Report Overview:
Total Clips (24)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (6)
Biological Sciences; Research (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Geology; Research (1)
History (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Music (1)
Pan-African Studies (1)
Psychology; Research (1)
Research; Students (1)
Town-Gown (3)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Art, School of (1)
HOLIDAY MART IS RETURNING TO AKRON ART MUSEUM TODAY: SHOP FOR CHRISTMAS WHILE ENJOYING MUSIC, REFRESHMENTS, EXHIBITS 12/06/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...life while enjoying music, food and the museum. Hand-crafted items include jewelry, clothing, accessories and original artwork from students from the University of Akron Myers School of Art, as well as local artists Renee Flynn, Lise Anderson, former Beacon Journal writer Connie Bloom, Barbe Beaty,...


Athletics (6)
Hazell's legacy at Kent State: Will to win (Nielsen) 12/07/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Hopes to Fill Hazell's Spot by End of Year (Nielsen) 12/07/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

GoDaddy Bowl pits interim versus outgoing Kent State coach (Nielson) 12/06/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

MOBILE, Ala. --- The news conference promoting the GoDaddy.com Bowl didn't have any coach on hand. Darrell Hazell, who will be leaving No. 25 Kent State after the Jan. 5 game to take over at Purdue, wasn't available Thursday. Neither was Gus Malzahn, who has already left Arkansas State to...

Mobile bowl will pit interim versus outgoing coach (Nielson) 12/06/2012 Sports Illustrated - Online Text Attachment Email

MOBILE, Ala. (AP) - The news conference promoting the GoDaddy.com Bowl was a coach-free zone. Darrell Hazell, who will be leaving No. 25 Kent State after the Jan. 5 game to take over at Purdue, wasn't available Thursday. Neither was Gus Malzahn, who has already left Arkansas State to...

Kent State to wear gold helmets proudly at GoDaddy.com Bowl (poll) (nielsen) 12/07/2012 al.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State coach to stay with team through GoDaddy.com Bowl (photos) 12/06/2012 al.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State coach Darrell Hazell will coach the Golden Flashes in the GoDaddy.com Bowl even though he's already been introduced as Purdue's head coach.


Biological Sciences; Research (1)
Data on Cell Biochemistry Discussed by Researchers at Kent State University 12/07/2012 NewsRx.com Text Email

...decrease (AVD). Cells counteract cell shrinkage by volume regulatory increase (RVI)." The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "The present study explored the response of human U937 cells to hypertonic solution thus elucidating the relationship between...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
NY exhibit showcases Hepburn's style (Druesedow) 12/07/2012 Cape Cod Times - Online Text Attachment Email

..."The fact that she wore slacks and wanted to be comfortable influenced women's ready-to-wear in the United States," said Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum, which was given 700 items from Hepburn's estate. Kent State was selected because it's one of the country's only...


Geology; Research (1)
Researchers Pinpoint 1,500-Year Cycle in Arctic Atmospheric Pattern (Ortiz) 12/07/2012 SitNews Text Attachment Email

...influences weather in the Northern Hemisphere. Researchers take samples aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the Arctic. Photo by Joseph Ortiz, Kent State University Courtesy National Science Foundation Lead researcher Dennis Darby, a geological oceanographer at Virginia's Old Dominion...


History (1)
KHS to present 'Kent in the 1920s' 12/07/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Redneck TV rules the airwaves (Batchelor) 12/07/2012 orangecounty.com Text Attachment Email

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM GETS TOP-50 NOD FROM STUDENT-MEDIA BLOG 12/06/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

...in the country." Other undergraduate programs recognized by Reimold include the journalism schools at Arizona State University, Boston University, Kent State University, Michigan State University, Northwestern University, Syracuse University, Temple University, the University of Alabama, the...


KSU at Geauga (1)
Geauga County Maple Leaf 12/06/2012 ??Geauga County Maple Leaf Text Attachment Email

Community News – December 6, 2012 Thursday, December 06, 2012 GEL Breakfast At KSU Burton Be sure to stop by Kent State Geauga on Fri. Dec. 7 for the monthly Geauga Economic Leadership breakfast will begin at 7:30 a.m. Dec. 7 with the annual Entrepreneur...


KSU at Stark (1)
Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent Stark to host information session Jan. 8 12/07/2012 Review - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Stark is sponsoring an information session for individuals interested in starting a small business or those who are in the...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Philharmonic in a holiday mood- New Philadelphia, OH - The Times-Reporter 12/07/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...and the Philharmonic Children's Chorus will present their annual "Yuletide Celebration" concert at 7:30 in the Performing Arts Center on the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas at New Philadelphia. The "Messiah" performance will be preceded by an organ prelude presented by Beth Fragasse...


Music (1)
'Jam' Festival of Music and the Arts Returns to Wooster April 12-13 12/07/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...intercollegiate a cappella competition that will showcase groups from The College of Wooster (A Round of Monkeys and COWBelles), Oberlin College (Obertones), Ohio State University (Key of Gee and Buck That!), Kent State University (Kent Clarks), and others. Participants will compete for a grand prize...


Pan-African Studies (1)
Annual Kwanzaa celebration promotes peace, purpose and prosperity (Okantah) 12/07/2012 Daily Athenaeum - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...ashay" echoed throughout the Mountainlair ballrooms Thursday evening. "Ashay" meaning, "Be with us," invited ancestors to join the celebration. The West Virginia University Center for Black Culture & Research welcomed the WVU community to its annual Kwanzaa celebration. Mwatabu S. Okantah,...


Psychology; Research (1)
Chew on this: Memory helps drive appetite - chicagotribune.com 12/06/2012 Chicago Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain. A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better...


Research; Students (1)
PROmoting the next GENeration of Researchers (PROGENY) Participants 2012 12/06/2012 ASHA Leader - Online Text Attachment Email

...experienced researchers about their research, and about pursuing an academic-research career. Name Affiliation Presentation Topic Allison Babic Kent State University Behavior Labeling in Pediatric Feeding: A Training Study Jamie Boster Marshall University Iconicity of Symbols: Adults vs....


Town-Gown (3)
Court rejects bid to halt move of Sherman House 12/07/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Progress continues on downtown Kent development work 12/07/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

UPDATE: Court Denies All Injunction Requests to Stop Wells Sherman House 12/06/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...confident that it had been handled properly," Susel said. The house remains in its temporary spot at the dead end of East College Avenue, land owned by Kent State University, where it was moved in August. The Kent Wells Sherman House group had been given a deadline by city and university officials...


University Press (1)
Wild turkey kill declines over last year 12/07/2012 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...as an Undercover Wildlife Officer.” The book records the adventures of R.T. Stewart as told to outdoor writer Chip Gross. The book was published by Kent State University Press and is available from Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com for $13.57. • Hurricane Sandy again proved the importance of...


News Headline: HOLIDAY MART IS RETURNING TO AKRON ART MUSEUM TODAY: SHOP FOR CHRISTMAS WHILE ENJOYING MUSIC, REFRESHMENTS, EXHIBITS | Email

News Date: 12/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Shinn, Dorothy
News OCR Text: The Akron Art Museum's fifth annual Holiday mART will be held today in the museum's lobby and store, where one-of-a-kind gifts can be found for the important people in your life while enjoying music, food and the museum.

Hand-crafted items include jewelry, clothing, accessories and original artwork from students from the University of Akron Myers School of Art, as well as local artists Renee Flynn, Lise Anderson, former Beacon Journal writer Connie Bloom, Barbe Beaty, Diane Harmon, Dana Hervey, Brian Graham, John Puglia and the Kent State University Jewelry/Metals Co-Op. Together, they will represent the museum's mission of "enriching lives through modern art."

Augmenting this year's event will be Nectar of the Vine, which specializes in refined refreshments, as well as Buckeye Chocolate Company, Ohio's gourmet chocolatiers.

Menu items from Urban Eats and a cash bar will be available during the music of the Joe Leaman Jazz Trio from 5-8:30 p.m.

Shoppers can make purchases using major credit cards as well as cash or check.

This event is free, but gallery admission is required to see the collection and special exhibitions.
FRIDAY

Art Talk - Anna Calluori Holcombe, professor of art at the University of Florida, Gainesville, will give a noon talk about her ceramics at the Kent State University School of Art Building, Room 202. For more information, call the school of art at 330-672-2192.

Bebop and Shop - Bebop and Shop is being held in the Canton Arts District, from 6 to 10 p.m. as part of First Friday. Santa will stop by Saxton from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. for holiday pictures, alongside samples and sales of Chocolates by Erin. Freddie Le Fever will assist with old-fashioned holiday ornament making at Carpe Diem. The art of Joe Martino will be at Julz; touchable 3-D art from Daniel Craven will be at Gassers; and Sharon Charmley's show, Pursuit, will delight at Translations. It's a Wonderful Life, will be screened at 7 and 8 p.m. at the new Parallax Theatre, 534 Cleveland Ave. NW. Download the First Friday map and any additional details you need at www.cantonfirstfriday.com. First Friday is sponsored by Stark Community Foundation and presented by the downtown Canton Special improvement District and ArtsinStark.
WORTH NOTING

Art Proposals Sought - The Emily Cooper Welty Expressive Therapy Center at Akron Children's Hospital is looking for proposals from local artists. This is a paid project. In order to become a part of this project, a proposal must be submitted. For questions and information about the project contact Brian Murphy via email at marph7@gmail.com or by phone at 330-329-3625.

