Report Overview:
Total Clips (40)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Higher Education (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Athletics (15)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Office of the Provost (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (2)
Geography (1)
Higher Education (1)
Higher Education; Office of the President (1)
Human Resources (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
KSU Museum (3)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Marketing and Entrepreneurship (3)
Marketing and Entrepreneurship; Office of the President; Research; Technology (1)
Safety (1)
Students (3)
Students; Study Abroad (1)
University Relations (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Higher Education (1)
Business notebook 11/17/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

HONORS Kent State University was named a Military Friendly School by G.I. Jobs magazine for the fourth year in a row.


Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Kent State architecture building competition announces 8 finalists 11/16/2012 Archinect Architecture News Text Attachment Email

Nearly 40 firms from around the world entered the competition to design the university's new College of Architecture and Environmental Design which will...


Athletics (15)
Kent State's Spencer Keith looks to complete wild Mid-American Conference title run (Hazell) 11/19/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State wins 31-24 thriller over Bowling Green for MAC East title (Hazell) 11/19/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Two teams in the Top 25, but still not much respect: Mid-American Conference Insider (Hazell) 11/19/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State 31, Bowling Green 24: Dri Archer dazzles as Kent State wins MAC East title (Hazell) 11/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Ghosts of mediocrity banished with Kent State's victory (Hazell) 11/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KSU coaches, men's basketball team to auction items at Brunch Bunch 11/19/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

KSU's Birkbeck named baseball Assistant Coach of the Year 11/19/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State wins MAC East Division with thrilling 31-24 win over Bowling Green (hazell) 11/19/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Kent State clinches first-ever 10-win season and earn a MAC title game berth 11/19/2012 Yahoo! Sports Text Attachment Email

No. 25 Kent State beats Bowling Green 31-24 11/19/2012 Yahoo! Sports Text Attachment Email

Go figure: The weekend's weird, wacky and wow 11/19/2012 USA Today Text Attachment Email

No. 25 Kent St beats Bowling Green 31-24 for spot in first Mid-American Conference title game 11/19/2012 Washington Post Text Attachment Email

Kent State v Bowling Green 11/18/2012 NBCsports.com Text Attachment Email

COLUMBUS, OH – NOVEMBER 17: Dri Archer #1 of the Kent State Golden Flashes breaks a tackle by Paul Swan #33 of the Bowling Green Falcons on November 17, 2012 at Doyt Perry Stadium in Bowling Green,...

Kent State runs its way to MAC glory; more early Week 12 Snap Judgments 11/19/2012 Sports Illustrated Text Attachment Email

Ohio State #4, Kent State #23 in latest AP poll 11/19/2012 Fox Sports Net (FSN) Ohio Text Attachment Email


College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Office of the Provost (1)
Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? 11/19/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


College of Public Health (COPH) (2)
Business people news -- Nov. 18 11/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Akron General Sonia Alemagno, dean of Kent State University's College of Public Health, was appointed as a member of Akron General Hospitals' Board, which governs Akron General Medical...

Charging drug-addicted moms could do more harm than good (Kenne) 11/17/2012 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...charge is a second-degree felony, punishable with a prison sentence of up to eight years. As an assistant professor of health policy and management at Kent State University's College of Public Health, I am concerned about the potential negative impact this policy will have for the state. While I...


Geography (1)
Kent State University team maps recovery to learn how cities rebuild from disaster (Curtis) 11/17/2012 Joplin Globe Text Email

...neighborhoods recover after a disaster but others don't. Andrew Curtis is the director of the Geographic Information Systems Health and Hazards Lab at Kent State University, and his work has taken him to some of the biggest natural disasters in the United States over the past seven years, including...


Higher Education (1)
Cleveland State University seeks to reduce course credits to help students 11/17/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...the three- and four-credit courses offered this fall by CSU to five other Ohio institutions. The percentage of four-credit courses was 10 percent at Kent State Universityand Bowling Green State University, 16 percent at the University of Toledo, 17 percent at Youngstown State Universityand 22 percent...


Higher Education; Office of the President (1)
Fiscal Cliff Threatens Research Funding, Education Grants, Leaving College Presidents Worried (Lefton) 11/19/2012 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email


Human Resources (1)
Lakeland Community College gives employees option to retire and be rehired at less pay (Walker) 11/17/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...back, said Judi McMullen, Tri-C's vice president of human resources. She said only a small number of employees have been rehired. The same is true at Kent State University. "We approach it from the standpoint that retirement and rehiring are two different things," said Willis Walker, Kent's vice...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Oak Ridge Boys bring holiday show to KSU Tusc 11/18/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

If there's one thing for certain, “Christmas Time's a Comin'. ” To be precise, it's headed to the Performing Arts Center on the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas, where the Oak Ridge Boys will appear in concert at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 24. Just a few seats remain for...

Autumn Odyssey 11/17/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

An Autumn Odyssey will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. Saturday at Kent State University at Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center. Proceeds benefit the Pathway to Wellness. The Odyssey will feature food, entertainment,...


KSU Museum (3)
Exhibition shows Katharine Hepburn as fashion icon (Druesedow) 11/18/2012 Miami Herald - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...“The fact that she wore slacks and wanted to be comfortable influenced women's ready-to-wear in the United States,” said Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum, which was given 700 items from Hepburn's estate. Kent State was selected because it's one of the country's only...

Photographing one of the best 11/16/2012 Worcester Telegram & Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

...Museum on Sunday. I was lucky enough to pull the assignment and photograph him. His talk complemented the iconic photos on display, entitled: "Kennedy to Kent State: Images of a Generation." Every seat in the room was taken and most people stayed late for the Q&A that followed. Kennerly won the Pulitzer...

Kent State University Museum. 11/16/2012 Museumnews.net Text Attachment Email

Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Children's book: Who picked the books 11/18/2012 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

...survey of children's books conducted by The Dispatch: ADULTS Debbie Ballinger: librarian, Maryland Elementary School, Bexley Carolyn S. Brodie: Kent State University professor; director, Reinberger Children's Library Center & Marantz Picturebook Collection; president, Association for Library...


Marketing and Entrepreneurship (3)
Black Friday is so last year (Albanese) 11/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...rosy forecasts for holiday spending and hope to get the biggest piece of the holiday spending that they can, said Paul Albanese, marketing professor at Kent State University, who focuses on consumer behavior. The National Retail Federation expects holiday sales to increase 4.1 percent from last...

Black Friday is so last year (Albanese) 11/18/2012 Bloomberg Businessweek - Online Text Attachment Email

...rosy forecasts for holiday spending and hope to get the biggest piece of the holiday spending that they can, said Paul Albanese, marketing professor at Kent State University, who focuses on consumer behavior. The National Retail Federation expects holiday sales to increase 4.1 percent from last...

Black Friday is so last year (Albanese) 11/18/2012 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...rosy forecasts for holiday spending and hope to get the biggest piece of the holiday spending that they can, said Paul Albanese, marketing professor at Kent State University, who focuses on consumer behavior. The National Retail Federation expects holiday sales to increase 4.1 percent from last...


Marketing and Entrepreneurship; Office of the President; Research; Technology (1)
Black Friday is so last year (Albanese) 11/18/2012 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...rosy forecasts for holiday spending and hope to get the biggest piece of the holiday spending that they can, said Paul Albanese, marketing professor at Kent State University, who focuses on consumer behavior. The National Retail Federation expects holiday sales to increase 4.1 percent from last...


Safety (1)
Homeless Man Arrested at Kent State Library 11/19/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Students (3)
Missing woman from Kent State University was safely located Saturday night 11/19/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Kent: Police locate missing Kent State student 11/18/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT -- Police had been looking for clues for a missing student after a missing persons report was filed with the department Friday. Heather Flynn,...

Missing Kent State Student Found 11/17/2012 19 Action News at 11 PM - WOIO-TV Text Email

...student heather flinn has been found. Police said she is safe and sound. We will have an update on action in in the morning. Again, heather flinn, the kent state constituent that was missing has been found. That's good news there.


Students; Study Abroad (1)
KENT STATE STUDENT IS FINALIST IN STUDENT DIPLOMAT VIDEO CONTEST 11/16/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Nov.16 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University student Glenn Bolich, a senior news major who studied in Italy,...


University Relations (1)
Playground ribbon-cutting held at Walls Elementary 11/17/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...ribbon-cutting with some of the Walls students are Walls PTO co-presidents Lisa Gallagher and Sara Kwan; Iris Harvey, vice president of University Relations at Kent State University; and Heidi Singer, Walls principal.


News Headline: Business notebook | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Kroll, Kathryn
News OCR Text: HONORS

Kent State University was named a Military Friendly School by G.I. Jobs magazine for the fourth year in a row.

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News Headline: Kent State architecture building competition announces 8 finalists | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Archinect Architecture News
Contact Name: Archinect
News OCR Text: Nearly 40 firms from around the world entered the competition to design the university's new College of Architecture and Environmental Design which will form a gateway to the campus in the city of Kent. They included Hadid, Moussavi, BIG, Gensler, Coop Himmelb(l)au, Perkins & Will and Eric Owen Moss Architects. But the long list of eight contains only US practices. The most internationally recognised are Morphosis and NBBJ.

The full list of invited firms can be viewed here.



The remaining firms include:


Bialosky & Partners Architects (with Architecture Research Office)
Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (with SoL Harris Day Architects)
KZF Design (with Morphosis)
NBBJ
Richard L Bowen & Associates (with Weiss/Manfredi)
The Collaborative, Inc (with Miller Hull Partnership, LLC)
Westlake Reed Leskosky
WTW Architects (with Overland Partners Architects)

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News Headline: Kent State's Spencer Keith looks to complete wild Mid-American Conference title run (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — Kent State quarterback Spencer Keith is clearly "The Survivor." Time will tell if he leads the Golden Flashes to the island of champions.

To find his name on any list of Mid-American Conference quarterbacks, one would have to look from the bottom up. And it still might not be there. As a QB, he is the ugly duckling in a league of flamethrower arms with artful-dodger feet.

Yet as the season winds down, look who is the swan leading one of the most exciting offensive teams in the MAC -- Spencer Keith. He leads No. 25 Kent State (9-1, 6-0) today against host Bowling Green (7-3, 5-1), and a Golden Flashes victory would secure a MAC East Division championship.

"It is satisfying," the 6-2, 215-pound Keith said. "I think that's due to preparation and more focus than before."

"And I have been trying to lead more than I have in the past."

No question, Keith has earned his feeling of satisfaction. Kent's brain trust brought in junior-college quarterback David Fisher last spring and said the starting job was up for grabs. The Flashes added freshman Colin Reardon to the challengers list at the start of preseason drills, and said the job was still up for grabs.

Coach Darrell Hazell said a starting QB would be picked after the first 10 days of camp . . . then after the first scrimmage . . . then after the final scrimmage . . . then before the opener. Every step of the way, Keith was the answer. Yet it appeared Kent was trying not to put the job back into the three-year starter's hands.

"I tried to block it out," Keith said. "But the competition has helped, bringing in those two guys. I mean, we've had our ups and downs this season, too. A couple of struggles early on. But we've all done a really good job of getting past those."

And still, Hazell kept looking. Three games into the season, the starting job was back on the table again. Keith came out on top again. The fact the product of Little Rock, Ark., won every challenge spoke volumes of Keith's ability to focus and handle the pressure of what is winding down to a possible championship season.

"Take it one practice at a time, not think about the circumstances, just think about the performance," Keith said. "That has helped me not go crazy about everything.

"It happened. And it has worked to our advantage. Fighting through controversy, being able to handle tough times when they come, that has definitely helped me out as a player. It's been a lot more fun to win, more exciting than the last couple of seasons we've been in."

Now 10 contests into the season, leading the MAC's East Division and amid a second-half gantlet of games that could have turned KSU's season back to .500, there is no question of Keith's standing.

"He's my quarterback," Hazell said in a private moment. "And you know, I probably haven't said that enough, publicly."

"We looked [at other QBs], but we put a whoa on it. Spencer gives us a confidence level, and the other guys are still trying to figure it all out. We feel good about Spencer."

Keith brings something to the table that makes him special.

He is a premed/biology major with a minor in mathematics. Keith has a 3.79 GPA and was the only quarterback named on the recent academic all-district team, which automatically puts him on the ballot for academic All-American.

"His game is right above the shoulders," Hazell said. "He knows that, and that's what he gets away with. He is what he is. And he still has to make a play or two for us. But we don't talk about it."

For player and coach, Keith's intellect helps him see plays perhaps his arm can't deliver and the coach can't call. The challenge for both is to fight the urge to force it.

Keith was lightly recruited out of high school with only a preferred walk-on offer from Vanderbilt in his hands before Kent. As a freshman, he had a shoulder injury, which raised more doubt about his arm strength. Add in the loss this season of Keith's favorite receiver -- Tyshon Goode (hamstring) -- to an average at best receiving corps, and the passing game Keith and Hazell clearly want in their arsenal has to be selective, not imposed.

"I think there is a common knowledge in the room that doesn't have to be said. This is what your [physical] strength is. This is what your running capabilities are, but this is where your intellect is, and that's through the roof," Hazell said, moving his hands higher and higher above his head at each step.

Kent's signature win to date came at then-No. 18 Rutgers, on Homecoming Day for the Scarlet Knights. Six turnovers forced by KSU's defense were the catalyst. As for offense, Hazell said, that 35-23 win was completely in Keith's hands.

"We could be aggressive with our play calls, because Spencer is so smart to change us to something else if it's not there," Hazell said. "It was close a lot of times [against Rutgers] but the play clock only got him once changing plays. And I'll tell you, three of our touchdowns against Rutgers came off of checks by Spencer, including the pass to Josh Boyle.

"You got to have something about you to do that, against that level of talent, in that environment. He's playing with so much more confidence right now. He's talking, and he never used to talk."

Keith is also running, albeit haltingly, keeping the ball himself because the lanes are open as more and more teams key on stopping the thunder and lightning ground attack from Trayion Durham and Dri Archer.

"I don't mind running, but if the pass is there, I always think pass first," Keith said. "On a couple of zone reads, I pull the ball and try to get as many yards as I can. I try to focus on that the whole game."

In the comeback win against rival Akron, he tucked the ball close on third-and-long and came close enough for the first down that Kent went for it on fourth to lock up the victory. Against Miami (Ohio), it was Keith's 28-yard touchdown run that helped give Kent a 35-10 halftime lead en route to a 48-32 win.

"I'm for whatever works," Keith said. "I threw a lot in high school and the first part of college. But I'd rather win."

And winning is an earmark of most survivors.

