Report Overview:
Total Clips (22)
Alumni; Athletics (1)
Art, School of; Office of the Provost (1)
Athletics (6)
Economics (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Higher Education; Human Resources (1)
Financial Aid (1)
KSU at Stark (5)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
NEOTEC (1)
Office of the President; University Press (1)
Student Involvement, Center for (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Athletics (1)
Devil's in details for Alabama's Saban 11/05/2012 New York Post Text Attachment Email


Art, School of; Office of the Provost (1)
ALONG THE WAY New American cherishes vote 11/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Athletics (6)
Darrell Hazell starts game passing, then lets Kent State backs run wild (Hazell) 11/05/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent-Akron rivalry game filled with excitement as KSU wins, 35-24 (Hazell) 11/05/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Don't fight Kent State's identity; Darrell Hazell needs to embrace dynamic duo (Hazell) 11/05/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Sports Report: Flashes field hockey, soccer teams fall short of tourney titles 11/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

GALLERY: Kent State football survives scare from arch-rival Akron, wins 35-24 (Hazell) 11/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Golden moment as KSU Flashes defeat arch-rival Akron Zips 11/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Economics (1)
Reports Outline Medicare and Medicaid Research from Kent State University 11/05/2012 Managed Care Weekly Digest Text Email

...determining Medicaid eligibility and served as both a place of residence and a store of wealth." The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Adoption of estate recovery programs changed the owner-occupied housing safety net by making the house eligible for recovery...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Higher Education; Human Resources (1)
Kent State Reviewing Tobacco-Free Campus Issue (Jarvie 11/05/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Financial Aid (1)
Cutting College Costs: Don't Miss Deadlines (VIDEO) (Evans) 11/05/2012 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (5)
Celebrations 11/05/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Stark to host first program of Oil and Gas Education Series November 29 11/05/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Canton Small Business Development Center and Kent State University at Stark, in conjunction with the attorneys at the Roetzel & Andress Law Firm, are presenting a four-part Oil and Gas Education...

Kent State University at Stark to Host Music Program Information Session 11/03/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark will host a Music Program Information Session on Monday, Nov. 19 from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts Building, 6000...

Turkey Trot to be Held at Kent State University at Stark 11/02/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark will host a Turkey Trot, an Adult 5K and a Kids' ¼ Mile Fun Run, on Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012. The events will be held...

Kent State Stark and Stark State College Place 1,000 Flags to Honor Veterans 11/02/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Students, faculty and staff from Kent State University at Stark and Stark State College will join in planting a flag-filled Field of Honor, recognizing local veterans in observance...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Research Reports on Depression from Kent State University Provide New Insights 11/05/2012 Mental Health Weekly Digest Text Email

...Individuals (26 men, 36 women) reported PTG 3 months postdiagnosis (T1) and 3 months later (T2)." The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Cross-sectional analyses revealed a linear association between PTG and QOL-more PTG was related to worse mental health at...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
US Patent Issued to Kent State University on Oct. 30 for "Liquid Crystal Device and Methods Thereof" (Ohio, Connecticut Inventors) 11/05/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

ALEXANDRIA, Va., Nov.5 -- United States Patent no.8,300,189, issued on Oct.30, was assigned to Kent State University (Kent, Ohio). "Liquid Crystal Device and Methods Thereof" was invented by Ke Zhang (Stow, Ohio), Philip J.Bos (Hudson, Ohio),...


NEOTEC (1)
INTERNATIONAL TRADE EVENT 11/02/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...regulatory environment in China. The seminar is being presented by groups including the Northeast Ohio Trade & Economic Consortium, headquartered at Kent State University. Sign-in for the seminar begins at 8 a.m., with the program running from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cost is $95 and includes continental...


Office of the President; University Press (1)
KSU president speaks about learning at assisted living facility 'graduation' (Lefton) 11/05/2012 Stow Sentry Text Attachment Email


Student Involvement, Center for (2)
Actors Jack Black and Kyle Gass take KSU students to vote in Ravenna (PHOTO VIEWER) 11/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Rockin the vote at KSU with Tenacious D 11/05/2012 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Devil's in details for Alabama's Saban | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: New York Post
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: On Halloween Day 1951, a bouncing baby goblin came into the world.

By all accounts, he was a sweet child. There were no signs — like in the movie, “The Omen” — that Nicholas Lou “Nick” Saban had a devilishly demanding side.

He was a good son. Starting at age 11, he helped his father run the family roadside gas station deep in the heart of West Virginia's coal country.

Despite his size (5-foot-8, 185 pounds), the hard-hitting Saban got a football scholarship to Kent State and a way out of Fairmont, W.Va.

He went into coaching, and this is where the changeling began. He could change young men with his steely-eyed stare or his demanding, meticulous nature or his sheer will.

“He sets clear expectations,'' Alabama center Barrett Jones told The Post. “If you follow them, everything will be fine. If you don't, he has no problem dismissing you from the organization.''

Saban, in pursuit of his fourth BCS National Championship with the Crimson Tide, turned 61 on Wednesday.

He has the energy of a man half his age. He works through lunch, always eating an iceberg lettuce salad topped with cherry tomatoes, sliced turkey and fat-free Dijon mustard dressing.

His star tight end, Michael Williams, said at SEC media day he has never seen Saban yawn.

Of course not. Humans yawn. Saban prepares.

He prepares to prepare. He prepares in ways other coaches haven't even considered preparing.

That preparation was never more on display than in last season's BCS National Championship game when his Alabama team avenged a 9-6 regular-season loss to LSU with a 21-0 domination of the Tigers.

The two SEC superpowers meet again tonight in Baton Rouge with a spot in the national championship game very much on the line.

The Tide (8-0, 5-0 SEC) have won 11 straight — the longest streak in the nation — since that LSU loss. The Tigers (7-1, 3-1) suffered a surprising loss at Florida and can't afford another.

All of the pressure should be on Alabama. The Tide are ranked No. 1. The Tide are on the road. The Tide are nine-point favorites, a staggering number in considering LSU's recent strength.

But Saban is the great equalizer, the goblin other college coaches can't shake.

He has psychological profiles of every player on his roster. He has brought in professional actors to lead players in improv training geared toward improving communication.

He brought in experts from Pacific Institute, a leadership-development company, to work on their mental toughness.

“One hour a week we work on controlling our thoughts,'' Jones said. “I know in games I've learned how to shut out crowd noise.''

“Do you mean to say,” I asked, ‘that you won't hear any of the 92,452 screaming Cajuns tonight in Death Valley?”

“Lock in,'' Jones said, “lock out.''

The Tide have been especially locked in this week. Saban found a flaw in his preparation before last season's donnybrook with LSU.

“If there was anything that I would say about last year's game, it is I think there is such a thing as being too ramped-up for a game,'' Saban said. “Everybody has a place and a recipe and a formula for how they play their best. That is obviously the goal for every week that you play.

“Now, when you play in games like this everyone would say that it is really critical that you play your best in a game like this. The formula and the recipe for that doesn't really change. Even though you would like to change it and put some more sugar in the cake to make it taste better, it usually makes it taste worse.''