Art Teachers Needed - Gary Peters, microenterprise adviser for Summit DD-Cuyahoga Falls Center, assists about 30 disabled artists and has been nominated for the 2013 Ohio Governor's Award for the Arts. Several of his clients are looking for some paid art instruction. They want to learn techniques in air brushing, portraits and children's illustration skills, while others just want basic painting lessons. In addition, their Dream Out Loud Art Studio, which works with 16 artists during the day, is looking for artists-in-residence. This would involve teaching a particular art skill in any medium a few hours a week. For more information, contact Gary Peters at 330-634-8186 or via email at gpeters@summitdd.org.

Sold Out - A word to the wise: If you've waited until now to sign up for the art museum's Island of Misfit Toys Workshop, its Glass Ornament Workshop or its Ring Making Workshop, you've waited too long - they're all sold out. Keep track of the popular museum events at http://akronartmuseum.org/calendar.
DEADLINES

Jan. 6 - Through the W2S Series, begun in 1991, the Sculpture Center, 12206 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, fosters and promotes the careers of sculptors during the first 10 years of their profession. Sculptors and installation and expanded media artists are chosen annually for one-person exhibitions in either the Main or Euclid Avenue Gallery. The five-week-long exhibitions are held January through May or June. The deadline to submit applications is Jan. 6. For guidelines and to apply, go to www.sculpturecenter.org. For more information, call 216-229-6527 or send an email to info@sculpturecenter.org.

Copyright © 2012 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Hazell's legacy at Kent State: Will to win (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Transformational Flashes
Coach Changed Attitudes, Too

Darrell Hazell brought
a sense of excitement to Kent
State University football that captivated
the campus and the Kent community,
transforming the Golden Flashes
into a true Cinderella team.
Kent State earned
the Mid-American
East Division title,
came heartbreakingly
close to winning the
MAC Championship
and won the Flashes' first bowl bid in 40
years.
Even more importantly, though, as one
player told the departing coach, he taught
the Golden Flashes how to win.
As Darrell Hazell leaves Kent to become
head football coach at Purdue University,
that's probably his most important legacy.
He was an inspirational coach and a
transfomational one who changed attitudes
as well as history. The team he built,
after only two years at its helm, is enormously
stronger because of his presence.
His successor, whoever that proves to be,
will inherit an enthusiastic and energized
group of young men with a will to win —
one of the key building blocks for a championship
season.
Coach Hazell's time at Kent State was
brief, and his departure for Purdue and a
reported $12 million compensation package
comes as no surprise. Kent State,
given its size and resources, cannot possibly
compete with schools such as Purdue,
which can offer so much more to a
talented young coach.
The Flashes will have one more opportunity
to play for Coach Hazell, who will
stay on as the team competes in their
first bowl game since Don James took the
Flashes to the Tangerine Bowl in 1972. We
hope that the GoDaddy.com Bowl against
Arkansas State on Jan. 6 proves to be a
victory lap for Kent State and their departing
coach.
It's hard to lose a winner, but we wish
Darrell Hazell continued success with
the Boilermakers and trust that he will
remember his time in Kent with fondness.
Like Don James before him, he will
remain in the hearts of many who found
themselves thrilled by KSU football for
the first time in a long while.
“I don't think we'll find another Darrell
Hazell,” KSU Athletics Director Joel
Nielsen said Wednesday when the coach's
departure was announced. Probably not.
But it was great having one on board, even
if only for two years.

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News Headline: Kent State Hopes to Fill Hazell's Spot by End of Year (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Darrell Hazell will still coach the football team in the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Jan. 6.

* By Mitch Cooper
* Email the author
* 12:04 am

The search is underway to find Darrell Hazell's replacement as the head coach of the Kent State football team.

Athletic Director Joel Nielson has already begun the search and wants to have the spot filled over the next two to three weeks, according to Aaron Chimenti, spokesman for the football team.

"There is great coaching talent out there - like Darrell - seeking an opportunity to demonstrate their capabilities," Nielsen said in press release Wednesday. "Our search will be both thorough and quick - and mirror the search we did that resulted in Darrell joining Kent State two years ago."

Hazell announced Wednesday morning that he accepted the head coaching position at Purdue University.

Hazell, who led the Kent State Golden Flashes (11-2, 8-0 MAC) to their first bowl game appearance this year in more than 40 years, had been rumored to be a candidate in several head coaching jobs across the country.

This year Hazell led the the Flashes through a dream season that will culminate with their appearance in the GoDaddy.com Bowl Jan. 6.

He said Purdue athletic officials have granted him permission to coach Kent State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl.

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News Headline: GoDaddy Bowl pits interim versus outgoing Kent State coach (Nielson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: MOBILE, Ala. --- The news conference promoting the GoDaddy.com Bowl didn't have any coach on hand.

Darrell Hazell, who will be leaving No. 25 Kent State after the Jan. 5 game to take over at Purdue, wasn't available Thursday. Neither was Gus Malzahn, who has already left Arkansas State to lead Auburn's program.

Defensive coordinator John Thompson will be interim coach for the Red Wolves, but wasn't here either.

It's Kent State's first bowl in 40 years. Athletic director Joel Nielson says having Hazell stick around for the game is "a great thing for our team."

This is the fifth straight year that at least one of the head coaches has not coached in the bowl game because they have taken another job. It's the first time other schools have hired both coaches.

NOTE: The above article ran in three additional media outlets.

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News Headline: Mobile bowl will pit interim versus outgoing coach (Nielson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Sports Illustrated - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MOBILE, Ala. (AP) - The news conference promoting the GoDaddy.com Bowl was a coach-free zone.

Darrell Hazell, who will be leaving No. 25 Kent State after the Jan. 5 game to take over at Purdue, wasn't available Thursday. Neither was Gus Malzahn, who has already left Arkansas State to lead Auburn's program.

Defensive coordinator John Thompson will be interim coach for the Red Wolves, but wasn't here either.

Hazell couldn't bear to miss Kent State's first bowl in 40 years, and is busy pulling double duty.

"It's a great thing for our team because he has such great respect with our team and our community and our university,'' Golden Flashes athletic director Joel Nielson said. "There was an outpouring (Wednesday) from our team and our community that if we had the chance to have coach Hazell in our bowl, they wanted me to make the right decision.

"I give Purdue a lot of credit allowing him to have dual roles here for about a month and allow us to have that for our student-athletes. That was really important to our team. I talked to the team and the captains and it was real important to have this staff involved.''

This is the fifth straight year that at least one of the head coaches has not coached in the Mobile bowl game because they have taken another job. It's the first time other schools have hired both coaches.

The Boilermakers will be led by receivers coach Patrick Higgins against Oklahoma State on Jan. 1 in the Heart of Dallas Bowl.

NOTE: The above article appeared in 24 additional media outlets.

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News Headline: Kent State to wear gold helmets proudly at GoDaddy.com Bowl (poll) (nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: al.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Mark Inabinett | minabinett@al.com al.com
on December 06, 2012 at 10:38 PM, updated December 06, 2012 at 10:56 PM

MOBILE, Alabama - Notre Dame won't be the only team sporting gold helmets in college football's postseason. Kent State will wear gold helmets in the GoDaddy.com Bowl.

The Golden Flashes will play Arkansas State at 8 p.m. Jan. 6 at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile. The GoDaddy.com Bowl will be Kent State's first bowl appearance since the 1972 Tangerine Bowl.

Those Golden Flashes wore gold helmets, but Kent State hasn't been regularly topped in gold since 1978, according to nationalchamp.net's Helmet Project. The Kent State helmet on display at the GoDaddy.com press conference on Thursday at Heron Lakes Country Club in Mobile was navy blue.

But when they take the field on Jan. 6, the Golden Flashes will have gold helmets. Kent State coach Darrell Hazell used a gold helmet as a way to focus on ending the Golden Flashes' bowl drought.

"When he came in, he found a gold helmet and said that would be the helmet that we wore in the bowl game," Kent State athletic director Joel Nielsen said on Thursday. "So just last week, we had all our helmets painted, so you'll see gold helmets for the Golden Flashes coming out on Jan. 6.

"He said it the first week that he was on campus. He wanted his team to see that target every time they walked in the office. And that target was that gold helmet. It's in a glass trophy case that has been in their office ever since he took the job. And so now, the young men are so excited about wearing that gold helmet because that's the goal that they really sought out for the last couple of years."

After going to the Tangerine Bowl, Kent State went 9-2 in 1973, part of four winning records in a five-season span for the Golden Flashes. But only the 1972 team went to a bowl.

Since Don James left the Kent State sideline to coach Washington after the 1974 season, the Golden Flashes had posted four winning campaigns before this season's 11-2 showing. Since 1977, they'd had only two - in 1987 and 2001.

In the highly competive and resource-balanced Mid-American Conference, the right coach can make all the difference, Neilsen said, and finding the coach that could get Kent State to a bowl was one of his goals when he became athletic director.

"Coming in, that was one of the things a little over two and a half years ago when I accepted the position that I wanted to do," Neilsen said. "The campus, the city were hungry for football success. I remember them asking me, 'What's it going to take to win in football?' That's a pretty tough question.

"We had to find the right guy. Coach Hazell and that staff have done a great job."

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News Headline: Kent State coach to stay with team through GoDaddy.com Bowl (photos) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: al.com
Contact Name: Mark Inabinett | minabinett@al.com
News OCR Text: Kent State coach Darrell Hazell will coach the Golden Flashes in the GoDaddy.com Bowl even though he's already been introduced as Purdue's head coach.

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News Headline: Data on Cell Biochemistry Discussed by Researchers at Kent State University | Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2012 DEC 7 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- A new study on Cell Biochemistry is now available. According to news reporting from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Osmotic cell shrinkage is a powerful trigger of suicidal cell death or apoptosis, which is paralleled and enforced by apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). Cells counteract cell shrinkage by volume regulatory increase (RVI)."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "The present study explored the response of human U937 cells to hypertonic solution thus elucidating the relationship between RVI and AVD. Cell water, concentration of monovalent ions and the appearance of apoptotic markers were followed for 0.5-4 h after the cells were transferred to a hypertonic medium. Intracellular water, K+, Na+, and Cl- content, ouabain-sensitive and -resistant Rb+ influxes were determined by measurement of the cell buoyant density in Percoll density gradient, flame emission analysis and Cl-36(-) assay, respectively. Fluorescent microscopy of live cells stained by acridine orange and ethidium bromide was used to verify apoptosis. After 2-4 h incubation in hypertonic media the cell population was split into light (L) and heavy (H) fractions. According to microscopy and analysis of monovalent ions the majority of cells in the L population were healthy, while the H fractions were enriched with apoptotic cells. The density of L cells was decreasing with time, while the density of H cells was increasing, thus reflecting the opposite effects of RVI and AVD. At the same time, some of the cells were shifting from L to H fractions, indicating that apoptosis was gradually extending to cells that were previously displaying normal RVI."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The findings suggest that apoptosis can develop in cells capable of RVI."

For more information on this research see: Dual Response of Human Leukemia U937 Cells to Hypertonic Shrinkage: Initial Regulatory Volume Increase (RVI) and Delayed Apoptotic Volume Decrease (AVD). Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry, 2012;30(4):964-973. Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry can be contacted at: Karger, Allschwilerstrasse 10, Ch-4009 Basel, Switzerland. (Karger - www.karger.com/; Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry - content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Aktion=JournalHome&ProduktNr=224332)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting V.E. Yurinskaya, Kent State University, Dept. of Biol Sci, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, Apoptosis, United States, Cell Biochemistry, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2012 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: NY exhibit showcases Hepburn's style (Druesedow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cape Cod Times - Online
Contact Name: Ula Ilnytzky
News OCR Text: John Howard, Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart in a 1940 publicity shot for George Cukor's romantic comedy, ”The Philadelphia Story.“The Associated Press, MGM

NEW YORK — Actress Katharine Hepburn had a 20-inch waist and a fierce fashion sense. Her trademark khakis and open-collar shirts were decidedly unconventional in the 1930s and '40s, when girdles and stockings were the order of the day.

The strongly independent Hepburn famously once said: "Anytime I hear a man say he prefers a woman in a skirt, I say, 'Try one. Try a skirt.'"

But skirts and dresses abound in "Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen" at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. The exhibition, with 40 displays, runs through Jan. 12.

Hepburn, who died in 2003 at age 96, saved almost all the costumes from her long career that included four Oscars and such memorable films as "The Philadelphia Story," "The African Queen," "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" and "On Golden Pond." One of the first things visitors will notice is how slender Hepburn was — she had a 20-inch waist — and a grouping of seven pairs of khaki pants artfully arranged on mannequin legs.

"The fact that she wore slacks and wanted to be comfortable influenced women's ready-to-wear in the United States," said Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum, which was given 700 items from Hepburn's estate. Kent State was selected because it's one of the country's only museums of performance clothes.

"That image said to the American woman 'Look you don't have to be in your girdle and stockings and tight dress. You can be comfortable. That was probably the first aspect of becoming a fashion icon," said Druesedow, a co-curator of the exhibition.

The strong-willed actress known for taking charge of her career worked closely with all her designers to decide her performing wardrobe.

"They understood what would help her characters, what she would feel comfortable wearing ... how it would support the story," Druesedow said.

Margaret Furse, an English designer who created Hepburn's wardrobes for "The Lion in Winter," "A Delicate Balance" and "Love Among the Ruins," went shopping with the star and talked extensively about what kinds of things would set the scene.

Among the highlights is a stunning satin and lace wedding gown created by Howard Greer for her role as Stella Surrege in "The Lake." The 1933 production was her first major Broadway role and also a huge flop. Writer and wit Dorothy Parker described her performance as running "the gamut of emotion from A to B." The experience taught Hepburn to have a bigger say in what roles she accepted, said Barbara Cohen-Stratyner, curator of exhibitions at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

When she really liked a costume she had copies made for herself, sometimes in a different color or fabric. A silk dress and coat by Norman Hartnell from "Suddenly, Last Summer" and a green raw silk jumpsuit by Valentina from "The Philadelphia Story" were among the pieces she had copied.

Comfort was paramount to Hepburn — being able to throw her leg over a chair or sit on the floor. She always wore her 'uniform' — khakis and a shirt — to rehearsals and pant ensembles to publicity appearances.

A companion book, "Katharine Hepburn: Rebel Chic," describes how RKO executives hid Hepburn's trousers in an effort to persuade her to abandon them.

"Her response was to threaten to walk around the lot naked. Though she only stripped down as far as her silk underwear before stepping out of her dressing room, she made her point — and she got her trousers back," fashion writer Nancy MacDonell wrote in an essay for the book.

But comfort didn't mean sacrificing style — and she certainly knew how to be glamorous especially when a role called for it.

In her private life, she shopped at the major cutting-edge New York couturiers and worked with the best costume shops of the period, including Muriel King and Valentina, said Cohen-Stratyner.

"She really appreciated good fabric and good construction," she said. "Even her trousers are couture."

The exhibition is supplemented by film clips, movie posters, and archival photographs of Hepburn wearing the very costumes worn by the mannequins. Her false eyelashes, makeup trays and sensible shoes are also on display.

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News Headline: Researchers Pinpoint 1,500-Year Cycle in Arctic Atmospheric Pattern (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: SitNews
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (SitNews) - A team of scientists supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) has identified for the first time a clear 1,500-year cycle in the far North's surface atmosphere pressure pattern. Called the Arctic Oscillation (AO), the cycle greatly influences weather in the Northern Hemisphere.

Researchers take samples aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the Arctic.

Photo by Joseph Ortiz, Kent State University

Courtesy National Science Foundation

Lead researcher Dennis Darby, a geological oceanographer at Virginia's Old Dominion University, used the findings to describe a worst-case scenario in which the cyclical pressure pattern could combine with man-made climate change to exacerbate severe weather and flooding trends.

William Wiseman, a program director in the Arctic Natural Sciences Program in NSF's Office of Polar Programs, said the new research is innovative in its approach to separating human influences on climate from naturally occurring events.

"Separating the effects of human contributions to climate variability from those due to natural variability is never easy," he said. "Darby and his colleagues, using clever analyses of sediment data, have noted an important long-term variation in sediment transport that is consistent with variability in the Arctic climate on similar time scales. This work adds one more piece of information to our understanding of a very complex system."

Working from a 20-meter-long sediment core raised offshore of Alaska from waters 1,300 meters deep, the researchers could detect varying amounts of iron-rich sand grains ice-rafted from Russia over the last 8,000 years. The core was originally recovered from the flank of Barrow Canyon by an NSF-funded oceanographic cruise on which researchers Lloyd Keigwin, Julie Brigham-Grette and Neil Driscoll were co-investigators.

Darby and his colleagues were able to show through geochemical analysis that some of these Russian grains came from the Kara Sea, which is off the northern Russia landmass east of the northern tip of Finland. This is more than 3,000 miles from the core sample site, and the authors say Kara iron grains could have only arrived at the Alaskan coast by drifting in ice. Furthermore, the ice floes would only move from the Kara to offshore Alaska during strong positive AO conditions.

When the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index is positive, surface pressure is low in the polar region. This helps the mid-latitude jet stream blow strongly and consistently from west to east, thus keeping cold Arctic air locked in the polar region. When the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index is negative, there tends to be high pressure in the polar region, weaker zonal winds and greater movement of frigid polar air into the populated areas of the middle latitudes.

Measurements taken by instruments in modern times clearly show relatively short-term fluctuations in the Arctic Oscillation (AO), with profound impacts on weather and climate. "But how the AO varies during the Holocene (roughly the last 12,000 years) is not well understood," the authors write in Nature Geoscience.

Darby said that time-series analysis of the researchers' geochemical record reveals a 1,500-year cycle that is similar to what other researchers have proposed in recent decades, based on scattered findings in paleoclimate records. But he and his colleagues are the first to find a high-resolution indicator of the Arctic record that resolves multidecadal-through-millennial-scale Arctic Oscillation cycles, he said.

"Our record is the longest record to date to reconstruct the AO and documents that there is millennial scale variability in the AO," Ortiz said. "The sedimentation rate at our site is also sufficient to statistically differentiate between a 1,000-year cycle and a 1,500-year cycle, which helps us to understand the dynamics of the response of the climate system to external forcing during the Holocene geological period."

The 1,500-year cycle is distinct from a 1,000-year cycle found in a similarly analyzed record of total solar irradiance, the authors write, suggesting that the longer cycle arises from either internal oscillation of the climate system or as an indirect response to low-latitude solar forcing.

"The AO can remain in a rather strong negative or positive mode for many decades," the research team writes in the Nature Geoscience article. "When it is positive as suggested by the upswing in the Kara series during the last 200 years, then the additional warmth due to the entrapped Arctic cold air masses during winters could exacerbate the mid-latitude signature of anthropogenic global warming resulting from increased atmospheric carbon dioxide. When the AO is strongly negative as seen in the winters of 2009-11, the Northern Hemisphere experiences prolonged intervals of colder than normal conditions. Because the maximum amplitudes of the AO as recorded in the Kara (iron) grain record in recent decades is less than a third of the amplitude in the past, the full range of variability in the AO is not likely recorded in the instrumental records of the last few decades."

Darby does his detective work by analyzing sediments, mostly from core samples that have been collected when researchers drill a hollow tube into the floor of the Arctic Ocean or nearby seas. The work is made possible by an iron-grain chemical fingerprinting technique he developed that enables him to determine the landmass where the grains originated. This provides evidence about winds and currents--and therefore the overall weather patterns--that brought the grain to its resting place.

Even if natural cycles are responsible for some recent warming trends, this doesn't let humans off the hook for polluting the atmosphere, Darby said. Human influence may combine with natural cycles to increase global warming.

Darby's research is not directly involved in weighing human contributions to climate change, such as increases in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere brought on by combustion.

"We're looking for natural conditions that are helping to cause this global warming and sea level rise," Darby said. "There seems to be a natural pacing to climate change. If you don't know what changes are naturally occurring over the long haul, you don't know how to deal with conditions over the short term."

The findings were published on Nature Geoscience's website. Darby coauthored the paper with a team of scientists from Old Dominion and Kent State universities and the University of Southern California (USC).

Coauthors are Joseph Ortiz, a geological oceanographer from Kent State; Chester Grosch, a physical oceanographer and computer scientist from ODU and Steven Lund, a geophysicist from USC.

Source of News:

National Science Foundation

www.nsf.gov

E-mail your news & photos to editor@sitnews.us

SitNews ©2012

Ketchikan, Alaska

Articles & photographs that appear in SitNews may be protected by copyright and may not be reprinted without written permission from and payment of any required fees to the proper sources.

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News Headline: KHS to present 'Kent in the 1920s' | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Record-Courier Staff Report

The Kent Historical Society
will host a special “All
About Kent” event, presented
by Kent State University
graduate students in the
school's public history program.
“Kent in the 1920s,” will
be held at 6:30 p.m. Monday
at the Kent Masonic
Center, which is located at
West Main and South Mantua
streets.
Professors John Jameson
and Helmut Flacheneckar
led the course this fall that
will culminate in the presentation
of nine speakers
covering aspects of Kent's
history that have been researched
during the semester.
Flacheneckar will discuss
“Kent in 1918, its hopes and
dreams after World War I as
reflected in the Kent Tribune”
and Jameson's topic
is “Politics of the day in
the U.S. and Ohio,” and students
will present their research
on a variety of topics.
Record-Courier Editor
Roger Di Paolo will discuss
1920s civic boosterism and
KHS Director Tom Hatch
will speak about social life
conserved in a museum:
KHS and the Clapp Woodward
House.

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News Headline: Redneck TV rules the airwaves (Batchelor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: orangecounty.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By MICHAEL HEWITT
THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER
Published: Dec. 6, 2012 Updated: 3:37 p.m.

We have long heard that the South will rise again, but who thought that return would be led by a 7-year-old girl and a band of brothers with ZZ Top beards and a fondness for frog hunting?

Yet here we are amid an explosion of reality shows about the South, more specifically the rural South, where TV producers seek out characters with thick accents and thin educations – rednecks, in other words.

Since the debut of History's "Swamp People" two years ago, the roster of redneck reality shows has grown to nearly two dozen, headed by the ratings hits "Here Comes Honey Boo Boo" and "Duck Dynasty." And more are headed our way, like MTV's forthcoming "Buckwild."

The shows offer a variety of protagonists – hog farmers, moonshiners, accidental millionaires – but what happens in them is pretty much the same: The characters take part in a backwoods activity, preferably involving mud; do something low-class, like let the dog lick the frosting on a wedding cake; use as much bad grammar as possible; and fight with each other. Setting something on fire – ideally themselves – is a bonus.

Reality TV always has pursued its own latest trend, with knockoffs of the most recent hit an absolute certainty. "The Real Housewives of Orange County" has spawned a franchise that now includes New York, New Jersey, Atlanta, Miami and Beverly Hills, as well as several off-brand copies. The megahit "Pawn Stars" revitalized the what's-stuff-worth genre.

But no topic in reality-documentary land has ever turned out as many shows as the redneck boom, which has spawned series on A&E, Animal Planet, CMT, Discovery, History, National Geographic and TLC.

It got it start, coincidentally, as part of the dangerous-jobs series boom begun by Discovery's "Deadliest Catch." The History channel launched "Swamp People," which focuses on Louisiana's annual 30-day alligator hunting season. The character's thick accents and backwoods ways caught hold. The trend accelerated last year with the success of A&E's "Duck Dynasty," and this summer's TLC smash "Here Comes Honey Boo Boo" is keeping the engine stoked.

But why do viewers find rednecks so appealing? The answer is multifaceted.

Demographic appeal plays a major role, says Richard Goedkoop, a retired professor of communications at La Salle University in Philadelphia.

"For one, it reaches the young male audience that is difficult to target with content that is not sports," Goedkoop said. "Second, it reaches a somewhat older male audience that wants to relate to a more basic element in their past: the frontiersman, the hunter, the gatherer. Third, it reaches part of a more general audience that is looking for diversion that takes them out of their mundane suburban or urban lives and probably makes them feel superior to those being portrayed."

And that last element is particularly important, says Bob Batchelor, an assistant professor of journalism and mass communications at Kent State University in Ohio and an expert on popular culture.

"The fascination with celebrities and high class lifestyles still exists ... but reality TV show creators have found that audiences also respond to the grotesque, whether it is someone bombing and then getting berated on "American Idol" or getting dirty in a Southern swamp," Batchelor said. "The fascination with rural Southern culture is based on the rest of the nation's misunderstanding of the region and its basic prejudice against the South in general. The rest of the country does not feel that making fun of the South is off-limits. As a matter of fact, Southerners are a group that it is still permissible to mock."

Others, though, don't see the pandering to stereotype as necessarily harmful.

Paul Levinson, a professor of communications and media studies at Fordham University in New York, believes that criticizing a TV genre for stereotyping a subculture "underrates human's intelligence."

"People can tell the difference between a TV show and real life,"

Some even see an aspirational aspect to shows like "Here Comes Honey Boo Boo." That series, which drew more than 2.5 million viewers an episode to its first season this summer, stars 7-year-old Alana Thompson and her family, which includes Sugar Bear, Pumpkin, Chubbs and Chickadee. The series plays like a sitcom, and the characters' main role seems to be to make as many off-the-wall comments as possible.

Carla Pero, a longtime Orange County resident now living in Missouri, became a fan of Honey Boo Boo when Honey was a regular on "Toddlers & Tiaras," the comic relief among "all the other perfect little kids." Pero started following the Thompson clan on Facebook, where she learned they were helping out poor families in their hometown.

"None of us are perfect, and this family is far from it, but I prefer to look at what is inside a person, and learn from them, and strive to be like them," Pero said. "I feel the show has gained popularity because of what the family stands for: all other poor families out there who hope to one day get ahead in life. ... It helps us want to be better people."

A viewer's guide to redneck TV

Here are 10 of the most popular reality shows that focus on the rural South:

"Here Comes Honey Boo Boo" (TLC) – The unquestioned queen of the redneck revolution, 7-year-old Alana Thompson and her family have become a huge hit just by being themselves, even though they don't really do anything.

"Duck Dynasty" (A&E) – The Robertson family made a small fortune manufacturing duck calls, but they still enjoy hunting frogs in the swamps of Louisiana and growing enormous beards – the guys, anyway.

"Swamp People" (History) – The Godfather of redneck series (it debuted in 2010) features a group of Louisiana alligator hunters as they negotiate the annual 30-day gator-hunting season.

"Cajun Pawn Stars" (History) – With Cajuns and pawnbrokers two of the hottest topics in reality TV, this show is a no-brainer – in more ways than one.

"Redneck Island" (CMT) – "Survivor" knockoffs generally fail, but this hillbilly version seems to be succeeding in its second season. Pro wrestler Stone Cold Steve Austin hosts.

"Hillbilly Handfishin'" (Animal Planet) – City folk come to Oklahoma to try this redneck sport, which involves wading into a mudhole to capture a catfish by sticking your forearm down its throat. Really.

"Bayou Billionaires" (CMT) - The Dowden family recently learned they live on a massive natural gas deposit and are suddenly reaping royalty checks. The real "Beverly Hillbillies" – except they stayed in Shreveport.

"Moonshiners" (Discovery) – The guys in this show are pretty much living backwoods clichés. It's like "Dukes of Hazzard" without the General Lee, Catherine Bach or nearly so many teeth.

"Big Shrimpin'" (History) – Take the ultra-popular "Deadliest Catch" and move it to the Gulf, and you have "Big Shrimpin'." Three boat crews compete for crustaceans and comprehensibility.

"Rocket City Redecks" (National Geographic) – The anti-redneck redneck show combines "Mythbusters" with "Moonshiners." These rednecks are engineers, and a couple even have PhDs.

Contact the writer: mhewitt@ocregister.com or 714-796-7724. Michael Hewitt is the Register's TV critic.

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News Headline: SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM GETS TOP-50 NOD FROM STUDENT-MEDIA BLOG | Email

News Date: 12/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MURFREESBORO, Tenn., Dec.6 -- Middle Tennessee State University issued the following news release:

A respected student-media scholar has included MTSU'S School of Journalism in his 2013 list of "50 Best Journalism Schools and Programs at U.S.Colleges and Universities."

Dr.Dan Reimold, who teaches journalism at the University of Tampa and blogs at CollegeMediaMatters.com, said he based his evaluations on "knowledge of various schools' and departments' reputations, faculty, affiliated student media, classes (and) internship and study-abroad connections."

"It is strongly biased in favor of programs exciting me in the digital journalism realm and in some way aligned with quality campus media and professional publishing opportunities," Reimold wrote."(These are) programs I consider to be the best in the country at this moment, AKA places I would strongly consider enrolling if I woke up tomorrow back in high school."

MTSU's undergraduate program in the College of Mass Communication is the only Tennessee program mentioned in the list.It's also a part of the fifth largest communication college in the United States and has produced some of the nation's top journalists for the last 30-plus years, said Dr.Dwight Brooks, the school's director.

In April, the university unveiled a new Center for Innovation in Media, where students from all media disciplines hone their real-world print, Web, audio and video journalism skills under one roof in a high-tech facility.The center combines the newsrooms for Sidelines, the student newspaper; WMTS-FM, the student-run radio station; MT Records, the student-run record label; MT10-HD, the student-operated cable TV station; and WMOT-FM, the university's 100,000-watt public radio station.

"This recognition is a testament to the many fine students, faculty and staff throughout the College of Mass Communication and MTSU," Brooks said."Every one of our 800 students majoring or minoring in one of the School of Journalism's programs should be as proud as I am for being listed among the top programs in the country."

Other undergraduate programs recognized by Reimold include the journalism schools at Arizona State University, Boston University, Kent State University, Michigan State University, Northwestern University, Syracuse University, Temple University, the University of Alabama, the University of Missouri and Western Kentucky University.

The complete list is available at http://tinyurl.com/crukngt.

Reimold said he required each program on his list to have at least a journalism major, not just a concentration or minor, as well as accreditation by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.He also focused strictly on undergraduate journalism programs, which is why the list doesn't include esteemed post-graduate programs at institutions like Columbia University and Stanford.

College Media Matters is a student journalism industry blog that "provides updates on influential, controversial, innovative, and newsworthy matters" affecting college media around the world.It maintains an official partnership with the Associated Collegiate Press, the largest and oldest U.S.student journalism organization.

"I am really pleased with this most recent news," said Dr.Roy Moore, dean of MTSU's College of Mass Communication."This national recognition points to the enhanced status the School of Journalism and other units in the College of Mass Communication continue to see as we move forward to meet the demands of a new media environment.It also is a testament to the high quality of faculty, students and staff in the school and to its leadership." For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Geauga County Maple Leaf | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: ??Geauga County Maple Leaf
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Community News – December 6, 2012

Thursday, December 06, 2012

GEL Breakfast At KSU Burton

Be sure to stop by Kent State Geauga on Fri. Dec. 7 for the monthly Geauga Economic Leadership breakfast will begin at 7:30 a.m. Dec. 7 with the annual Entrepreneur Success breakfast at Kent State Geauga. Breakfast will be followed by a presentation at 8 a.m. by local entrepreneur and owner of Mercury Plastics, Bill Rowley.

As the 1997 Northeast Ohio Entrepreneur of the Year, he has quite a story to tell as his company has grown to over $35 million in sales and now employs 225 people in the Middlefield business.

Please RSVP Carol Gardner at 440-834-3755.

The Singing Angels In Chardon

The Geauga Lyric Theater Guild will present Cleveland's youth chorus, the Singing Angels, Dec. 6 beginning at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10.

Call the box office at 440-286-2255 for information.

Angel Shoppe And Craft Show

The Huntsburg Congregational Church, 12435 Madison Road, will hold the Angel Shoppe and Craft Show Dec. 8 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Children can shop in the Angel Shoppe where gifts are priced from 50 cents to $5. All gifts will be wrapped and labeled.

A light lunch is available and crafters are still wanted. Cost is $15 for table setup.

Call Merry Lou Knuckles at 440-632-0860 for more information. All proceeds will go to the Sunday school's "Ark of Animals Project" through Heifer International.

GANG To Meet Dec. 18

The Geauga Arts Network Group will meet at the Chardon Heinen's CafÏ' on Dec. 18 at 6:30 p.m. The Kindred Spirits will entertain the public during their annual holiday sing-along. It is a fun event every year. Buy a cup of coffee, relax and enjoy the festivities.

No RSVP is necessary. Be sure to bring songs, stories and artwork reflective of the holiday season.

Birthday Greetings

Happy birthday greetings go out to Cecilia Sysak. I was talking her daughter, Chris Hrapko, at St. Luke's Episcopal Church's community dinner last week and found out that she was born on Nov. 1, 1914. Cecilia had 16 brothers and sisters and was born in Johnstown, Pa. She loves to cook, believes in angels and enjoys bird watching.

Mary Ann Skiba celebrated her birthday on Nov. 1, and Ben Robert will also celebrate a special birthday on Jan. 5.

The Geauga YMCA is having a craft show and boutique this weekend.

The Chardon Public Library Friends will host its annual Christmas party on Dec. 9 beginning at 1:30 p.m. Santa will be there as well as Banjo the Christmas Clown. Guests can also bid on the beautifully decorated Christmas trees at the library's annual fundraising event.

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News Headline: Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent Stark to host information session Jan. 8 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Review - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Stark is sponsoring an information session for individuals interested in starting a small business or those who are in the early stages of business...

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News Headline: Philharmonic in a holiday mood- New Philadelphia, OH - The Times-Reporter | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hot Links Games

Philharmonic in a holiday mood

By Anonymous

Posted Dec 06, 2012 @ 08:30 PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -

 The Tuscarawas Philharmonic orchestra and choruses will warm hearts in the Tuscarawas Valley with the traditional and much-anticipated sounds of the season.

Sunday, at 3 p.m., in Sacred Heart Church in New Philadelphia, the Philharmonic's adult chorus and soloists will present selections from Handel's "Messiah," perhaps the most beloved choral work ever written.

Then Dec. 15, the orchestra and the Philharmonic Children's Chorus will present their annual "Yuletide Celebration" concert at 7:30 in the Performing Arts Center on the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas at New Philadelphia.

The "Messiah" performance will be preceded by an organ prelude presented by Beth Fragasse and Linda Angel Rice, and will conclude with a community carol sing featuring an arrangement of carols by Eric Benjamin that has become a Philharmonic favorite tradition.

Soloists for "Messiah" are Roberta Myers, soprano; Linda Yoder, mezzo; Melanie Winn, soprano; Charles Spencer, bass; and Kyle Kelvington, tenor.

As the philharmonic's Christmas gift to the community, the "Messiah" concert is free. The concert is made possible in part by sponsors Barbour Publishing, Inc.; BASEC Management, Inc., doing business as Wendy's; and Union Hospital. Concert co-sponsor is First National Bank of

Dennison.

Sacred Heart Church is located at 139 Third St. NE, New Philadelphia.

This year's "Yuletide Celebration" concert, titled "Let It Snow!," is always an audience favorite. The nearly 100-voice Tuscarawas Philharmonic Children's Chorus will be joined by the Greater Tuscarawas Children's Chorus, directed by Monica Davies.

The philharmonic chorus, made up of area students ages 7 through 14, will entertain concert-goers with a blend of familiar traditional music along with some newer music for the Christmas season. Among other favorites are songs from the movie "Home Alone" and a Philharmonic holiday tradition, "Marvelous Toy."

A special feature this year will be the first appearance of the Philharmonic's High School Women's Honors Chorus, directed by Shawna Hinkle. It will perform alone and with the Children's Chorus.

Adding to the variety and spectacle will be members of the Tuscarawas Dance Arts Center under the direction of Shelly Beitzel, who will present selections from the "Nutcracker Ballet," accompanied by the orchestra and chorus.

Eric Benjamin's "Ideo" is a jubilantly joyous work which takes the 14th century French dance tune-turned-Christmas carol "On This Day Earth Shall Ring" and combines it with another dance tune of the same vintage and origin which we know as "Ding Dong Merrily on High."

The work was debuted by the Mt. Holyoke College Women's Chorus to show-stopping applause on a performing junket in New York City. Benjamin, who is on the faculty at the college, composed the piece for the chorus in three-part voicing and later adapted it for the Philharmonic Children's Chorus.

"Yuletide Celebration" sponsors are Marlowe's Compounding Pharmacy, Glenn Mears and Dr. Renee Miskimmin. Co-sponsors are the Rick and Becky Brinkman Family, Ronald McDonald House Charities-NEO, William D. and Angela Singhaus, and New Philadelphia Kiwanis.         

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is at 330 University Drive, NE, New Philadelphia.

All seats are reserved and prices range from $9 to $32. In addition, a $3 facility fee is added to each ticket by the Performing Arts Center.

Tickets for philharmonic performances can be purchased at the orchestra's website www.Tuscarawas

Philharmonic.org, where concert-goers can see online what seats still are available and can reserve their

choices by clicking on those  seats on the diagram and paying by credit card.

Tickets also can be reserved by stopping in, or by calling the PAC box office at 330-308-6400. Philharmonic tickets are not available through the PAC's website.

Philharmonic "Yuletide Celebration" CD's _ a compilation from former years, featuring the orchestra, chorus, and children's chorus, as well as gospel singing group Divine Hope, and hammered dulcimer player Tina Bergmann - will be available in the lobby, as will CDs of last season's performance of "As A Child Looks At Christmas."

 

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News Headline: 'Jam' Festival of Music and the Arts Returns to Wooster April 12-13 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ‘Jam' Festival of Music and the Arts Returns to Wooster April 12-13
UPublish story by John Finn
Published: December 6, 2012 - 10:50 AM

WOOSTER, Ohio – Wooster Jam, a two-day celebration of music and the arts, returns to the Wayne County Fairgrounds this spring (April 12-13) with new sponsors and new ideas, as well as many of the same activities and attractions that have made the event so popular since its inception in 2011.

“The ‘Jam' is returning under the auspices of the arts community of Wayne County,” said James Levin, who founded the event two years ago and continues to serve as executive director. “We have reorganized and redesigned things with support from the Junior Women's League, Wayne Center for the Arts, and Wayne County Career Center.

“We are pleased to have an ongoing partnership with the fairgrounds, and excited to receive sponsorship from the J.M. Smucker Company, the Ohio Arts Council and the Noble Foundation,” added Levin. “This will give us an opportunity to continue showcasing the wonderful art and music of the College, the greater Wooster community, and the northeast Ohio region.”

The “Jam” is a multimedia celebration of artistic talents and creativity that features many groups and individual artists from across the state, including a blend of opera, folk, jazz, rock and roll, cloggers, theatre, dance, magic, illusions, poetry, storytelling, painting, chalk art, sculpture, installations, photography, and more.

Expected to perform again this spring are illusionist Rick Smith and the big-band fusion sound of Uzizi, as well as the Cedar Valley Cloggers, Ohio Light Opera, the bluegrass group Northwest Territory, and historical storyteller Jim Bowsher. Also back by popular demand is “VoiceFest,” an intercollegiate a cappella competition that will showcase groups from The College of Wooster (A Round of Monkeys and COWBelles), Oberlin College (Obertones), Ohio State University (Key of Gee and Buck That!), Kent State University (Kent Clarks), and others. Participants will compete for a grand prize of $1,000. In addition, the Wooster Ethnic Fair, also known as “WE Fair,” will be running concurrently at the fairgrounds that weekend.

This year the Jam will also feature a visual arts competition in which schools, collaborative ensembles, and individual artists will exhibit paintings, sculptures, installations, and interactive work for prizes.

The festival is free and open to the public with complimentary shuttles available for students of The College of Wooster, and Wooster Hospitality Transit shuttles for community members. The Jam will also have food and beverages (both alcoholic and non-alcoholic). Half of the profits from the alcohol sales on the premises will benefit the People to People Ministries.

Artists, musicians, and others interested in participating are asked to contact Levin at 216-347-3499 or james@levinventures.com . Additional information can be found at www.woosterjam.com .

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News Headline: Annual Kwanzaa celebration promotes peace, purpose and prosperity (Okantah) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily Athenaeum - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kristen Basham/The Daily Athenaeum

Poet Mwatabu Okantah talks at a Kwanzaa celebration held in the Mountainlair on Thursday.

The words "ashay, ashay, ashay" echoed throughout the Mountainlair ballrooms Thursday evening.

"Ashay" meaning, "Be with us," invited ancestors to join the celebration.

The West Virginia University Center for Black Culture & Research welcomed the WVU community to its annual Kwanzaa celebration.

Mwatabu S. Okantah, assistant professor at Kent State University, served as a guest performer and speaker for the event.

Okantah cleared up a common myth about Kwanzaa.

"Kwanzaa is not a ‘Black Christmas'; If you celebrate Kwanzaa, you can still celebrate Christmas," he said.

Okantah said he looks forward to the unity the celebration brings about within the community.

"As an artist, I look at myself as an ambassador. Some people come every year and enjoy the celebrations," Okantah said. "Some people are new, and the opportunity to turn people on to this excites me, because culture brings people together."

Kwanzaa was derived from Swahili meaning, "the first roots," Okantah said.

Throughout his presentation, Okantah embraced the concept of culture.

Kwanzaa honors the seven principles of unity: self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity and faith.

For each day of the celebration, an additional candle on the kinara is lit to honor one of the principles.

Traditionally, those celebrating Kwanzaa begin each day by asking one another, "Habari Ganni," which is Swahili for, "What's the news?" he said.

In response to the question, Okantah then invited seven volunteers to light the red, green and black candles resting on the table.

He called for both genders and newcomers, creating a feeling of togetherness in the room.

"By watching, I learned what the meaning of the colors of the flags meant. Red was for the blood shed, black was for the blackness when we pray, and green was for the land people came to, and that the real meaning behind diversity is coming together across ethnicity and religion," said Ismael Chery, television journalism student.

Afterward, Okantah joined with the Cavani String Quartet for a collaborative performance.

Okantah said he enjoys the opportunity to come together each year for a unique performance.

"Every year is special, because I worked with these women (of the Quartet) for many years. What we have done today…combining music from an African Griot with music from the European chamber, is a way of showing people that we can communicate across the cultural-ethnic divide," Okantah said. "Just looking at the audience, I am glad to see the diversity here."

Okantah said he was thrilled for the opportunity to break down barriers, join the WVU community together and celebrate the holiday.

"We need to get away from the tyranny of color," he said. "We can either come together in our wisdom or perish together in our foolishness."

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News Headline: Chew on this: Memory helps drive appetite - chicagotribune.com | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Chicago Tribune - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Chew on this: Memory helps drive appetite

Memories of a satisfying meal can suppress hunger and appetite several hours later -- even when that memory is faulty. But failing to remember how satisfying your last meal was, that's a recipe for overeating. ( Jay Clendenin )

By Melissa Healy

6:30 p.m. CST , December 5, 2012

In a finding that makes clear that appetite is often a case of mind over matter, new research finds that the memory of a hearty recent meal can fill you up. But the memory of a stingy serving of victuals -- even an inaccurate memory -- can make you hungrier, and prompt heavier eating at the next meal, researchers found.

The study , published Wednesday in the journal Public Library of Science One, used an ingenious trick to manipulate research subjects' memories of a lunchtime meal they had: At the bottom of a soup bowl filled with cream of tomato soup, they installed a hidden pump, which could be used to surreptitiously refill the bowl while the subject ate or draw down its contents.

The researchers wondered whether subjects tricked by such a manipulation would later remember the sight of the hefty 500-mg serving of soup they were asked to eat, or whether they would somehow register the punier 300-mg serving they actually ate. And they wondered whether, as dinnertime approached, the subjects' appetite would be driven by the actual lunch they had eaten or the more satisfying meal they thought they ate.

When asked how hungry they were as dinnertime approached, subjects' memories of the meal they saw -- not the one they ate -- seemed to be most influential. Even when their soup bowls were steadily drained, those who were seated in front of a large bowl of soup were less hungry. And those who were presented with a small bowl of soup pronounced themselves more hungry -- even if researchers behind the scenes were steadily refilling their bowls.

The next day, the subjects' memory of the soup's ability to satisfy continued to be colored by the memory formed on the previous day: Those who "saw" a big bowl of soup the day before declared a medium-sized bowl of soup likely to fill them up; those who had been presented a small bowl of soup (even one that was furtively refilled) were more likely to say it would not.

The link between mental function and obesity is a complex one, which researchers are just beginning to capture. Neurologists have long known that people whose memories of recent events have been impaired by stroke or injury will often eat one meal after another: Without the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain.

A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better memory and executive function went on to lose more weight than those with poorer cognitive skills. Finally, researchers have noted that mindless or distracted eating -- the intake of food that might result in a fuzzy memory -- also seems to override the effect of the body's satiety signals.

A 2006 study found that when people ate what was described as a "meal," they consumed fewer calories at the next meal than people who were given the same amount of food described as a "snack."

Our beliefs about the food we eat -- and our ability to remember what we eat and how much we eat -- appears to influence our eating behavior powerfully when we eat again. Too much distraction, too little attention, food presentation -- such as large dishes that distort our assessment of portion size -- can play havoc with our food memories. And eventually, this study suggests, with our waistlines.

Read more about food manipulation and intake in this article:

Mellow setting puts fast food consumers in a mood to ... eat less

NOTE: The above article appeared in four additional media outlets.

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News Headline: PROmoting the next GENeration of Researchers (PROGENY) Participants 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: ASHA Leader - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The purpose of PROGENY is to encourage the development of young scientists in communication sciences and disorders, and to highlight undergraduate research efforts. PROGENY pairs faculty researchers with undergraduate students who are first authors on poster presentations at the annual ASHA Convention. PROGENY highlights and supports the work of these undergraduates by providing them with an opportunity to talk with experienced researchers about their research, and about pursuing an academic-research career.

Name Affiliation Presentation Topic

Allison Babic Kent State University Behavior Labeling in Pediatric Feeding: A Training Study

Jamie Boster Marshall University Iconicity of Symbols: Adults vs. Children

Chanice Brown Howard University Effects of Bilingualism on Cognitive Control in Language Learners

Claire Butler Florida State University Teaching Young Children New Vocabulary With Interactive Digital Storybooks

Olivia Cali George Washington University Measuring Anticipatory Anxiety in Adults Who Stutter

Emlynn Chazhikat University of North Texas Awareness of Aphasia & Aphasia Services in South India

Leah Craft, Holly Forst, and Rebecca Schulz University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire Instructional Strategies for Facilitating Literacy in Children Diagnosed With Autism

Sharon Crouse-Matlock University of Arizona Phonetic & Phonotactic Inventory Elicitation in Bilingual Children

Katherine DeTurk Marywood University Hurtful Interactions in the Supervisory Process

Brittany Frazer Bowling Green State University Phonation vs. Collision Threshold Pressure: A Modeling Study*

Delia Gomez and Michelle Gonzalez University of Texas-El Paso Measuring Narrative Retell Performance in Spanish-Speaking Children

Stephanie Grasso University of Redlands Language Growth in English-Spanish Bilingual 2-Year-Old Children

Angela Hancock University of South Carolina Music Appreciation in Adult Cochlear Implant Users

Kelsey Hendershott Florida State University Communication Between Toddlers & Caregivers in Everyday Routines

Nichole Houle College of Saint Rose Enhancing Cultural Competence: A Classroom Project With Transgender Clients

Allison Kallstrom University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire A Survey of Phonological Intervention for 2-Year-Old Children

Katelyn Lippitt University of Maryland–College Park "Um" & "Uh" : Stumbles, Brainblocks, or Something More?

Derek Maffett University of Washington Real-Time Feedback Is Critical for Speech Sensorimotor Adaptation*

Sarah Marshall University of Tulsa Preparation for Collaboration

Amanda Maxwell Florida State University Spanish-English Naming of Young Dual-Language Learners on the EOWPVT-SBE

Autumn Meyer and Lauren Natzke University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire ADSD Therapy: Assessing the Effectiveness of a Combined-Modality Treatment

Meghan Murphy Iona College The Technological & Social Skills of School-Age Children

Marley Nordmeyer University of Vermont The Expression of Mental State Terms in Children With ASD

Hannah Painter Western Carolina University Phonetic Usage by Graduate Students in Practicum Sites

Hilary Sandberg Old Dominion University Rehabilitation of Listening in Noise: A Case Study in Aphasia

Lauren Schembre Louisiana State University Conversational Efficiency Differences Between Two Aphasia Treatments: A Case Report

Sadie Schwarz Ohio State University Addressing Literacy: SLPs' Use of Literacy-Related Targets & Materials

Rocio Solis University of Texas–El Paso Propositions vs. Key Components in the Narratives of Bilingual Children

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News Headline: Court rejects bid to halt move of Sherman House | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Magistrate: Kent did not violate open meeting law, city ordinance in historic home decision

By Thomas Gallick | Staff Writer Published: December 7, 2012 4:00AM

A magistrate has rejected a group's claim that the city of Kent violated state open meetings law when its Architectural Review Board reviewed plans to move a historic house to a lot on North Water Street.

Eric Fink, Kent's assistant law director, said Thursday Magistrate Kent Graham found the city "did not violate Sunshine Law, state or local ordinance" when its Architectural Review Board met in August to discuss a non-profit group's plan to move the Kent Wells Sherman House, constructed in 1858 for town founding father Zenas Kent's daughter, to 247 N. Water St.

A second group, called "Save the Standing Rock Garden," objects to the house's move to the lot adjacent to Standing Rock Cultural Arts, which does not own the space but used it with permission for gardening and educational purposes for the past 20 years. Kent Wells Sherman House Inc., the group looking to move the house, bought the site from Arthur Property Management earlier this year.

Kent Wells Sherman House Inc. went through three city boards for approval of the plan to move the house, including two trips to the Kent Planning Commission, which rejected the group's first site plan for the project.

The "Save the Standing Rock Garden" group filed a lawsuit appealing Planning Commission's final decision and asked for injunctions against Kent Wells Sherman House and the city of Kent. The group claimed Planning Commission should have waited a year before reviewing the Kent Wells Sherman House a second time, also alleging the city violated open meeting law by not properly notifying the public of its Architectural Review Board's meeting.

Graham approved a temporary restraining order in late October against Kent Wells Sherman House Inc. from working on the site at 247 N. Water St., an order he dismissed Nov. 26 in a ruling that found "Save the Standing Rock Garden" could prove no ownership of the property.

He struck another blow to "Save the Standing Rock Garden's" case Wednesday when he refused to grant an injunction against the city of Kent, ruling the "plaintiffs have no basis to dispute the site plan approval granted to Wells-Sherman."

Graham said the city had "established a reasonable method to inform the public" of meetings by posting schedules in public offices and sending notices to local media, thus following open meeting laws. "Save the Standing Rock Garden" had argued the city violated the law because it did not include "instructions to the paper to publish the notice," an argument Graham rejected.

The magistrate also ruled that the city's board did not act improperly by hearing the case twice in one year, noting that it was typical procedure for the board to review a project more than once in a year if the proponents made "material changes" to the site plan.

Fink said "Save the Standing Rock Garden" can still continue its appeal of the Kent Planning Commission decision, but he believes Wednesday's ruling makes it likely the appeal will ultimately be rejected.

Roger Thurman, vice chairman of Kent Wells Sherman House inc., said the group is looking forward to moving the house after it receives a foundation permit from the city of Kent.

The house, purchased by Kent State University so it could be demolished to make way for a pedestrian walkway, is currently sitting on KSU property on East College Avenue. Thurman said KSU, which sold the house to Kent Wells Sherman House Inc. for $1 after its history came to light, originally set a deadline of Dec. 1 for the house to be off university property, but added that school officials have since taken a more flexible stance on the issue.

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1126 or tgallick@recordpub.com

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News Headline: Progress continues on downtown Kent development work | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: December 7, 2012 4:00AM

This aerial photograph shows construction work continuing on the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, located at the corner of Haymaker Parkway and DePeyster Street and the neighboring Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's Kent Central Gateway parking deck and transit center. The two projects are part of more than $100 million in redevelopment work in downtown Kent, including the Fairmount Properties buildings, just west of the KSU Hotel and Conference Center at the corner of Haymaker Parkway and Water Street, which include offices for Ametek and Davey Resource Group and retail spaces. Ron Burbick's Acorn Alley retail developments, along with Acorn Corner, formerly the old Kent Hotel, sit west of the parking deck. Both the hotel and parking deck are expected to open by summer 2013. A third Fairmount Properties building with restaurant and apartment space located behind the Davey and Ametek buildings is expected to open in fall 2013.