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News Headline: Kent State wins 31-24 thriller over Bowling Green for MAC East title (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Bowling Green, Ohio -- Lightning struck for No. 25 Kent State Saturday afternoon. KSU tailback Dri Archer put on an electrifying show to anchor Kent State's 31-24 down-to-the-wire victory over the Bowling Green Falcons to secure the Golden Flashes' first Mid-American Conference East Division title in school history.

The 5-8, 175-pound junior showed his 4.21-second speed in the 40-yard dash speed on TD runs of 79 and 74 yards. That helped to offset a rare four-turnover day for the Golden Flashes (10-1, 7-0 MAC), and a 355-yard passing game from BG quarterback Matt Schilz. The Falcons (7-4, 5-2) entered the game with the best overall defense and the best run defense in the league. But with Archer notching 241 yards and two TDs on 17 carries, the BG run defense was splintered.

Add in a tough 39 rushing yards and game-deciding TD by Kent quarterback Spencer Keith, and the Falcons did not have enough to overcome the Flashes, who led, 10-0; trailed, 17-10; went ahead, 24-17; saw the game tied, 24-24; took the lead, 31-24, and watched BG with the ball and marching in the final 2:33 of the game.

"When it went back to 24-24, I tell you what, my stomach was in my throat the whole game," Kent head coach Darrell Hazell said. "It really was. I usually relax at some point during the game. Not today. But you can't let the team see it."

That tie came just after Archer's second touchdown of the game seemed to take all the air from the BG sideline and inflate the Golden Flashes.

With starting tailback Trayion Durham sidelined with a hip injury suffered earlier in the second half, Archer was now in for extra duty. All season long Hazell said the key to Archer's effectiveness was limited touches for maximum results. No more than a dozen, if possible.

But with Durham down, the fourth quarter was Archer's, with explicit instructions from Hazell. "Coach told me, 'Hold on to the ball, and don't go down,' " Archer said.

On his ninth carry of the game Archer took a handoff and went to work behind the strength of KSU's offensive line, senior guard Josh Klein and senior tackle Brian Winters. Archer sprinted down the sidelines and appeared to be stopped by BG defensive end Ted Oullett. Archer said he felt Oullett grab at his shoulders, so the speedster ducked his head and rolled under the tackle.

"He flew over me," Archer said. "I was in a big cluster and I fought back out."

Suddenly, Archer was cutting back toward the middle of the field and burning rubber toward the end zone. "Spencer got the block that broke it," Archer said. Kent teammate Luke Wollet said Archer had pulled the same move on him once in practice.

"You never lose hope with someone like that," Wollet said. "Nothing surprises me with him. It's like trying to tackle air."

But the Falcons answered immediately with an 81-yard touchdown pass from Schilz to Chris Gallon (10 receptions, 213 yards, two TDs).

The game was in the balance inside the final seconds with the Falcons in the midst of a 13-play, 58-yard drive, facing fourth down at the Kent 13. But KSU defensive end Jake Dooley forced Schilz to rush his throw to the back of the end zone, where Wollet was waiting with open arms.

"I sat back, read his eyes, and broke on it," Wollet said. The interception started Kent's celebration before a gaggle of fans in the corner of Doyt Perry Stadium.

The previous 39 minutes had been back and forth with Kent suffering self-inflicted wounds all game. But in the fourth quarter both the offense and defense stepped up. After the Falcons tied the score, then got the ball back, KSU defensive lineman Roosevelt Nix bull-rushed into the backfield, and stuck his hand into the air as Schilz passed.

Nix's tipped ball was intercepted by fellow defensive lineman Richard Gray at the BG 20. That led to Keith's 7-yard TD run for a 31-24 Kent lead with 8:06 to play. BG then marched down to Kent's 17, where Schilz was pressured on fourth down. This time Nix had dropped into coverage and knocked the ball down. That gave the ball back to Kent with 5:00 to play.

"Big Stop," Hazell said. "The A-players show up when they have to."

Kent could not run out the clock, but a 54-yard KSU punt made the Falcons start on their own 25. Schilz got close. Yet Keith, unlike his coach, sat comfortably on the sidelines.

"We knew our defense had one big play left," he said.

And Wollet delivered it.

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News Headline: Two teams in the Top 25, but still not much respect: Mid-American Conference Insider (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Call it faint praise as Northern Illinois finally cracked both the Associated Press and the USA Today polls, while Kent inched into the coaches poll after surfacing in the AP Poll last week. Still no real love for MAC football which has six teams bowl eligible with seven wins or more, including NIU and Kent with 10-1 records.

Kent is ranked No. 23 in the AP Poll with NIU No. 24. In the USA Today coaches' poll, the Huskies are No. 23 and Kent is No. 25.

Remember, more than 30 percent of the coaches voting in the USA Today poll are current or past MAC coaches. Still, this poll still ranks Boise State (8-2, unranked in the AP) ahead of both MAC teams at No. 22, 94 points ahead of NIU.

It seems the Flashes, in particular, are being measured more against their 47-14 loss on the road to hapless Kentucky (2-9) on Sept. 8, than they are by their win Oct. 27 at No. 18 Rutgers.

It is plain from his comments that the coaches and other pollsters have not made a favorable impression on MAC Commissioner Jon Steinbrecher. Four MAC teams have been ranked at some point this season, but none higher than No. 21. This is despite the league having 16 wins over teams from the six major conferences this season.

"I am pleased to see the national pollsters are finally recognizing the outstanding football being played in the Mid-American Conference," he said via e-mail. "Kent State and Northern Illinois are deserving of the attention they are receiving"

Odd team out: With six bowl-eligible teams in the league, it is possible all could get a bowl invitation. But it is also possible only five make it. So which would be the odd team out? Ohio University (7-4, 4-3) has lost three of its past four games and likely needs a road upset on Friday against No. 23 Kent to solidify its bowl worthiness. Bowling Green (7-4, 5-2) might also look at its game vs. Buffalo (4-7, 3-4) as a must-win in order to avoid finishing the season with two straight losses.

At the opposite end, the MAC's three bowl tie-ins -- The Pizza Bowl in Detroit, GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala., and the Potato Bowl in Boise, Idaho -- will likely be bantering over the likes of Northern Illinois, Kent State and Toledo (8-3, 5-2). However, it can be argued that the most impressive MAC team down the stretch has been Ball State (8-3, 5-2), which ends the season with a home game against reeling Miami (4-7, 3-4).

Cinder-fella: The final numbers said 91 yards passing and 39 yards rushing. But there were two touchdowns inside those 130 yards for Kent State senior quarterback Spencer Keith, along with some hidden gems his teammates and coaches recognized.

The 6-2, 215-pound Keith still draws some ire from KSU fans for not being like most of his QB brothers in the Mid-American Conference as he is neither strong in the run or the pass. His strength is as a game manager with low turnovers. Others are expected to provide highlight material for KSU, for the most part, not Keith.

"He still has to make a play or two for us," head coach Darrell Hazell said of his QB. "But we don't talk about it."

In Kent State's 31-24 win over Bowling Green to secure a MAC East Division title, the highlights were provided by Dri Archer's touchdown runs of 79 and 74 yards. But inside Keith's 91 yards passing was a 32-yard TD throw to Eric Adeyemi that tied the score, 17-17. And at the end, there was Keith's 7-yard TD run to give Kent the lead for good.

"He played tough, physically," Hazell said. "Even on his fumble, he was running hard."

Archer pointed out that on his zig-zagging 74-yard TD run, Keith had the block that sprung him into the end zone.

"I just got in the way," Keith deadpanned. But it came with a smile on his face.

Oops: In Kent's past two wins, over Miami and BG, the Flashes have been careless with the football. There were two interceptions and three fumbles (none lost) against Miami, and one interception and three fumbles (two lost) against the Falcons. Luckily the lost fumbles did not come back to haunt Kent against the Falcons.

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News Headline: Kent State 31, Bowling Green 24: Dri Archer dazzles as Kent State wins MAC East title (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BOWLING GREEN: Dri Archer's touchdown run almost defied explanation.

Many in the press box lowered their heads, figuring the Kent State junior had been tackled near midfield. With Archer, they never will make that mistake again.

Archer was determined to shoulder more of the load because Trayion Durham, the powerful half of the Golden Flashes' running back tandem, was already bothered by last week's quadriceps pull. Then in the third quarter, Durham suffered an injury to his lower abdomen, KSU coach Darrell Hazell said. Durham's last carry was a 9-yard gain; a later pass intended for him was intercepted.

“Before that drive, Coach was telling me ‘Hold on to the ball and don't go down,' ” Archer said. “The whole time, I was thinking in my head, ‘Don't get tackled.' ”

So when defensive tackle Ted Oullett jumped on Archer's back and grabbed him by the shoulders, Archer ducked and flipped Oullett. Archer raced to the end zone, benefiting from a late block from quarterback Spencer Keith, for a spectacular 74-yard touchdown.

“It was like a big cluster and I just popped back out. I was still up and I just kept running,” Archer said. “I didn't want to go down. I was fighting more than he was. That was probably one of my most exciting runs so far this season.”

Archer's dash was not the game-winning touchdown in a 31-24 victory over Bowling Green on Saturday at Doyt Perry Stadium that wrapped up the Mid-American Conference East Division title for Kent State (10-1, 7-0). That honor went to Keith, who rushed 7 yards for a touchdown with 1:48 remaining.

Junior linebacker Luke Wollet preserved the victory with 21 seconds to play, when he intercepted Bowling Green quarterback Matt Schilz's pass in the end zone. It was the 10th career interception for Wollet, who also had a game-high 13 tackles.

Archer's amazing feats will provide the buzz as Kent State advances to the Nov. 30 MAC Championship against Northern Illinois at Ford Field in Detroit and likely to its first bowl appearance in 40 years.

“He's a spectacular player,” Hazell said of Archer. “The things that guy can do with the ball in his hands are absolutely incredible.”

Added Wollet: “He's a game-changer. He's such a great talent, I'm blessed to be on his team.”

Against the stubborn Falcons (7-4, 5-2), Archer dazzled with a career-high 241 yards on 17 carries and two touchdowns, the other going for 79 yards in the second quarter. He added runs of 11, 12, 14 and 16 yards and caught a 13-yard pass. He ran his KSU single-season record to 21 touchdowns, four of those runs for 60 yards or more, and increased his average per carry to 10.3 yards.

Going into Friday's regular-season finale against Ohio University, Archer has 118 touches this season, 36 of them for 20 or more yards, 64 of them for 10 or more.

“You watch highlight clips of [Archer] making big play after big play after big play, but that can't change what you do fundamentally,” Bowling Green coach Dave Clawson said. “We missed some tackles in tight space. … He made our guys miss, just like he makes everybody miss.”

Oullett's whiff actually took Wollet off the hook. Archer said he used the same move on Wollet in KSU's indoor facility last winter.

“He did the same thing to me and I slid right over him,” Wollet said. “Nothing surprises me with him. It's like trying to tackle air. He's just something, a great talent, and he's got a tremendous future ahead of him.”

Asked if was hard to live that miss down, Wollet said: “At least someone takes over my spot. It won't be about me any more.”

The triumph was not all about Archer. Kent State intercepted three Schilz passes, giving the Golden Flashes 32 takeaways this season. Senior cornerback Norman Wolfe of Butchel, playing with a broken arm, had his 10th career interception to set up a field goal. Keith completed just 9-of-17 passes for 91 yards with an interception and a fumble (one of two KSU lost), but threw a 32-yard touchdown pass to Eric Adeyemi and rushed 12 times for 39 yards.

Of the game-winning touchdown, Keith said: “I saw the end crash so I pulled it out and I had a lead blocker out there. I think No. 7 [linebacker D.J. Lynch] was right on my tail. I ran as hard as I could to the end zone. I'm not sure which receiver was out there, maybe [Matt] Hurdle, got a good block.”

But the Falcons had answers for many of the Golden Flashes' big plays. Schilz hit redshirt freshman receiver Chris Gallon on touchdown passes of 72 and 81 yards on the next offensive snap after Archer's long touchdown runs.

“Those two big plays they had on us were mental collapses,” Wollet said.

“It's unfortunate, but that happens in big games. Our offense responded great. When they had a turnover, we responded with a couple turnovers that were pretty big. That happens in a heavyweight fight like this. We were punching back and forth and we happened to get the last punch in.”

But even with the punches and counterpunches, Wollet was confident because the Golden Flashes have Archer, a Venice, Fla., product.

“He's fun to have on your team,” Wollet said. “When something bad happens, you never lose hope when you have someone like that because you know he can break a 90-yarder and make 11 guys miss, even when your offense is struggling.”

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News Headline: Ghosts of mediocrity banished with Kent State's victory (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BOWLING GREEN: It's safe for Jack Lambert to come out of the woods.

The Hall of Fame linebacker's reclusive nature has nothing to do with the fact that for years his Kent State football program bordered on bag-over-the-head mediocrity. But if it did, Lambert would have ripped that paper to shreds Saturday afternoon like a Great White shark mauling an unsuspecting swimmer.

Kent State football is no longer a laughingstock.

No. 25 Kent State (10-1) buried the bad old days with a 31-24 victory over Bowling Green in Doyt Perry Stadium. It captured its first Mid-American Conference East title since the league split into divisions in 1997 and advanced to the Nov. 30 MAC Championship game at Ford Field in Detroit.

After that, KSU's first bowl appearance since 1972 certainly awaits.

The Golden Flashes broke the 90-year-old program's record for victories in a season, surpassing the (Don) James' Gang's 9-3 record in 1973, when Lambert was a senior.

They moved to 7-0 in the MAC, which they've never done in their 61 years in the conference. They earned their 14th victory in their past 16 games, one of five teams in the Football Bowl Subdivision that could make that claim going into Saturday night. They put up their ninth consecutive triumph, extending another KSU record. They won their sixth consecutive road game this season, another program record. And those numbers can still increase. The regular season concludes Friday at home with an 11 a.m. game against Ohio University.

Dominoes from 90 years ago and 40 years ago are falling. And the man responsible, the coach who restored the James Gang's glory, was wearing a strangely shaped cap covered in grass.

“I think somebody stepped on my hat in the locker room,” Kent State coach Darrell Hazell said.

In just his second season, the former Ohio State assistant head coach/receivers coach might be surprised by how fast the Golden Flashes learned to become winners.

“When I took the job a year and a half ago and looked at what kind of players we had, I thought we had a chance,” he said. “We've taken off a little bit, we really have.”

He was still recovering from his second career Gatorade shower, his first since a victory at Akron in 2011. He couldn't tell which flavor he'd tasted, all he knew was it tasted good. He had no idea it was nose tackle Dana Brown who ambushed him from behind with a bucket of lemon-lime.

“Totally caught me off guard,” Hazell said. “It's on film, though, I'm sure. They got me good.”

Hazell was more concerned with what the MAC East title meant for the university, for the players, for the town, for the graduates who have wanted to wear their sports gear proudly during football season, but had nothing to be proud about.

“What a wonderful win for this football program and all the people who have ever put on football uniforms, ever put on a Kent State sweatshirt,” Hazell said. “To think what our team has accomplished this season and the end of last season, it's mind-boggling. It tells you when guys put their minds to something and they work the plan, so much can be accomplished.”

Hazell sounded almost in awe of what's being done by his players, who were rejected by big schools.

“They have been so humble, their preparation has been incredible and they're so driven,” Hazell said. “You'd think after getting five or six wins they would take their foot off the gas pedal, that has not been the case at all. Not for one second have they let up.”

In some ways, KSU junior Roosevelt Nix typifies what Hazell has done. He took a 5-foot-11, 245-pound Reynoldsburg High School product who some thought was too small to play defensive tackle and helped make him a force. That force broke up a Bowling Green pass on fourth-and-2 from the KSU 17 with five minutes remaining to help preserve the victory.

“There's been plenty of times coaches came up after games and said, ‘We were wrong.' I just like to prove people wrong,” Nix said. “I joke with coach Hazell all the time; he was at Ohio State.”

Nix reveled in the Golden Flashes' ghost-busting victory.

“It's an amazing feeling, you know the history behind our program, just to change it up,” Nix said.

Junior strong safety Luke Wollet of Poland Seminary, who had a game-clinching interception with 21 seconds remaining, was another who appreciated the accomplishment not just for himself, but for Golden Flashes everywhere.

“Aw, man, this is just a big moment for this city and this football program,” Wollet said, sighing before he spoke. “I'm sure there's 40 years of players that just sat back in their chair and had a big smile. It feels great to do this for them and to do this for us. So many Kent State football players and students who have wanted to come watch a nice football team … we're hoping we can build on that.

“It's something I'll never forget.”

Behind the stadium, Kent State fans who traveled to Northwest Ohio were joyously congratulating players and coaches. There were hugs and handshakes and even a few tears. One KSU administrator wiped his eyes before he entered the locker room.

Old burdens had been lifted. No one who ever put on a Kent State uniform may have been spared an emotional response, perhaps not even Lambert.

“I hope Jack calls,” Hazell said excitedly

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News Headline: KSU coaches, men's basketball team to auction items at Brunch Bunch | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Annual charity ‘fun-raiser' set for Thanksgiving Day in Kent

The annual Brunch
Bunch Charity “Fun-Raiser”
Auction will take place
from 8 a.m. to noon Thanksgiving
Day at the American
Legion Underwood Hall
at 1945 Mogadore Road in
Kent.
Always a crowd pleaser,
members of the Kent State
University men's basketball
team and head coach
Rob Senderoff will serve
as guest auctioneers during
the event, as well as
Herb Page, KSU men's golf
coach.
Guest auctioneers will
take the auction stage at
10 a.m. and will be taking
bids for KSU apparel and
autographed items, such
as a 1972 replica mini football
helmet signed by Head
Football Coach Darrell Hazell,
a KSU College World
Series Clubhouse Chair
signed by head men's baseball
coach Scott Stricklin,
and “one of a kind” golf related
items.
Other items up for auction
will be a ride for two
in the Goodyear blimp, autographed
items by Josh
Cribbs and many specialty
gift baskets.
Back by popular demand,
Cajun Dave's at the
Water Street Tavern is offering
12 lb. average fully
cooked smoked turkeys in
time for Thanksgiving for
only $40 with all net proceeds
benefiting Brunch
Bunch.
Limited quantities are
available and must be ordered
and paid for in advance
by contacting Jeanne
Kotis at 330-673-5873.
Donations for the auction
can be dropped off
at Hall-Green Agency at
146 N. DePeyster Street
in Kent; Portage Community
Bank in Ravenna at
1311 E. Main Street or at
their Kent location at 1532
S. Water Street.
For more information,
contact Michelle Hartman
at 330-815-4315.
Charities to benefit from
the auction are Kent Social
Services Hot Meals, The
Lord's Pantry, Center of
Hope and Coleman Adult
Day Services food program.

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News Headline: KSU's Birkbeck named baseball Assistant Coach of the Year | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mike Birkbeck has long been recognized as one of the top pitching coaches in the country. So it should come as no surprise to Kent State baseball followers that Birkbeck was recently named the 2012 Baseball America/American Baseball Coaches Association Assistant Coach of the Year.

Birkbeck will begin his 17th season as the Golden Flashes pitching coach with the start of the 2013 season. Under his tenure, 37 pitchers have been drafted or signed into professional baseball. He has also mentored 28 All-MAC, 14 All-MAC Tournament, nine All-Region and nine All-American honorees.

Before joining the Kent State staff, Birkbeck played 14 years of professional baseball, including stints with the Milwaukee Brewers and the New York Mets.

Birkbeck is a member of the Orrville Sports Hall of Fame, University of Akron Sports Hall of Fame, Wayne County Sports Hall of Fame, the Greater Akron Baseball Hall of Fame, the Summit County Sports Hall of Fame, the Richmond Braves 10th Anniversary All-Diamond Team and Richmond's All-Century Team.

WRESTLING

Behind four individual champions, Kent State won the Navy Classic Saturday at Wesley Brown Field House in Annapolis, Md. The Golden Flashes finished first of nine teams with 115.5 points, just ahead of host Navy (109.5).

Flashes fifth-year seniors Dustin Kilgore and Casey Newburg remained unbeaten, and were joined on the top of the podium by Caleb Marsh and Stevie Mitcheff.

For Marsh (165 pounds), it was his first competition of the season coming off an injury. The sophomore went 4-0 with a major decision and defeated Navy's Jacob Schalles 9-5 in the finals.

Kilgore (197) pinned all three of his opponents, including a first-period fall against second-seeded Paul Rands of Navy.

Newburg (184) went 4-0 with a pin and two major decisions. He moved to 12-0 on the season with a 5-3 victory over Navy's Mason Bailey in the final.

Mitcheff earned his first title of the season, going 4-0 with two major decisions. It was an all-Kent State final at 125 as Mitcheff edged freshman Alfredo Gray 6-5.

Redshirt freshman Nick Carr made another finals appearance at 149, where he was topped by Navy's Zach Basich 4-3. Carr went 3-1 on the day with a pin and a major decision.

Redshirt freshmen Sam Wheeler also went 3-1 to take second. After three comfortable victories, including a technical fall, Wheeler dropped the 174-pound final bout to Ohio's Cody Walters 7-4.

The Flashes will take next weekend off from competition before heading to Las Vegas for the Cliff Keen Invitational Nov. 30 and Dec. 1.

MEN'S GOLF

Kent State Director of Golf/Head Coach Herb Page has announced the signing of Josh Whalen (Napanee, Ontario) to a National Letter of Intent. Whalen will join the Golden Flashes as a freshman for the 2013-14 season.

"Josh is an accomplished golfer who plays and manages his game at a high level," said Page, who led the Golden Flashes to a fifth-place finish at the NCAA Championship in 2012. "What I really love about him is the fact that he is a winner. He is rated as one of the top junior golfers in Canada, and his accomplishments at the local, provincial and national levels back up that ranking. We have had a lot of success here at Kent State recruiting top amateur talent from Canada, and Josh fits that same mold."

In 2012 Whalen won a USGA Junior Amateur Qualifier at Aurora Country Club with rounds of 70-71. He also tied for medalist honors at a PGA Canadian Tour "Chase The Dream" Qualifier Tournament with rounds of 70-70. His "Chase The Dream" victory earned him a spot at the Canadian Professional Tour's Great Waterway Classic this past September, where he finished as the top amateur in the 126-man field.

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News Headline: Kent State wins MAC East Division with thrilling 31-24 win over Bowling Green (hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Want proof that anything is indeed possible?

Need assurance that miracles do occur?

Just read these words: Kent State, 2012 MAC East Division football champions.

After a 39-year title drought, most of which was spent wallowing in the bowels of college football, the 25th-ranked Golden Flashes clinched the Mid-American Conference East Division crown by emerging from what may go down as the most thrilling battle in program history with a 31-24 victory over Bowling Green on Saturday afternoon at Doyt Perry Stadium.

Kent State (10-1, 7-0 MAC), which set a school record for wins in a single season with triumph No. 10, captured its first MAC title of any kind since 1972 and earned the program's first bowl bid since that same season. Most importantly, the Flashes earned a spot in the MAC Championship Game against West Division champion Northern Illinois on Nov. 30 at Ford Field in Detroit.

All this from a program that's produced a mere three winning seasons in the last 35 years. But those immense struggles of the past have at long last been put to rest.

“What a wonderful win for this football program and all the people who have ever put on football uniforms, even everyone who has ever put on a Kent State sweatshirt,” said second-year head coach Darrell Hazell, who has authored KSU's amazing turnaround — from a 1-6 to start last season to MAC East Division champs this season.”

“To think of what our team has accomplished here this season and the end of last season is mind-boggling to me,” Hazell said. It just tells you that when guys put their minds to something and they work the plan, so much can be accomplished.

“I can't be more proud of my players, coaches, support staff. ... This is a great feeling right now.”

Junior blazer Dri Archer led a parade of Golden Flashes heroes, rushing for a career-high 241 yards on just 17 carries with a pair of touchdowns covering 79 and 74 yards that will be talked about for as long as football is played at Kent State.

Senior quarterback Spencer Keith scored the game-winning touchdown on a 7-yard run with 8:14 to play, and junior strong safety Luke Wollet iced it by picking off a fourth-and-long pass in his end zone with just 21 seconds to play.

“This game means so much more to the people here at Kent State right now. It's 40 years,” said Wollet. “People can sit back in their chair with a big sigh of relief. It feels great to be able to do that.”

There was no time for relief in this epic clash until that last pass came to rest in Wollet's arms.

Kent State seized early control when an interception by senior cornerback Norman Wolfe set up a 32-yard Freddy Cortez field goal, then Archer shed a tackle near the line of scrimmage and exploded downfield past helpless BG defenders for a 79-yard score to give the Flashes a 10-0 second-quarter lead.

That “control” lasted for all of 19 seconds.

On the Falcons' next play from scrimmage, junior quarterback Matt Schilz (22-of-44, 355 yards, 3 TDs, 3 INTs) found freshman wide receiver Chris Gallon (10 catches, 213 yards, 2 TDs) wide open down the right seam for a 72-yard score that brought BG within three at 10-7.

Falcons junior Josh Pettus then ripped the football out of KSU receiver Matt Hurdle's arms following a short catch at the Flashes' 41, and Bowling Green converted the turnover into a 30-yard Tyler Tate field goal that left the game tied 10-10 at halftime.

The Falcons (7-4, 5-2) grabbed their first lead after junior cornerback Cameron Truss stripped the ball from Keith on a keeper, and junior defensive back Aaron Foster recovered at the KSU 40. Schilz lobbed a 27-yard touchdown pass to junior wideout Shaun Joplin, who snagged it over Wolfe to put Bowling Green on top 17-10.

The Flashes answered on their next possession. After runs of 14 and 11 by Archer, Keith tossed a 32-yard pass to senior wide receiver Eric Adeyemi to knot the contest at 17 with 7:47 to play in the third quarter.

The game was still tied in the fourth quarter when Archer ripped off his most memorable run of what's been a highlight reel season.

Archer broke loose down the left side to around midfield, where he ducked a couple of BG tacklers and emerged from a pack of players as he jolted across the field and toward the right side. In the blink of an eye, Archer was running loose through the Falcons' secondary and streaking into the end zone for a 79-yard run that gave Kent State a 24-17 lead.

“He's a spectacular player,” said Hazell. “The things that guy can do with the ball in his hands are incredible, absolutely incredible.”

However, in a bizarre case of deja vu all over again, this time the Flashes' lead lasted all of 20 seconds.

Schilz found Gallon down the left sideline, and the Falcons' 6-4, 221-pound receiver first juked Leon Green, then fought off Sidney Saulter before breaking loose down the sideline for an 81-yard score that knotted the game once again at 24 with 14:11 to play.

“I thought our guys stayed poised throughout the possession changes and the lead changes,” said Hazell. “That's what it was gonna take for us to win this football game. Our guys have such resolve, you knew they were gonna keep battling no matter what.”

At this point, the Flashes' defense went back to what got them to this point: Forcing turnovers.

After a Kent State punt, Bowling Green took over at its own 20. On the second play, Flashes star defensive tackle Roosevelt Nix batted a Schilz pass into the air, and junior defensive end Richard Gray snared the interception at the BG 20.

After Saturday's game the Flashes have 21 interceptions, several of which have come from tipped or batted balls.

“That tip was huge,” said Hazell. “The ‘A' players show up when they have to, and (Nix) is certainly one of them.”

After three straight runs by Archer moved the ball to the 10, Keith faked an inside handoff to Archer and took off to the left, diving into the end zone for a 7-yard touchdown — Kent State's biggest score in 40 years.

“They're definitely gonna bite on that fake,” said Spencer, smiling at Archer. “It wasn't a called run for me, it was a read. I saw them crash in and I took it outside. I saw a guy on my heels and I just ran as hard as I could. I had a clear way.”

Bowling Green had two more shots to retaliate, but came up empty. First the Falcons marched to the KSU 17, where they faced a fourth-and-2. Schilz, under heavy pressure from blitzing Kent State senior linebacker C.J. Malauulu (9 tackles), threw a pass that was batted down by Nix, who had backed downfield in coverage.

The Flashes then went three-and-out, but a 54-yard Anthony Melchiori punt pushed Bowling Green back to its own 25. The Falcons advanced to the KSU 14 before the drive stalled, ending in Wollet's game-clinching pick.

“I was just looking where his eyes were,” said Wollet. “I knew it was gonna be a desperation heave on fourth-and-13, and I was just fortunate to be there.”

The Flashes pushed their string of victories to a school-record nine games, increased their mark for consecutive road wins in a season to six, and are now 14-2 in their past 16 games after snapping Bowling Green's six-game winning streak.

“BG, you have to give them tons of credit. They're fighters,” said Wollet. “Every time we'd punch them, they swung right back. We just happened to get the last punch in.”

The Flashes will play their final regular season game of the year Friday at Dix Stadium at 11 a.m. against Ohio before setting their sights on Northern Illinois.

REMEMBERING A FRIEND

Wollet played arguably the best game of his career on the biggest stage, tying a career-high with 13 tackles, along with 1 1/2 tackles for loss and his game-ending interception, which was the 10th of his career.

