President.

3. Cleveland APL in the dark

The Cleveland APL is still without power and heat, and is in need of blankets and towels. They are also offering cats and kittens up for adoptions for just $5.

4. West Side Market cake

To celebrate the 100-year-old West Side Market on Friday, local bakeries will offer free cake, while supplies last. On Saturday, the historic market will close at 2 p.m. to prepare for the Centennial Gala.

5. World Series of Wine

The 17th annual World Series of Wine comes to Cleveland on Friday with tastings at the Terrance Club at Progressive Field. More than 450 wines will be available during Saturday's event at the Hilton Garden Inn.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State cornhole tourney helps United Way | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A cornhole tournament is set for Thursday at the Recreation and Wellness Center at Kent State University to help the United Way of Portage County's annual campaign to raise funds for local organizations.

Steve Kleiber, president and CEO of the local United Way, said the tournament will run from 4 to 6 p.m. The tournament is limited to 64 teams and the winner will be the best of three games.

Kleiber said the cost is $50 per team and all are welcome to participate.

Since this year's campaign kicked off, the United Way has raised more than $200,000 on its way to a goal of $1.12 million.

Businesses that want to help may contact Kleiber at 330-297-1424, ext. 112, or steve@uwportage.org.

Return to Top



News Headline: The Story of a Serial Killer: Strongsville Author Writes Book about Anthony Sowell (Cash) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Strongsville Patch
Contact Name: Debbie Palmer
News OCR Text: 'House of Horrors' details Imperial Avenue killings

new

Robert Sberna, who grew up in Strongsville and lives in town today, wrote a book about Anthony Sowell: House of Horrors, the Shocking True Story of The Cleveland Strangler.

http://strongsville.patch.com/articles/the-mind-of-a-serial-killer-strongsville-author-writes-book-about-anthony-sowell/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1351785631

Anthony Sowell, the man who killed 11 women at his Cleveland home and then lived among their remains, doesn't sound like a monster when you talk to him.

"He's charismatic, very glib and charming," said Robert Sberna, who interviewed Sowell a half-dozen times by phone as he researched his book. "I found him to be not unintelligent. I found him to be narcissistic, though."

Sberna, a longtime journalist who grew up in Strongsville, was captivated by the story of the serial killer who raped, tortured and murdered 11 women in his Cleveland home.

Days after the news broke in 2009, he visited Sowell's Imperial Avenue house, while police were still digging for more victims in the back yard.

"I knew it was going to be a big story," Sberna said. "I thought if I was ever going to write a book, this was my chance."

House of Horrors is a gripping account of the Imperial Avenue killings as the story unfolded, told in detail through Sberna's first-hand reporting and interviews with survivors, family members and investigators -- and with Sowell himself.

A Voice for the Victims

Sberna said as he investigated the story, he found people dismissing the victims -- crack addicts who were lured to Sowell's house by the promise of drugs.

"They were being demonized because of their lifestyle," Sberna said. "But when you start getting into it, you see crack is a nasty addiction."

He chose to tell their stories, painting portraits of troubled women whose disappearances over a two-year period caused no more than a ripple of concern for anyone other than their families.

He also spoke with survivors -- five women who were attacked by Sowell, but lived to talk about it.

The Killer's Own Words

And he interviewed Sowell from Death Row, where he discovered a killer willing to talk about his crimes, but not necessarily express remorse.

"He didn't really hold himself accountable for what happened," Sberna said.

The book details the interviews and includes letters Sowell wrote to the author, offering to exchange an in-person intervew for $300 worth of items from the prison commissary.

At one point, asked about what happened on Imperial Avenue, Sowell alludes to pressure that "just kept building."

"I just had to release it," Sowell said.

Sberna threw his book launch party, not coincidentally, on the third anniversary of the raid on Sowell's Imperial Avenue house that uncovered the first of 11 bodies.

A few hundred people braved the first winds of Hurricane Sandy Oct. 29 to gather at Old Town Hall for the party.

The book was published by Kent State University Press, which has a large true-crime history series, according to Susan Cash, marketing director.

"This fits right in," Cash said. "And Bob is a very good writer, so we were happy to publish it."

House of Horrors is available at bookstores, through Kent State University Press, on Sberna's website and other online outlets, including Amazon.com.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus