Report Overview:
Total Clips (33)
Alumni; Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
Alumni; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Office of the University Architect; Renovation at KSU (1)
Athletics (1)
College of Applied Eng, Sustainability and Tech (2)
College of Business (COB) (1)
Commencement (2)
Community Service, Learning and Volunteerism; Hospitality Management; Quality Initiatives and Curriculum, Office of (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (4)
Geography (1)
Geology (1)
Global Education (1)
History (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Psychology (7)
Town-Gown (2)
University Press (3)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
ALONG THE WAY A festive, competitive MAC title game 12/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Alumni; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Celebrations 12/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Architecture and Environmental Design; Office of the University Architect; Renovation at KSU (1)
Finalists for Kent State architecture building must get specific (Bruder, Steidl) 12/10/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

Officials in renowned program acknowledge pressure to reflect reputation Kent State University's renowned College of Architecture and Environmental Design needs a new home, and the university is taking an unusual approach...


Athletics (1)
Our View: Departing KSU coach Darrell Hazell inspired, transformed Flashes (Nielsen) 12/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Applied Eng, Sustainability and Tech (2)
KSU, NEOMED collaborate on wound research (McGimpsey, Malcuit, Kim) 12/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State, NEOMED Partner on Tissue Regrowth Project (McGimpsey, Malcuit, Kim) 12/08/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Tissue regeneration targets wound healing A team of scientists from Kent State University and Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) has begun collaboration on the development of a macrophage targeted...


College of Business (COB) (1)
THS business students partner with KSU for Event Marketing program 12/09/2012 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University College of Business Administration selected Tallmadge High School's Business and Marketing Department for two consecutive years...


Commencement (2)
KSU's 2012 fall commencement ceremonies to take place Saturday 12/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Winter Graduation is Dec. 15 12/10/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Community Service, Learning and Volunteerism; Hospitality Management; Quality Initiatives and Curriculum, Office of (1)
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY Campus Kitchen wins national award (Gosky) 12/08/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...need. All of the meals are prepared and served by student volunteers. At this year's 2012 Campus Kitchen Project conference, the Campus Kitchen at Kent State University won the Excellence in Programming Award for its outreach and programming efforts at the Haymaker Farmers' Market. The Haymaker...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (4)
Celebrations 12/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Restore the Runway supports Habitat for Humanity (Quevedo) 12/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

In Gone with the Wind, Scarlett O'Hara made a ball gown out of the parlor drapes. However she had nothing on the students at the Kent State University Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising, who used newspaper, pizza boxes, bubble wrap,...

Exhibit celebrates Kate's iconic style (Druesedow) 12/08/2012 Hamilton Spectator, The Text Email

... "The fact that she wore slacks and wanted to be comfortable influenced women's ready-to-wear in the United States," said Jean Druesedow, director of Kent State University Museum, which was given 700 items from Hepburn's estate. "That image said to the American woman 'Look, you don't have to...

Study Reveals That 77% Of New Fashion Graduates Would Take A Substantially Lower Salary To Work For (Stanforth, Hauck) 12/08/2012 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...Academic Affairs and Chair of the Fashion Merchandising Department at LIM College , Nancy Stanforth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Fashion Merchandising at Kent State University , and William Hauck, Assistant Professor of Fashion Merchandising at Kent State University, were recently published in...


Geography (1)
Home and garden happenings -- Week of Dec. 8 12/07/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...a.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 26, has the theme Seasonal Sustainability. Among the sessions will be a keynote speech by Scott Sheridan, a climatology professor at Kent State University, who will talk about evidence of climate change and what it means for the world and your garden. Other sessions are Green...


Geology (1)
Exploradio: Arctic ice and global warming (Ortiz) 12/10/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

A Kent State University researcher finds changing patterns in Arctic sea-ice drift is another sign of a warming world by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR ...


Global Education (1)
KSU hosts 3 from Muskie program (Di Maria) 12/08/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University welcomed three international students to campus as part of the U.S. Department of State's Edmund S. Muskie Graduate Fellowship...


History (1)
KHS to present 'Kent in the 1920s' 12/07/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent Historical Society will host a special "All About Kent" event, presented by Kent State University graduate students in the school's public history program. "Kent in the 1920s," will be held at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Kent...


KSU at Stark (2)
Kent Stark Offers STRETCH Classes for Breast Cancer Rehabilitation 12/07/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University at Stark Fitness and Recreation Center will begin offering a Breast Cancer STRETCH class during the spring semester. Classes...

Researchers from Kent State University Provide Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of Peptide Hormones 12/08/2012 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week Text Email

...adenylyl cyclases and a soluble adenylyl cyclase are regulated by a diversity of ligands." Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "In this study we have examined the rat ovaries, prior to and subsequent to gonadotropin treatment, for the presence of different...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Celebrations 12/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Psychology (7)
Chew on this: Memory helps drive appetite 12/07/2012 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain. A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better...

Can your memory influence your appetite? 12/07/2012 Louisville Courier-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending “stop eating, I’m full” messages to the brain. A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better...

Study suggests that memory helps drive appetite 12/08/2012 Duluth News Tribune - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain. A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better...

Chew on this: Memory helps drive appetite 12/07/2012 News & Observer - Online Text Attachment Email

...the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain. A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better...

Chew on This: Memory Helps Drive Appetite 12/08/2012 Real Estate – Online Text Attachment Email

...the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending “stop eating, I'm full” messages to the brain. A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better...

Food: Is it mind over matter? 12/09/2012 Times Colonist - Online Text Attachment Email

...the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain. A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had undergone weight-loss surgery, those with better...

Chew on this: Memory helps drive appetite 12/07/2012 KSCW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain. A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better...


Town-Gown (2)
Apartment complex, new restaurant planned for Kent 12/09/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...as new retailers. The city has demolished and rebuilt entire downtown blocks. Building C will sit on DePeyster Street, directly across from the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center and diagonal to the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's new transit center. It will...

Kent State to Raze 10 More Houses for Esplanade 12/09/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Properties all owned by university Esplanade Extension to Downtown Kent Kent State University is getting ready to demolish 10 more houses in the neighborhood west of campus for construction of the Esplanade. The Kent...


University Press (3)
Wild turkey kill declines over last year 12/08/2012 News-Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...as an Undercover Wildlife Officer.” The book records the adventures of R.T. Stewart as told to outdoor writer Chip Gross. The book was published by Kent State University Press and is available from Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com for $13.57. • Hurricane Sandy again proved the importance of...

Wild turkey kill declines over last year 12/07/2012 Lancaster Eagle-Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

...an Undercover Wildlife Officer. The book records the adventures of R.T. Stewart as told to outdoor writer Chip Gross. The book was published by the Kent State University Press and is available from Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com for $13.57. • Hurricane Sandy proved again the importance of...

Wild turkey kill declines over last year 12/08/2012 Fremont News Messenger - Online Text Attachment Email

...as an Undercover Wildlife Officer.” The book records the adventures of R.T. Stewart as told to outdoor writer Chip Gross. The book was published by Kent State University Press and is available from Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com for $13.57. • Hurricane Sandy again proved the importance of...


News Headline: ALONG THE WAY A festive, competitive MAC title game | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "You guys nearly gave me a heart attack,” a Huskies'
fan told us a week ago Friday evening during
the short walk back to the Atheneum Hotel
from Ford Field Stadium in Detroit after the Mid-
American Conference title game between Northern
Illinois and the Kent State Golden Flashes.

The Huskies had just managed to squeak out a
victory over the valiant Golden Flashes in double
overtime. Other Huskies fans were complimentary,
too. If they were any indication, the fans of
Northern Illinois, a university in DeKalb, are certainly
gracious in victory.

We had traveled Friday afternoon via the Ohio
Turnpike and I-75 to Detroit to see the big game.
Our group included attorney and former State
Sen. Leigh Herington, our unofficial tour guide,
and his wife, Anita, Common Pleas Court Judge
John Enlow and his wife, Lois, Linda Sandvoss
and Janet and me. Thousands of fans must have
been traveling the same route. At a service plaza
on the Ohio Turnpike, we encountered a slew
of people dressed in Kent State Blue and Gold.

Outside our hotel, we ran into attorney John
Flynn and his wife, Connie, and Dave and Sherry
Joy. At the big game, Laing and Saundra Kennedy
were seated in front of us. I noticed Dr. Em Ferrara,
his wife, Margaret, and some of their children and
grandchildren in attendance. He is a KSU trustee.
We encountered Steve Colecchi and his wife,
Andrea. The Robinson Memorial Hospital CEO
and president is a KSU trustee, too.

Former KSU Vice President Mark Lindemood,
his wife, Deb,and their daughter, Haley, had driven
up from their home in Goshen to join their Kent
neighbors, Ralph Kletzien and his wife, Judy, for
the game. I remember seeing retired pharmacist
Jim Myers in attendance. I saw Dick Kotis there
and Reed and Karen Beck. I saw Matt French,
the Ametek vice president and general manager.
Architect Doug Fuller, who arrived on one of the
KSU Blue and Gold sponsored buses, sat with
us at the KSU tailgate party prior to the game.

The so-called tailgate party was actually a
sumptuous buffet in a large banquet room at Ford
Field Stadium, a huge all-enclosed facility that is
home field for the Detroit Lions. There, KSU President
Lester Lefton and his wife, Linda, and Athletic
Director Joel Nielson and his wife, Sharon,
circulated to welcome fans. With as many as 500
or more seated at the party, Lori Randorf, executive
director of the Kent State Alumni Association,
stepped up to the microphone to welcome
fans and introduce her boss, Lefton.

“Go Flashes,” Lefton proclaimed over the microphone
amidst cheering fans, who've not been to a
title game for the Flashes since 1972. Add Coach
Darrell Hazell's and his team's great success to
last summer's College World Series appearance
by the KSU baseball team and the Lefton Era at
Kent State in Division I sports is looking pretty
remarkable.

Combined, the fans of the Huskies and the
Flashes couldn't begin to fill the nearly 80,000
seats of Ford Field Stadium where one sits comfortably
indoors. Nevertheless, the enthusiasm by
fans on both sides filled the air with cheering. The
marching bands of the two universities added to
the festive, competitive atmosphere.