Afterward he remembered a former teammate at Poland Seminary High School, Darius Patton, who was found dead Wednesday at his mother's residence in Farrell, Pa. The death was confirmed a suicide, according to an article that appeared in the Youngstown Vindicator.

Patton received a football scholarship from the University of Pittsburgh, and played for the Panthers last season.

“My old high school teammate, Darius Patton, he died (a few) days ago,” said Wollet, choking back tears. “I knew he was playing with me today. It's something I'll never forget. I knew he was here today. It's very emotional.”

No. 25 KENT STATE 31, BGSU 24

Kent St. 0 10 7 14 — 31

Bowling Green 0 10 7 7 — 24

SCORING SUMMARY

Second Quarter

Kent—FG Cortez 32, 11:40.

Kent—Archer 79 run (Cortez kick), 8:35.

BG—Gallon 72 pass from Schilz (Stein kick), 8:16.

BG—FG Tate 30, 3:36.

Third Quarter

BG—Joplin 27 pass from Schilz (Stein kick), 10:50.

Kent—Adeyemi 32 pass from Keith (Cortez kick), 7:47.

Fourth Quarter

Kent—Archer 74 run (Cortez kick), 14:31.

BG—Gallon 81 pass from Schilz (Stein kick), 14:11.

Kent—Keith 7 run (Cortez kick), 8:14.

Kent BG

First downs 14 19

Rushes-yards 42-334 31-83

Passing 91 355

Comp-Att-Int 9-17-1 22-44-3

Return Yards (-1) 0

Punts-Avg. 6-40.8 5-39.0

Fumbles-Lost 3-2 0-0

Penalties-Yards 4-18 3-18

Time of Possession 30:04 29:56

RUSHING—Kent St., Archer 17-241, Keith 12-39, Terhune 1-31,

Durham 10-20, Durden 1-5, Team 1-(minus 2). Bowling Green, Samuel 19-64,

Pettigrew 8-17, Schilz 3-4, Team 1-(minus 2).

PASSING—Kent St., Keith 9-17-1-91. Bowling Green,

Schilz 22-44-3-355.

RECEIVING—Kent St., Hurdle 3-8, Adeyemi 2-39, Boyle 2-6,

Humphrey 1-25, Archer 1-13. Bowling Green, Gallon 10-213, Joplin 5-74, Bayer 5-48, Burbrink 1-18, Hopgood 1-2.

A—16,002.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Kent State clinches first-ever 10-win season and earn a MAC title game berth | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! Sports
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State hasn't had a lot to brag about on the gridiron.

It hasn't had a winning season since 2001 and has had just two winning seasons since 1977. It hasn't played in a bowl game since 1972.

But things are looking up — way up — for the Golden Flashes, who defeated Bowling Green 31-24 to claim the Mid-American Conference East Division championship and notch their first-ever trip to the MAC championship game.

And they did it in grand fashion.

After trading touchdowns with Bowling Green throughout the game, the Golden Flashes stopped the Falcons twice in their territory in the final five minutes, including a game-sealing interception in the end zone with no time remaining in the game.

The title is a bit a sweet justice after the Golden Flashes were the most-mocked team following a wrong-way punt return during the opening weekend. In their next game against Kentucky — the Golden Flashes' only loss of the year — they were once again the butt of the college football joke as two players ran into each other in the end zone to cause an ill-timed safety

Click here to view video: http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/ncaaf-dr-saturday/kent-state-clinches-first-ever-10-game-season-211203296--ncaaf.html

But Kent State pulled it together and blew out its opponents almost all year long. The Golden Flashes have never won 10 games in a season — the closest they came was nine wins in 1973 — and they still have a chance to win 11 against Ohio in the regular season finale and as many as 13 by the end of the year.

Running back Dri Archer has been outstanding this season. On Saturday, he became on the fifth FBS players this year with two 70-yard rushes in the same game

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News Headline: No. 25 Kent State beats Bowling Green 31-24 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! Sports
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ..BOWLING GREEN, Ohio (AP) -- Kent State's remarkable season just keeps getting better.

The No. 25 Golden Flashes are going to their first Mid-American Conference title game with the most wins in school history. But getting there wasn't easy Saturday, especially for second-year coach Darrell Hazell.

Kent State's defense stopped Bowling Green twice within the last five minutes in the Flashes' territory, holding on for a 31-24 victory.

Luke Wollet's interception of Matt Schilz' heave into the end zone with 21 seconds left sealed the victory. The Falcons had driven to the Kent State 14 with less than a minute left, before coming up empty on four consecutive throws.

''My stomach was in my throat,'' Hazell said. ''I couldn't let the players see it.''

The former Ohio State assistant has revived a Kent State (10-1, 7-0 MAC) program that has been one of the worst in the conference the last four decades with more winless seasons (four) than winning ones (two) up until this year.

The Flashes' speedy junior running back Dri Archer took over the game with leading rusher Trayion Durham banged up and unable to do much.

Archer ran for 241 yards on 17 carries and two touchdowns of more than 70 yards.

On his second score at the start of the fourth quarter, Archer broke three tackles on his way to a 74-yard touchdown run that put Kent State ahead 24-17. He appeared to be stopped at midfield, but somehow managed to slip away and zigzagged into the end zone.

The teams traded scores until Kent State defensive tackle Roosevelt Nix tipped Schilz's pass and lineman Richard Gray grabbed the ball out of the air, setting up the Flashes at Bowling Green's 20.

Archer took it from there, getting the offense down to the 7. Quarterback Spencer Keith then faked to Archer and kept it for a 7-yard TD that put the Flashes ahead for good with 8:14 left.

Bowling Green (7-4, 5-2) had two more shots, but they were stopped on downs and then intercepted in the end zone.

Keith, a senior, said his teammates had no doubt they were going to win. That wasn't an attitude they had in the past.

''Before we definitely had some doubt,'' Keith said. ''Just because of our past history.''

Back in the national rankings for the first time since 1973, Kent State avoided becoming the third MAC team to lose a week after getting into the Top 25.

Ohio was the first MAC team to get into the rankings this season, and the Bobcats then lost their next game to Miami (Ohio). Toledo got into the rankings and promptly lost to Ball State last week.

It was a game of big plays on both sides, with four touchdowns going for over 70 yards, including Archer's scoring runs of 79 and 74 yards.

Archer and Durham have both run 1,000-yards, but Archer knew he would be counted on even more with teammate hurting.

''Coach told me all week I'd have to do more,'' he said

Archer's first score was spectacular, too. He took a handoff, made one cut and raced past everyone for a 79-yard TD that gave Kent State a 10-0 lead midway through the second quarter.

Kent State extended its school record nine-game winning streak in what is its first winning season since 2001.

They've now won 14 of 16, including 11 straight in the MAC, since beating Bowling Green a year ago.

Schilz was 22-of-44 passing for 355 yards and three touchdowns, carving up a Kent defense that has given a lot of passing yards all season.

His throw to Chris Gallon along the sideline for an 81-yard TD, his second of the day, tied it at 24-24 early in the fourth quarter.

Gallon finished with 213 receiving yards and two touchdowns.

Bowling Green had taken the lead early in the third quarter 17-10 when Schilz lofted a 27-yard throw to Shaun Joplin who leaped over a defender and came down with one foot in the corner of the end zone.

Kent State came back on the next drive by turning to Archer who had a catch and two runs for 38 yards, setting up Keith's 32-yard TD pass to Eric Adeyemi, making it 17-17 with 7:47 left in the third quarter.

Bowling Green had bottled up the Flashes' physical, grind-it-out running game in the first quarter, holding them to just three first downs - the first coming on a fake punt that gained 31 yards.

That's when Kent State began relying on Archer.

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News Headline: Go figure: The weekend's weird, wacky and wow | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: USA Today
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 1:35PM EST November 18. 2012 - Some notable performances and accomplishments in college football this weekend, by the numbers.

3: Consecutive seasons of double-digit wins for Northern Illinois (10-1) after its 31-24 victory against Toledo clinched the MAC West title. Before that string, the Huskies had three seasons of double-digit wins in their first 108 years of football.

3: Field goals of 50-plus yards by Rice's Chris Boswell in a 36-14 win against SMU, tying an FBS game record. Boswell had five field goals in all. He has five 50-plus kicks this season and 10 in his career.

7: Schools in FBS that have never had a season of double-digit wins. Kent State (10-1) left that group Saturday with its 31-24 win at Bowling Green that clinched a spot in the MAC title game. Still looking for that season of 10-plus wins are Indiana, Iowa State, Louisiana-Lafayette, South Florida (which has had football only since 1997), Utah State (the Aggies could do it this week), Vanderbilt and Western Michigan.

9: Wins this season for Rutgers coach Kyle Flood, a school record for a first-year coach, after a 10-3 win at Cincinnati. Flood is the 26th man to coach the Scarlet Knights.

32: Consecutive points by Division III Wittenberg (Ohio) as it rallied from a 31-13 halftime deficit to beat Heidelberg (Ohio) 52-38 in a first-round playoff game. Heidelberg was driving in Wittenberg territory with a minute to go, aiming for the tying touchdown, when Heath Eby returned an interception 60 yards for a touchdown to clinch it.

39.4: Harvard's scoring average this season, an Ivy League record, after wrapping up an 8-2 season with a 34-24 win against Yale. The Crimson, who have beaten their archrival a record six times in a row, averaged 37.4 points last season to miss the league record by 0.2 points.

41: Touchdowns Clemson QB Tajh Boyd has accounted for rushing and passing this season, breaking his own school and ACC record. He had eight (five passing, three rushing) in a 62-48 win against North Carolina State while racking up a school-record 531 yards of offense. The Tigers reached 10 wins in the regular season for the first time since 1981, the year they won the national title.

44: Career rushing TDs for Army QB Trent Steelman, a school record. Legendary RB Glenn Davis had the old mark of 43, set in 1946. Steelman, who has a game left in his college career, ran for three TDs and 139 yards in a 63-32 loss to Temple.

82: Years since Drake collected consecutive league titles. The Bulldogs did it this year, winning 32-29 at Jacksonville to wrap up at least a share of the Pioneer League crown. Drake won four consecutive Missouri Valley titles from 1928 to 1931.

90: Punts this season by Wake Forest's Alexander Kinal, tying the ACC record set by Maryland's Dan DeArmas in 1991. Kinal punted 10 times Saturday in a a 38-0 loss at Notre Dame.

124: Catches this season by Eastern Illinois' Erik Lora, an FCS record. He had nine grabs for 52 yards and a TD in a 48-30 loss to Central Arkansas. The previous mark of 123 was set by Elon's Terrell Hudgins in 2009.

448: Career points by Florida State PK Dustin Hopkins, an FBS record for kickers. He topped the old mark of 439 by Boise State's Kyle Brotzman with a second-quarter field goal in a 41-14 win at Maryland that clinched a spot in the ACC title game.

572: All-purpose yards by West Virginia's Tavon Austin, 6 shy of the FBS record, in a 50-49 loss to Oklahoma. He had a school-record 344 yards rushing, 146 on kickoff returns and 82 receiving. OU's Landry Jones countered with a school-record 554 yards and six TDs passing, including a 5-yarder to Kenny Stills with 24 seconds left.

4,161: Yards of total offense this season by Texas A&M's Johnny Manziel, an FBS record for a freshman. He racked up 367 yards Saturday in a 47-28 win against Sam Houston State.

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News Headline: No. 25 Kent St beats Bowling Green 31-24 for spot in first Mid-American Conference title game | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Washington Post
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BOWLING GREEN, Ohio — Kent State's remarkable season just keeps getting better.

The No. 25 Golden Flashes are going to their first Mid-American Conference title game with the most wins in school history. But getting there wasn't easy Saturday, especially for second-year coach Darrell Hazell.

Kent State's defense stopped Bowling Green twice within the last five minutes in the Flashes' territory, holding on for a 31-24 victory.

Luke Wollet's interception of Matt Schilz' heave into the end zone with 21 seconds left sealed the victory. The Falcons had driven to the Kent State 14 with less than a minute left, before coming up empty on four consecutive throws.

“My stomach was in my throat,” Hazell said. “I couldn't let the players see it.”

The former Ohio State assistant has revived a Kent State (10-1, 7-0 MAC) program that has been one of the worst in the conference the last four decades with more winless seasons (four) than winning ones (two) up until this year.

The Flashes' speedy junior running back Dri Archer took over the game with leading rusher Trayion Durham banged up and unable to do much.

Archer ran for 241 yards on 17 carries and two touchdowns of more than 70 yards.

On his second score at the start of the fourth quarter, Archer broke three tackles on his way to a 74-yard touchdown run that put Kent State ahead 24-17. He appeared to be stopped at midfield, but somehow managed to slip away and zigzagged into the end zone.

The teams traded scores until Kent State defensive tackle Roosevelt Nix tipped Schilz's pass and lineman Richard Gray grabbed the ball out of the air, setting up the Flashes at Bowling Green's 20.

Archer took it from there, getting the offense down to the 7. Quarterback Spencer Keith then faked to Archer and kept it for a 7-yard TD that put the Flashes ahead for good with 8:14 left.

Bowling Green (7-4, 5-2) had two more shots, but they were stopped on downs and then intercepted in the end zone.

Keith, a senior, said his teammates had no doubt they were going to win. That wasn't an attitude they had in the past.

“Before we definitely had some doubt,” Keith said. “Just because of our past history.”

Back in the national rankings for the first time since 1973, Kent State avoided becoming the third MAC team to lose a week after getting into the Top 25.

Ohio was the first MAC team to get into the rankings this season, and the Bobcats then lost their next game to Miami (Ohio). Toledo got into the rankings and promptly lost to Ball State last week.

It was a game of big plays on both sides, with four touchdowns going for over 70 yards, including Archer's scoring runs of 79 and 74 yards.

Archer and Durham have both run 1,000-yards, but Archer knew he would be counted on even more with teammate hurting.

“Coach told me all week I'd have to do more,” he said

Archer's first score was spectacular, too. He took a handoff, made one cut and raced past everyone for a 79-yard TD that gave Kent State a 10-0 lead midway through the second quarter.

Kent State extended its school record nine-game winning streak in what is its first winning season since 2001.

They've now won 14 of 16, including 11 straight in the MAC, since beating Bowling Green a year ago.

Schilz was 22-of-44 passing for 355 yards and three touchdowns, carving up a Kent defense that has given a lot of passing yards all season.

His throw to Chris Gallon along the sideline for an 81-yard TD, his second of the day, tied it at 24-24 early in the fourth quarter.

Gallon finished with 213 receiving yards and two touchdowns.

Bowling Green had taken the lead early in the third quarter 17-10 when Schilz lofted a 27-yard throw to Shaun Joplin who leaped over a defender and came down with one foot in the corner of the end zone.

Kent State came back on the next drive by turning to Archer who had a catch and two runs for 38 yards, setting up Keith's 32-yard TD pass to Eric Adeyemi, making it 17-17 with 7:47 left in the third quarter.

Bowling Green had bottled up the Flashes' physical, grind-it-out running game in the first quarter, holding them to just three first downs — the first coming on a fake punt that gained 31 yards.

That's when Kent State began relying on Archer.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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News Headline: Kent State v Bowling Green | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: NBCsports.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, OH – NOVEMBER 17: Dri Archer #1 of the Kent State Golden Flashes breaks a tackle by Paul Swan #33 of the Bowling Green Falcons on November 17, 2012 at Doyt Perry Stadium in Bowling Green, Ohio. Kent State defeated Bowling Green 31-24. (Photo by Kirk Irwin/Getty Images)

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News Headline: Kent State runs its way to MAC glory; more early Week 12 Snap Judgments | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Sports Illustrated
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: No. 25 Kent State 31, Bowling Green 24. Brothers and sisters, we have nearly come to the end of this thing. This is the last normal weekend of college football in the 2012 season: Next week's games are scattered willy-nilly over the Thanksgiving holiday, and after that there's just the conference championships and a dozen or so assorted other contests. Then, we will be all plunged into darkness with only the promise of Army-Navy and the New Mexico Bowl to guide us. So we understand your impatience, and you can imagine ours, as we flipped channels today only to be met time and again with lackluster on-field products.

We were delighted but not surprised to find the most compelling action of Week 12′s first flight of games in the form of daylight MACtion. If you're not a regular reader of Profiles in Profiteroles or lack a fondness for college football's less-celebrated conferences, you may not be familiar with the works of Kent State's Dri Archer. The top-ranked kick returner in the FBS got most of the Golden Flashes' touches at running back today, and to spectacular effect: 241 rushing yards, including touchdowns of 79 and 74 yards.

Kent State's other two touchdowns were scored by quarterback Spencer Keith (one passing, one rushing); the last gave the Golden Flashes their final lead of the game midway through the fourth quarter. The Falcons mounted an impressive final would-be scoring drive that ended with Luke Wollet picking off Matt Schilz in Kent State's end zone with 21 seconds remaining on the clock, and punching the Golden Flashes' first ticket to the MAC championship game. They'll face Northern Illinois in Detroit on Friday, November 30. [BOX | RECAP]

• No. 22 Rutgers 10, Cincinnati 3. The Bearcats escaped what would have been their first home shutout in seven years with a 36-yard field goal 20 seconds before time expired, but the Scarlet Knights remain the lone team in the Big East without a conference loss. Rutgers had not beaten Cincinnati at Cincinnati since 1987 before this afternoon. Remaining hurdles: a trip to Pittsburgh next Saturday and a prime time date with Louisville the Thursday after. [BOX | RECAP]

• No. 23 Michigan 42, Iowa 17. Nice little sendoff for Denard Robinson in his final home game as a Wolverine: Starting at running back, Robinson recorded 98 yards rushing on 13 carries and caught two passes for an additional 24 yards. His recent replacement at quarterback, Devin Gardner, went 18-for-23 with 314 yards, three passing touchdowns, three rushing touchdowns and one interception. (His stat line accounts neatly for all of Michigan's touchdowns, you may have noticed.) One big blight on the afternoon for the Wolverines: The loss of Fitzgerald Toussaint, who left the game in the first quarter with a nasty-looking leg injury. Toussaint is currently hospitalized and undergoing surgery; the school has provided no further details. [BOX | RECAP]

• Tulsa 23, Central Florida 21. The Golden Hurricane are the last remaining team in Conference USA without a conference loss, are assured of a spot in the conference title game and can only have their league record blemished at this point with some bad work at SMU next weekend. (As of this writing, the Mustangs trail Rice, 13-7.) [BOX | RECAP]

• Temple 63, Army 32. This is how we do it: When facing the nation's 105th-ranked rushing defense with no possibility of securing a .500 record for the season, go out swinging. And swinging. And swinging. Owls running back Montel Harris, averaging just a hair less than 75 yards per game heading into Week 12, recorded 351 rushing yards and seven touchdowns against the Black Knights. Those are his actual stats. We feel that to compare them to any sort of explosion or sorcery, no matter how complimentary, would do them a disservice. [BOX | RECAP]

• Penn State 45, Indiana 22. No postseason implications to consider here, obviously, but we mention this game because of unfortunate injury-related reasons: Michael Mauti, Nittany Lions senior linebacker and a highly visible team leader, was carted off the field in the first quarter with what looked to be a left knee injury. The nature and extent of his injury was not disclosed in the postgame press conference. [BOX | RECAP]

• Northwestern 23, Michigan State 20. To the delight of our Wildcats-heavy college football staff, Northwestern went and held on to a fourth-quarter lead! Mostly! Ten points to Ravenclaw and three cheers for office harmony. [BOX | RECAP]

• No. 10 Florida State 41, Maryland 14. Florida State is in the top 10, and played a football game, and scored five times before Maryland scored once. For more, click these links! [BOX | RECAP]

• LET US NOW SPEAK OF THE SEC. So when we joked yesterday about half the SEC taking a traditional pre-Thanksgiving nap, we meant that teams in our part of the country like to gear up for their final rivalry games by playing ridiculously overmatched competition — not that we expected them to play those games as though they were wearing ill-fitted footie pajamas. Taking care of business: Alabama over Western Carolina [BOX | RECAP] and Auburn over Alabama A&M [BOX | RECAP]. Making us sweat with disdain, just a little: Georgia over Georgia Southern [BOX | RECAP] and Florida over Jacksonville State [BOX | RECAP]. Game featuring an allegedly ranked team that was tied with an FCS team into the fourth quarter: South Carolina over Wofford [BOX | RECAP]. Everybody go to your rooms.

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News Headline: Ohio State #4, Kent State #23 in latest AP poll | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox Sports Net (FSN) Ohio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW YORK (AP) -- Notre Dame is No. 1 and Alabama is No. 2 in The Associated Press college football poll, moving to the top of the rankings after Oregon and Kansas State were upset Saturday night.

Ohio State, following a 21-14 overtime win over Wisconsin, bumped up 2 spots to #4. The Buckeyes have one last game to play to complete their quest for a perfect season, a home date against Michigan on Saturday at Noon.

The Fighting Irish are No. 1 for the first time since Nov. 14, 1993. The Fighting Irish were a unanimous No. 1, getting all 60 first-place votes. They are a victory against rival Southern California away from completing a perfect regular season and playing in the BCS championship game Jan. 7 in Miami.

A week after being upset as the No. 1 team, Alabama is back to No. 2, taking advantage of the two big upsets.

The Ducks had been No. 1 but fell in overtime to Stanford. Kansas State was No. 2 when it was beaten at Baylor.

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News Headline: Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University: James Blank was named interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Said Sewell was appointed to the newly created position of assistant provost for Academic Affairs, and Eboni Pringle was named interim dean of undergraduate studies.

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News Headline: Business people news -- Nov. 18 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Akron General

Sonia Alemagno, dean of Kent State University's College of Public Health, was appointed as a member of Akron General Hospitals' Board, which governs Akron General Medical Center, Lodi Community Hospital and Edwin Shaw Rehabilitation Institute.

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News Headline: Charging drug-addicted moms could do more harm than good (Kenne) | Email

News Date: 11/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In the Oct. 28 Dispatch article, "Moms charged when babies born addicted," Jennifer Springer, assistant Knox County prosecutor, is using Ohio law to charge drug-using women once they have delivered their babies.

The charge is a second-degree felony, punishable with a prison sentence of up to eight years. As an assistant professor of health policy and management at Kent State University's College of Public Health, I am concerned about the potential negative impact this policy will have for the state. While I can appreciate the well-intentioned efforts of the Knox County prosecuting attorney's office, its policy to prosecute women who deliver drug-addicted babies will only compound a growing and complex problem.

Infants exposed to opiate drugs in utero often suffer from painful effects of drug withdrawal, known as Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, shortly after birth. Limited studies suggest that opiate-exposed fetuses are at increased risk for poor fetal growth, prematurity, low birth weight, neurobehavioral problems, congenital heart defects, glaucoma and spina bifida.

There is general agreement among health-care providers, drug-treatment and other social-service providers that the earlier we can intervene with these women, the greater the likelihood of reducing or eliminating risks to the developing fetus, thus reducing related health-care costs. In contrast, a policy like the one being championed in Knox County will have the unintended consequence of pushing pregnant drug-using women into hiding because of their fear of being prosecuted and sent to prison, losing custody of their children.

As an example, the Guttmacher Institute noted that in 1997, the Supreme Court of South Carolina supported the state's charge and conviction of a pregnant woman for criminal child neglect for using cocaine during her pregnancy (Whitner vs. South Carolina). As a result, in the year after the decision, there was as much as an 80 percent decrease in pregnant women seeking drug-treatment services.

Further, the infant-mortality rate in South Carolina increased for the first time since 1990 during that year. The Knox County policy will hamper current health-care and drug-treatment efforts to intervene early in a pregnancy and will likely result in an increase in newborns requiring expensive short- and long-term medical care and other services.

What Knox County prosecutors and members of the community need to understand is that drug abuse is a complex problem that is more than a simple choice to use. The pregnant women in our studies and others are overwhelmed with a sense of guilt and want to do everything they can to stop their drug use and protect their developing baby.

However, poor social support and family dynamics, traumatic physical and sexual abuse and other unfortunate circumstances all contribute to and increase the propensity to use drugs for these women. Those same circumstances substantially hamper a pregnant woman's efforts to remain drug-free after treatment.

Rather than supporting Knox County's punitive policy to convict and imprison pregnant drug-using women or using that policy to pressure pregnant women into seeking treatment in lieu of imprisonment, we should formulate policy that creates an environment that encourages pregnant drug users to seek medical and drug-treatment services as early as possible upon learning of a pregnancy.

To this end, Ohio should work to establish coordinated collaborative relationships between law enforcement, health-care and drug-treatment providers, child protective services and other social-services agencies to create comprehensive service coordination that will more effectively help pregnant drug-using women and their newborns.

DERIC KENNE

Wadsworth

Copyright © 2012 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH and may not be republished without permission.

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News Headline: Kent State University team maps recovery to learn how cities rebuild from disaster (Curtis) | Email

News Date: 11/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Joplin Globe
Contact Name: Richardson, Ryan
News OCR Text: Nov. 17--JOPLIN, Mo. -- An Ohio professor is using advanced mapping techniques to examine rebuilding in Joplin for clues that might explain why some neighborhoods recover after a disaster but others don't.

Andrew Curtis is the director of the Geographic Information Systems Health and Hazards Lab at Kent State University, and his work has taken him to some of the biggest natural disasters in the United States over the past seven years, including the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina and Tuscaloosa, Ala., after its 2011 tornado.

Curtis tracked the path of destruction from Hurricane Katrina in 2005 at a street-by-street level using methods similar to those used by Google Street View.

He was in Joplin over the weekend, his fifth visit since the storm.

"We have a street view of all of these roads that were in the path of the tornado," Curtis said. "We are looking at why places returned and how they got there. We are mapping how a community grows and develops in the face of a disaster like this."

The mapping will examine what role might a church, park or school play in a neighborhood's recovery, for example.

Equipped with a Subaru Outback and three high-definition video cameras mounted on it, on this visit he studied the roads that he and his crew traveled near 26th Street to see how much work still had to be done.

Curtis said he will compile roughly 60 hours of video over the weekend that he will then compare with his previous video.

He hopes to isolate factors that limit growth, in addition to creating a visual narrative for areas that have experienced major disasters.

"In situations like Joplin, you can see the anchoring of neighborhoods that have rebuilt, and it spreads from there," Curtis said. "We are articulating the land changes and providing a context of where growth will occur. In addition to mapping that growth, the applications that others can use this for are nearly limitless."

Steve Smith, a geography professor at Missouri Southern State University, was providing local assistance.

"We will be using this information for years to come by tracking patterns of change," Smith said. "In effect, we are still mapping, but it is happening in such a different way. We aren't showing one picture or one isolated frame here. Instead, this is a bigger scope by explaining the why of how an area changes and that is handled visually. Putting it together makes you realize the impact of how this area will rebuild over a long enough timeline."

Curtis said he will keep tracking the rebuilding for as long it takes.

"I plan on returning here often to keep this project going over the next five years," Curtis said. "I want to keep filming until there is no further visible change to the area. I want the community of Joplin to benefit over the long term from this work, and the filming that I am doing will be available to anyone who can put it to use locally."

Real-world lab

The Kent State University experts in town this weekend are only the latest who see in Joplin a real-world lab to study disaster issues. Students and faculty from the University of Oregon, Haverford College in Pennsylvania, Drury University and the University of Arkansas have been here studying everything from immediate disaster response to urban planning; the role photographs play in families, society and history; and post-traumatic stress disorder.


Copyright © 2012 The Joplin Globe, Mo.

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News Headline: Cleveland State University seeks to reduce course credits to help students | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Karen Farkas
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio - Many Cleveland State Universitystudents take longer to graduate and have more credits than needed to complete a degree at other Ohio public universities because most CSU courses are four credit hours.

Three credit hours per course is the standard at other four-year institutions in Ohio. The more credit hours a course carries, the more time and money a student could spend on that class.

"We are out of sync with other institutions and it has created a huge, complex process for students," said Teresa LaGrange, vice provost for academic planning after she recently made a presentation to CSU trustees. "No wonder it is difficult to get out of here in six years."

President Ronald Berkman and trustees said the faculty will have to revise courses to three credit hours, the norm for universities like CSU on a two-semester academic year. The issue is being discussed in the faculty curriculum committee, which will make a recommendation to the Faculty Senate.

"We are here to serve the customer – and that is the student," said trustee Dan Moore. "It is way overdue."

LaGrange said students are likely unaware that they are taking extra credits because they are focused on graduating. Complicating the picture at CSU is the fact that the university's general education requirements are based on three-credit courses, even though most courses are four. That means that a student who takes two courses to satisfy an arts and humanities requirement usually accrues eight credit hours, even though only six are required, LaGrange said.

The average CSU student graduates with 10 to 15 more credits than required. And CSU requires about 128 credits to graduate, more than the 120 recommended by the Ohio Board of Regents.

It is not known how much longer it takes a CSU student to graduate or how much more his or her degree might cost because of the additional credit hours. But it is clear the university lags behind others, officials said.

Ohio Board of RegentsChancellor Jim Petro has said that students need to graduate as quickly as possible and that time can be the enemy when it comes to completing degrees.

