Report Overview:
Total Clips (11)
Athletics (2)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Geology (1)
Information Services (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications; LGBTQ (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Psychology (1)
Safety (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (2)
Dri Archer Earns ESPN Honor 12/11/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Busy time for Kent State University AD Joel Nielsen (Nielsen) 12/11/2012 al.com Text Attachment Email


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Kent Schools conducting community survey 12/11/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...been sent to a random sample of Kent community members. The Research and Evaluation Bureau at the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University is conducting the survey, which was mailed in late November. According to Superintendent Joe Giancola, "We need input from...


Geology (1)
1,500-Year Cycle Found in Arctic Atmospheric Pattern (Ortiz) 12/10/2012 Epoch Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Researchers take samples aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the Arctic. (Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University) A team of scientists supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) has identified for the first time a clear 1,500-year...


Information Services (1)
Protecting electronics from accidents (Bues) 12/10/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

... "My children have broken every iPad I have ever brought into the house, and I've had every single one replaced under accidental damage protection," Kent State Information Technology Manager Christopher Bues said. Bues looks for plans that offer accidental damage protection like SquareTrade,...


Journalism and Mass Communications; LGBTQ (1)
Gay Community Endowment Fund awards $26,900 to local LGBT programs 12/10/2012 Akronist Text Attachment Email

...broadcast anti-bullying messages on KIDJAM! radio in Akron Public Schools, $2,400 Fusion Magazine, for a marketing campaign that will expand the reach of Kent State University's award-winning, student-produced publication, which strives to unify people of different backgrounds and orientations, $3,000...


KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
Essay contest participation invited 12/10/2012 Weirton Daily Times - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...LIVERPOOL, Ohio - Area schools are invited to have their students enter the Martin Luther King/Coretta Scott King essay and illustration contest sponsored by Kent State University East Liverpool Campus Diversity Committee, English Department and dean and the East Liverpool-Wellsville NAACP. Those entering...


KSU at Stark (1)
Kent State University at Stark Advisory Board Welcomes Christopher White 12/10/2012 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark is proud to announce a new member on the campus Advisory Board. Christopher T. White, publisher of The Repository/GateHouse...


KSU Museum (1)
On With The Show 12/10/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...Life,” “Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works,” “Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques,” “Fandemonium” and “Fashion Timeline,” the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State campus off East Main Street in Kent.


Psychology (1)
Memory helps drive appetite 12/11/2012 Hamilton Spectator - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending “stop eating, I'm full” messages to the brain. A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better...


Safety (1)
Fight at Kent State Bus Stop 12/11/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Reported robbery led to scuffle Kent State University Police are investigating a fight and possible robbery that took place early Monday at a campus bus stop. Kent Police Lt....


News Headline: Dri Archer Earns ESPN Honor | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State kick returner was named to ESPN.com's 2012 All-America team.

Dri Archer continues to get national recognition.

One of Kent State football's top players was recently named to the ESPN.com 2012 All-America team as an all-purpose player.

"Arguably no FBS player reflects his team's nickname better than Archer, who with the ball in his hands, usually is gone in a flash for the Golden Flashes," writes ESPN's Adam Rittenburg.

Last week Archer was named to the Walter Camp All-America First Team as a kick returner, the first player to earn the honor in school history. He was also named MAC Special Teams Player of the Year.

In his junior season Archer had 15 kick returns this season for 573 yards and three touchdowns including a 98-yard return against Towson, a 99-yard return against Ball State and another 98-yard return at Eastern Michigan.

Archer and the Golden Flashes will play in Kent State's first bowl game in 40 years as they face Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Jan. 6.

Head coach Darrell Hazell will coach in that game even though he accepted the same position at Purdue University earlier this week.

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News Headline: Busy time for Kent State University AD Joel Nielsen (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: al.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MOBILE, Alabama -- Kent State athletics director Joel Nielsen is wearing a lot of hats these days. he is working on preparations for the Golden Flashes' Jan. 6 appearance in Mobile for the GoDaddy.com Bowl game against Arkansas State, while also looking for a replacement for head coach Darrell Hazell, who accepted the same position at Purdue recently.

Aside from that, there's the business of running the athletics department and all the other day-to-day duties that go along with the job. Recently, Nielsen visited Mobile for a GoDaddy.com Bowl press conference. During that stop, he took a few moments to speak with AL.com on how his job has changed, how the Kent State football program has changed the past couple of seasons and what's ahead.

Q: What will life be like for you for the next few weeks?

A: It will be a little hectic, obviously. We haven't had to prepare for a bowl for 40 years, so that's new to us. I brought on an individual to help us out with that. Also last week I lost my deputy athletic director - he took the athletic director's job at Georgia Southern - so I'm down some man hours I guess you could say in staff. But I brought an individual in to help with the bowl and he'll be my bowl manager and obviously I'll get some help with the search (for a new head coach).

So I obviously have two large projects going on here. One is an ending date unknown, but hopefully in the next few weeks, and the other on Jan.6. (All) that, and I'm still running an athletic department too. We still have other sports and 400 student-athletes and everything else that goes on. It will be a busy holiday season.

Q: What does it mean to be in a bowl after such a long time?

A: When I took the job two and a half years ago, they asked me what would it take to turn around football. That's not a short answer. If anybody really knows they wouldn't be doing my job, they'd be a consultant and making millions of dollars. We just starting working on things and putting things together. Obviously, it was important to put the right staff together and we hired the right head coach obviously and his staff. We funded them better. We really invested in people. We fund-raised - we're up to $3 million just in football in the last two years. We shoved that all in salaries and for our people because we feel you win with people first.

I lean heavily on some of our alums and people who are close to the program, including Don James, Lou Holtz, Nick Saban - who people know around this area - and Gary Pinkel. We have some great people out there that I can call on and to a man they have all said, 'This is kind of how we put it together.' We can't do it quite as quickly as at some of those larger places, but as I said, we went out and raised quite a bit of money and sunk it into staff and hired the right guys. That's my goal now obviously, is to find that next guy who can now build upon the idea that we can get it done. We've now proven that. So there's a little bit more of a foundation and the interest level has been quite high, I can tell you that.

Q: How has the job search changed since the last time?

A: There has been a lot of difference, from the standpoint that people understand now that we can get it done at Kent State. That the MAC is such a difficult league - the bandwidth is quite small; everybody has the same resources available, we all play with a lot of the same student-athletes. So it really is a coaching league. That's why you see so many coaches move out of the MAC and go on to have a lot of success because they have proven they can Q: coach in the MAC because it's such a competitive league across the board and we've got some great examples out there. Both of the coaches in the national championship game are MAC guys (Saban and Brian Kelly) and that's pretty special.

Q: Have you been surprised by the interest shown in the Kent State head coaching vacancy?

A: I think even last time we were doing a search you had a couple of those wow moments every now and then where you said, 'Wow, are they really interested?' But I think our pool might be a little deeper. I think we have just as much quality as the last time, I think it's just deeper. Where if I had a top six last time I might have a top 12 this time.

Q: Your school had a shot at a BCS bowl berth. What was that like and how tough was it when that opportunity didn't materialize?

A: Last week ... I spent the whole week preparing for what if it's the Orange Bowl. It's such a larger event, I guess you could say, so we spent the whole week on that. We had a pretty good idea that if we took care of business in Detroit (in the MAC Championship Game) we would be in (the BCS Orange Bowl). We're so happy that Northern (Illinois) made it. It means a lot to our league. Obviously it means a lot to the reputation of our league and if we couldn't be there I'm glad they're there.

It was really hard last week to lose - it's hard anything to lose the championship - but boy it's hard to lose in double overtime when you realize the stakes from a win. I was with these guys for probably an hour in the locker room afterward and that's a tough part of our business. We have a lot of highs and sometimes we have some really low lows. That was a tough one. But these guys will rally.

I think it helps that we have coach Hazell and his staff at the game. We will have our coach and our coaching staff here for the game. I don't know if it's an advantage for us over what Arkansas State has (Gus Malzahn will not coach in the game), but I know it's great thing for our team because he has so much respect from our team and our community and our university. There was an outpouring from our fans and our community that if we had the chance to have coach Hazell at our bowl that they wanted me to make the right decision.

And I give Purdue a lot of credit too, that they would allow him to really work dual roles here for about a month and allow us to have that for our student-athletes. Because that was really important to them. I talked to the team and I talked to the captains and it was really important to have that staff involved.

Q: When was the moment you noticed when things flipped, that the turnaround had taken place for the football program?

A: It was last year. I kind of felt it swing obviously when we hired coach Hazell because I could see it change right away. But we opened up last year 1-6 (that one win was a 33-25 victory over South Alabama) and then we won four out of our last five games. Then we roll into this year and go 11-1. It was really after that 1-6 start that we had a bye week and (Hazell) moved some offensive linemen around. He and I talked about it the other night when he told me about the Purdue opportunity. It obviously was that transition and we've never looked back since. Now we've just got to find the guy to keep it rolling.

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News Headline: Kent Schools conducting community survey | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In order to gather information for a new Five-Year Strategic Plan for the Kent City Schools, a survey has been sent to a random sample of Kent community members.

The Research and Evaluation Bureau at the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University is conducting the survey, which was mailed in late November.

According to Superintendent Joe Giancola, "We need input from our community members about a number of issues so that our next Five-Year Strategic Plan accurately reflects the important programs and initiatives our district must address. Survey topics include curriculum and instruction, school safety, technology and facilities, as well as district communication and finances."

Survey results will be presented to the Board of Education at its regular meeting at 7 p.m. on Jan. 15 at Holden Elementary.

A steering committee made up of Kent community and school members began meeting in September to begin preparations for the Five-Year Strategic Plan. All community members are invited to attend the two community forums, which will be scheduled later in 2013. The Five-Year Strategic Plan is expected to be completed by early fall.

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News Headline: 1,500-Year Cycle Found in Arctic Atmospheric Pattern (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Epoch Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Researchers take samples aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the Arctic. (Joseph Ortiz/Kent State University)

A team of scientists supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) has identified for the first time a clear 1,500-year cycle in the far North's surface atmosphere pressure pattern. Called the Arctic Oscillation (AO), the cycle greatly influences weather in the Northern Hemisphere.

Lead researcher Dennis Darby, a geological oceanographer at Virginia's Old Dominion University, used the findings to describe a worst-case scenario in which the cyclical pressure pattern could combine with man-made climate change to exacerbate severe weather and flooding trends.

The findings were published Nov. 11 on Nature Geoscience's website. Darby coauthored the paper with a team of scientists from Old Dominion and Kent State universities and the University of Southern California (USC).

Coauthors are Joseph Ortiz, a geological oceanographer from Kent State; Chester Grosch, a physical oceanographer and computer scientist from ODU and Steven Lund, a geophysicist from USC.

William Wiseman, a program director in the Arctic Natural Sciences Program in NSF's Office of Polar Programs, said the new research is innovative in its approach to separating human influences on climate from naturally occurring events.

“Separating the effects of human contributions to climate variability from those due to natural variability is never easy,” he said. “Darby and his colleagues, using clever analyses of sediment data, have noted an important long-term variation in sediment transport that is consistent with variability in the Arctic climate on similar time scales. This work adds one more piece of information to our understanding of a very complex system.”

Working from a 20-meter-long sediment core raised offshore of Alaska from waters 1,300 meters deep, the researchers could detect varying amounts of iron-rich sand grains ice-rafted from Russia over the last 8,000 years. The core was originally recovered from the flank of Barrow Canyon by an NSF-funded oceanographic cruise on which researchers Lloyd Keigwin, Julie Brigham-Grette and Neil Driscoll were co-investigators.

Darby and his colleagues were able to show through geochemical analysis that some of these Russian grains came from the Kara Sea, which is off the northern Russia landmass east of the northern tip of Finland. This is more than 3,000 miles from the core sample site, and the authors say Kara iron grains could have only arrived at the Alaskan coast by drifting in ice. Furthermore, the ice floes would only move from the Kara to offshore Alaska during strong positive AO conditions.

When the AO index is positive, surface pressure is low in the polar region. This helps the mid-latitude jet stream blow strongly and consistently from west to east, thus keeping cold Arctic air locked in the polar region. When the AO index is negative, there tends to be high pressure in the polar region, weaker zonal winds and greater movement of frigid polar air into the populated areas of the middle latitudes.

Measurements taken by instruments in modern times clearly show relatively short-term fluctuations in the AO, with profound impacts on weather and climate. “But how the AO varies during the Holocene (roughly the last 12,000 years) is not well understood,” the authors write in Nature Geoscience.

Darby said that time-series analysis of the researchers' geochemical record reveals a 1,500-year cycle that is similar to what other researchers have proposed in recent decades, based on scattered findings in paleoclimate records. But he and his colleagues are the first to find a high-resolution indicator of the Arctic record that resolves multidecadal-through-millennial-scale AO cycles, he said.

“Our record is the longest record to date to reconstruct the AO and documents that there is millennial scale variability in the AO,” Ortiz said. “The sedimentation rate at our site is also sufficient to statistically differentiate between a 1,000-year cycle and a 1,500-year cycle, which helps us to understand the dynamics of the response of the climate system to external forcing during the Holocene geological period.”

The 1,500-year cycle is distinct from a 1,000-year cycle found in a similarly analyzed record of total solar irradiance, the authors write, suggesting that the longer cycle arises from either internal oscillation of the climate system or as an indirect response to low-latitude solar forcing.

“The AO can remain in a rather strong negative or positive mode for many decades,” the research team writes in the Nature Geoscience article. “When it is positive as suggested by the upswing in the Kara series during the last 200 years, then the additional warmth due to the entrapped Arctic cold air masses during winters could exacerbate the mid-latitude signature of anthropogenic global warming resulting from increased atmospheric carbon dioxide. When the AO is strongly negative as seen in the winters of 2009-11, the Northern Hemisphere experiences prolonged intervals of colder than normal conditions. Because the maximum amplitudes of the AO as recorded in the Kara (iron) grain record in recent decades is less than a third of the amplitude in the past, the full range of variability in the AO is not likely recorded in the instrumental records of the last few decades.”

Darby does his detective work by analyzing sediments, mostly from core samples that have been collected when researchers drill a hollow tube into the floor of the Arctic Ocean or nearby seas. The work is made possible by an iron-grain chemical fingerprinting technique he developed that enables him to determine the landmass where the grains originated. This provides evidence about winds and currents—and therefore the overall weather patterns—that brought the grain to its resting place.

Even if natural cycles are responsible for some recent warming trends, this doesn't let humans off the hook for polluting the atmosphere, Darby said. Human influence may combine with natural cycles to increase global warming.

Darby's research is not directly involved in weighing human contributions to climate change, such as increases in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere brought on by combustion.

“We're looking for natural conditions that are helping to cause this global warming and sea level rise,” Darby said. “There seems to be a natural pacing to climate change. If you don't know what changes are naturally occurring over the long haul, you don't know how to deal with conditions over the short term.”

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News Headline: Protecting electronics from accidents (Bues) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Protecting your electronic items from water, cracks, and other damage

CLEVELAND - How many times have you dropped your phone and hoped it wasn't broken? As we carry around more expensive devices, protection plans may be an option to consider. We look at whether it's worth the money.