The Golden Flashes demonstrated once again
the poise they have acquired this season. They
came roaring back in the fourth quarter and forced
the game into overtime and then double overtime.
What a great team with a great coach and a great
coaching staff, especially considering where they
came from two years ago.

Hazell will become head coach at Purdue next
season and will face a tough turn-around situation
not unlike the one he undertook at Kent State.
Purdue and Kent State have worked out an amicable
agreement that lets Hazell coach the Flashes
in the GoDaddy Bowl on Jan. 6. This is much
better than what took place in the Huskies' locker
room immediately after the Mid-American title
game when Head Coach Dave Doren reportedly
shocked his victorious team by telling them
he was leaving to coach at North Carolina State.

GoDaddy is the name of the company that sponsors
the NCAA sanctioned Division I bowl game
where the Flashes will face Arkansas State Jan.
6 in Mobile, Ala. The company's name seems odd
to me, but maybe GoDaddy is a sign of the times.
The company was founded in 1997. Its work is
domain name registering and website hosting.
The company is privately held. Its founder sold
65 percent his company to a group of investors
for a reported $2.25 billion last year. Before 2011,
the bowl was sponsored by GMAC. Currently the
GoDaddy Bowl matches Mid-American Conference
and Southern Conference teams. Bowling
Green, Miami, Central Michigan and Ball State
have played in it.

Those flags atop the new Ametek offices in the
Fairmount complex on Kent's North Water Street
represent the eight countries where Ametek Precision
Motion Control has manufacturing locations
that report back to the company's Kent division
headquarters.

That's the word from Matt French, vice president
and general manager, who pushed very hard
to keep his company from leaving Kent. Instead of
leaving, Ametek remained and occupies premier
space in Kent's rejuvenated downtown. The eight
flags represent Brazil, China, the Czech Republic,
England, Germany, Italy, Mexico and Serbia.

French says the flags speak to the international
aura Kent is gaining in terms of bringing in internationals
who will soon be hosted in the new
hotel that is going up a block east of Ametek. He
says Ametek brings in an average of three internationals
a week and sometimes many more than
that for conferences. He currently hosts them in
neighboring cities, but says that will all switch
to Kent when the new hotel opens in 2013. Kent
State brings in hundreds of internationals over a
year's time and they will utilize the new hotel also.

As vice president and general manger, French
has gotten Ametek much more engaged in the
life of Kent. The company paid for the impressive
display of fireworks at the conclusion of KSU's
home opener Aug. 28, when the Flashes defeated
the Towson University Tigers. While the Golden
Flashes practiced for the big MAC title game
in Detroit, Matt had eight Kent State flags installed
temporarily in place of the eight international
flags.

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News Headline: Celebrations | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Education

Gretchan E. Sekulich, vice president of communications for FirstEnergy, has joined the Professional Advisory Board at Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Sekulich graduated from KSU in 1977 with a bachelor's degree in public relations and journalism and joined Ohio Edison in 1981.

Brandon Turley, son of Robert and Jennifer Turley of Akron, was inducted into the Golden Key International Honour Society. He is studying communications and journalism at Kent State. He graduated from Ellet High in 2009.

The Kent State School of Journalism and Mass Communication named Elizabeth Z. Bartz as its 2012 William D. Taylor Distinguished Alumni Award winner. Bartz, president and chief executive officer of State and Federal Communications in Akron, has a bachelor's and master's degree from KSU. The Taylor award is the highest distinction given to school alumni.

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News Headline: Finalists for Kent State architecture building must get specific (Bruder, Steidl) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Officials in renowned program acknowledge pressure to reflect reputation

Kent State University's renowned College of Architecture and Environmental Design needs a new home, and the university is taking an unusual approach in creating one with its decision to construct a roughly $40 million building on the outskirts of downtown Kent rather than in the heart of campus.

Knowing full well the pressure it's under from the architecture and design community to construct a building that reflects the hallmark program, Kent State also is taking an atypical tack in how it will select the firm to design the structure. Rather than the traditional route of selecting a firm based on a vague proposal and an interview, the university is injecting a competitive edge to the process by asking four architectural teams to hash out designs for the building.

“There was hope this building would really capture our imagination,” said Michael Bruder, director of design and construction at Kent State's Office of the University Architect. “We wanted our vision to match (the architects') vision really early on.”

The four finalists vying for the high-profile job are Bialosky & Partners Architects, which has offices in New York and Cleveland, in association with Architecture Research Office of New York; Richard L. Bowen & Associates Inc. of Cleveland, in association with Weiss/ Manfredi in New York; The Collaborative Inc. in Toledo, in association with the Miller Hull Partnership of Seattle; and Westlake Reed Leskosky, which has offices in Cleveland and four other cities.

Each team will receive a $25,000 stipend for its work, so Kent State will have spent $100,000 before selecting a designer for the project. Mr. Bruder contends the cost is worthwhile given the pressure of designing a landmark building and because the designs, studies and other information garnered from the firms during the competition are “worth well more than that.”

The teams will present their design concepts and cost estimates to university officials next month, followed by a short presentation open to the public. A final decision is expected by February, and the college hopes to occupy the building by 2015.

“There are pressures to make the school the best that we can,” said Douglas Steidl, dean of the university's College of Architecture and Environmental Design. “The facility should demonstrate what we deal in and reflect who we are.”

Kent State's architecture program has a reputation as being among the most rigorous programs in Kent State's portfolio, and a large piece of the learning comes from peer-to-peer interaction. The architecture program now is housed in three separate buildings across campus, and Mr. Steidl said consolidating the program into one building would strengthen those collaborations.

The new building also would allow the college to grow in terms of its enrollment, Mr. Steidl said, as its current digs offer little room for expansion. About 850 students are enrolled in the college at present, and he anticipates growing enrollment by a few hundred students in the five years following the building's completion.

“This is a significant building in the life of Kent State,” Mr. Steidl said.

Icon in the works

The new building is a large piece of the university's massive $150 million construction initiative, which is made possible, in part, by a $170 million bond issue from early this year. The bond will be financed by a new course overload fee — a $440 per-credit-hour charge for each credit a student is enrolled beyond 17 credit hours in a semester.

Other construction projects in the pipeline include a $22 million building for Kent State's arts programs and $72 million of upgrades to buildings housing the school's science programs. Still, Kent State officials contend the architecture building is among the most exciting of the projects, as it also will serve as a new front door to the university for those arriving from the north.

“This is going to be a new icon,” Mr. Bruder said. “As soon as you come toward campus, this will be one of the first buildings you see.”

The building is to be built along an under-construction walkway — or, as it's been dubbed, an esplanade — that will extend about a quarter mile northwest from campus toward downtown Kent. The esplanade itself has been mulled for much of the last two decades by city and university officials, ever since a bypass road was built that extended state Route 59 and severed the flow of pedestrian traffic from campus to downtown.

“We think the esplanade is a tremendous additional connector and bridges the gap and breaks up that quarter-mile stretch,” said Daniel Smith, the city's economic development director. “It will make it easy for students, faculty and staff members of the university to take advantage of the amenities we've invested in downtown.”

The new architecture building is only a drop in the bucket in terms of the total dollars being pumped into real estate in the city of Kent. Private developer Ron Burbick has put millions of his own dollars into building retail space and is credited by many as igniting the wave of redevelopment. Among other projects, Fairmount Properties of Cleveland is leading the development of a $27 million mixed-use complex.

However, city and university officials suggest the presence of a prominent academic building within a stone's throw of downtown represents the renewed relationship between the city and the university — a relationship that, at times, had been contentious.

“(Kent State president) Lester Lefton and the city have been very public in their desire to reconnect,” Kent city manager David Ruller said. “This is the physical expression of that.”

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News Headline: Our View: Departing KSU coach Darrell Hazell inspired, transformed Flashes (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Transformational Flashes coach changed attitudes, too

Darrell Hazell brought a sense of excitement to Kent State University football that captivated the campus and the Kent community, transforming the Golden Flashes into a true Cinderella team.

Kent State earned the Mid-American East Division title, came heartbreakingly close to winning the MAC championship and won the Flashes' first bowl bid in 40 years.

Even more importantly, though, as one player told the departing coach, he taught the Golden Flashes how to win.

As Darrell Hazell leaves Kent to become head football coach at Purdue University, that's probably his most important legacy. He was an inspirational coach and a transfomational one who changed attitudes as well as history. The team he built, after only two years at its helm, is enormously stronger because of his presence. His successor, whoever that proves to be, will inherit an enthusiastic and energized group of young men with a will to win -- one of the key building blocks for a championship season.

Coach Hazell's time at Kent State was brief, and his departure for Purdue and a reported $12 million compensation package comes as no surprise. Kent State, given its size and resources, cannot possibly compete with schools such as Purdue, which can offer so much more to a talented coach.

The Flashes will have one more opportunity to play for coach Hazell, who will stay on as the team competes in their first bowl game since Don James took the Flashes to the Tangerine Bowl in 1972. We hope that the GoDaddy.com Bowl against Arkansas State on Jan. 6 proves to be a victory lap for Kent State and their departing coach.

It's hard to lose a winner, but we wish Darrell Hazell continued success with the Boilermakers and trust that he will remember his time in Kent with fondness. Like Don James before him, he will remain in the hearts of many who found themselves thrilled by KSU football for the first time in a long while.

"I don't think we'll find another Darrell Hazell," KSU Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen said Wednesday when the coach's departure was announced. Probably not. But it was great having one on board, even if only for two years.

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News Headline: KSU, NEOMED collaborate on wound research (McGimpsey, Malcuit, Kim) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scientists from Kent State University
and Northeast Ohio Medical
University in Rootstown are collaborating
on the development of a
stem cell therapy for tissue regeneration
and wound healing.

The $120,000 program, with equal
funding from KSU and NEOMED,
will support a post-doctoral researcher
for two years and is part
of KSU's new internal post-doctoral
fellow seed program.

The team of principal investigators
is Min-Ho Kim, Ph.D., and
Christopher Malcuit, Ph.D., professors
from KSU's new bioengineering
program in the College of
Applied Engineering, Sustainability
and Technology and Fayez F.
Safadi, Ph.D., NEOMED professor
of anatomy and neurobiology and
Ohio Research Scholar.

“Post-operative wounds
or chronic wounds caused
by underlying disease or
lowered immunity have
high morbidity and significant
mortality,” said
Grant McGimpsey, KSU's
vice president for research.
“Finding ways to address
these problems based on
regenerative medicine approaches
is an exciting
effort, and I am very excited
about our growing
research relationship with
NEOMED. The northeast
Ohio region is rich in biomedical
research and development
opportunities,
and it is imperative that
research institutions like
Kent State and NEOMED
develop strong partnerships
in order to bring our
combined expertise to bear
on important medical challenges.”

Malcuit expressed his appreciation
for this collaboration.

“I am grateful and honored
by the combined support
from both Kent State
University and NEOMED
in fostering this exciting
interdisciplinary project to
identify therapeutic targets
to treat individuals
suffering from acute and
chronic wounds,” he said. “I
envision the successful outcome
of this collaboration
to be just the beginning of
much larger future research
efforts between our two institutions
in the area of regenerative
medicine.”

Safadi shared his excitement.

“It is great opportunity to
initiate such collaboration
with the talented faculty
at Kent State,” he said. “I
am very excited about this
program, and we are on our
way to develop a great relationship
with Kent State.”

For Kim, the partnership
between the two institutions
creates great opportunity.

“This is a really valuable
opportunity in that this
research partnership can
bring together and maximize
the research strengths
in stem cell/ tissue engineering
at Kent State and
in biomedical sciences at
NEOMED,” Kim said.

Walter E. Horton Jr.,
Ph.D., vice president for research
and dean of the College
of Graduate Studies at
NEOMED, said this program
helps the working relationship
between the two
institutions for future ongoing
research partnerships.

“This is a very important
first step in building ongoing
research collaboration
between Kent State University
and NEOMED,” he
said. “Both Kent State and
NEOMED have strengths
in bioscience research, and
by working together, we can
more rapidly identify breakthroughs
that will improve
the health and economic vitality
of our region.”

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News Headline: Kent State, NEOMED Partner on Tissue Regrowth Project (McGimpsey, Malcuit, Kim) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tissue regeneration targets wound healing

A team of scientists from Kent State University and Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) has begun collaboration on the development of a macrophage targeted mesenchymal stem cell therapy for tissue regeneration and wound healing, a fast-growing research area and major medical challenge.

The $120,000 internally funded program, with equal contributions from both Kent State and NEOMED, will support a post-doctoral researcher for a period of two years and is part of Kent State's new internal post-doctoral fellow seed program.

The team of principal investigators for this project is Min-Ho Kim, Ph.D., and Christopher Malcuit, Ph.D., professors from Kent State's new bioengineering program in the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology (formerly known as the College of Technology) and Fayez F. Safadi, Ph.D., professor of anatomy and neurobiology and Ohio Research Scholar at NEOMED.

“Post-operative wounds or chronic wounds caused by underlying disease or lowered immunity have high morbidity and significant mortality,” said Grant McGimpsey, Kent State's vice president for research. “Finding ways to address these problems based on regenerative medicine approaches is an exciting effort, and I am very excited about our growing research relationship with NEOMED.  The Northeast Ohio region is rich in biomedical research and development opportunities, and it is imperative that research institutions like Kent State and NEOMED develop strong partnerships in order to bring our combined expertise to bear on important medical challenges. This project is one example of what I expect to be a growing number of inter-institutional relationships in our region. The particular project that Professors Kim, Malcuit and Safadi are pursuing is an excellent example of the kinds of collaborative partnerships we want to create.

“Beyond the specific scientific and medical goals, this program has been created to further the relationship between Kent State's growing biomedical research expertise and our partner medical university,” McGimpsey continued. “It is designed to allow research teams to quickly gather the data needed to submit competitive proposals to the National Institutes of Health and other government medical funding agencies.”

Malcuit expressed his appreciation for this collaboration.

“I am grateful and honored by the combined support from both Kent State University and NEOMED in fostering this exciting interdisciplinary project to identify therapeutic targets to treat individuals suffering from acute and chronic wounds,” Malcuit said. “I envision the successful outcome of this collaboration to be just the beginning of much larger future research efforts between our two institutions in the area of regenerative medicine."

Safadi shared his excitement.

“It is great opportunity to initiate such collaboration with the talented faculty at Kent State,” Safadi said.  “I am very excited about this program, and we are on our way to develop a great relationship with Kent State.”

For Kim, the partnership between the two institutions creates great opportunity.

“This is a really valuable opportunity in that this research partnership can bring together and maximize the research strengths in stem cell/ tissue engineering at Kent State and in biomedical sciences at NEOMED,” Kim said.

Walter E. Horton Jr., Ph.D., vice president for research and dean of the College of Graduate Studies at NEOMED, said this program helps the working relationship between the two institutions for future ongoing research partnerships.

“This is a very important first step in building ongoing research collaboration between Kent State University and NEOMED,” he said. “Both Kent State and NEOMED have strengths in bioscience research, and by working together, we can more rapidly identify breakthroughs that will improve the health and economic vitality of our region.”

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

For more information about NEOMED, visit www.neomed.edu.

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News Headline: THS business students partner with KSU for Event Marketing program | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University College of Business Administration selected Tallmadge High School's Business and Marketing Department for two consecutive years as a partner for its Event Marketing program lead by Elizabeth Sinclair.

Four Event Marketing students presented information about KSU and the College of Business Administration to students currently enrolled in Financial Literacy and Business Concepts, Software Technology, Business Management and Marketing classes at Tallmadge High School Nov. 29.

The KSU students provided THS students with refreshments, KSU string bags containing sunglasses, pens and key chains. Several prizes were given away during the presentation, including Nook tablets, which were the grand prizes and were won by juniors Mary Ryan and Aaron Allebach.

The presentation also promoted the third annual Young Business Scholars' Program, a five-day business-focused camp for high school students who will be juniors or seniors during the 2013-14 academic year. The Young Business Scholars' Program is scheduled to take place July 21 through 26. Tallmadge students interested in applying to the program should contact Lisa Haller, Joni Giles or Kim Brendel for an application.

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News Headline: KSU's 2012 fall commencement ceremonies to take place Saturday | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will
hold its fall commencement
ceremonies Saturday at
the Memorial Athletic and
Convocation Center on the
Kent campus.

Kent State will confer
1,963 degrees, including
1,531 bachelor's degrees,
370 master's degrees, 59
doctoral degrees and 3 educational
specialist degrees
in ceremonies at 9:30 a.m.
and 1:30 p.m.

The 9:30 a.m. ceremony
is for those receiving their
bachelor's degrees. The
speaker for this ceremony
is José C. Feliciano, a
Cleveland trial lawyer who
also serves as KSU's 2012-
13 President's Ambassador.
A partner at Baker
Hostetler's Cleveland office,
Feliciano has more than 35
years of experience in complex
commercial and employment
litigation. He is a
past president of the Cleveland
Bar Association, and
he was also named one of
the Ten Outstanding Young
Men in America by the U.S.
Jaycees in 1985, an award
that had been given to President
John F. Kennedy, Sen.
Robert Kennedy and Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger.

Feliciano is the founder
and chairman of the Hispanic
Roundtable. He is
former chairman of the Hispanic
Leadership Development
Program and founder
of the Hispanic Community
Forum, for which he
also served as president.
He also was a founder of the
Ohio Hispanic Bar Association
and served as its vice
president. Feliciano, who
was born in Puerto Rico,
became the first Hispanic
public official in the history
of Cleveland when he was
named chief prosecuting attorney
for the city in 1980. In
1984, he was appointed by
President Ronald Reagan
as a White House Fellow.

The ceremony for those
receiving master's and
doctoral degrees is at 1:30
p.m. The speaker for the
afternoon ceremony is Virginia
Horvath, president
of the State University of
New York at Fredonia. She
also holds rank as professor
of English and formerly
served as vice president for
academic affairs at SUNY
Fredonia. Previously, she
was a faculty member at
KSU's East Liverpool and
Stark campuses, dean of
academic and student services
for KSU's Regional
Campuses and assistant
to the president for strategic
planning.

A recipient of KSU's Distinguished
Teaching Award,
she has academic specialties
in medieval literature,
British literature, children's/
young adult literature and
poetry. Horvath earned a
bachelor's degree in English
from the University at Buffalo
and a master's and doctorate
in English from KSU.

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News Headline: Kent State Winter Graduation is Dec. 15 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University will confer 1,963 degrees this semester

Kent State University will hold its fall commencement ceremonies at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15, at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center (MAC Center). Kent State will confer 1,963 degrees, including 1,531 bachelor's degrees, 370 master's degrees, 59 doctoral degrees and 3 educational specialist degrees.

The 9:30 a.m. ceremony is for those receiving their bachelor's degrees. The speaker for this ceremony is José C. Feliciano, a respected trial lawyer who also serves as Kent State's 2012-2013 President's Ambassador. A partner at Baker Hostetler's Cleveland office, Feliciano has more than 35 years of experience in complex commercial and employment litigation. He is a past president of the Cleveland Bar Association, and he was also named one of the Ten Outstanding Young Men in America by the U.S. Jaycees in 1985, an award that had been given to President John F. Kennedy, Sen. Robert Kennedy and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. Feliciano is the founder and chairman of the Hispanic Roundtable. He is former chairman of the Hispanic Leadership Development Program and founder of the Hispanic Community Forum, for which he also served as president. He also was a founder of the Ohio Hispanic Bar Association and served as its vice president. Feliciano, who was born in Puerto Rico, became the first Hispanic public official in the history of Cleveland when he was named chief prosecuting attorney for the city in 1980. In 1984, he was appointed by President Ronald Reagan as a White House Fellow.

The ceremony for those receiving master's and doctoral degrees is at 1:30 p.m. The speaker for the afternoon ceremony is Virginia Horvath, Ph.D., president of the State University of New York at Fredonia (SUNY Fredonia). She also holds rank as professor of English and formerly served as vice president for academic affairs at SUNY Fredonia. Previously, she was a faculty member at Kent State University at East Liverpool and Kent State University at Stark and then dean of academic and student services for Kent State's Regional Campuses and assistant to the president for strategic planning. A recipient of Kent State's Distinguished Teaching Award, she has academic specialties in medieval literature, British literature, children's/young adult literature and poetry. Horvath earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University at Buffalo and a master's and doctorate in English from Kent State.

The commencement ceremonies may be viewed live at www.kent.edu/commencement/webcast/live-webcast.cfm.

For more information about Kent State's commencement, visit www.kent.edu/commencement.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY Campus Kitchen wins national award (Gosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Campus Kitchen Project is a national organization that provides healthy meals to those in need.

All of the meals are prepared and served by student volunteers.

At this year's 2012 Campus Kitchen Project conference, the Campus Kitchen at Kent State University won the Excellence in Programming Award for its outreach and programming efforts at the Haymaker Farmers' Market.

The Haymaker Farmers' Market, in Kent, draws a big crowd with each season. Over the summer, Campus Kitchen at Kent State student volunteers made a new partnership with the farmers. The students conducted food demonstrations and provided nutrition information for the customers, and the local community embraced the students' efforts.

“I think we received the award because our students are committed to making a difference in the community,” said Ann Gosky, senior special assistant for quality initiatives and curriculum and project advisor for the Campus Kitchen at Kent State. “And that's evident. They've been excited about the project from the beginning and they've shared that excitement with other students.”

With this program, Kent State students are working to spread the word about the Campus Kitchen organization to the local community, as well as the farmers and vendors at the market.

The students have developed a solid relationship with the farmers and in return, the farmers donate their excess weekly produce to the Campus Kitchen.

“The farmers are happy that the produce doesn't go to waste, we're happy because we have this great product and the community is happy because we're using it to feed those in need,” Gosky said. “It's a great partnership and that's really the effort that was recognized this year.”

The farmers market program began over the summer and runs all year. It will continue the outreach at The Junction in Kent during the winter months.

Thirty-three schools across the United States have Campus Kitchens. The Campus Kitchen at Kent State started in March 2011 and served 60 meals a week.

Today, the student volunteers prepare and serve 260 meals per week and a meal supplement to an additional 60-100 of those in need in the community. The Campus Kitchen at Kent State is open to all volunteers.

“I believe no matter your major or interest, you can find something at the Campus Kitchen Project that speaks to you and helps you better yourself and at the same time better the community in which we all live,” said Christopher Vogliano, a Kent State student majoring in nutrition and a regular Campus Kitchen volunteer.

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News Headline: Celebrations | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State student Brittany Casper of Brunswick was among 24 students nationwide to win $5,000 scholarships from the National Retail Federation. Students were selected for their scholastic achievements and passion for the retail industry.

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News Headline: Restore the Runway supports Habitat for Humanity (Quevedo) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In Gone with the Wind, Scarlett O'Hara made a ball gown out of the parlor drapes. However she had nothing on the students at the Kent State University Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising, who used newspaper, pizza boxes, bubble wrap, vinyl records, CDs and packing foam to create fashions for Restore the Runway.

The fashion show at the Kent State University Ballroom Saturday evening raised funds for Habitat for Humanity of Portage County. Senior students Daniel McKenna and Tye Clarke produced the show, which featured 100 models, all students at the university. Design students worked in teams to create garments from recycled materials and second-hand items that they deconstructed and repurposed into a new design.

Professor Vince Quevedo, who was commentator for the show, said, "You'll see skirts become shirts and shirts become pants, all designed by freshman Fashion Visuals students." The goal of the class is to make the students think creatively and also to get them involved in community service.

Guests were welcomed by Katlyn Carter, Alex Evans, Danielle Cefaratti, Tara Melton, Megan Briggs and Tara Casper, all members of the Habitat for Humanity chapter at Kent State University. The chapter is currently working on two houses in Atwater in conjunction with Metis Construction, according to Brian Reitz, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Portage County.

As fashion students glided down the runway to music by Dominick Rao of DRao Productions, Samantha Taylor stood by with tape, just in case the stunning garments needed a quick repair.

Special guests were Dave and Jane Palmstrom, founders of the Portage Chapter of Habitat, who enjoyed the show, along with Wayland and Joan Ritzman, Thad and Michelle Gauthier and J.R. Campbell, director of the Fashion School.

At intermission, Leigh West and Kara Oberdove introduced the Nova Jazz Singers, a group of student jazz artists directed by Dr. Chris Venesile.

The team comprised of Andrea Konopinski, Victoria Wallis and Emilie Richer took first place in the competition with a dress made from magazines, modeled by Electa Royal.

"We stayed up for three days making the rosettes from magazine pages," said Konopinski. The team had two designs in the Top 10, including another garment modeled by Becket Thompson.

Runners-up were Morgan Woods, Annabelle Hemmeter and Madalynne Stanic, who designed a ball gown modeled by Emily Brogan.

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News Headline: Exhibit celebrates Kate's iconic style (Druesedow) | Email

News Date: 12/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hamilton Spectator, The
Contact Name: Ilnytzky, Ula
News OCR Text: A new exhibition is hailing the fashion sense of Katharine Hepburn, whose trademark khakis and open-collar shirts were decidedly unconventional in the 1930s and '40s, when girdles and stockings were the order of the day.

The fiercely independent Hepburn famously said: "Anytime I hear a man say he prefers a woman in a skirt, I say, 'Try one. Try a skirt.'" But skirts and dresses abound in Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

Hepburn, who died in 2003 at age 96, saved almost all the costumes from her long career that included four Oscars and such memorable films as The Philadelphia Story, The African Queen, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner and On Golden Pond. Forty are on view at the exhibition, which runs through Jan. 12.

One of the first things visitors will notice is how slender Hepburn was - she had a 20-inch waist - and a grouping of seven khaki pants artfully arranged on a pair of mannequin legs.

"The fact that she wore slacks and wanted to be comfortable influenced women's ready-to-wear in the United States," said Jean Druesedow, director of Kent State University Museum, which was given 700 items from Hepburn's estate.

"That image said to the American woman 'Look, you don't have to be in your girdle and stockings and tight dress. You can be comfortable. That was probably the first aspect of becoming a fashion icon," said cocurator Druesedow.

The strong-willed actress known for taking charge of her career worked closely with designers to decide her performance wardrobe. Margaret Furse, an English designer who created Hepburn's wardrobes for The Lion in Winter, A Delicate Balance and Love Among the Ruins, shopped with the star and talked extensively about what kinds of things would set the scene.

Among the highlights is a stunning satin and lace wedding gown by Howard Greer for her role as Stella Surrege in The Lake. The 1933 production was her first major Broadway role and also a huge flop. Pundit Dorothy Parker described her performance as running "the gamut of emotion from A to B."

The experience taught Hepburn to have a bigger say in what roles she accepted, said Barbara Cohen-Stratyner, curator of exhibitions at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

Comfort was paramount to Hepburn - being able to throw her leg over a chair or sit on the floor. She always wore her "uniform" - khakis and a shirt - to rehearsals and pant ensembles to publicity appearances.

A companion book, Katharine Hepburn: Rebel Chic (Skira Rizzoli, $42.50), notes how RKO execs hid her trousers to persuade her to abandon them. "Her response was to threaten to walk around the lot naked. Though she only stripped down as far as her silk underwear before stepping out of her dressing room, she made her point - and she got her trousers back," Nancy MacDonell wrote in an essay.

The exhibition also has film clips, movie posters and archival photographs of Hepburn wearing the costumes worn by the mannequins. Her false eyelashes and sensible shoes are also on display.

If you go

Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen is at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, 40 Lincoln Center Plaza, nypl.org/events/exhibitions/

katharine-hepburn-dressed-stage-and-screen. Open Monday to Saturday, noon to 6 p.m.; and until 8 p.m. on Thursdays. Free

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News Headline: Study Reveals That 77% Of New Fashion Graduates Would Take A Substantially Lower Salary To Work For (Stanforth, Hauck) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students would overwhelmingly choose lower salaries to work for companies that have better working conditions and higher levels of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) over positions paying substantially more in companies that treated potential employees in a less desirable manner and did not place a high value on CSR. In fact, more than 77% of the new graduates surveyed were willing to accept $42,000 versus $52,000 to work at companies with a high level of CSR, according to the results of a new survey, Corporate Social Responsibility and Career Decisions.

The results of the study of 247 fashion students in three higher education institutions offering fashion programs (in New York, Ohio and Oregon), which was developed and conducted by Michael P. Londrigan, Interim Dean of Academic Affairs and Chair of the Fashion Merchandising Department at LIM College , Nancy Stanforth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Fashion Merchandising at Kent State University , and William Hauck, Assistant Professor of Fashion Merchandising at Kent State University, were recently published in the U.K.-based International Journal of Fashion Design, Technology and Education .

In announcing the release of Corporate Social Responsibility and Career Decisions, Professor Londrigan of LIM College said, "We observed our own students and monitored the marketplace discussion of students' priorities in seeking their first career position upon graduation. Because there was no clear definitive analysis on the role of CSR in their decision-making, we decided to research the subject." LIM College is located in New York City and focuses exclusively on the study of business and fashion.

"We believed that CSR was important, but we did not know to what extent. What we found exceeded our expectations. Students overwhelmingly would choose jobs with substantially lower salaries at companies with higher levels of CSR," Kent State University's Dr. Stanforth continued.

"Our study goes a long way to demonstrate the need for companies to establish sound CSR policies that can be easily recognized and evaluated by prospective employees. This will contribute to their ability to recruit new college graduates for employment," Professor Hauck of Kent State University continued.

For example, key findings indicate:

60% would choose positions with lower pay if the prospective employer did not hire and promote based on physical appearance

65% would choose lower pay in order to work fewer hours

84% would choose a position with a company with an ethical supply chain over a company whose supply chain was deemed less socially responsible

In addition, when participants were asked what they believed the important issues in the fashion industry were:

85% indicated that a socially responsible supply chain was important

77% indicated that a reasonable work-life balance was important

88% indicated that CSR is important

As for their personal habits, the study revealed:

64% make an effort to choose products that were not made by low-wage workers

73% make an effort to conserve water

41% buy biodegradable products

82% recycle whenever they can

"Our survey revealed that CSR strategies are important to students in accepting a position. Fashion degree programs clearly attract students who are highly interested in the industry, and thus CSR strategies should be an important aspect of the fashion industry's recruitment efforts," LIM College's Professor Londrigan concluded.

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News Headline: Home and garden happenings -- Week of Dec. 8 | Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Breckenridge, Mary Beth
News OCR Text: Remember our exceptionally early spring? Our soggy fall?

Weather extremes like those can be challenging for gardeners. But Cleveland Botanical Garden's upcoming Sustainability Symposium will help you keep your garden flourishing amid changing weather patterns.

The symposium, scheduled for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 26, has the theme Seasonal Sustainability. Among the sessions will be a keynote speech by Scott Sheridan, a climatology professor at Kent State University, who will talk about evidence of climate change and what it means for the world and your garden.

Other sessions are Green Gardening for Winter Interest; Clean Up, Green Up: Removing Home-Based Hazardous Materials; Bringing the Outdoors In and Preserving Your Fall Garden Harvest.

Admission is $50 for members of the garden and $60 for others. Register at 216-721-1600, ext. 100, or www.cbgarden.org.

Cleveland Botanical Garden is at 11030 East Blvd.

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News Headline: Exploradio: Arctic ice and global warming (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University researcher finds changing patterns in Arctic sea-ice drift is another sign of a warming world

by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR

This story is part of a special series .

A Russian ship sailing from Siberia to Japan last month became the first commercial tanker to cross the Northeast Passage in WINTER. Summer crossings of the formerly ice choked North Pole are now commonplace.

On this week's Exploradio, WKSU's Jeff St.Clair looks at melting ice, global warming, and the difference between natural and man-made climate change.

The sands of frozen time

Dr. Joseph Ortiz selects a small glass vial from a wooden cabinet. It's full of sand he says came from the bottom of the ocean, just off the Alaskan coast.

It's part a sediment core from the North Win Ridge.

Ortiz is a paleo-oceanographer at Kent State University. He studies what oceans used to look like. He says sand like this hitches across the Arctic on icebergs. During the summer, when the ice melts, the sand particles fall, and over thousands of years form layers on the ocean floor. Ortiz says like a passport, the sand has a chemical signature that tells exactly where it's from.

He says by looking at those trace elements using an electron microprobe, "we can fingerprint those and tie them from the source outcrop where they originally came from."

Ortiz and colleagues from Old Dominion University and the University of Southern California travelled to Alaska last year and drilled deep into the muck to analyze the pattern of drifting Arctic ice based on sand grain deposits dating back 8,000 years.

A post-glacial climate clock

Ortiz says what his team found, "was a prominent 1,500 year cycle within the Arctic Oscillation , and this hadn't been shown previously from earlier scientific results."

The Arctic Oscillation is caused by wind and ocean currents that flow from Siberia to North America. And it's during those times of enhanced trans-polar drift that material from the European side, the Eurasian side, makes its way over to the Alaskan coast.

Ortiz and his team found that this 15-hundred year cycle varies between two extremes. One is the ice-forming positive Arctic oscillation that traps cold air in the north, and the second is the ice-melting negative oscillation that sucks warm air into the pole and pushes cold air south.

Here in the U.S. we feel the negative Arctic oscillation as the Alberta Clipper, these weather patterns that we get here that explain very cold conditions.

Ironically, melting polar ice and the negative Arctic Oscillation bring colder winters and more extreme weather to the eastern U.S. and Europe.

Millennial-old patterns gone awry

While science can't pinpoint what drives these cycles, Ortiz says the eight-thousand year natural weather patterns recorded in the mud below the Arctic Ocean are now under assault by human activity.

He says what we're seeing since the 1860's or so is a long-term trend, "a drift if you will, and that drift is driven by the amount of CO2 that's being put into the atmosphere."

While the cycle Ortiz revealed shows the Arctic should be building ice, the opposite is happening.

Ortiz and other climate scientists can't explain what's driving the variability we're seeing through natural causes alone.

Ortiz's says weather models based on natural forces alone, such as Arctic ice drift, solar cycles, volcanoes, or ocean currents, don't match what's happening today UNLESS greenhouse gases are added to the equations. THEN climate models reflect the data of a warming planet and the disrupted Arctic cycle.

The evidence for human caused climate change is overwhelming, according to Ortiz - If you look at the data from many different angles, from many different fields, it says pretty convincingly that humans have modified the climate system. We need to be paying attention to that."

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change , the international body of scientists tracking climate data since 1988, says the Arctic Ocean is thawing so quickly, it could be entirely ice free by mid century.

And with no ice at the North Pole, Santa won't be the only one left out in the cold.

Please click on link for audio:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/33970

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News Headline: KSU hosts 3 from Muskie program (Di Maria) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University welcomed three international students to campus as part of the U.S. Department of State's Edmund S. Muskie Graduate Fellowship Program.

Madina Assangaliyeva from Kazakhstan, Nodirbek Ismailov from Kyrgyzstan and Kirill Zagurskiy from Russia have become part of the Kent State student body this fall semester.

“It is a great honor for Kent State to once again host students through the Edmund S. Muskie Fellowship Program,” said David Di Maria, associate director for Kent State's Office of Global Education. “This prestigious fellowship brings emerging leaders from Eurasia to study at the graduate level in the United States for one or two years.”

The Muskie Program is highly competitive with a 4 percent acceptance rate.

Established by the U.S. Congress in 1992 to encourage economic and democratic growth in Eurasia, the Muskie program is a program of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State and administered by IREX.

By selecting emerging leaders from 12 countries of the former Soviet Union, the Muskie program aims to promote mutual understanding, build democracy and foster the transition to market economies in Eurasia and Central Asia through intensive academic study and professional training.

“Muskie fellows enrich our campus community and promote mutual understanding between the United States and Eurasian countries,” Di Maria said. “In addition to their studies, the fellows perform at least 40 hours of community service and complete an internship in their field of academic specialization prior to returning to their home countries.”

Celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, the Muskie program has, since its inception, identified, trained and supported talented practitioners who do the hard work needed to advance democracy and development.

The program boasts nearly 5,000 alumni who have returned to their home countries to lead institutional change and economic growth in the professional sectors where they work.

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News Headline: KHS to present 'Kent in the 1920s' | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Historical Society will host a special "All About Kent" event, presented by Kent State University graduate students in the school's public history program.

"Kent in the 1920s," will be held at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Kent Masonic Center, which is located at West Main and South Mantua streets.

Professors John Jameson and Helmut Flacheneckar led the course this fall that will culminate in the presentation of nine speakers covering aspects of Kent's history that have been researched during the semester.

Flacheneckar will discuss "Kent in 1918, its hopes and dreams after World War I as reflected in the Kent Tribune" and Jameson's topic is "Politics of the day in the U.S. and Ohio," and students will present their research on a variety of topics.

Record-Courier Editor Roger Di Paolo will discuss 1920s civic boosterism and KHS Director Tom Hatch will speak about social life conserved in a museum: KHS and the Clapp Woodward House.

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News Headline: Kent Stark Offers STRETCH Classes for Breast Cancer Rehabilitation | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University at Stark Fitness and Recreation Center will begin offering a Breast Cancer STRETCH class during the spring semester. Classes will be held from 10 – 11 a.m. each Tuesday and Thursday from January 15 through April 18, 2013, in the Kent State Stark Physical Education Building, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township.

Breast Cancer STRETCH (Strength Through Recreation Exercise Togetherness Caring Health), instructed by Stacie Humm, academic program coordinator, is open to the campus community and the general public. There is no cost for this non-credit class and participation is on a first-come basis, as class size is limited. Pre-registration and a physician's clearance are required for participation. No classes will be held when the university is closed due to weather emergencies, holidays or during spring break.

This class will incorporate stretching, muscular endurance and cardiovascular activity to help survivors rehabilitate both mentally and physically from the effects of breast cancer. Special attention will be given to education about lymphedema, range of motion and strength issues associated with non/surgical cancer treatments. Participants of any fitness level are encouraged to attend, including those who may need to sit during classes.

To register or for more information, call the Kent State Stark Fitness and Recreation Center at 330-244-3392, or email Stacie Humm at shumm2@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Researchers from Kent State University Provide Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of Peptide Hormones | Email

News Date: 12/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2012 DEC 8 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Peptide Proteins. According to news reporting originating from North Canton, Ohio, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "In the mammalian ovary both gonadotropins and local cytokines, acting through G-protein coupled receptors, govern the physiology of the ovary in part by regulating the cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate via adenylyl cyclases. The nine transmembrane adenylyl cyclases and a soluble adenylyl cyclase are regulated by a diversity of ligands."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "In this study we have examined the rat ovaries, prior to and subsequent to gonadotropin treatment, for the presence of different transmembrane adenylyl cyclases by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Adenylyl cyclase I immunoreactivity was observed in the nuclei of oocytes in preantral and antral follicles along with some staining in granulosa cells. Equine chorionic gonadotropin injection increased adenylyl cyclase I staining in granulosa cells. Adenylyl cyclase I staining was also observed in luteal and endothelial cells. Adenylyl cyclase II was observed throughout the ovary, including granulosa cells and the ovarian surface epithelium. Adenylyl cyclase II staining was also found to increase in granulosa cells after equine chorionic gonadotropin injection. Adenylyl cyclase III was distributed primarily in theca and smooth muscle cells of arterioles, with faint staining in the oocytes of equine chorionic gonadotropin-injected ovaries. Adenylyl cyclase IV staining was present throughout the ovary, including the nuclei of oocytes. Adenylyl cyclase VIII staining in granulosa cells increased subsequent to equine chorionic gonadotropin injection and remained in luteal cells."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Our study reveals the redundancy of adenylyl cyclases present in the rat ovary and, therefore, implies potential regulation of follicular and corpus luteum physiology by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate generated through distinct adenylyl cyclases."

For more information on this research see: Distribution of adenylyl cyclases in the rat ovary by immunofluorescence microscopy. Anatomical Record, 2012;295(10):1717-26. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Anatomical Record - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1932-8494)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting P. Bagavandoss, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Kent State University at Stark, North Canton, Ohio, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Ohio, Cyclase, North Canton, United States, Peptide Hormones, Peptide Proteins, Immunofluorescence, Placental Hormones, Pregnancy Proteins, Enzymes and Coenzymes, Chorionic Gonadotropin, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2012 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Celebrations | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Education

Beverly Cain, originally of Barberton and now of Columbus, received the Friend of the Year Award from Kent State's School of Library and Information Science. Others who won awards from the KSU school were: Paige Lucas-Stannard of Damascus, Ohio, the Information Architecture and Knowledge Management Alumnus of the Year Award; Jeff Young of Marion, Alumnus of the Year; Elizabeth Owens of Olmsted Falls, the August Alpers Award; Shelly Miller of Bloomville, Ohio, the Beta Phi Mu Student Achievement Award; Jon-Erik Gilot of Mount Pleasant, Ohio, the H.F. Group Preservation Award; Kathleen Rak of Cleveland, the Janice Smuda Children's Librarianship Award; Ruwaida Salem of North Canton, the Thomas J. Froehlich Award; Karyn Lewis, originally of Fairborn, the Dan Maclachlan School Library Media Award; and Jodi Cooper-Wentz of Mansfield, the Dan Maclachlan School Library Media Award. All graduated from the KSU library program.

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News Headline: Chew on this: Memory helps drive appetite | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Sacramento Bee - Online, The
Contact Name: MELISSA HEALY
News OCR Text: In a finding that makes clear that appetite is often a case of mind over matter, new research finds that the memory of a hearty recent meal can fill you up. But the memory of a stingy serving of victuals - even an inaccurate memory - can make you hungrier, and prompt heavier eating at the next meal, researchers found.

The study, published this week in the journal Public Library of Science One, used an ingenious trick to manipulate research subjects' memories of a lunchtime meal they had: At the bottom of a soup bowl filled with cream of tomato soup, they installed a hidden pump, which could be used to surreptitiously refill the bowl while the subject ate or draw down its contents.

The researchers wondered whether subjects tricked by such a manipulation would later remember the sight of the hefty 500-mg serving of soup they were asked to eat, or whether they would somehow register the punier 300-mg serving they actually ate. And they wondered whether, as dinnertime approached, the subjects' appetite would be driven by the actual lunch they had eaten or the more satisfying meal they thought they ate.

When asked how hungry they were as dinnertime approached, subjects' memories of the meal they saw - not the one they ate - seemed to be most influential. Even when their soup bowls were steadily drained, those who were seated in front of a large bowl of soup were less hungry. And those who were presented with a small bowl of soup pronounced themselves more hungry - even if researchers behind the scenes were steadily refilling their bowls.

The next day, the subjects' memory of the soup's ability to satisfy continued to be colored by the memory formed on the previous day: Those who "saw" a big bowl of soup the day before declared a medium-sized bowl of soup likely to fill them up; those who had been presented a small bowl of soup (even one that was furtively refilled) were more likely to say it would not.

The link between mental function and obesity is a complex one, which researchers are just beginning to capture. Neurologists have long known that people whose memories of recent events have been impaired by stroke or injury will often eat one meal after another: Without the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain.

A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better memory and executive function went on to lose more weight than those with poorer cognitive skills. Finally, researchers have noted that mindless or distracted eating - the intake of food that might result in a fuzzy memory - also seems to override the effect of the body's satiety signals.

A 2006 study found that when people ate what was described as a "meal," they consumed fewer calories at the next meal than people who were given the same amount of food described as a "snack."

Our beliefs about the food we eat - and our ability to remember what we eat and how much we eat - appear to influence our eating behavior powerfully when we eat again. Too much distraction, too little attention, food presentation - such as large dishes that distort our assessment of portion size - can play havoc with our food memories. And eventually, this study suggests, with our waistlines.

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News Headline: Can your memory influence your appetite? | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Louisville Courier-Journal - Online
Contact Name: Melissa Healy Los Angeles Times
News OCR Text: In a finding that makes clear that appetite is often a case of mind over matter, new research finds that the memory of a hearty recent meal can fill you up. But the memory of a stingy serving of victuals — even an inaccurate memory — can make you hungrier, and prompt heavier eating at the next meal, researchers found.

The study, published this week in the journal Public Library of Science One, used an ingenious trick to manipulate research subjects’ memories of a lunchtime meal they had: At the bottom of a soup bowl filled with cream of tomato soup, they installed a hidden pump, which could be used to surreptitiously refill the bowl while the subject ate or draw down its contents.

The researchers wondered whether subjects tricked by such a manipulation would later remember the sight of the hefty 500-mg serving of soup they were asked to eat, or whether they would somehow register the punier 300-mg serving they actually ate. And they wondered whether, as dinnertime approached, the subjects’ appetite would be driven by the actual lunch they had eaten or the more satisfying meal they thought they ate.

When asked how hungry they were as dinnertime approached, subjects’ memories of the meal they saw — not the one they ate — seemed to be most influential. Even when their soup bowls were steadily drained, those who were seated in front of a large bowl of soup were less hungry. And those who were presented with a small bowl of soup pronounced themselves more hungry — even if researchers behind the scenes were steadily refilling their bowls.

The next day, the subjects’ memory of the soup’s ability to satisfy continued to be colored by the memory formed on the previous day: Those who “saw” a big bowl of soup the day before declared a medium-sized bowl of soup likely to fill them up; those who had been presented a small bowl of soup (even one that was furtively refilled) were more likely to say it would not.

The link between mental function and obesity is a complex one, which researchers are just beginning to capture. Neurologists have long known that people whose memories of recent events have been impaired by stroke or injury will often eat one meal after another: Without the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending “stop eating, I’m full” messages to the brain.

A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better memory and executive function went on to lose more weight than those with poorer cognitive skills. Finally, researchers have noted that mindless or distracted eating — the intake of food that might result in a fuzzy memory — also seems to override the effect of the bodyâs satiety signals.

A 2006 study found that when people ate what was described as a “meal,” they consumed fewer calories at the next meal than people who were given the same amount of food described as a “snack.”

Our beliefs about the food we eat — and our ability to remember what we eat and how much we eat — appear to influence our eating behavior powerfully when we eat again. Too much distraction, too little attention, food presentation — such as large dishes that distort our assessment of portion size — can play havoc with our food memories. And eventually, this study suggests, with our waistlines.

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News Headline: Study suggests that memory helps drive appetite | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Duluth News Tribune - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In a finding that makes clear that appetite is often a case of mind over matter, new research finds that the memory of a hearty recent meal can fill you up. But the memory of a stingy serving of victuals — even an inaccurate memory — can make you hungrier, and prompt heavier eating at the next meal, researchers found.

The study, published this week in the journal Public Library of Science One, used an ingenious trick to manipulate research subjects' memories of a lunchtime meal they had: At the bottom of a soup bowl filled with cream of tomato soup, they installed a hidden pump, which could be used to surreptitiously refill the bowl while the subject ate or draw down its contents.

The researchers wondered whether subjects tricked by such a manipulation would later remember the sight of the hefty 500-mg serving of soup they were asked to eat, or whether they would somehow register the punier 300-mg serving they actually ate. And they wondered whether, as dinnertime approached, the subjects' appetite would be driven by the actual lunch they had eaten or the more satisfying meal they thought they ate.

When asked how hungry they were as dinnertime approached, subjects' memories of the meal they saw — not the one they ate — seemed to be most influential. Even when their soup bowls were steadily drained, those who were seated in front of a large bowl of soup were less hungry. And those who were presented with a small bowl of soup pronounced themselves more hungry — even if researchers behind the scenes were steadily refilling their bowls.

The next day, the subjects' memory of the soup's ability to satisfy continued to be colored by the memory formed on the previous day: Those who "saw" a big bowl of soup the day before declared a medium-sized bowl of soup likely to fill them up; those who had been presented a small bowl of soup (even one that was furtively refilled) were more likely to say it would not.

The link between mental function and obesity is a complex one, which researchers are just beginning to capture. Neurologists have long known that people whose memories of recent events have been impaired by stroke or injury will often eat one meal after another: Without the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain.

A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better memory and executive function went on to lose more weight than those with poorer cognitive skills. Finally, researchers have noted that mindless or distracted eating — the intake of food that might result in a fuzzy memory — also seems to override the effect of the body's satiety signals.

A 2006 study found that when people ate what was described as a "meal," they consumed fewer calories at the next meal than people who were given the same amount of food described as a "snack."

Our beliefs about the food we eat — and our ability to remember what we eat and how much we eat — appear to influence our eating behavior powerfully when we eat again. Too much distraction, too little attention, food presentation — such as large dishes that distort our assessment of portion size — can play havoc with our food memories. And eventually, this study suggests, with our waistlines.

Tags: news, updates, health, food

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News Headline: Chew on this: Memory helps drive appetite | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: News & Observer - Online
Contact Name: MELISSA HEALY
News OCR Text: In a finding that makes clear that appetite is often a case of mind over matter, new research finds that the memory of a hearty recent meal can fill you up. But the memory of a stingy serving of victuals - even an inaccurate memory - can make you hungrier, and prompt heavier eating at the next meal, researchers found.

The study, published this week in the journal Public Library of Science One, used an ingenious trick to manipulate research subjects' memories of a lunchtime meal they had: At the bottom of a soup bowl filled with cream of tomato soup, they installed a hidden pump, which could be used to surreptitiously refill the bowl while the subject ate or draw down its contents.

The researchers wondered whether subjects tricked by such a manipulation would later remember the sight of the hefty 500-mg serving of soup they were asked to eat, or whether they would somehow register the punier 300-mg serving they actually ate. And they wondered whether, as dinnertime approached, the subjects' appetite would be driven by the actual lunch they had eaten or the more satisfying meal they thought they ate.

When asked how hungry they were as dinnertime approached, subjects' memories of the meal they saw - not the one they ate - seemed to be most influential. Even when their soup bowls were steadily drained, those who were seated in front of a large bowl of soup were less hungry. And those who were presented with a small bowl of soup pronounced themselves more hungry - even if researchers behind the scenes were steadily refilling their bowls.

The next day, the subjects' memory of the soup's ability to satisfy continued to be colored by the memory formed on the previous day: Those who "saw" a big bowl of soup the day before declared a medium-sized bowl of soup likely to fill them up; those who had been presented a small bowl of soup (even one that was furtively refilled) were more likely to say it would not.

The link between mental function and obesity is a complex one, which researchers are just beginning to capture. Neurologists have long known that people whose memories of recent events have been impaired by stroke or injury will often eat one meal after another: Without the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain.