A standard credit hour equates to one hour of classroom time and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class work per week during a semester, which is 14 to 16 weeks. Full-time students usually take five three-credit classes per semester. At that rate, they would have 120 credits at the end of four years, the graduation requirement at most colleges.

In an academic year based on quarters, which are shorter than semesters, students take fewer classes, but most of them are worth four credits.

The 17 two- and four-year public institutions in Ohio still on quarters made the switch to semesters this school year and were required to revise all their courses to three credits.

But that didn't happen at CSU when it converted to a semester system in the fall of 1999.

"Each department was given the right to make their own determination on credits," LaGrange said. "The majority opted for four-credit courses, and some had a mix of three and four credits."

Under CSU's current contract, a fulltime faculty teaching load is 24 credit hours in an academic year, which breaks down to three four-credit courses a semester, compared to four three-credit courses, she said. The effect on the teaching load is why some faculty object to more three-credit courses, LaGrange said.

Faculty are fairly split on the issue of converting to three-credit courses, according to Joanne Goodell, a professor in teacher education, president of the Faculty Senate and the faculty representative to the board of trustees. She supports the conversion.

LaGrange said that if the faculty doesn't revise the courses to three credit hours, the Board of Regents could step in.

A task force that revised the university's general education curriculum in 2007 recommended courses be revised to three credits.

"For whatever reason, it was deep-sixed," Berkman said. "It will be implemented this time. If it is something that can save the students money, even if it is hard or not, we must do it."

A CSU student retention plan issued this fall also recommended standardizing all courses to three credits and proposed requiring 120 credit hours to graduate.

LaGrange said she compared the three- and four-credit courses offered this fall by CSU to five other Ohio institutions.

The percentage of four-credit courses was 10 percent at Kent State Universityand Bowling Green State University, 16 percent at the University of Toledo, 17 percent at Youngstown State Universityand 22 percent at the University of Akron.

It was 70 percent at CSU.

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News Headline: Fiscal Cliff Threatens Research Funding, Education Grants, Leaving College Presidents Worried (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW YORK -- The looming fiscal cliff could mean colleges and universities around the country -- both public and private -- will lose billions of dollars they previously received from the federal government. As the deadline approaches, presidents of the institutions are nervously watching for a solution from Congress.

"I'm very worried about it," said James Barker, president of Clemson University in South Carolina. "It's keeping me awake -- honestly -- it's keeping me awake at night."

As detailed in a report released by the White House's Office of Management and Budget, the sequestration's 8.2 percent across-the-board cut for domestic discretionary programs and 7.6 percent cut for mandatory spending programs would impact several funding streams that are critical for universities, including sources of scholarship programs and research grants.

One area is safe from automatic cuts: the Pell Grant, which offers federal funding that does not need to be repaid to students with financial need. Bentley University President Gloria Larson, who also jointly chaired Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick's 2006 transition team, said she believes President Obama will "fall on his sword," to guard the Pell Grant program from cuts. "But I'm worried about some of the other programs," she said.

The National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health and the National Endowment for the Humanities are all subject to cuts that fall within both the 7.6 percent cut to mandatory spending and the 8.2 percent cut to discretionary spending. Other domestic departments with money for research grants would also see cuts if Congress fails to reach an agreement to avoid the sequester cuts. As Inside Higher Ed noted, the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant and federal work-study would fall under the 8.2 percent cut. Federal student loan origination fees would also be expected to increase, making it even more expensive to borrow money to go to college. Several scholarship programs would also likely be slashed as part of the cuts, Inside Higher Ed reported.

Cuts to the Department of Defense would also impact federal research dollars.

Sequestration will require a major slashing of defense and domestic spending if Congress and the White House do not come to an agreement on an alternate deal before the end of the calendar year. The arrangement was intended to force a Congressional super committee to identify ways to reduce the national deficit. What's referred to as the fiscal cliff includes the sequestration paired with the expiration of Bush-era tax cuts, which both occur on Jan. 1, 2013.

"We still are a country that wants more government than we're willing to pay for," said Kenneth P. Ruscio, president of Washington & Lee University. Ruscio said he hopes that during any discussion about what specifically should be cut, the importance of investment in education will be recognized.

Lester Lefton, president of Kent State University in Ohio, didn't sound as optimistic.

"I think [the cuts are] going to force us to have less education, rather than more education," Lefton said.

Some of the top research universities get a majority of their research funding from the federal government. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for example, reported that 69 percent of the institution's campus research expenditures were sponsored by federal funding in its 2012 fiscal year. Ivy League institutions, like Yale, Harvard, Brown and Dartmouth, get 20 to 25 percent of their revenue through federal money, the Yale Daily News reported.

The leaders of Harvard and MIT, along with several other institutions in their state including Tufts, Northeastern and the University of Massachusetts, penned a letter to their Congressional delegation sounding the alarm on the billions they stand to lose just in the Bay State.

TRIO and GEAR UP, federal college access programs, would also see an 8.2 percent cut, Washington Monthly reported.

Arizona State University President Michael Crow offered a different reason for worrying about the fiscal cliff. "I'm only worried because it'd be a symbol of ultimate foolishness led by fools if they can't solve this," he said. "I'm worried about being led by fools."

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News Headline: Lakeland Community College gives employees option to retire and be rehired at less pay (Walker) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Karen Farkas
News OCR Text: KIRTLAND, Ohio — Lakeland Community College, aiming to save money, has offered qualifying administrators and staff the option to retire and then be rehired for less pay.

About 30 of the 92 eligible employees have indicated they plan to apply for the program, said President Morris Beverage. Beverage, 58, who recently reached 30 years of service, said he is seriously considering the option, which allows rehired employees to collect their pension benefits and reduced salary at the same time.

Opponents call that practice double-dipping. Employers say it saves money because it defers the cost of hiring and training a new worker and the rehired employee can be paid less.

Lakeland's "Post-Retirement Employment Program" will save the college up to $500,000 a year, according to Beverage and David Kalina, chairman of the college's board of trustees.

The program was developed to offset state budget cuts totaling about $4 million over the last three years, Kalina said. The annual budget of the Lake County college, which has about 10,000 students, is about $60 million.

"The state has challenged us to be creative to find ways to cut costs or increase revenue by maintaining quality," Kalina said. "This is one of the pieces we decided to take a whack at."

Under the policy, approved by trustees on Nov. 1, all part- and full-time staff and administrators who retire between Jan. 1 and July 1, 2013 are eligible to be rehired. Administrators would be paid 90 percent of their salary and staff members would be paid 80 percent.

"This reduces costs by maintaining quality," Kalina said. "We can keep the ones we have but bring them back at a lower amount. That is what is driving this."

Re-employment is not guaranteed, but the college expects to rehire those who retire, Beverage said. The college would save $28,500 a year if the president, who earns $285,000 a year, decides to participate.

Interested employees have to notify the college by Dec. 3.

Beverage said officials at the pension systems that represent Lakeland employees -- the School Employees Retirement System and State Teachers Retirement System -- told him other schools have adopted policies similar to Lakeland's.

He and Kalina said no one has voiced objections to the plan.

"I have heard people describe this as taxpayers paying twice for someone to work," Beverage said. But employees pay into the retirement system during their working years and a pension is for work previously done, he said.

Officials at Lorain County Community Collegeand Cuyahoga Community Collegesaid employees who retire from those two schools are rarely rehired.

If someone retires from Tri-C and the college determines it has a need that person can fill , it will consider bringing him or her back, said Judi McMullen, Tri-C's vice president of human resources. She said only a small number of employees have been rehired.

The same is true at Kent State University.

"We approach it from the standpoint that retirement and rehiring are two different things," said Willis Walker, Kent's vice president for human resources and general counsel. "They retire if eligible under the state retirement system and make that decision independent of any promise of employment. If there is a need, they could be considered to be rehired."

Walker said fewer than 50 people have been rehired in the past seven years.

Five faculty and five professional staff at the University of Akron are re-employed retirees, a spokeswoman said.

Cleveland State University'svoluntary retirement program, in effect for several years, focuses on re-employing retirees who served in critical positions at the university, said Stacey Monroe, director of recruitment and employment services.

The rehired employee, who cannot work more than 32 hours a week, must be approved by the human resources department and President Ronald Berkman.

Five people have been rehired, she said, including Jack Boyle, who retired as vice president of business and finance, but was rehired to work on university projects.

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News Headline: Oak Ridge Boys bring holiday show to KSU Tusc | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If there's one thing for certain, “Christmas Time's a Comin'. ”

To be precise, it's headed to the Performing Arts Center on the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas, where the Oak Ridge Boys will appear in concert at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 24.

Just a few seats remain for each performance. The campus is at 330 University Drive NE.

“The show we will perform in New Philadelphia will feature all the songs on our new Christmas CD,” said longtime Oak Ridge Boy Richard Sterban. “We come out at beginning of show and for 40 to 45 minutes will perform a mini version of our regular show featuring a lot of our hits, including ‘Elvira'. ”

“After intermission, we will present a complete Christmas show,” Sterban continued. “We'll pay tribute to Santa Claus and Santa will interact with the kids in the audience. At the end of the show, we do a series of songs on what we believe to be the true meaning of Christmas,” said Sterban. “It's the total package.”

This year's Christmas tour began this past week in Branson, Mo. “Christmas comes to Branson earlier than anywhere else,” said Sterban.

“It's a very ambitious tour,” added Sterban. “We'll be doing 40 Christmas shows total, ending just two days before Christmas.”

Next year will mark the 40th anniversary for the Oak Ridge Boys. “I don't think you can experience longevity of that type without loving what you're doing,” said Sterban. “We love what we do and even after all these years we still are having fun and a good time on stage.

“If not, at this stage in our lives we would probably have decided to find something else to do,” said Sterban. “I think the key to our future is our health. None of us are youngsters, but for our ages we all are still doing pretty. We'll continue as long as the good Lord above keeps blessing us.”

Sterban said the Oak Ridge Boys are on the road an average of 150 days a year. He added many dates already have been booked for next year's 40th anniversary tour.

Among the group's many hits, Sterban said “Elvira” has to be their signature song. “In 1981, it was the biggest record in the business. There were only two platinum singles that year, ‘Elvira' and ‘Celebration' by Kool and the Gang.”

As for Sterban's personal preferences when it comes to Christmas music, he said he tends to like the traditional. “There's just something about the season that takes you back to your childhood,” he said.

Sterban said the Nov. 24 concert definitely will be family friendly.

“It's a family show from top to bottom and a great way for families to spend time together during the holiday season,” Sterban said. “It's just a great way for people to get into the holiday spirit.”

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News Headline: Autumn Odyssey | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An Autumn Odyssey will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. Saturday at Kent State University at Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center. Proceeds benefit the Pathway to Wellness.

The Odyssey will feature food, entertainment, music, active and silent auctions, and a cash bar. Tickets are $35 per person or $60 per couple. Tickets are available at the homeless shelter, www.tusc.kent.edu/pac, or by contacting Anita Davis at 330-340-0209. Tickets also will be available at the door.

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News Headline: Exhibition shows Katharine Hepburn as fashion icon (Druesedow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Miami Herald - Online, The
Contact Name: ULA ILNYTZKY
News OCR Text: NEW YORK -- A new exhibition is hailing the fashion sense of Katharine Hepburn, whose trademark khakis and open-collar shirts were decidedly unconventional in the 1930s and 40s, when girdles and stockings were the order of the day.

The fiercely independent Hepburn famously once said: “Anytime I hear a man say he prefers a woman in a skirt, I say, ‘Try one. Try a skirt.' ”

But skirts and dresses abound in Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, which opens Thursday.

Hepburn, who died in 2003 at age 96, saved almost all the costumes from her long career that included four Oscars and such memorable films as The Philadelphia Story, The African Queen, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner and On Golden Pond. Forty are on view at the exhibition, which runs through Jan. 12.

One of the first things visitors will notice is how slender Hepburn was — she had a 20-inch waist — and a grouping of seven khaki pants artfully arranged on a pair of mannequin legs.

“The fact that she wore slacks and wanted to be comfortable influenced women's ready-to-wear in the United States,” said Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum, which was given 700 items from Hepburn's estate. Kent State was selected because it's one of the country's only museums of performance clothes.

“That image said to the American woman ‘Look you don't have to be in your girdle and stockings and tight dress. You can be comfortable.' That was probably the first aspect of becoming a fashion icon,” said Druesedow, a co-curator of the exhibition.

The strong-willed actress known for taking charge of her career worked closely with all her designers to decide her performing wardrobe.

Comfort was paramount to Hepburn – being able to throw her leg over a chair or sit on the floor. She always wore her “uniform” – khakis and a shirt – to rehearsals and pant ensembles to publicity appearances.

A companion book, Katharine Hepburn: Rebel Chic, describes how RKO executives hid Hepburn's trousers in an effort to persuade her to abandon them.

“Her response was to threaten to walk around the lot naked. Though she only stripped down as far as her silk underwear before stepping out of her dressing room, she made her point – and she got her trousers back,” fashion writer Nancy MacDonell wrote in an essay for the book.

• Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, 40 Lincoln Center Plaza (65th Street west of Broadway), www.nypl.org/events/exhibitions/katharine-hepburn-dressed-stage-and-screen. Free.

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News Headline: Photographing one of the best | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Worcester Telegram & Gazette - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WORCESTER —

Award-winning photographer David Hume Kennerly visited Worcester Art Museum on Sunday. I was lucky enough to pull the assignment and photograph him. His talk complemented the iconic photos on display, entitled: "Kennedy to Kent State: Images of a Generation."

Every seat in the room was taken and most people stayed late for the Q&A that followed. Kennerly won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography in 1972. He captured images from Vietnam.

Kennerly's talk centered on his war work, politics and humor. He shared images of his peers, like Eddie Adams, Bernie Boston and others. At a time where our images are viewable in a nanosecond after being taken, it is hard to imagine that Kennerly couldn't see his images for weeks or months after making them. In fact, when he got word that he had won the Pulitzer, he didn't know which of his images had been cited.

While sitting in the back of the room, I observed the light, or more precisely, the lack of it. A dark room accentuated the projected images on a screen, but it didn't help my efforts to make them. As Kennerly spoke from the podium, all eyes were on that screen. I made a few shots using my flash. Yikes. Luckily I had time to stay.

He told many stories about his career but what stood out the most was his face-to-face job interview with President Gerald Ford. Kennerly, who was only 25 years-old at the time, told President Ford "I want to report directly and only to you and I want total access." President Ford responded, "And do you want Air Force One on the weekend as well?"