We take our electronics everywhere: on vacation, to the kitchen, even to the bathroom. Make one mistake and your gadget is waterlogged or damaged in a second.

"It was on my lap. I was getting out of the car. It hit the ground. It cracked," Brandon Repp said of his phone. Luckily, Repp had a protection plan through Best Buy and got a replacement phone.

"It's better than what you get through the carriers," Repp explained.

For years, consumers have been advised against buying an extended warranty. So, are these protection plans different?

"My children have broken every iPad I have ever brought into the house, and I've had every single one replaced under accidental damage protection," Kent State Information Technology Manager Christopher Bues said.

Bues looks for plans that offer accidental damage protection like SquareTrade, an online company that sells protection plans. For a tablet or eReader valued at up to $500, the plan costs about $100.

Best Buy's plans vary based on the price of the tablet, but they're comparable.

"A lot of times they have coupons where you can save up to 30-percent off on the warranty," Bues said.

There are other electronic protection options like canopy and Apple care. Always be sure to read the fine print and be aware of deductibles.

If you don't want to buy a plan, consider buying a cover or case. For less than $50, you get another layer of protection for your electronic device.

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News Headline: Gay Community Endowment Fund awards $26,900 to local LGBT programs | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akronist
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Gay Community Endowment Fund of Akron Community Foundation awarded grants totaling $26,900 to nine greater Akron nonprofit organizations. Akron Community Foundation's board ratified this latest round of grants at its quarterly meeting Nov. 30.

Grants were awarded to programs that increase awareness about domestic violence and bullying in the LGBT community, including a $2,400 grant to install KIDJAM! radio in Akron Public Schools. Created by 91.3 The Summit, KIDJAM! promotes inclusion and respect among pre-teens through positive music and messaging.

Other grants will provide outreach to LGBT individuals and their families in greater Akron, including counseling for senior citizens and educational resources for parents and friends.

Since awarding its first grants in 2005, the Gay Community Endowment Fund has reinvested $183,438 into local nonprofit initiatives that promote the well-being and full inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender citizens in the greater Akron area.

To make a gift to the Gay Community Endowment Fund, visit www.akroncf.org/give/gcef.

The following grants were awarded this year:

Battered Women's Shelter, for a community outreach program that educates teens and adults about same-sex domestic violence, $1,500

Domestic Violence Project Inc., to provide emergency shelter for victims of same-sex domestic violence, $1,500

Fair Housing Contact Service Inc., to study housing discrimination against LGBT individuals in Akron, $4,000

Friends of 91.3, to broadcast anti-bullying messages on KIDJAM! radio in Akron Public Schools, $2,400

Fusion Magazine, for a marketing campaign that will expand the reach of Kent State University's award-winning, student-produced publication, which strives to unify people of different backgrounds and orientations, $3,000

Jewish Family Service of Akron Ohio, for counseling and support groups for LGBT senior citizens, $5,000

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Union, to send University of Akron students to the 2013 National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Creating Change Conference, $5,000

Akron Parents Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, to purchase educational materials that answer questions and provide support for the families and friends of LGBT individuals, $1,000

Weathervane Community Playhouse Inc., for the production of "Next Fall," a contemporary comedy about the issues that arise in the long-term relationships of gay men, $3,500

About the Gay Community Endowment Fund

Founded in 2001, the Gay Community Endowment Fund is a permanent philanthropic endowment of Akron Community Foundation. It facilitates and perpetuates philanthropy by supporting programs and services that support or positively impact the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community, as well as the entire greater Akron community. The fund has reinvested more than $183,000 in the community since its inception. Contributions of any amount are welcome and support future grant-making. Checks may be sent to the Gay Community Endowment Fund of Akron Community Foundation, 345 W. Cedar St., Akron, OH 44307-2407. For more information, call 330-376-8522 or visit www.gaycommunityfund.org.