Al Beckwith/Commercial Aviation photo

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News Headline: UPDATE: Court Denies All Injunction Requests to Stop Wells Sherman House | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Magistrate's order issued Wednesday, made public today

The Kent Wells-Sherman House at its temporary location on East College Avenue on Aug. 11, 2012.

Credit Matt Fredmonsky http://o5.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/resize/273x203/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/11d3d835c1ff99359c13ec48e6006d9c http://o2.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/patch/a73d001df6b61c2628450f26025d4b12

http://kent.patch.com/articles/court-denies-all-injunction-requests-to-stop-wells-sherman-house/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1354833132

A Portage County magistrate has ruled that several requests for an injunction to stop the relocation of the Kent Wells Sherman House to 247 N. Water St. have all been denied by the court.

Portage County magistrate Kent Graham issued his ruling in the case Wednesday, and the order became public for the first time this afternoon, essentially allowing the relocation of the house to the vacant lot between the Scribbles Coffee building and the Standing Rock Cultural Arts gallery.

Kent residents under the banner Save the Standing Rock Garden filed requests for injunctions last month against the Kent Architectural Review Board, Kent Planning Commission and the Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc., board to try and stop the relocation of the historic house.

"Upon review and considerations of the motions, pleadings, verified complaint, and affidavit filed herein and the trial testimony and exhibits, the magistrate finds that plaintiffs have not established the elements necessary to grant preliminary injunctions," Graham wrote. "Consequently, plaintiffs' motion for preliminary injunctions against Wells-Sherman and Kent City's Architectural Review Board and Planning Commission cannot be granted."

Portage County Common Pleas Judge John Enlow, for whom Graham serves as magistrate, signed off on the ruling Wednesday.

In his ruling, Graham explained the four criteria the request of the plaintiff, in this case members of Save the Standing Rock Garden, would have to meet in order for the court to grant an injunction — essentially a court order prohibiting an action.

Whether there is a substantial likelihood that the plaintiff will prevail on the merits of the case

Whether the plaintiff will suffer irreparable injury if the injunction is not granted

Whether third parties will be unjustifiably harmed if the injunction is granted

Whether the public good will be served by the injunction

3 injunction requests

In reviewing the case, Graham had to rule on three basic requests for a preliminary injunction.

The first request for an injunction by members of Save the Standing Rock Garden was to stop the Kent Wells Sherman House group from disturbing the lot at 247 N. Water St., which the non-profit group owns, or placing any equipment or structures on the property.

Graham ruled that the injunction request failed to meet any of those four criteria and was dismissed on those grounds.

"Plaintiffs have no ownership ... no legitimate claim, and no express permission to exclude Wells-Sherman from improving its lot," the magistrate's ruling states.

Architecture board meeting

Members of Save the Standing Rock Garden also sought an injunction against the Kent Architectural Review Board regarding a meeting in September that addressed the issue.

John Plough, the Kent attorney representing the group, argued the city violated Ohio public meetings laws by not appropriately advertising the architecture board meeting to the public. The architecture board's decision to grant the project a certificate of appropriateness was then considered by the planning commission when it voted in September to approve a site plan for the project.

Had Graham determined the city did not properly advertise the meeting, Plough argued the architecture board decision should have been thrown out.

However, in his ruling the magistrate wrote that Plough's argument appeared to be based on the requirements for advertising special meetings and not regularly scheduled meetings.

"These meetings were regular meetings, not special meetings. So advance notice to news media was not required," Graham wrote. "In spite of this, the architectural review board informed local news media before the meeting.

"Kent city has established a reasonable method to inform the public of the architectural review board's regular meetings," the magistrate's ruling states. "The meeting schedule was properly posted, pursuant to Kent (ordinance)" and state regulations.

Planning commission decision

Plough also argued for an injunction against the planning commission for having taken action twice within one year's time on a site plan for the project "without establishing newly discovered evidence of proof of changed conditions."

Graham determined that the two site plans considered by the commission — one first with the house set back 15 feet from the sidewalk and a second with the house set back 16 inches — were materially different and therefore the commission's actions were appropriate.

"The setback proposed in the second application was a material alteration from the first application," Graham wrote.

Timeline for move unclear

It's unclear if members of Save the Standing Rock Garden will appeal the magistrate's decision.

Lisa Regula Meyer, the first plaintiff named in the case, could not be reached for comment Thursday.

Kent Community Development Department Director Bridget Susel said she believed the city followed all state and local laws regarding the actions of the planning commission and architecture board.

"I was very confident that it had been handled properly," Susel said.

The house remains in its temporary spot at the dead end of East College Avenue, land owned by Kent State University, where it was moved in August.

The Kent Wells Sherman House group had been given a deadline by city and university officials to move it from there by Dec. 1 or it would be demolished so as not to interfere with the operations of city snow plows.

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent said previously the university would not decide on razing the house until after the magistrate's decision.

"It is our hope that we can move forward with the transaction and relocation of the house," Vincent said. "Details still need to be worked out."

The Kent Wells Sherman House group also needs a final permit from the city to build the foundation on the North Water Street lot for the house, and that permit remains in the technical review process.

And the group also would have to obtain the necessary approvals to move the house in the public right of way and address any obstacles to the physical move — such as traffic lights — from where it sits on East College Avenue to the North Water Street site.

Add to all that red tape the fact that winter weather could slow any site construction and seeing the house move before January appears unlikely.

Roger Thurman, vice president of the Kent Wells Sherman House Inc. board, said previously he would like to work with Standing Rock Cultural Arts in the future to use the space cooperatively once the house is restored.

"Standing Rock technically was not party to the suit, but of course their supporters were," Thurman said. "We just want to do our project and have people give us a chance to see what our building can do for that side of town."

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News Headline: Wild turkey kill declines over last year | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name: Dick Martin News Journal
News OCR Text: Hunters harvested 1,338 wild turkeys during the recent fall season. This year’s total is a 2.5 percent decline over last year’s kill of 1,372 wild turkeys.

“Wild turkey hunting is a challenging activity that thousands of hunters enjoy year after year,” said ODNR Director James Zehringer. “Ohio’s wild turkey population remains strong and we appreciate those hunters who participated this year.”

The top counties for fall wild turkey success were Ashtabula (61), Coshocton (56), Geauga and Tuscarawas (53 each). Richland County hunters killed 37, Ashland 22, and Knox 46.

• According to a recent article in “Ohio Outdoor News,” cougars are, without a doub,t moving east from their western strongholds. Whether we like it or not, they may eventually become residents in Ohio.

Recently, the Michigan Wildlife Conservancy released a trail cam photo of a mountain lion seen on private property in southern Marquette County. The Michigan DNR confirmed the photo was authentic.

That marks the 15th time state wildlife biologists have confirmed the presence of a mountain lion in Michigan.

• Lake Erie’s walleye hatch was again lower than expected. This year’s hatch was calculated to be 2 fish per hectare, higher than last year’s 1.76 per hectare, but far short of 2010’s hatch of 7.28 per hectare.

An average hatch in recent years has produced nine walleye per hectare, which provides about nine million catchable walleye two years later. Natural and fishing mortality removes about one third of the fish from each year’s hatch.

Yellow perch had a poor year, too, producing a hatch of 23 fish per hectare, about two thirds fewer than the average of 70 fish per hectare. There was better success in the Central Basin, so anglers might want to direct their fishing activity from Fairport to Conneaut in future years.

• Area walleye anglers are invited to the next meeting of the Mid-Ohio Walleye Club, which will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at Gorman Nature Center. The speaker will be Scott Stercker, founder of the Reef Runner Company, who will discuss walleye, lures and the best ways to fish for this fine game fish.

For more information, call Mike Gibson at 419-524-6453.

• Readers might enjoy a new book, “Poachers Were My Prey: Eighteen Years as an Undercover Wildlife Officer.” The book records the adventures of R.T. Stewart as told to outdoor writer Chip Gross.

The book was published by Kent State University Press and is available from Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com for $13.57.

• Hurricane Sandy again proved the importance of electricity for home owners. New emergencies could happen anytime, and could come in the form of blizzards or ice storms that knock down trees and destroy power lines.

Enviro-Log, Inc. recommends home owners have an emergency kit on hand this winter that contains aS gallon of water per person for 10 days, a 10-day supply of non-perishable food, a battery powered or hand-cranked NOAA weather radio, flashlight and extra batteries, a lighter for starting fires, candles, and a first-aid kit.

These items may never be needed, but disasters seem to happen more often these days.

Dick Martin is a retired biology teacher from Shelby who has written an outdoor column for more than 20 years. He can be reached at richmart@neo.rr.com.

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