Kennerly's talk was captivating, interesting and funny. As he showed his Pulitzer Prize-winning image of a soldier among scorched trees, he talked about the crop. He shot it as a horizontal but it was cropped and submitted as a vertical. Due to the immediacy of digital imaging, such a drastic crop from a photographer's intent is less likely today. A crop like that could result in a terse discussion with an editor, at the very least.

After the formal presentation I approached Kennerly and asked to photograph him in the gallery near his work. To photograph another photographer is always interesting, to photograph a Pulitzer Prize-winning shooter is another matter altogether. If I thought the conference room was dark - the gallery was surprisingly tomb like. Dark walls with small but effective illumination on the art, but little room light. Beautiful for the hung images but very difficult conditions to shoot a flattering portrait. My options amounted to using a flash, a high ISO and slow shutter.

A crowd gathered, listening-in as he spoke with the collector, David Davis, and another man, Larry Collins. I made it work. I relaxed after I got a few images.

As we wrapped-up inside he asked if I would photograph him out by the sign in front of the Museum that read "FREE David Hume Kennerly FREE." He thought the sign was comical and wanted to show friends back home and post it on Facebook. When we finished he took out his iPhone and enthusiastically began taking pictures.

He commented on the architecture of Tuckerman Hall, the light falling on the old North High, and became captivated by a nearby antique lamp post. As he worked and commented on our beautiful city, I continued to photograph him. He then turned and photographed the pink afternoon light bathing the Trinity Lutheran Church Steeple.

The photojournalists from the 60's created the road map for many modern day photographers to follow, even if we never go to war.

The exhibit, "Kennedy to Kent State: Images of a Generation," remains on display at the Worcester Art Museum. It contains images from 1958 to 1975, and include the presidency and assassination of John F. Kennedy, as well as the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the American space program and its mission to the moon, the antiwar movement and counterculture.

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News Headline: Kent State University Museum. | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Museumnews.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum.

10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45 p.m. Sunday. Admission: $3-$5.

Exhibit: "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works."

Linda Ohrn-McDaniel's works focus on pattern making, draping and construction, as well as machine knitting, which will be reflected in about 20 pieces in the exhibit.

Exhibit runs through Feb. 10. (11/16)

Free with admission.

Exhibit: "RESIST: a World of Resist Dye Techniques."

The exhibit showcases textiles and costumes from around the world that incorporate several resist dye techniques, including tie-dye, ikat and batik.

Exhibit runs through March 17.

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News Headline: Children's book: Who picked the books | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name: Dispatch Librarian Julie Albert.
News OCR Text: Participants in the survey of children's books conducted by The Dispatch:

ADULTS

Debbie Ballinger: librarian, Maryland Elementary School, Bexley

Carolyn S. Brodie: Kent State University professor; director, Reinberger Children's Library Center & Marantz Picturebook Collection; president, Association for Library Service to Children

Beth Clark: library-media specialist, Scottish Corners Elementary School, Dublin

Kerry Cramer: librarian, New Albany Elementary School

Floyd C. Dickman: adjunct professor, School of Library and Information Science, Kent State University; co-director Mazza Museum Children's Book Center, University of Findlay; former member of Caldecott, Newbery and Pura Belpre Medal selection committees

Diane Driessen: librarian, retired from Wickliffe Progressive Community School, Upper Arlington; former member, Newbery selection committee

Claudia Fett: library-media specialist, Tremont Elementary School, Upper Arlington

Margaret Peterson Haddix: author of books for children and young adults, including Caught and Game Changer

Mary Lee Hahn: teacher, Daniel Wright Elementary School, Dublin; past chair, National Council of Teachers of English Notable Children's Books in the Language Arts selection committee; author, Reconsidering Read-Aloud

Karen Hildebrand: retired library media specialist, Delaware schools; member, International Reading Association Notable Books for a Global Society selection committee

Angela Beumer Johnson: associate professor, Wright State University

Barbara Kiefer: professor of children's literature, Ohio State University; author, Charlotte Huck's Children's Literature, 10th edition

Kenneth Marantz: professor emeritus, Ohio State University; reviewer, Children's Literature Comprehensive Database; co-author, Multicultural Picturebooks: Art for Illuminating Our World

Susan Marantz: teacher, gifted and talented program, Maryland Elementary School, Bexley

Sylvia Marantz: retired librarian; reviewer, Children's Literature Comprehensive Database; co-author, Multicultural Picturebooks: Art for Illuminating Our World

Sally Oddi: owner, Cover to Cover bookstore

Edith Pattou: author of the children's books East and Mrs. Spitzer's Garden and the “Songs of Eirren” fantasy series

Connie Pottle: youth services manager, Delaware County District Library; former member, Newbery and Caldecott selection committees and Notable Children's Book Awards of the American Library Association

Bill Prosser: teacher and librarian, Mary Emma Bailey Elementary School, Dublin

Annie Ruefle: librarian, St. Mary School, German Village; author, Creating a Culture of Literacy

Tonya Salisbury , teacher, Heritage Middle School, Westerville

Franki Sibberson , teacher, Indian Run Elementary, Dublin City Schools; author, Beyond Leveled Books

Thomas Sweigard: professor of children's literature, Cedarville University, Cedarville

Heather Webb: youth-services materials selector, Worthington Libraries

Carol Wolfenbarger: children's literature consultant; book collector

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News Headline: Black Friday is so last year (Albanese) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Holiday shoppers are off and buying in stores and online.

In some cases, they already are waiting in lines - days ahead of time - to snag bargains at those stores opening Thanksgiving and others in the wee hours of Black Friday.

One such shopper, Tony Avitar, a Black Friday fanatic, has made an annual tradition of camping outside. The 49-year-old Akron man set up his tent Thursday night to ensure he would be the first one in line to get inside when the Best Buy off Howe Avenue in Cuyahoga Falls opens at midnight Thanksgiving night.

Retailers see relatively rosy forecasts for holiday spending and hope to get the biggest piece of the holiday spending that they can, said Paul Albanese, marketing professor at Kent State University, who focuses on consumer behavior.

The National Retail Federation expects holiday sales to increase 4.1 percent from last year. That's a lower rise than last year but above the 10-year average increase. The group said 53 percent of consumers already have begun their holiday shopping.

Shoppers want the earlier hours, Albanese said. "Retailers are simply responding to the demand."

"Black Friday is a big day, and if they can make it an even bigger day by opening earlier and offering even bigger bargains, they can get a bigger piece of the pie," Albanese said. "They're trying to one-up the competition."

Deep discounts on select items - so-called "door busters" - will attract customers, and retailers are hoping shoppers pick up other items in the store while they're there.

For retailers, it's a game of one-upsmanship, said Marshal Cohen, chief research analyst at NPD Inc., a market research firm in New York.

Beat the competition

"Retailers are trying to crush the competition, whether it be other stores, beating them to the punch to get the early consumer dollar, or whether to compete with online [shopping sites] that would traditionally have Thanksgiving all to themselves," Cohen said. "It's Christmas crush."

For some retailers, opening on Thanksgiving is nothing new.

Those holiday stores include the Discount Drug Mart Inc. chain, which is based in Medina. The company's 80-plus-year owner, Parviz Boodjeh, a pharmacist, has been known to stop in at one or more stores and offer greetings.

Kmart, which has opened on Thanksgiving for 21 years, is expanding its hours this year to run through Black Friday.

The retailer is trying to appeal to younger shoppers who want to shop later.

"It's kind of a bonding experience for them," she said. "Groups of friends will go out together."

While retail giant Walmart is opening at 8 p.m. Thanksgiving, archrival Target is opening stores at 9 p.m., three hours earlier than last year. Target says this is what its customers want.

Customer feedback shows that "many prefer to shop following their family gatherings rather than in the very early hours of the morning," spokeswoman Molly Snyder said.

Target's move has prompted online petitions against the earlier Thanksgiving hours.

Acme Fresh Markets will be closed on Thanksgiving, as always.

Acme Executive Vice President Jim Trout said that last year he asked the Akron chain's Facebook fans what they thought about Acme being closed on the day.

"It just blew up, he said. "Every one of the fans who wrote back to us - and it was over 100 - said absolutely it was the right thing to do. It validated in my mind to close that day."

Other perks

Some retailers are offering perks to their earliest customers.

At Lodi Station Outlets, the first 150 people at 10 p.m. at the food court Thanksgiving night will receive a $15 gift card. The outlets open again at 7 a.m. Friday and are giving the first 350 people at 7 a.m. a free $15 gift card.

At Summit Mall, the first 250 people to register their email address at guest services will receive a "swag bag" full of goodies such as food samples, a sample of Diet Coke, water and retailer coupons, said Kate Miller, mall marketing manager.

There will also be a free "rejuvenation station" with free muffins, water, candy and coffee starting at midnight for Black Friday shoppers. Some food-court vendors at the mall will also be open at midnight.

Internet sales

Online shopping is expected to continue to grow.

Shop.org, part of the National Retail Federation, expects 2012 online sales in November and December to hit $92 billion to $96 billion. That's up 12 percent from a year ago. (Total holiday spending in 2011 hit $563 billion, according to the NRF.)

The organization said that last year people spent an estimated $1.25 billion on "Cyber Monday," the Monday after Thanksgiving. (Shop.org said it coined the term Cyber Monday in 2005.)

Online retailer Amazon has brought back its "Countdown to Black Friday Deals Week" promotions. It also just started offering a one-month free trial of its Amazon Prime service that costs $79 a year. Amazon Prime offers unlimited free two-day delivery on purchases and also competes with services such as Netflix by providing free access to tens of thousands of instant streaming movies and television shows.

C/NET, which reviews and rates all sorts of gadgets, gizmos and software in addition to covering technology-related news, has an online retail site, complete with a holiday gift guide.

Online news and sales sites are filling email inboxes with holiday sales promotions.

Big-box retailers also have been emailing Black Friday promotions, putting holiday advertising on their own websites and providing the promotional information to discount retail online sites such as dealnews.com.

Smart phones and tablets feature prominently in retailer plans to get you to spend money with them. Device apps have been created, tweaked and upgraded.

Walmart's upgraded smart phone app, for instance, will show you where items you want are located in a particular store.

Dealnews.com said the Walmart app will recognize when a shopper enters a particular store and display an interactive map. The app is supposed to be updated with Black Friday information on Nov. 19, Dealnews says.

Macy's Apple iPhone-only app has been updated to offer in-store Black Friday specials, including telling you where sale items can be found.

The website Appolicious lists and reviews Black Friday related apps for iPhone and Android owners. Some apps, for instance, use a smart phone's built-in camera to scan merchandise prices and the price compare against other stores in the area.

Keep in mind most brick-and-mortar retailers offer online shopping as well, in many cases with free shipping - sometimes if a certain minimum purchase amount is made.

Retailers also are using social media sites Facebook and Twitter to woo shoppers.

Return to Top



News Headline: Black Friday is so last year (Albanese) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bloomberg Businessweek - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Nov. 18--Holiday shoppers are off and buying in stores and online.

In some cases, they already are waiting in lines -- days ahead of time -- to snag bargains at those stores opening Thanksgiving and others in the wee hours of Black Friday.

One such shopper, Tony Avitar, a Black Friday fanatic, has made an annual tradition of camping outside. The 49-year-old Akron man set up his tent Thursday night to ensure he would be the first one in line to get inside when the Best Buy off Howe Avenue in Cuyahoga Falls opens at midnight Thanksgiving night.

Retailers see relatively rosy forecasts for holiday spending and hope to get the biggest piece of the holiday spending that they can, said Paul Albanese, marketing professor at Kent State University, who focuses on consumer behavior.

The National Retail Federation expects holiday sales to increase 4.1 percent from last year. That's a lower rise than last year but above the 10-year average increase. The group said 53 percent of consumers already have begun their holiday shopping.

Shoppers want the earlier hours, Albanese said. "Retailers are simply responding to the demand."

"Black Friday is a big day, and if they can make it an even bigger day by opening earlier and offering even bigger bargains, they can get a bigger piece of the pie," Albanese said. "They're trying to one-up the competition."

Deep discounts on select items -- so-called "door busters" -- will attract customers, and retailers are hoping shoppers pick up other items in the store while they're there.

For retailers, it's a game of one-upsmanship, said Marshal Cohen, chief research analyst at NPD Inc., a market research firm in New York.

Beat the competition

"Retailers are trying to crush the competition, whether it be other stores, beating them to the punch to get the early consumer dollar, or whether to compete with online [shopping sites] that would traditionally have Thanksgiving all to themselves," Cohen said. "It's Christmas crush."

For some retailers, opening on Thanksgiving is nothing new.

Those holiday stores include the Discount Drug Mart Inc. chain, which is based in Medina. The company's 80-plus-year owner, Parviz Boodjeh, a pharmacist, has been known to stop in at one or more stores and offer greetings.

Kmart, which has opened on Thanksgiving for 21 years, is expanding its hours this year to run through Black Friday.

The retailer is trying to appeal to younger shoppers who want to shop later.

"It's kind of a bonding experience for them," she said. "Groups of friends will go out together."

While retail giant Walmart is opening at 8 p.m. Thanksgiving, archrival Target is opening stores at 9 p.m., three hours earlier than last year. Target says this is what its customers want.

Customer feedback shows that "many prefer to shop following their family gatherings rather than in the very early hours of the morning," spokeswoman Molly Snyder said.

Target's move has prompted online petitions against the earlier Thanksgiving hours.

Acme Fresh Markets will be closed on Thanksgiving, as always.

Acme Executive Vice President Jim Trout said that last year he asked the Akron chain's Facebook fans what they thought about Acme being closed on the day.

"It just blew up, he said. "Every one of the fans who wrote back to us -- and it was over 100 -- said absolutely it was the right thing to do. It validated in my mind to close that day."

Other perks

Some retailers are offering perks to their earliest customers.

At Lodi Station Outlets, the first 150 people at 10 p.m. at the food court Thanksgiving night will receive a $15 gift card. The outlets open again at 7 a.m. Friday and are giving the first 350 people at 7 a.m. a free $15 gift card.

Return to Top



News Headline: Black Friday is so last year (Albanese) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Holiday shoppers are off and buying in stores and online.

In some cases, they already are waiting in lines -- days ahead of time -- to snag bargains at those stores opening Thanksgiving and others in the wee hours of Black Friday.

One such shopper, Tony Avitar, a Black Friday fanatic, has made an annual tradition of camping outside. The 49-year-old Akron man set up his tent Thursday night to ensure he would be the first one in line to get inside when the Best Buy off Howe Avenue in Cuyahoga Falls opens at midnight Thanksgiving night.

Retailers see relatively rosy forecasts for holiday spending and hope to get the biggest piece of the holiday spending that they can, said Paul Albanese, marketing professor at Kent State University, who focuses on consumer behavior.