This is as flowery as Saban gets. Usually it's iceberg lettuce, the Chevrolet of lettuces. But just remember, Saban's spirit is always at work, thinking of an edge, finding an opponent's weakness, chasing perfect preparation.

It's almost spooky.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY New American cherishes vote | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Election Day will be special for Moema Furtado,
the wife of Todd Diacon, the recently appointed
provost of Kent State University.

The Brazilian native, who became a U.S. citizen
two years ago, will cast a ballot Tuesday in her
first presidential election. She and her husband
reside in Hudson, having moved there from the
greater Amherst, Mass., area, where Diacon was
serving as deputy chancellor at the University of
Massachusetts.

It's special for Furtado because she remembers
when democracy did not exist in the country of
her birth, Brazil, which in the 1970s was ruled by
a military junta. Furtado left her country in 1973
to come to America to study at Cornell University
where she obtained a bachelor's degree in design
and environmental analysis. She later obtained a
Master in Fine Arts degree in painting from the
University of Wisconsin-Madison.

As a permanent resident, working in the United
States, she would travel to Brazil to visit her family.
Democracy returned to Brazil and elections
were re-established in the early 1980s, but voting
absentee from the United States by registering at
the Brazilian consulate proved inconvenient because
Brazil's consulates are designated for specific
states. For example, when she and her husband
resided in Tennessee, the consulate where
Furtado would have voted was in Miami.

Unlike the United States, the vote in Brazil is
mandatory so every time Brazil had a presidential
election she had to justify why she did not vote as
soon as she arrived in Brazil for a visit.

Finally, having spent most of her adult life in
the United States, she applied for U.S. citizenship
and two years ago, having obtained it, she
voted in Massachusetts in that state's gubernatorial
election. This year, having moved to Ohio,
her husband told her Ohio voting laws enable her
to vote absentee or early by mail.

Furtado replied that she wants to feel the excitement
of casting her vote on Election Day and
that's what she plans to do.

Voter suppression an increasing concern

An artist and an instructor in the Kent State
School of Art, Furtado is best known for her installations
and sculptures. I'm not knowledgeable
in various aspects of art, but Furtado told me her
work deals with issues of separation and displacement.
She utilizes a variety of man-made and organic
materials such as latex, bricks, wood, sand,
soap, oil and marble.

She must be pretty good because her work is in
private and public collections including the Tennessee
governor's executive residence in Nashville. She
has exhibited nationally and internationally.

Her timing must be good, too, because Furtado
and her students at Kent State have put together
an exhibition that is currently in the Oscar Ritchie
Gallery on the main campus that is devoted to
the subject of voting and its restrictions.

I've not seen it, but kentwired.com describes
it as featuring a barbed-wire aisle leading up to
three voting booths. The first booth has a wooden
obstruction preventing people form entering.
The second has a cup of sharpened pencils, but
with a steel ballot. The third booth has paper
ballots and pencils, but with the tips of the pencils
broken off.

A reference to the bad old days in Brazil when
military rule prevailed? Perhaps, but voter fraud
and voter suppression have become big issues
in America.

Republicans speak of voter fraud and cite the
old Democratic Tammany Hall-like operations
that bought votes for Thanksgiving turkeys or
registered voters using names of the deceased. In
modern times, they cite ACORN, the voter registration
effort by Democratic supporters that four
years ago was caught committing voter fraud in
at least one instance.

Democrats counter that the talk of fraud is really
voter suppression designed to discourage minorities,
who traditionally vote Democratic. They
cite the 28,000 ballots not counted in the Miami-
Dade County in 2000 because of hanging chads.
Had those ballots been counted, Democrats say,
Florida would have gone for Vice President Al
Gore, who would have become the nation's 43rd
president instead of George W. Bush.

With the Obama-Romney election close, Republicans
are gearing up to spot and root out
voter fraud. Democrats charge the Republicans
are really targeting traditionally Democratic-voting
minorities, especially Hispanics and African-
Americans, and are running an updated, sophisticated
form of the old Jim Crow laws that for 100
years after the Civil War in the South kept African-
Americans from voting.

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News Headline: Darrell Hazell starts game passing, then lets Kent State backs run wild (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — The Akron Zips had rival Kent State reeling from the outset of Saturday's Wagon Wheel rivalry game — with numerous implications for the Golden Flashes' title hopes and little more than bragging rights for the Zips.

Akron couldn't be stopped as the Zips scored on their first two possessions while Kent coach Darrell Hazell went to his "Kentucky" offense. Kent was throwing the ball all over the lot, as KSU did in its 47-14 loss at Kentucky, while keeping the horses — tailbacks Trayion Durham and Dri Archer — in the stable.

"It was my decision we were going to throw the first eight plays of the game," he said. "I thought we'd do something a little bit different to keep them off-balance."

But it was Kent that was out of step, down, 14-0, and throwing on seven of its first nine plays before its traditional running game surfaced to keep the Golden Flashes at 8-1, 5-0, and first in the Mid-American Conference East Division. Archer took care of the first half, and Durham took care of the second as the Golden Flashes emerged with a 35-24 win.

"No. 1 [Archer] kept them in the game until everybody else, and their defense, started to adjust," Akron coach Terry Bowden said as the Zips fell to 1-9, 0-6. "We didn't have an answer for him."

Archer had four carries for 48 of his 126 yards at halftime, but one went for 44 yards to set up Kent's first score. He had all three of his receptions in the first half, but one went for 20 yards to help set up Kent's second score. The 5-8, 175-pound speedster allowed Kent to only trail at halftime, 24-14, instead of being blanked.

"You can't solve speed if you don't got it," Bowden said.

For the year, Archer has 16 touchdowns, two short of tying the school record.

But more indicative of his speed, in 136 touches on the season, he has 50 plays of 10 yards or more and 28 of 20 or more, including four (44 yards, 37, 30 and 20) against the Zips.

"It's hard to stop our running game," Archer said, "especially when we can stay fresh. We keep coming at them."

The second half, it was the 6-1, 250-pound Durham who delivered 72 of his 107 yards and three touchdowns, two coming on fourth down, covering six and 15 yards.

"They just whipped us on short-yardage plays," Bowden said.

Short or long, Archer or Durham, that was the difference for Kent State.

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News Headline: Kent-Akron rivalry game filled with excitement as KSU wins, 35-24 (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- The Akron Zips rose to the challenge of its rivalry with Kent State, and put the Golden Flashes' backs to the wall. But chasing what still could be a championship season, KSU scored 21 second-half points while holding Akron scoreless to squeeze out a 35-24 victory over the Zips Saturday afternoon at Dix Stadium.

Kent (8-1, 5-0) remains undefeated and first in the Mid-American Conference East Division.

It took a 15-yard TD run on fourth down from tailback Trayion Durham to seal the victory with 38 seconds left to keep the game Zips (1-9, 0-6) winless in conference play.

• Akron-Kent State final statistics

"A great win," Kent head coach Darrell Hazell said. "I knew it wouldn't be easy. Going down the stretch we're probably going to see a few more of these. This is what championship runs are all about."

The Golden Flashes entered with a one-game lead in the East over Ohio, Bowling Green and Miami. The Bobcats and Falcons had byes, but the RedHawks lost at Buffalo, 27-24. With Saturday's win, KSU's next two games are on the road at Miami next Saturday, then at Bowling Green on Nov. 17 before ending the season with a home game against OU.

The Zips took leads of 14-0, 21-7 and 24-14 at halftime before the Golden Flashes stepped up. The key, Akron coach Terry Bowden said, was Kent never became flustered.

"I congratulate Kent on the way they kept their composure, and made their adjustments at halftime," Bowden said. "Like so many times this season, [we] gave out at some point. We didn't have enough guns."

Kent has been vulnerable to spread offenses. Saturday, the Zips unleashed their spread and scored on their first four possessions.

Kent's defense was in need of a hold to start the second half. The Zips moved the ball, but facing fourth-and-1 at Kent's 43 opted to punt.

"You don't know how often you second-guess yourself," Bowden said. "But I wanted [Kent] to have to drive the field."

Starting from their own 6, the Flashes went to work. A 37-yard run by Dri Archer (126 yards, 1 TD) to get out of trouble ultimately led to a six-yard TD run from Durham on fourth down, cutting Akron's lead to 24-21. Then Kent's defense stepped up, with Roosevelt Nix stripping Akron's Jawon Chisholm (115 yards) at the 41, with linebacker Luke Batton on the recovery.

Moments later, Archer took a reverse handoff from Durham for 30 yards and a touchdown to give KSU a 28-24 lead with 6:13 to go in the quarter.

With 4:21 left in the game, Akron had its last chance at Kent's 26. But Batton knocked down a third-and-1 pass, then Jake Dooley stopped Chisholm on fourth down.

Kent held on until the end, with Durham getting 29 of his 107 yards on a six-play drive that was capped by a 15-yard scoring dash to complete the scoring.

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News Headline: Don't fight Kent State's identity; Darrell Hazell needs to embrace dynamic duo (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: It shouldn't have taken a 35-24 scare against the University of Akron on Saturday to convince the Kent State coaching staff what it must do to win.

“On Archer, On Durham,” should be the Golden Flashes' strategy in the final three regular-season games and beyond, assuming there is a beyond.

In the presumed mismatch, Kent State coach Darrell Hazell's misguided decision to throw on the first eight plays to “do something a little bit different to keep them off-balance” allowed UA to jump out to a 14-0 lead and could have cost the Flashes the game.

Actually, KSU threw seven times and ran the ball once on its first two possessions, but it stalled on third downs at the UA 36- and 30-yard lines.

There's nothing wrong with keeping an opponent off-balance. But Hazell's now-8-1 Flashes were facing a now-1-9 Zips team that lacks muscle up front and depth everywhere. It would be an admirable strategy at Miami, at Bowling Green or in the finale at home against Ohio.

Not to mention the fact that the Golden Flashes' defense hasn't fared well in matchups against spread offenses this season (check the highlights of the lone loss at Kentucky for verification). KSU's lack of execution in the pass-first first quarter gave the Zips life and UA's no-huddle spread, aka “Bowdenball,” more chances.

It wasn't until the start of the second quarter that Hazell quashed the aerial assault in favor of his dangerous thunder-and-lightning tandem. He finally called on his two key offensive players — Darren Sproles-clone Dri Archer and big-bodied Jerome Bettis-like bruiser Trayion Durham.

There might be better running backs in the Mid-American Conference. But no school in the league has the combination of speed and power that Kent State boasts in Archer and Durham.

“Lightning” Archer finished with 126 yards on 11 carries and a touchdown. He had four plays of 20 or more yards — runs of 44, 37 and 30 yards (a reverse for a touchdown) and a 20-yard reception. That gave him 28 plays of 20 or more yards this season.

Archer, a junior from Laurel, Fla., has touched the ball 136 times rushing, receiving and on returns and 50 of those have gone for at least 10 yards. Archer boosted his single-season touchdown total to 16, two behind co-leaders Larry Poole (1973) and Eugene Baker “The Touchdown Maker” in 1997.

“Thunder” Durham contributed 107 yards on 24 attempts and three touchdowns. He accounted for 28 yards on KSU's final possession, sealing the victory with a 15-yard score with 38 seconds remaining.

In the past six games, Durham, a sophomore from Cincinnati Colerain, is averaging 105.7 yards per game and has scored 10 touchdowns. Last weekend he literally carried the Flashes to victory at No. 18 Rutgers with a career-high 131 yards.

Durham also converted two crucial fourth-and-1 plays — gaining 6 yards on the first and scoring a 15-yard touchdown on the other.

Hazell joked that those were the only two fourth-down calls on the play sheet.

“We'll just keep running them over and over until they stop us,” Hazell said.

That should have been the plan all along, even on the first eight plays.

After nine games, the Golden Flashes have found themselves — “They've got a very patient offense and an opportunistic defense,” UA coach Terry Bowden said, boiling it down perfectly. But Hazell seems to be fighting that identity because it makes his offense sound too predictable.

“That's their game plan,” Bowden said of the Golden Flashes' running attack. “We kind of solved 34 [Durham] until we over-solved it, and he just walked in on the outside. If you're going to stop it you've got to play in the gaps.

“One [Archer], we never solved him too much. He had too much speed. You can't solve speed. You can gang up on a big guy maybe and slow him down. But you can't solve speed if you don't got it. He was always one step ahead of us.”

Both Archer and Durham are on pace for 1,000 rushing yards. Archer is already on the watch list for the Doak Walker Award that goes to the nation's best running back, and Durham could join him this week. That level of recognition should help boost Kent State's program, bidding for its first bowl invitation since 1972.

Hazell surely had a method to his first-quarter madness against the Zips. He wants opponents to respect the pass and not constantly stack the line of scrimmage. He wants to boost the confidence of senior quarterback Spencer Keith. He wants to defy the notion that the Flashes are one-dimensional.

That they are not. Keith can pick apart an opponent when called on, like his 295-yard, three-touchdown performance against Ball State showed.

But on Saturday against the Zips at Dix Stadium, Hazell was guilty of overthinking.

When KSU's version of Thunder and Lightning is all the Golden Flashes need to dominate, Hazell should unleash the storm.

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News Headline: Kent State Sports Report: Flashes field hockey, soccer teams fall short of tourney titles | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State field hockey and women's soccer teams each saw successful seasons come to a close with losses to Miami in their respective Mid-American Conference tournaments last weekend.

The RedHawks defeated the Golden Flashes field hockey team 2-1 in the MAC tourney championship game, while Kent State's women's soccer squad fell to Miami 3-1 in the semifinals.

Miami was a thorn in the side of both KSU teams this fall. In fact both Flashes squads had little trouble with anyone else in the MAC except the RedHawks, who handed the Kent State field hockey team (9-13) its only two league losses of the season and dealt the soccer team (13-5-2) two of its four league setbacks.

Both Flashes teams had three players named All-MAC.

In field hockey, junior Rebecca Lee and sophomore Julia Hofmann were First-Team choices, while sophomore Hannah Faulkner was named to the Second Team.

Lee registered nine goals and seven assists this season for a total of 25 points, which ranks second on the team. Lee was named All-MAC First Team for the second straight year, and was MAC Freshman of the Year in 2010.

Hofmann moved up from Second Team to First Team after leading the MAC with 16 goals. She added three assists for a team-high 35 points.

Faulkner scored seven goals to go along with two assists during the 2012 season.

In women's soccer, junior forward Jaclyn Dutton, sophomore forward Stephanie Haugh and senior defender Hannah Newhouse garnered Second Team All-MAC accolades.

Dutton led the MAC with 37 points on 15 goals and seven assists. Against MAC foes, Dutton tallied 16 points on six goals and four assists, including two game-winning strikes.

Haugh tied the Kent State single-season mark for assists at 11 with her helper in Kent State's MAC Tournament quarterfinal victory over Ball State. In less than two seasons, Haugh is now ninth in program history in career assists.

Newhouse played every minute this season on Kent State's defense, helping the Golden Flashes register nine shutouts, good for second in the program's 16-year history.

Kent State tied or set seven team season records, including wins (13), winning percentage (.700), goals (40) and assists (44). Individually, Dutton set the single-season records for points with 37 points and penalty kicks made in a season with four. Freshman goalkeeper Stephanie Senn's eight shutouts and 13 victories are new team individual standards, while her goals-against average of 0.84 for the year is third-best in team history.

WRESTING

Former Kent State wrestling coach Ron Gray will be one of four distinguished members inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame on June 1 in Stillwater, Okla.

Gray coached the Golden Flashes for 25 seasons, leading them to nine Mid-American Conference titles from 1977-1990. Kent State finished 14th at the NCAA Championships on two occasions (1981, 1984) during his tenure.

In all, Gray's teams earned 233 dual-meet victories and produced six All-Americans. From 1981-93, the Flashes never lost more than one conference dual in a season.

As a wrestler, Gray was a two-time NCAA champion and a three-time NCAA finalist at Iowa State. In 1959, he won the NCAA Championships' Outstanding Wrestler Award.

Gray also recruited and coached Kent State's current head wrestling coach, Jim Andrassy.

WOMEN'S GOLF

Kent State wrapped up the fall portion of its 2012-13 campaign last Tuesday at the Betsy Rawls Longhorn Invitational, hosted by the University of Texas at the University of Texas Golf Club. The Golden Flashes slipped slightly on the final day to finish in 11th place.

Freshman Josee Doyon registered Kent State's best individual score on Tuesday with a 2-over-par 74. Doyon made three straight birdies on No. 16, 17 and 18 to go 2-under through her first eight holes and finished tied for 27th place overall.

Sophomore Jennifer Ha shot a 3-over 75 on the final day and wound up tied with Doyon.

Kent State will return to competition with the Lady Puerto Rico Classic Feb. 10-12.

MEN'S BASKETBALL

Carlton Guyton, who played a key role on the last two Kent State teams, was drafted in the seventh round of the 2012 NBA Developmental League Draft by the Erie BayHawks on Friday.

Guyton, a 6-foot-4 swingman, averaged 11.2 points, 3.3 rebounds and three assists per game during his two-year career with the Flashes.

VOLLEYBALL

Kent State (6-20, 3-11 MAC) fell in three sets to host Eastern Michigan on Saturday.

Freshmen Morgan Semmelhack and Haley Schneider each had a team-high nine kills, and Semmelhack added seven digs. Junior Hannah Herc finished with 22 digs.

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News Headline: GALLERY: Kent State football survives scare from arch-rival Akron, wins 35-24 (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The collective exhale that resonated from Dix Stadium late Saturday afternoon could have been felt in arch-enemy territory, some 10 miles west.

Kent State's storybook season is still in tact, despite one-win rival Akron's best efforts to scrap it. The Golden Flashes retained the Wagon Wheel for the third straight season with a 35-24 victory over the Zips in a nail-biter that wasn't decided until sophomore bruiser back Trayion Durham broke loose on a fourth-and-one for a 15-yard touchdown run with 38 seconds to play.

It was the career-high third touchdown run of the day for Durham (24 carries, 107 yards), who eclipsed 100 yards for the third straight game, while junior blazer Dri Archer broke loose for a game-high 126 yards and a score on just 11 carries to help bale out the Flashes.

A stunning second-half shutout pitched by the KSU defense also came in mighty handy.

“It was a great win. We knew it wouldn't be easy,” said Flashes coach Darrell Hazell. “It's never going to be easy, especially when you play a rivalry. Going down the stretch, you're probably going to see a few more of these types of games. You just have to find a way to win them at the end of the day.”

Kent State (8-1, 5-0 MAC East Division) found a way to win its seventh straight game, which ties a school record first set in 1940, and improve to 5-0 in the Mid-American Conference for the first time in school history.

The Flashes did so, even though precious little went right for much of the afternoon.

The first half was an unmitigated disaster for the Kent State defense, which coughed up 24 points and 292 yards in the first 30 minutes alone.

Akron (1-9, 0-6) used the same up-tempo, no-huddle offense that has given the Flashes fits repeatedly this year to completely dissect their defense in the first half. Senior quarterback Dalton Williams completed 18-of-22 passes for 184 yards and two touchdowns while leading TD drives of 89, 70 and 94 yards.

The Zips scored on all four first-half possessions. Their first two drives ended with TD passes of 13 and 21 yards, respectively, from Williams to 6-foot-5 junior wide receiver Jerrod Dillard that put 18-point underdog Akron up 14-0 after the first quarter.

Archer brought Kent State's offense to life with a 44-yard run on an inside handoff to the Zips one-foot line, setting up a 1-yard TD run by Durham that cut the deficit to 14-7. But not for long, as Akron senior running back Jawon Chisholm busted through a hole up the middle and bulled through a pack of defenders midway through his 50-yard touchdown run that put the Zips right back up by 14.

Archer set up another KSU score with a 20-yard catch-and-run, followed by senior quarterback Spencer Keith's 4-yard TD run off a fake to Durham that trimmed the lead to 21-14.

But Akron's offense put the finishing touches on a near-flawless first half by waltzing 60 yards to set up a 32-yard Robert Stein field goal as time expired in the first half.

After absorbing Akron's best punch, the Flashes staggered into the locker room trailing 24-14.

“They came at us quick,” said KSU senior defensive lineman Jake Dooley. “In the first half we were on our heels a little. “

Both teams spoke of the adjustments Kent State's defense made at halftime, but an attitude adjustment was what mattered most.

“Our coaches told us in the second half we're not gonna run anything different,” said Dooley. “We just had to settle down and do what we're coached to do. We kind of took a step back, took a breather and said, ‘Let's do this.' ”

A new defense emerged from the Kent State locker room in the second half, led by Dooley and star defensive tackle Roosevelt Nix.

Akron took the second-half kickoff and marched to the KSU 43, where Chisholm was stopped by Nix a yard short on third down. At this point the Zips were still moving the ball virtually at will against the Flashes, but Akron coach Terry Bowden decided to punt rather than go for it on fourth-and-short.

“ We have seen teams be able to pound our defense. I said I am not going to put our defense in that situation,” said Bowden. “We were gouging them more with runs on first and second downs. Fourth-and-(2) is not an easy one against that defense. I wanted to make them drive the field.”