A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better memory and executive function went on to lose more weight than those with poorer cognitive skills. Finally, researchers have noted that mindless or distracted eating - the intake of food that might result in a fuzzy memory - also seems to override the effect of the body's satiety signals.

A 2006 study found that when people ate what was described as a "meal," they consumed fewer calories at the next meal than people who were given the same amount of food described as a "snack."

Our beliefs about the food we eat - and our ability to remember what we eat and how much we eat - appear to influence our eating behavior powerfully when we eat again. Too much distraction, too little attention, food presentation - such as large dishes that distort our assessment of portion size - can play havoc with our food memories. And eventually, this study suggests, with our waistlines.

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News Headline: Chew on This: Memory Helps Drive Appetite | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Real Estate – Online
Contact Name: Melissa Healy
News OCR Text: (MCT)—In a finding that makes clear that appetite is often a case of mind over matter, new research finds that the memory of a hearty recent meal can fill you up. But the memory of a stingy serving of victuals — even an inaccurate memory — can make you hungrier, and prompt heavier eating at the next meal, researchers found.

The study, published this week in the journal Public Library of Science One, used an ingenious trick to manipulate research subjects' memories of a lunchtime meal they had: At the bottom of a soup bowl filled with cream of tomato soup, they installed a hidden pump, which could be used to surreptitiously refill the bowl while the subject ate or draw down its contents.

The researchers wondered whether subjects tricked by such a manipulation would later remember the sight of the hefty 500-mg serving of soup they were asked to eat, or whether they would somehow register the punier 300-mg serving they actually ate. And they wondered whether, as dinnertime approached, the subjects' appetite would be driven by the actual lunch they had eaten or the more satisfying meal they thought they ate.

When asked how hungry they were as dinnertime approached, subjects' memories of the meal they saw — not the one they ate — seemed to be most influential. Even when their soup bowls were steadily drained, those who were seated in front of a large bowl of soup were less hungry. And those who were presented with a small bowl of soup pronounced themselves more hungry — even if researchers behind the scenes were steadily refilling their bowls.

The next day, the subjects' memory of the soup's ability to satisfy continued to be colored by the memory formed on the previous day: Those who “saw” a big bowl of soup the day before declared a medium-sized bowl of soup likely to fill them up; those who had been presented a small bowl of soup (even one that was furtively refilled) were more likely to say it would not.

The link between mental function and obesity is a complex one, which researchers are just beginning to capture. Neurologists have long known that people whose memories of recent events have been impaired by stroke or injury will often eat one meal after another: Without the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending “stop eating, I'm full” messages to the brain.

A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better memory and executive function went on to lose more weight than those with poorer cognitive skills. Finally, researchers have noted that mindless or distracted eating — the intake of food that might result in a fuzzy memory — also seems to override the effect of the body's satiety signals.

A 2006 study found that when people ate what was described as a “meal,” they consumed fewer calories at the next meal than people who were given the same amount of food described as a “snack.”

Our beliefs about the food we eat — and our ability to remember what we eat and how much we eat — appear to influence our eating behavior powerfully when we eat again. Too much distraction, too little attention, food presentation — such as large dishes that distort our assessment of portion size — can play havoc with our food memories. And eventually, this study suggests, with our waistlines.

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News Headline: Food: Is it mind over matter? | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times Colonist - Online
Contact Name: Melissa Healy
News OCR Text: Your memory of small servings can make you feel more hungry

In a finding that makes clear that appetite is often a case of mind over matter, new research finds that the memory of a hearty recent meal can fill you up. But the memory of a stingy serving of victuals - even an inaccurate memory - can make you hungrier and prompt heavier eating at the next meal, researchers found.

The study, published this week in the journal Public Library of Science One, used an ingenious trick to manipulate research subjects' memories of a lunchtime meal they had: At the bottom of a soup bowl filled with cream of tomato soup, they installed a hidden pump, which could be used to surreptitiously refill the bowl while the subject ate or draw down its contents.

The researchers wondered whether subjects tricked by such a manipulation would later remember the sight of the hefty 500-mg serving of soup they were asked to eat, or whether they would somehow register the punier 300-mg serving they actually ate. And they wondered whether, as dinnertime approached, the subjects' appetite would be driven by the actual lunch they had eaten or the more satisfying meal they thought they ate.

When asked how hungry they were as dinnertime approached, subjects' memories of the meal they saw - not the one they ate - seemed to be most influential. Even when their soup bowls were steadily drained, those who were seated in front of a large bowl of soup were less hungry. And those who were presented with a small bowl of soup pronounced themselves more hungry - even if researchers behind the scenes were steadily refilling their bowls.

The next day, the subjects' memory of the soup's ability to satisfy continued to be coloured by the memory formed on the previous day: Those who "saw" a big bowl of soup the day before declared a medium-sized bowl of soup likely to fill them up; those who had been presented a small bowl of soup (even one that was furtively refilled) were more likely to say it would not.

The link between mental function and obesity is a complex one, which researchers are just beginning to capture. Neurologists have long known that people whose memories of recent events have been impaired by stroke or injury will often eat one meal after another: Without the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain.

A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had undergone weight-loss surgery, those with better memory and executive function went on to lose more weight than those with poorer cognitive skills. Finally, researchers have noted that mindless or distracted eating - the intake of food that might result in a fuzzy memory - also seems to override the effect of the body's satiety signals.

A 2006 study found that when people ate what was described as a "meal," they consumed fewer calories at the next meal than people who were given the same amount of food described as a "snack."

Our beliefs about the food we eat - and our ability to remember what we eat and how much we eat - appear to influence our eating behaviour powerfully when we eat again. Too much distraction, too little attention, food presentation - such as large dishes that distort our assessment of portion size - can play havoc with our food memories. And eventually, this study suggests, with our waistlines.

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News Headline: Chew on this: Memory helps drive appetite | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: KSCW-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Memories of a satisfying meal can suppress hunger and appetite several hours later -- even when that memory is faulty. But failing to remember how satisfying your last meal was, that's a recipe for overeating. ( Jay Clendenin )

In a finding that makes clear that appetite is often a case of mind over matter, new research finds that the memory of a hearty recent meal can fill you up. But the memory of a stingy serving of victuals -- even an inaccurate memory -- can make you hungrier, and prompt heavier eating at the next meal, researchers found.

The study , published Wednesday in the journal Public Library of Science One, used an ingenious trick to manipulate research subjects' memories of a lunchtime meal they had: At the bottom of a soup bowl filled with cream of tomato soup, they installed a hidden pump, which could be used to surreptitiously refill the bowl while the subject ate or draw down its contents.

The researchers wondered whether subjects tricked by such a manipulation would later remember the sight of the hefty 500-mg serving of soup they were asked to eat, or whether they would somehow register the punier 300-mg serving they actually ate. And they wondered whether, as dinnertime approached, the subjects' appetite would be driven by the actual lunch they had eaten or the more satisfying meal they thought they ate.

When asked how hungry they were as dinnertime approached, subjects' memories of the meal they saw -- not the one they ate -- seemed to be most influential. Even when their soup bowls were steadily drained, those who were seated in front of a large bowl of soup were less hungry. And those who were presented with a small bowl of soup pronounced themselves more hungry -- even if researchers behind the scenes were steadily refilling their bowls.

The next day, the subjects' memory of the soup's ability to satisfy continued to be colored by the memory formed on the previous day: Those who "saw" a big bowl of soup the day before declared a medium-sized bowl of soup likely to fill them up; those who had been presented a small bowl of soup (even one that was furtively refilled) were more likely to say it would not.

The link between mental function and obesity is a complex one, which researchers are just beginning to capture. Neurologists have long known that people whose memories of recent events have been impaired by stroke or injury will often eat one meal after another: Without the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending "stop eating, I'm full" messages to the brain.

A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better memory and executive function went on to lose more weight than those with poorer cognitive skills. Finally, researchers have noted that mindless or distracted eating -- the intake of food that might result in a fuzzy memory -- also seems to override the effect of the body's satiety signals.

A 2006 study found that when people ate what was described as a "meal," they consumed fewer calories at the next meal than people who were given the same amount of food described as a "snack."

Our beliefs about the food we eat -- and our ability to remember what we eat and how much we eat -- appears to influence our eating behavior powerfully when we eat again. Too much distraction, too little attention, food presentation -- such as large dishes that distort our assessment of portion size -- can play havoc with our food memories. And eventually, this study suggests, with our waistlines.

Read more about food manipulation and intake in this article:

Mellow setting puts fast food consumers in a mood to ... eat less

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News Headline: Apartment complex, new restaurant planned for Kent | Email

News Date: 12/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Schleis, Paula
News OCR Text: Downtown Kent, which has been winding down its $100 million makeover, will probably start up the earthmovers again in the next couple of months.

A development officials refer to as "Building C" has one more paper hurdle before construction begins on the five-story structure which will feature 32 apartments and a new Bricco restaurant.

The Kent Architectural Review Board gave its approval last week, leaving only a final look by the Kent Planning Commission on Dec. 18.

If weather cooperates, ground could be broken in January, Kent Economic Development Director Dan Smith said.

The "somewhat upscale" apartments in Building C and four more on the upper floors of Acorn Corner -- the former historic hotel currently being renovated -- will be the only housing units downtown, Smith said.

"We think there is an incredible amount of interest in living in the new district because of the amount of amenities," Smith said.

Downtown has added more than a dozen new restaurants to downtown in the past few years, as well as new retailers. The city has demolished and rebuilt entire downtown blocks.

Building C will sit on DePeyster Street, directly across from the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center and diagonal to the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's new transit center. It will be managed by Fairmount Properties, the private company that developed the new retail and office spaces on South Water Street.

Smith said Bricco has already signed a lease for the 7,000-square-foot ground floor.

The apartments above it will be one- and two-bedroom units that are "not traditional student housing," Smith said. "It shouldn't be hard to attract tenants.''

The goal is to finish the lower floor for Bricco by next fall and open the apartments in the spring of 2014.

Meanwhile, Acorn Corner expects the restaurant Buffalo Wild Wings to open on its lower floor in March, with apartments ready soon after, Smith said.

Having people staying downtown -- both living in the apartments and visiting at KSU's hotel -- will complete a synergy that officials have envisioned. Residential units support businesses, and quality businesses support the desire for housing.

"There are many pieces to the puzzle and they are all interconnected and feed off each other," Smith said.