The National Retail Federation expects holiday sales to increase 4.1 percent from last year. That's a lower rise than last year but above the 10-year average increase. The group said 53 percent of consumers already have begun their holiday shopping.

Shoppers want the earlier hours, Albanese said. "Retailers are simply responding to the demand."

"Black Friday is a big day, and if they can make it an even bigger day by opening earlier and offering even bigger bargains, they can get a bigger piece of the pie," Albanese said. "They're trying to one-up the competition."

Deep discounts on select items -- so-called "door busters" -- will attract customers, and retailers are hoping shoppers pick up other items in the store while they're there.

For retailers, it's a game of one-upsmanship, said Marshal Cohen, chief research analyst at NPD Inc., a market research firm in New York.

Beat the competition

"Retailers are trying to crush the competition, whether it be other stores, beating them to the punch to get the early consumer dollar, or whether to compete with online [shopping sites] that would traditionally have Thanksgiving all to themselves," Cohen said. "It's Christmas crush."

For some retailers, opening on Thanksgiving is nothing new.

Those holiday stores include the Discount Drug Mart Inc. chain, which is based in Medina. The company's 80-plus-year owner, Parviz Boodjeh, a pharmacist, has been known to stop in at one or more stores and offer greetings.

Kmart, which has opened on Thanksgiving for 21 years, is expanding its hours this year to run through Black Friday.

The retailer is trying to appeal to younger shoppers who want to shop later.

"It's kind of a bonding experience for them," she said. "Groups of friends will go out together."

While retail giant Walmart is opening at 8 p.m. Thanksgiving, archrival Target is opening stores at 9 p.m., three hours earlier than last year. Target says this is what its customers want.

Customer feedback shows that "many prefer to shop following their family gatherings rather than in the very early hours of the morning," spokeswoman Molly Snyder said.

Target's move has prompted online petitions against the earlier Thanksgiving hours.

Acme Fresh Markets will be closed on Thanksgiving, as always.

Acme Executive Vice President Jim Trout said that last year he asked the Akron chain's Facebook fans what they thought about Acme being closed on the day.

"It just blew up, he said. "Every one of the fans who wrote back to us -- and it was over 100 -- said absolutely it was the right thing to do. It validated in my mind to close that day."

Other perks

Some retailers are offering perks to their earliest customers.

At Lodi Station Outlets, the first 150 people at 10 p.m. at the food court Thanksgiving night will receive a $15 gift card. The outlets open again at 7 a.m. Friday and are giving the first 350 people at 7 a.m. a free $15 gift card.

At Summit Mall, the first 250 people to register their email address at guest services will receive a "swag bag" full of goodies such as food samples, a sample of Diet Coke, water and retailer coupons, said Kate Miller, mall marketing manager.

There will also be a free "rejuvenation station" with free muffins, water, candy and coffee starting at midnight for Black Friday shoppers. Some food-court vendors at the mall will also be open at midnight.

Internet sales

Online shopping is expected to continue to grow.

Shop.org, part of the National Retail Federation, expects 2012 online sales in November and December to hit $92 billion to $96 billion. That's up 12 percent from a year ago. (Total holiday spending in 2011 hit $563 billion, according to the NRF.)

The organization said that last year people spent an estimated $1.25 billion on "Cyber Monday," the Monday after Thanksgiving. (Shop.org said it coined the term Cyber Monday in 2005.)

Online retailer Amazon has brought back its "Countdown to Black Friday Deals Week" promotions. It also just started offering a one-month free trial of its Amazon Prime service that costs $79 a year. Amazon Prime offers unlimited free two-day delivery on purchases and also competes with services such as Netflix by providing free access to tens of thousands of instant streaming movies and television shows.

C/NET, which reviews and rates all sorts of gadgets, gizmos and software in addition to covering technology-related news, has an online retail site, complete with a holiday gift guide.

Online news and sales sites are filling email inboxes with holiday sales promotions.

Big-box retailers also have been emailing Black Friday promotions, putting holiday advertising on their own websites and providing the promotional information to discount retail online sites such as dealnews.com.

Smart phones and tablets feature prominently in retailer plans to get you to spend money with them. Device apps have been created, tweaked and upgraded.

Walmart's upgraded smart phone app, for instance, will show you where items you want are located in a particular store.

Dealnews.com said the Walmart app will recognize when a shopper enters a particular store and display an interactive map. The app is supposed to be updated with Black Friday information on Nov. 19, Dealnews says.

Macy's Apple iPhone-only app has been updated to offer in-store Black Friday specials, including telling you where sale items can be found.

The website Appolicious lists and reviews Black Friday related apps for iPhone and Android owners. Some apps, for instance, use a smart phone's built-in camera to scan merchandise prices and the price compare against other stores in the area.

Keep in mind most brick-and-mortar retailers offer online shopping as well, in many cases with free shipping -- sometimes if a certain minimum purchase amount is made.

Retailers also are using social media sites Facebook and Twitter to woo shoppers.

Copyright (C) 2012, The Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Black Friday is so last year (Albanese) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Holiday shoppers are off and buying in stores and online.

In some cases, they already are waiting in lines -- days ahead of time -- to snag bargains at those stores opening Thanksgiving and others in the wee hours of Black Friday.

One such shopper, Tony Avitar, a Black Friday fanatic, has made an annual tradition of camping outside. The 49-year-old Akron man set up his tent Thursday night to ensure he would be the first one in line to get inside when the Best Buy off Howe Avenue in Cuyahoga Falls opens at midnight Thanksgiving night.

Retailers see relatively rosy forecasts for holiday spending and hope to get the biggest piece of the holiday spending that they can, said Paul Albanese, marketing professor at Kent State University, who focuses on consumer behavior.

The National Retail Federation expects holiday sales to increase 4.1 percent from last year. That's a lower rise than last year but above the 10-year average increase. The group said 53 percent of consumers already have begun their holiday shopping.

Shoppers want the earlier hours, Albanese said. "Retailers are simply responding to the demand." "Black Friday is a big day, and if they can make it an even bigger day by opening earlier and offering even bigger bargains, they can get a bigger piece of the pie," Albanese said. "They're trying to one-up the competition." Deep discounts on select items -- so-called "door busters" -- will attract customers, and retailers are hoping shoppers pick up other items in the store while they're there.

For retailers, it's a game of one-upsmanship, said Marshal Cohen, chief research analyst at NPD Inc., a market research firm in New York.

Beat the competition "Retailers are trying to crush the competition, whether it be other stores, beating them to the punch to get the early consumer dollar, or whether to compete with online [shopping sites] that would traditionally have Thanksgiving all to themselves," Cohen said. "It's Christmas crush." For some retailers, opening on Thanksgiving is nothing new.

Those holiday stores include the Discount Drug Mart Inc. chain, which is based in Medina. The company's 80-plus-year owner, Parviz Boodjeh, a pharmacist, has been known to stop in at one or more stores and offer greetings.

Kmart, which has opened on Thanksgiving for 21 years, is expanding its hours this year to run through Black Friday.

The retailer is trying to appeal to younger shoppers who want to shop later.

"It's kind of a bonding experience for them," she said. "Groups of friends will go out together." While retail giant Walmart is opening at 8 p.m. Thanksgiving, archrival Target is opening stores at 9 p.m., three hours earlier than last year. Target says this is what its customers want.

Customer feedback shows that "many prefer to shop following their family gatherings rather than in the very early hours of the morning," spokeswoman Molly Snyder said.

Target's move has prompted online petitions against the earlier Thanksgiving hours.

Acme Fresh Markets will be closed on Thanksgiving, as always.

Acme Executive Vice President Jim Trout said that last year he asked the Akron chain's Facebook fans what they thought about Acme being closed on the day.

"It just blew up, he said. "Every one of the fans who wrote back to us -- and it was over 100 -- said absolutely it was the right thing to do. It validated in my mind to close that day." Other perks Some retailers are offering perks to their earliest customers.

At Lodi Station Outlets, the first 150 people at 10 p.m. at the food court Thanksgiving night will receive a $15 gift card. The outlets open again at 7 a.m. Friday and are giving the first 350 people at 7 a.m. a free $15 gift card.

At Summit Mall, the first 250 people to register their email address at guest services will receive a "swag bag" full of goodies such as food samples, a sample of Diet Coke, water and retailer coupons, said Kate Miller, mall marketing manager.

There will also be a free "rejuvenation station" with free muffins, water, candy and coffee starting at midnight for Black Friday shoppers. Some food-court vendors at the mall will also be open at midnight.

Internet sales Online shopping is expected to continue to grow.

Shop.org, part of the National Retail Federation, expects 2012 online sales in November and December to hit $92 billion to $96 billion. That's up 12 percent from a year ago. (Total holiday spending in 2011 hit $563 billion, according to the NRF.) The organization said that last year people spent an estimated $1.25 billion on "Cyber Monday," the Monday after Thanksgiving. (Shop.org said it coined the term Cyber Monday in 2005.) Online retailer Amazon has brought back its "Countdown to Black Friday Deals Week" promotions. It also just started offering a one-month free trial of its Amazon Prime service that costs $79 a year. Amazon Prime offers unlimited free two-day delivery on purchases and also competes with services such as Netflix by providing free access to tens of thousands of instant streaming movies and television shows.

C/NET, which reviews and rates all sorts of gadgets, gizmos and software in addition to covering technology-related news, has an online retail site, complete with a holiday gift guide.

Online news and sales sites are filling email inboxes with holiday sales promotions.

Big-box retailers also have been emailing Black Friday promotions, putting holiday advertising on their own websites and providing the promotional information to discount retail online sites such as dealnews.com.

Smart phones and tablets feature prominently in retailer plans to get you to spend money with them. Device apps have been created, tweaked and upgraded.

Walmart's upgraded smart phone app, for instance, will show you where items you want are located in a particular store.

Dealnews.com said the Walmart app will recognize when a shopper enters a particular store and display an interactive map. The app is supposed to be updated with Black Friday information on Nov. 19, Dealnews says.

Macy's Apple iPhone-only app has been updated to offer in-store Black Friday specials, including telling you where sale items can be found.

The website Appolicious lists and reviews Black Friday related apps for iPhone and Android owners. Some apps, for instance, use a smart phone's built-in camera to scan merchandise prices and the price compare against other stores in the area.

Keep in mind most brick-and-mortar retailers offer online shopping as well, in many cases with free shipping -- sometimes if a certain minimum purchase amount is made.

Retailers also are using social media sites Facebook and Twitter to woo shoppers.

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News Headline: Homeless Man Arrested at Kent State Library | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Judge orders man to stay off campus property

A homeless man was arrested at the Kent State University Library and charged with disorderly conduct, a minor misdemeanor.

Kent State Police arrested Christopher K. Bunsey, 50, Nov. 14 at about 11:30 p.m. on charges he was drunk and posed a threat to himself or others in the library.

Bunsey had slurred speech, bloodshot eyes and difficulty walking at the time of his arrest, according to Portage County court records.

Bunsey was arraigned on the charge Friday and pleaded guilty to Portage County Municipal Court Judge Barb Oswick.

Oswick sentenced Bunsey the same day and ordered him to pay a $50 fine plus court costs. He also was ordered to stay off Kent State property.

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News Headline: Missing woman from Kent State University was safely located Saturday night | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT -
A Kent State University (KSU) student reported missing by family members has been found safe.

The Kent Police Department confirmed 24-year-old Heather Flynn was located and contacted her family on Saturday night. Law enforcement also spoke with Heather, confirming that she was OK.

Flynn was last seen at KSU's library on Nov. 13.

Kent Police said there was no indication of foul play and no other details about her disappearance have been released.

Students at KSU were passing out flyers around campus and posting around social networking sites this weekend.

The Kent Police Department thanks all who put effort into locating Ms. Flynn.

Copyright 2012 Scripps Media, Inc.

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News Headline: Kent: Police locate missing Kent State student | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT -- Police had been looking for clues for a missing student after a missing persons report was filed with the department Friday.

Heather Flynn, 24, was last seen Tuesday night headed to a library.

Police confirmed that she was located Saturday evening but didn't release any other details about her disappearance.

Flynn's parents filed a missing person's report Friday night after not hearing from her in three days.

Police are expected to release more information Sunday.

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News Headline: Missing Kent State Student Found | Email

News Date: 11/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: 19 Action News at 11 PM - WOIO-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Breaking news now. We have information that kent student heather flinn has been found. Police said she is safe and sound. We will have an update on action in in the morning. Again, heather flinn, the kent state constituent that was missing has been found. That's good news there.

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News Headline: KENT STATE STUDENT IS FINALIST IN STUDENT DIPLOMAT VIDEO CONTEST | Email

News Date: 11/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Nov.16 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University student Glenn Bolich, a senior news major who studied in Italy, is one of the five finalists in a national contest that will decide the winner of Student Diplomat Video Contest.

The competition is sponsored by Connecting Our World, an advocacy community powered by NAFSA: Association of International Educators.

Videos from the five finalists can be viewed on the website ConnectingOurWorld.org until Nov.27.Winners will be determined by survey votes and will be announced in December.The winner will be bestowed the title of 2012 Student Diplomat and will receive a $1,000 travel voucher from STA Travel, a NAFSA Global Partner.The runner-up will be awarded a hand-held flip camera.

The other finalists in the 2012 Student Diplomat Video Contest are:

* Alisha Forbes of Doane College; studied in Africa (Tanzania, Malawi, Namibia, Lesotho, and South Africa)

* Ashley Feith of Marymount Manhattan College; studied in Greece

* Angela Santilli of California State University, Chico; studied in Ghana

* Samantha Costas of the University of the South; studied in Cuba

The challenge to contestants was to tell a compelling story about how they became "student diplomats" by connecting in meaningful ways with people and cultures in other countries and by gaining global skills that will help them in their future academic studies and professional careers.

Connecting Our World is a global community of individuals taking action to support public policies that strengthen and expand international education.STA Travel is a youth travel agency enabling students and young adults to explore the world by creating experiences filled with adventure, discovery and personal growth.

For more information about opportunities to study abroad while attending Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/studyabroad.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Playground ribbon-cutting held at Walls Elementary | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Around 50 local families, friends, staff and local business representatives recently bundled up to help Walls Elementary School in Kent celebrate the completion of their playground renovation with a ribbon cutting. The Walls Parent Teacher Organization (current and past) and Walls staff worked for many years to raise funds for this project and, with the donations of many community members and Walls School parents, it has become a reality. Taking part in the ribbon-cutting with some of the Walls students are Walls PTO co-presidents Lisa Gallagher and Sara Kwan; Iris Harvey, vice president of University Relations at Kent State University; and Heidi Singer, Walls principal.

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