The decision seemed to work when Akron downed the punt at the KSU 6. But the Flashes proceeded to drive 94 yards for a touchdown, and controlled the game from that point on.

Durham gave Kent State some breathing room with a 12-yard run, and Archer broke loose for 37 yards to the Akron 45. Later the Flashes faced their favorite situation — fourth-and-one — from the Akron 6, and converted it as usual as Durham took a pitch left and was untouched until he reached the end zone to bring Kent State within 24-21.

During the seven-game winning streak, the Flashes are 10-of-10 on fourth-down conversions, with nearly every one of them going to Durham over the left side of the line behind senior tackle Brian Winters and senior guard Josh Kline.

“All we have are two fourth-down (and short) plays,” said Hazell. “We just keep running them over 'til they stop us.”

Kent State, which had forced 13 turnovers in the past two games, then generated its first and only turnover of the afternoon when Nix stripped Chisholm and senior linebacker Luke Batton recovered at the Akron 37. Archer then scored what proved to be the game-winning touchdown on a reverse handoff from Durham, cutting off a pancake block downfield by Winters and sprinting home for a 30-yard score that put the Flashes on top 28-24 with 6:13 to play in the third quarter.

Kent State's defense took it from there.

The Zips' next two drives resulted in their first two three-and-outs of the game. Dooley then stuffed Conor Hundley for no-gain on a third-and-one at the KSU 47, forcing another punt.

Akron's next drive reached Kent State's 25, but ended with a punt from the 45 after a personal foul call on the Zips. Then their last shot at the upset ended at around the four-minute mark, when Batton tipped a pass on third-and-one and Dooley stopped Chisholm (16 carries, 115 yards) short on fourth down.

Akron's possessions in the last 30 minutes ended with five punts, a fumble and a turnover on downs, as the Zips gained just 150 total yards in the second half. Williams wound up completing 30-of-41 passes for 312 yards, but was held in check in the second half thanks in part to a recharged KSU pass rush that was virtually non-existent in the first half.

Nix led the charge defensively with a career-high nine tackles, one sack, one tackle for a loss and one forced fumble.

“In the second half I thought our defense did a great job changing some things up, challenging the receivers a little bit more, changing the scheme a little bit and holding them to no points,” said Hazell.

Meanwhile, Keith was a model of consistency, completing 14-of-19 passes for 103 yards with no interceptions. He also rushed five times for 28 yards, helping Kent State generate 261 yards on the ground in 40 attempts.

Afterward, the jubilant Flashes took turns carrying the Wagon Wheel around as Kent State students trickled onto the field.

“We don't like Akron at all. That's just the honest truth,” said Archer. “After the game it's a good feeling. I knew my guys. I knew we'd come out on top.”

The Flashes, who currently lead Ohio and Bowling Green by a game in the MAC East Division, visit Miami (4-5, 3-2) next Saturday.

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News Headline: Golden moment as KSU Flashes defeat arch-rival Akron Zips | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's storybook season is still intact, despite the University of Akron's best efforts to scrap it. The Golden Flashes retained the Wagon Wheel for the third straight season with a 35-24 victory over the Zips in a nail-biter that wasn't decided until sophomore bruiser back Trayion Durham broke loose on a fourth-and-one for a 15-yard touchdown run with 38 seconds to play.

It was the career-high third touchdown run of the day for Durham (24 carries, 107 yards), who eclipsed 100 yards for the third straight game, while junior blazer Dri Archer broke loose for a game-high 126 yards and a score on just 11 carries to help bale out the Flashes.

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News Headline: Reports Outline Medicare and Medicaid Research from Kent State University | Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Managed Care Weekly Digest
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2012 NOV 5 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Managed Care Weekly Digest -- Data detailed on Medicare and Medicaid have been presented. According to news reporting originating in Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx editors, the research stated, "I examine the impact of Medicaid on elderly housing and portfolio decisions by using recent state-by-calendar-year level variation in the Medicaid treatment of owner-occupied housing assets from the adoption of Medicaid estate recovery programs. Prior to the adoption of these programs, the house, which represents the most important non-pension asset to the elderly, was exempt from determining Medicaid eligibility and served as both a place of residence and a store of wealth."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Adoption of estate recovery programs changed the owner-occupied housing safety net by making the house eligible for recovery by the government, which increased the implicit tax of holding owner-occupied housing. Using data from 1993 to 2004 in the Health and Retirement Study on elderly individuals, I find that state adoption of estate recovery programs makes the elderly decrease homeownership by 4.6%, decrease home equity by 15%, and also decrease the housing share of the elderly wealth portfolio."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "State adoption of these programs results in elderly baseline homeowners being 33% less likely to own their homes at death and more likely to use a trust as a substitute to housing in order to preserve assets and carry out bequest motives at death."

For more information on this research see: Medicaid and the housing and asset decisions of the elderly: Evidence from estate recovery programs. Journal of Urban Economics, 2012;72(2-3):210-224. Journal of Urban Economics can be contacted at: Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science, 525 B St, Ste 1900, San Diego, CA 92101-4495, USA. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Journal of Urban Economics - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/622905)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting N. Greenhalgh-Stanley, Kent State University, Dept. of Econ, Kent, OH 44242, United States.



Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2012 Managed Care Weekly Digest via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Kent State Reviewing Tobacco-Free Campus Issue (Jarvie | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio colleges weigh smoking ban at recommendation of Board of Regents

By the end of this academic year students at Kent State University should have an idea whether or not the campus is moving towards a smoke-free policy.

University administrators are in the midst of reviewing a recommendation from the Ohio Board of Regents, issued this summer, suggesting all public universities and colleges in Ohio ban the use of tobacco products on their campuses.

At Kent State, students can expect to get a survey by the end of this semester gauging their opinion about the idea of completely banning smoking on campus.

Greg Jarvie, vice president of enrollment management and student affairs, is co-charing a committee with Willis Walker, vice president of human resources, comprised of about 20 faculty, staff and students to consider the issue.

Jarvie said the committee should be able to make some suggestions to the president's cabinet by the end of this year about how to respond to the board of regents recommendation and whether or not Kent State should ban tobacco use on campus.

"We really want to focus on what our students think," Jarvie said. "We have to listen to everybody."

Tell us what you think. Take our poll on the issue here.

Kent State's existing tobacco policy adheres to state law, which prohibits smoking inside all public buildings. The university policy also permits smoking in outdoor areas provided smokers are no closer than 20 feet to doors, windows, vents and other building entrances.

"We have this 20-foot rule," Jarvie said. "I will emphatically say that does not work. The devil's in the details, that's really what the issue is on this one. Because we need to figure out if we are going to go smoke free, what does that mean.”

Kent State only has to look a few miles south from its main campus to see a completely smoke-free policy in action.

In Rootstown, OH, at the campus of the Northeast Ohio Medical University, students and staff learned in September that by Nov. 1, this past Thursday, their tobacco-free campus policy would take effect.

Richard Lewis, secretary to the board of trustees for NEOMED, said banning tobacco use completely on campus made sense for them because it is a wholly medical institution.