The city has one more piece of property it hopes to develop downtown, at the corner of Haymaker and Depeyster streets. Smith envisions a mix of office and retail, but no plans have been made.

"We're still having conversations and entertaining a variety of uses for that," he said.

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News Headline: Kent State to Raze 10 More Houses for Esplanade | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Properties all owned by university

Esplanade Extension to Downtown Kent

Kent State University is getting ready to demolish 10 more houses in the neighborhood west of campus for construction of the Esplanade.

The Kent Community Development Department issued 10 demolition permits to the university this month for structures at the following addresses: 122 S. Lincoln St.; 128 S. Lincoln St.; 117 S. Willow St.; 123 S. Willow St.; 129 S. Willow St.; 205 S. Willow St.; 209 S. Willow St.; 210 S. Willow St.; 230 S. Willow St.; and 329 E. College Ave.

Lockhart Companies, of Akron, OH, will handle the demolition of all 10 structures.

Some of the properties have already been completely or partially demolished.

A fire almost completely destroyed the house at 128 S. Lincoln St. in November. And 128 S. Lincoln St. is where the historic May H. Prentice house stood until it was moved to avoid demolition in February.

The remaining structures are among the 41 properties bought by Kent State to extend the Esplanade, the on-campus leg of The Portage Hike and Bike Trail, into downtown Kent.

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News Headline: Wild turkey kill declines over last year | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald - Online
Contact Name: Dick Martin News Journal
News OCR Text: Hunters harvested 1,338 wild turkeys during the recent fall season. This year’s total is a 2.5 percent decline over last year’s kill of 1,372 wild turkeys.

“Wild turkey hunting is a challenging activity that thousands of hunters enjoy year after year,” said ODNR Director James Zehringer. “Ohio’s wild turkey population remains strong and we appreciate those hunters who participated this year.”

The top counties for fall wild turkey success were Ashtabula (61), Coshocton (56), Geauga and Tuscarawas (53 each). Richland County hunters killed 37, Ashland 22, and Knox 46.

• According to a recent article in “Ohio Outdoor News,” cougars are, without a doub,t moving east from their western strongholds. Whether we like it or not, they may eventually become residents in Ohio.

Recently, the Michigan Wildlife Conservancy released a trail cam photo of a mountain lion seen on private property in southern Marquette County. The Michigan DNR confirmed the photo was authentic.

That marks the 15th time state wildlife biologists have confirmed the presence of a mountain lion in Michigan.

• Lake Erie’s walleye hatch was again lower than expected. This year’s hatch was calculated to be 2 fish per hectare, higher than last year’s 1.76 per hectare, but far short of 2010’s hatch of 7.28 per hectare.

An average hatch in recent years has produced nine walleye per hectare, which provides about nine million catchable walleye two years later. Natural and fishing mortality removes about one third of the fish from each year’s hatch.

Yellow perch had a poor year, too, producing a hatch of 23 fish per hectare, about two thirds fewer than the average of 70 fish per hectare. There was better success in the Central Basin, so anglers might want to direct their fishing activity from Fairport to Conneaut in future years.

• Area walleye anglers are invited to the next meeting of the Mid-Ohio Walleye Club, which will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at Gorman Nature Center. The speaker will be Scott Stercker, founder of the Reef Runner Company, who will discuss walleye, lures and the best ways to fish for this fine game fish.

For more information, call Mike Gibson at 419-524-6453.

• Readers might enjoy a new book, “Poachers Were My Prey: Eighteen Years as an Undercover Wildlife Officer.” The book records the adventures of R.T. Stewart as told to outdoor writer Chip Gross.

The book was published by Kent State University Press and is available from Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com for $13.57.

• Hurricane Sandy again proved the importance of electricity for home owners. New emergencies could happen anytime, and could come in the form of blizzards or ice storms that knock down trees and destroy power lines.

Enviro-Log, Inc. recommends home owners have an emergency kit on hand this winter that contains aS gallon of water per person for 10 days, a 10-day supply of non-perishable food, a battery powered or hand-cranked NOAA weather radio, flashlight and extra batteries, a lighter for starting fires, candles, and a first-aid kit.

These items may never be needed, but disasters seem to happen more often these days.

Dick Martin is a retired biology teacher from Shelby who has written an outdoor column for more than 20 years. He can be reached at richmart@neo.rr.com.

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News Headline: Wild turkey kill declines over last year | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Lancaster Eagle-Gazette - Online
Contact Name: Dick Martin Telegraph
News OCR Text: Hunters harvested 1,338 wild turkeys during the recent fall season. This year’s total is a 2.5 percent decline over last year’s kill of 1,372 wild turkeys.

“Wild turkey hunting is a challenging activity that thousands of hunters enjoy year after year,” said ODNR Director James Zehringer. “Ohio’s wild turkey population remains strong and we appreciate those hunters who participated this year.”

The top counties for fall wild turkey success were Ashtabula (61), Coshocton (56), Geauga and Tuscarawas (53 each). Richland County hunters killed 37, Ashland 22, and Knox 46.

• According to a recent article in the Ohio Outdoor News, cougars are without a doubt moving east from their western strongholds. Whether we like it or not, they may eventually become a resident of Ohio.

Recently, the Michigan Wildlife Conservancy released a trail cam photo of a lion seen on private property in southern Marquette County. The Michigan DNR confirmed the photo was authentic.

That marks the 15th time state wildlife biologists have confirmed the presence of a mountain lion in Michigan.

• Lake Erie’s walleye hatch was again lower than expected. This year’s hatch was calculated to be 2 fish per hectare, higher than last year’s 1.76 per hectare, but far short of 2010’s hatch of 7.28 per hectare.

An average hatch in recent years has produced nine walleye per hectare, which provides about nine million catchable walleye two years later. Natural and fishing mortality removes about one third of the fish from each year’s hatch.

Yellow perch had a poor year too, producing a hatch of 23 fish per hectare, about two thirds fewer than the average of 70 fish per hectare. There was better success in the Central Basin, so anglers might want to direct their fishing activity from Fairport to Conneaut in future years.

• Area walleye anglers are invited to the next meeting of the Mid-Ohio Walleye Club which will be at 7 p.m. on Dec. 13 at the Gorman Nature Center. The speaker will be Scott Stercker, founder of the Reef Runner Company, who will discuss walleyes, lures, and best ways to fish for this fine game fish.

For more information, call Mike Gibson at 419-524-6453.

• Readers might enjoy a new book, Poachers Were My Prey: Eighteen Years as an Undercover Wildlife Officer. The book records the adventures of R.T. Stewart as told to outdoor writer Chip Gross.

The book was published by the Kent State University Press and is available from Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com for $13.57.

• Hurricane Sandy proved again the importance of electricity for home owners. New emergencies could happen anytime, whether they be blizzards or ice storms that knock down trees and destroy power lines.

Enviro-Log, Inc. recommends home owners have an emergency kit on hand this winter that contains one gallon of water per person for 10 days, a 10-day supply of non-perishable food, a battery powered or hand-cranked NOAA weather radio, flashlight and extra batteries, a lighter for starting fires, candles, and a first-aid kit.

These items may never be needed, but disasters seem to happen more often these days.

Dick Martin is a retired biology teacher from Shelby who has written an outdoor column for more than 20 years. He can be reached at richmart@neo.rr.com.

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News Headline: Wild turkey kill declines over last year | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fremont News Messenger - Online
Contact Name: Dick Martin News Journal
News OCR Text: Hunters harvested 1,338 wild turkeys during the recent fall season. This year’s total is a 2.5 percent decline over last year’s kill of 1,372 wild turkeys.

“Wild turkey hunting is a challenging activity that thousands of hunters enjoy year after year,” said ODNR Director James Zehringer. “Ohio’s wild turkey population remains strong and we appreciate those hunters who participated this year.”

The top counties for fall wild turkey success were Ashtabula (61), Coshocton (56), Geauga and Tuscarawas (53 each). Richland County hunters killed 37, Ashland 22, and Knox 46.

• According to a recent article in “Ohio Outdoor News,” cougars are, without a doub,t moving east from their western strongholds. Whether we like it or not, they may eventually become residents in Ohio.

Recently, the Michigan Wildlife Conservancy released a trail cam photo of a mountain lion seen on private property in southern Marquette County. The Michigan DNR confirmed the photo was authentic.

That marks the 15th time state wildlife biologists have confirmed the presence of a mountain lion in Michigan.

• Lake Erie’s walleye hatch was again lower than expected. This year’s hatch was calculated to be 2 fish per hectare, higher than last year’s 1.76 per hectare, but far short of 2010’s hatch of 7.28 per hectare.

An average hatch in recent years has produced nine walleye per hectare, which provides about nine million catchable walleye two years later. Natural and fishing mortality removes about one third of the fish from each year’s hatch.

Yellow perch had a poor year, too, producing a hatch of 23 fish per hectare, about two thirds fewer than the average of 70 fish per hectare. There was better success in the Central Basin, so anglers might want to direct their fishing activity from Fairport to Conneaut in future years.

• Area walleye anglers are invited to the next meeting of the Mid-Ohio Walleye Club, which will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at Gorman Nature Center. The speaker will be Scott Stercker, founder of the Reef Runner Company, who will discuss walleye, lures and the best ways to fish for this fine game fish.

For more information, call Mike Gibson at 419-524-6453.

• Readers might enjoy a new book, “Poachers Were My Prey: Eighteen Years as an Undercover Wildlife Officer.” The book records the adventures of R.T. Stewart as told to outdoor writer Chip Gross.

The book was published by Kent State University Press and is available from Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com for $13.57.

• Hurricane Sandy again proved the importance of electricity for home owners. New emergencies could happen anytime, and could come in the form of blizzards or ice storms that knock down trees and destroy power lines.

Enviro-Log, Inc. recommends home owners have an emergency kit on hand this winter that contains aS gallon of water per person for 10 days, a 10-day supply of non-perishable food, a battery powered or hand-cranked NOAA weather radio, flashlight and extra batteries, a lighter for starting fires, candles, and a first-aid kit.

These items may never be needed, but disasters seem to happen more often these days.

Dick Martin is a retired biology teacher from Shelby who has written an outdoor column for more than 20 years. He can be reached at richmart@neo.rr.com.

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