"Based upon the significance and negative implications of what tobacco does to people's health, ranging from direct usage to passive inhalation, and the cancerous results to folks who experience passive inhalation, we felt we were at the point to consider restricting it completely on campus," Lewis said.

NEOMED's policy prohibits students and staff from even possessing tobacco products — that means you can't even have it in your car — while on campus.

Lewis said they're not searching people's cars for cigarettes, and NEOMED is phasing the new policy in with the restrictions to take full effect by Jan. 1, 2013.

"We're not going to be going out of our way to find out if somebody has tobacco products with them," he said. "Our primary concern is if someone lights up on campus and continues to light up. What folks do off campus is their business."

The medical college offers smoking cessation programs — something Kent State already does — to help those who want to quit smoking. And to coincide with a new recreation center under construction the health college plans to incorporate personal wellness education and preventive medicine into the programs there.

"We're trying to help people understand that anything that is abused can come back to haunt you later in life," Lewis said.

Kent State faces different challenges when compared with NEOMED. At the main campus, about 6,000 Kent State students live in residence halls during the school year with hundreds more living on campus year-round.

"That's a pretty sizable population, so if you've got a percentage of those folks who smoke … it puts it into perspective," Jarvie said. "Those are the things we have to think about."

Kent State's College of Public Health surveyed Kent campus students in the spring of 2011 and found 25 percent of undergraduate students smoked, which amounted to about 5,100 students at the time.

Jarvie said if you apply that percentage to incoming classes and consider Kent State has recently had average incoming freshman classes of 4,000 students, the university could potentially have close to 1,000 new smokers coming to the Kent campus each year.

"There's no doubt it could have an affect on enrollment," Jarvie said. "We have to be fair to everybody."

Along with the survey, the university's tobacco-use committee will conduct focus groups in an effort to determine what the campus community thinks should be done.

At the least, the university may do nothing or simply update its existing smoking policy. Or administrators could recommend a complete ban on tobacco use — something Kent State's Board of Trustees would have the final decision on.

Jarvie said any such action likely wouldn't happen until possibly January of 2014. Any decision would apply to all eight Kent State campuses.

Kent's cross-town sports rival, the University of Akron, is taking a somewhat less aggressive approach to the Board of Regents recommendation.

Sarah Lane, spokesperson for the University of Akron, said the university has no immediate plans to change its smoking policy.

"The (university) board of trustees adopted a policy that complies with the current state smoking law," she said. "No further discussion is underway."

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News Headline: Cutting College Costs: Don't Miss Deadlines (VIDEO) (Evans) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LaShay Ford, 20, loves every minute of living on the campus of Kent State University while pursuing a degree in Public Health. She's putting herself through school on loans and grant money but no scholarships. She told Call for Action Reporter Lorrie Taylor she put off the application process until it was too late.

“I'd be like, OK, let me go sit down and do this and I go to do it and OK, wait, I'll do it tomorrow, I'll do it the next day. I'm a huge procrastinator,” she said.

She's not alone. Missing deadlines may be the number one reason college students lose out on free money, according to Mark Evans, Director of Student Financial Aid at Kent State.

“Really, for the next three or four months is a critical time to apply for scholarships,” said Evans. “If you start your scholarship process after the first of the year you've likely missed a lot of the key deadlines.”

Evans said it is absolutely critical students fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, every year they're in school.

Click here for more information on college savings …

“Regulations change every year, the questions on the Free Application for Student Aid change every year, the methodology that the Department of Education uses to determine financial need changes,” said Evans.

He also said it's important for students to check in with financial aid counselors because their circumstances can change.

“Financial aid offices have the ability to have the financial aid application reprocessed, using an estimate of the current year in place of the previous calendar year,” he said.

He stressed the importance of not mistaking the first “no” as the final word.

“Just because a family may not qualify one year doesn't automatically mean they won't qualify for the next four years,” he told Taylor.

Missing out on free money is a mistake Ford insisted she won't make again.

“I really want to try to do it this year again.”

Please click on link for video:
http://fox8.com/2012/11/05/cutting-college-costs-dont-miss-deadlines/

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News Headline: Celebrations | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Education

The Ohio Parks and Recreation Association Foundation awarded two $1,000 scholarships to Ohio college students planning for careers in parks and recreation. Ashley Mowen is a recreation, parks and tourism management major at Kent State. Laura Lansinger is a recreation management major at KSU.

Kent State Stark senior Felicia Dragos of North Canton received the Innis Maggiore Endowed Scholarship for Communications. She is majoring in marketing. Innis Maggiore is an advertising company in Canton.
Military

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News Headline: Kent State Stark to host first program of Oil and Gas Education Series November 29 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Canton Small Business Development Center and Kent State University at Stark, in conjunction with the attorneys at the Roetzel & Andress Law Firm, are presenting a four-part Oil and Gas Education Series.

The series will begin on Nov. 29 with a presentation of "The Regulation of Oil and Gas." This program will review S.B. 315, Ohio's newest law on oil and gas, as well as the regulations in the State of Ohio, including set-backs, chemical disclosure, requirements for pre-drilling, groundwater testing and permitting, among others.

The feature presenters are Robert B. Casarona, a Roetzel & Andress partner with a practice that focuses on environmental litigation, and Shane A. Farolino, a Roetzel & Andress partner and a leader on the firm's Oil and Gas Industry Team.

The public presentations are designed to provide education to members of the community. Presented by knowledgeable attorneys at Roetzel & Andress, each event will provide a factual forum, with an opportunity for attendees to ask questions regarding the subject matter.

Each event in the series will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Kent State Stark's Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Avenue NW, Jackson Township. Participants may register online for $10 per person or $15 per couple at www.cantonsbdc.org.

The remaining events in the series, "Real Estate and Mineral Rights," "Understanding the Process and Basic Contracts Used in Oil" and "Gas Management," will be scheduled soon. For more information on the Oil and Gas Education Series, visit www.cantonsbdc.org or call 330-244-3290.

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News Headline: Kent State University at Stark to Host Music Program Information Session | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark will host a Music Program Information Session on Monday, Nov. 19 from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township.

The presentation will provide prospective students and their parents with details about Kent State Stark's Music Program, including the admission requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Music Technology degree, which is only offered at the Stark Campus of Kent State University. Available minors, such as music, audio recording and music technology/production, as well as information on the bachelor's degrees in music and music education will also be covered.

Attendees will have the option to tour the Kent State Stark campus from 5:30 - 6 p.m. The information session begins at 6 p.m. and will include a tour of the Fine Arts music production studios, audio labs and classrooms. Music faculty members and students will speak to attendees about the program. The evening will also include light refreshments.

To RSVP for the Music Program Information Session or for more information, visitwww.stark.kent.edu/music.

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News Headline: Turkey Trot to be Held at Kent State University at Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark will host a Turkey Trot, an Adult 5K and a Kids' ¼ Mile Fun Run, on Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012. The events will be held on Kent State Stark's beautiful, 200-acre campus, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township. Registration for both events will take place from 7:30 – 8:15 a.m. on November 17. Registrants will receive a free t-shirt and hat, while supplies last.

The Kids' Fun Run will begin at 8:30 a.m. The pre-pay fee is $10 per person. On the day of the event, the fee is $15 per person. Payment is accepted by cash or check (payable to Kent State University). In addition to the monetary fee, each registrant should bring one non-perishable food item to benefit the Stark County Hunger Task Force. Participants in the Kids' Run will make a craft to take home.

The Adult 5K race will begin at 9 a.m. The pre-pay fee is $15 per person. On the day of the event, the fee is $20 per person. Payment is accepted by cash or check (payable to Kent State University). In addition to the monetary fee, each registrant should bring one non-perishable food item to benefit the Stark County Hunger Task Force. The top male and female adult runners will each win a turkey.

Preregistration payments may be dropped off at the Kent State Stark Physical Education Building or mailed to: Stacie Humm, Kent State University at Stark, 6000 Frank Avenue NW, North Canton, OH 44720. The hours for the Physical Education Building are Monday - Thursday 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

For more information, visit www.stark.kent.edu/student/fitness/events/turkey-trot.cfm or contact Stacie Humm at 330-244-3390.

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News Headline: Kent State Stark and Stark State College Place 1,000 Flags to Honor Veterans | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students, faculty and staff from Kent State University at Stark and Stark State College will join in planting a flag-filled Field of Honor, recognizing local veterans in observance of Veterans Day. One thousand flags will be placed in the flagpole circle on the “boulevard” shared by both colleges at the shared Frank Avenue NW entrance in Jackson Township.

When: Monday, Nov. 5

Time:  9:30 a.m.

Where: Frank Avenue entrance at Stark State College and Kent State University at Stark, 6000-6200 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township

Listed below are additional activities that Kent State Stark will offer to commemorate Veterans Day. All activities are free and take place on Kent State Stark's campus, located at 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township. The public is encouraged to participate in all activities.

COLLECTION DRIVE: The campus is collecting various items to send to American soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. Collection boxes are located in campus buildings. Items may be dropped off through Thursday, Nov. 8. To view the items that are most needed, please visit http://www.stark.kent.edu/about/events/upload/veterans-collection-2012.pdf.

FLAG RAISING CEREMONY: Thursday, Nov. 8 at noon – Flag Pole Circle

Ceremony led by members of Mineral City's American Legion Post #519

VETERANS CONNECTION: Thursday, Nov. 8 in the Library Conference Room

1 p.m.:   Discussion with multiple organizations that assist veterans and their families.

2:30 p.m.:   Individual breakouts: Opportunity for attendees to talk to the members of the organizations represented at the Veterans Connection.

REFLECTIONS OF SERVICE:

This on-going, online multimedia collection of military experiences from all branches of American armed services in coordinated through the Kent State Stark Library. To share your experience, provide an item or view the collection, visit www.stark.kent.edu/library/reflections-of-service.cfm.

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News Headline: Research Reports on Depression from Kent State University Provide New Insights | Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Mental Health Weekly Digest
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2012 NOV 5 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Mental Health Weekly Digest -- Investigators publish new report on Mental Health. According to news reporting originating in Warren, Ohio, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "This study examined the linkage of posttraumatic growth (PTG) to quality of life (QOL) among individuals newly diagnosed with cancer. Individuals (26 men, 36 women) reported PTG 3 months postdiagnosis (T1) and 3 months later (T2)."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Cross-sectional analyses revealed a linear association between PTG and QOL-more PTG was related to worse mental health at T1 (ß=-.28). PTG, however, revealed a quadratic relationship with depressive symptoms at T1 and physical health at T2: Individuals with high or low levels of PTG had fewer depressive symptoms and better QOL than those with moderate levels. Longitudinal analyses revealed a linear association between PTG and QOL; more PTG at T1 predicted better physical health at T2. There were no longitudinal curvilinear associations. Although the linear links of PTG to QOL were contradictory within this study, both of the curvilinear relations, although not robust, confirm previous research. Further analyses differentiated low, medium, and high PTG groups in terms of perceiving cancer as stressful, intrusive thoughts, and coping strategies. Overall, relations of PTG to adjustment may be more complex and dynamic than previously assumed."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Clinicians should consider the notion that more growth may sometimes, but not always, be better."

For more information on this research see: Posttraumatic growth following cancer: links to quality of life. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 2012;25(5):567-73. Journal of Traumatic Stress can be contacted at: Wiley-Liss, Div John Wiley & Sons Inc, 111 River St, Hoboken, NJ 07030, USA. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Journal of Traumatic Stress - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1573-6598)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting P.L. Tomich, Dept. of Psychology, Kent State University, Warren, Ohio, United States.

The publisher of the Journal of Traumatic Stress can be contacted at: Wiley-Liss, Div John Wiley & Sons Inc, 111 River St, Hoboken, NJ 07030, USA.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2012 Mental Health Weekly Digest via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: US Patent Issued to Kent State University on Oct. 30 for "Liquid Crystal Device and Methods Thereof" (Ohio, Connecticut Inventors) | Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ALEXANDRIA, Va., Nov.5 -- United States Patent no.8,300,189, issued on Oct.30, was assigned to Kent State University (Kent, Ohio).

"Liquid Crystal Device and Methods Thereof" was invented by Ke Zhang (Stow, Ohio), Philip J.Bos (Hudson, Ohio), Robert J.Twieg (Kent, Ohio) and Na Liu (Bloomfield, Conn.).

According to the abstract released by the U.S.Patent & Trademark Office: "Provided is a liquid crystal (LC) device and method thereof.The device comprises (i) a body of liquid crystal, (ii) a first layer comprising a first material, and (iii) a second layer comprising a second material; wherein the first layer is located between the body of liquid crystal and the second layer; the first layer alone aligns the liquid crystal in a first orientation; the second layer alone aligns the liquid crystal in a second orientation; and the first orientation is different from the second orientation.With optimized first layer thickness, the invention can be used in sensor applications to improve detection sensitivity, and in LCD applications with enhanced control over LC pretilt transition."

The patent was filed on June 26, 2009, under Application No.12/459,153.

For further information please visit: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=8300189&OS=8300189&RS=8300189

For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: INTERNATIONAL TRADE EVENT | Email

News Date: 11/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: staff, Compiled from
News OCR Text: Area companies can learn about certifications that are needed for global trade at an International Standards Update seminar Nov. 15 at Corporate College East in Warrensville Heights in suburban Cleveland.

Topics will include what certifications are needed and how companies obtain certification, the product conformance (CE mark) used in the European Union, the Underwriters Laboratories certification (UL mark) on products, as well as the Canadian Standards Association certification (CSA mark), product certification for China and the regulatory environment in China.

The seminar is being presented by groups including the Northeast Ohio Trade & Economic Consortium, headquartered at Kent State University.

Sign-in for the seminar begins at 8 a.m., with the program running from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cost is $95 and includes continental breakfast, lunch, and a seminar booklet.

For details or to register, go online to www.neotec.org and click on Upcoming Events.

Copyright © 2012 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: KSU president speaks about learning at assisted living facility 'graduation' (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Munroe Falls -- About 60 residents from Mulberry Gardens Assisted Living received diplomas Oct. 29 after they "graduated" from a health and wellness program, a ceremony during which Kent State University President Lester Lefton gave a speech about lifelong learning.

Activity Coordinator Tara Berardinelli said Hawthorn Retirement Group, the company that owns Mulberry Gardens, implemented the optional program for the first time at each of its assisted living facilities in the U.S. and Canada to encourage its residents to keep mentally and physically active.

She said the program may become an annual offering.

Over four weeks, participants who took a certain number of "classes" earned a certificate of participation or a "degree" from the "University of Hawthorn School of Health and Wellness." The classes were offered at the assisted living facility.

In his 10-minute speech at the start of the graduation, Lefton praised the residents for seeking opportunities to learn.

"I applaud your efforts to explore new ideas through the University of Hawthorn. Most of all, I hope your experience has led you to share my view that learning is like drinking from the fountain of youth," he said. "I'm a psychologist by training, and one of the things we know is that people who study, who learn and who do so throughout their life lives longer, healthier and happier lives because it keeps them sharp as a tack ..."

Lefton said KSU has 1,500 students in their 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s working toward degrees, and this semester one student is 82 years old.

"Just as learning isn't confined to certain places, it isn't an activity with an expiration date ... I don't think we should ever let age define us. We should let age limit us because there are natural consequences that come with age, but not when it comes to learning ...," he said.

The university also gave a gift of books published by the Kent State University Press as a gift for the library at Mulberry Gardens.

Residents chose from a variety of classes, including a KSU professor-taught one called "International People, Places and Things" and another Tallmadge Mayor Dave Kline gave about the history of Tallmadge. A representative from Summa Health System talked about heart health, a doctor about art therapy and a representative of Stan Hywet gave a tour of the historical museum, while other classes focused on nutrition, preventing falls, medication safety and the benefits of exercise.

The number of classes each participant took determined whether they earned an "associate's," "bachelor's," "master's" or "doctorate."

"The people who got the 'doctorates' were in the activity room pretty much all day every day. They participated in pretty much all of the classes that were offered," Berardinelli said.

She sought out and booked local speakers for the classes and Lefton for the graduation speech.

"I asked [Lefton] because the program is about lifelong learning, and because it's called the University of Hawthorn, I tried to make it as close to a university graduation as possible," she said.

She knew the program was of interest to residents when those who typically spend much of their time in their apartments came out to participate. She said the program helped to reinforce concepts, such as exercise, that residents already are exposed to at the assisted living facility.

"We offer exercise every day here so when they heard from the various speakers how important it is, they think, 'Oh, it's important.' It's more believable," Berardinelli said.

Mary Ann Repeta, 84, who earned an associate's degree, opted for classes in dentistry, Ohio history and preserving memory.

"I picked out the classes, and they were great. I think Tara did a wonderful job ... I had a good time, and I know other people had a good time," she said. "I hope she does something like this again."

Claire Allen, who said she was "plus 80" years old, earned a master's degree. Classes that focused on pottery and painting were her favorites as she has always had an interest in the arts.

"There's not much opportunity to be creative when you're a senior citizen. Nobody thinks you can do it," she said.

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News Headline: Actors Jack Black and Kyle Gass take KSU students to vote in Ravenna (PHOTO VIEWER) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University freshman Sydney Bachochin will never forget the first time she voted in a presidential election. After all, how many people can say they got a ride to the polls with Tenacious D bandmates Jack Black and Kyle Gass?

Bachochin joined a busload of other students for a private mini-concert with Black and Gass on the way to the Portage County Board of Elections from the MAC Center on Friday.

“There's a lot of people here because of Jack Black,” she said. “It got the students excited.”

Bachochin said she still would have voted, but she thinks the A-list celebrities' appearance brought out students who otherwise wouldn't have done the same.

“This event highlights the importance of early voting and how much students have an impact,” said Evan Gildenblatt, president of the student body. “They're braving the cold to see one of their idols and go out and vote.”

While Mitt Romney has the support of Kid Rock and Meat Loaf, Gildenblatt said he'd take Bruce Springsteen and Tenacious D any day.

“I think Jack and Kyle take it seriously,” he said. “They're high profile surrogates. What they say resonates with people.”

Even though Black wore his “Ohio For Obama” pin and made reference to women's and gay rights, his focus wasn't on telling people who to vote for.

“We're encouraging students to come out and vote, make their voices heard,” Black said.

Olivia Sliman, senior electronic media major, said Black was pretty unbiased and focused on the students' roles in this election.

“It was a really cool idea,” she said. “It got us pumped up to vote.”

As Black and Gass faced the cold and the rain, about two hundred students showed up at the MAC Center to greet them. Black emphasized the importance of this election, and Ohio's role as a swing state.

“So goes Ohio, so goes the nation,” Black said. “We want to give it one last push.”

Please click on link for photo viewers:
http://www.recordpub.com/news/article/5226462

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News Headline: Rockin the vote at KSU with Tenacious D | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Actor Jack Black and bandmate Kyle Gass get serious, mostly

You could be forgiven for thinking the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is holding some special concert this week. Bruce Springsteen, Stevie Wonder, Jay Z, and Kid Rock are all coming to Ohio. But they're not selling their music; they're selling their candidates. WKSU's Mark Urycki caught up with the over-the-top hard rock/comedy duo known as “Tenacious D”

“This is a concert you're going to want to tell your grandkids about..”

That's the actor Jack Black trying to entice students at Kent State University to join him and his bandmate Kyle Gass as they take a bus to the Portage County Board of Elections. Known together as Tenacious D, they played a “rock the vote” concert Thursday night at the House of Blues in Cleveland. Black said he wasn't going to tell the students how to vote but he was wearing an Ohio for Obama button. He also said the President saved the country from an economic disaster and then spelled out issues he thought would be important to the young people.

“This election is incredibly important because of women's rights. And If you think gays and lesbians should have the same rights at all other living human beings then it's an important vote. If you don't want the neo-cons taking over the military and dropping bombs all over the globe then this is an important vote. If you want to continue on the path to rescuing our economy this is an important vote.”

Kyle Gass told the students voting is their responsibility.

“Let's not squander it, the future depends on us. Right now the future depends on getting on this bus with us and voting.”

About 150 students stood in the rain and those who fit on the first bus trip to the polls heard a free concert on the ride.

A line of at least 50 people already stretched down the hall at the elections board when the students started showing up – some in their own cars. Gass and Black stood outside posing for photos with every single one of them, sometimes singing into their phones as the kids called friends and parents.

Some of the celebrities that appear with Mitt Romney or President Obama at least get face-time with the candidates. But Tenacious D is on its own, standing out in a cold rain in Ravenna. Kyle Gass says this is not a side trip from a regular music tour. The pair traveled from California just to get people to vote.
“We're on a mission until Tuesday. We have to do all we can just so we can feel good at night. “

It seems like a lot of work to get 40 or 50 people at a time to vote but Black said “It's kind of a Johnny Appleseed effect. You spread the passion and they'll tell two friends and they'll tell two friends and so on and so on. “

Black said they decided to come to Ohio because “as Ohio goes so goes the nation and we wanted to give it one last push.” This is the last get-out-the-vote stop for Tenacious D. They and many other bands have been treating Ohio like Cinderella at the ball. Midnight strikes Tuesday.

Please click on link for audio:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/33632

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