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News Headline: Essay contest participation invited | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Weirton Daily Times - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio - Area schools are invited to have their students enter the Martin Luther King/Coretta Scott King essay and illustration contest sponsored by Kent State University East Liverpool Campus Diversity Committee, English Department and dean and the East Liverpool-Wellsville NAACP.

Those entering the contest should read a book that has won the American Library Association's Coretta Scott King Award and write an essay or create an artwork describing what the book, the struggle for equality and justice in America and the legacy of those who have worked for equality means to them. Those participating are encouraged to think about what is still needed to gain equity.

The essay should be at least five pages if handwritten or three pages typed, double-spaced, 1-inch margins and a 12-point font. An essay should include the name, grade, school, author's name and the book title on the first page of the essay. An artwork should have the name, grade, teacher, school, author and book title on the back.

Categories will include elementary, middle and high school. Entries must be sent to the campus, marked Attention: Patti Swartz, Kent State University East Liverpool Campus, 400 E. Fourth St., East Liverpool, OH 43920. Entries must be submitted by Jan. 16.

Prizes will be $50, $35 and $25 bookstore gift cards for first, second and third place in each category. Winners will be announced at the Martin Luther King Celebration Jan. 21 in East Liverpool.

For information, contact Swartz at (330) 397-5749 or pswartz@ kent.edu.

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News Headline: Kent State University at Stark Advisory Board Welcomes Christopher White | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark is proud to announce a new member on the campus Advisory Board. Christopher T. White, publisher of The Repository/GateHouse Ohio Media, recently joined the 14-member board, chaired by Dick Maggiore, the president and CEO of Innis Maggiore. The Kent State Stark Advisory Board assists in the development of resources that are necessary for the campus to carry out its educational mission, among other objectives.

As a GateHouse publisher, White oversees the operation of The Repository, The Independent and The Times-Reporter, along with three weekly publications, a magazine and associated digital editions. Prior to his June 2012 appointment as publisher, he held the position of The Repository's general manager and senior vice president of sales and marketing for GateHouse. From 1993 – 2007, White was employed by Community Newspaper Holdings Inc. (CNHI), serving in various positions, including publisher, advertising director and vice president of sales and marketing.

White earned his bachelor's degree from East Central University in Oklahoma, where he was a member of the Presidential Leadership Class. As an active member of the local community, White serves on the board of directors for the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce and Pathway Caring for Children, as well as volunteers in other area organizations.

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News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES

Currently — “Undress: Shaping Fashion and Private Life,” “Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works,” “Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques,” “Fandemonium” and “Fashion Timeline,” the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State campus off East Main Street in Kent.

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News Headline: Memory helps drive appetite | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hamilton Spectator - Online, The
Contact Name: Melissa Healy
News OCR Text: In a finding that makes clear that appetite is often a case of mind over matter, new research finds that the memory of a hearty recent meal can fill you up. But the memory of a stingy serving of victuals — even an inaccurate memory — can make you hungrier, and prompt heavier eating at the next meal, researchers found.

The study, published last week in the journal Public Library of Science One, used an ingenious trick to manipulate research subjects' memories of a lunchtime meal they had: At the bottom of a soup bowl filled with cream of tomato soup, they installed a hidden pump, which could be used to surreptitiously refill the bowl while the subject ate or draw down its contents.

The researchers wondered whether subjects tricked by such a manipulation would later remember the sight of the hefty 500-mL serving of soup they were asked to eat, or whether they would somehow register the punier 300-mL serving they actually ate. And they wondered whether, as dinnertime approached, the subjects' appetite would be driven by the actual lunch they had eaten or the more satisfying meal they thought they ate.

When asked how hungry they were as dinnertime approached, subjects' memories of the meal they saw — not the one they ate — seemed to be most influential. Even when their soup bowls were steadily drained, those who were seated in front of a large bowl of soup were less hungry. And those who were presented with a small bowl of soup pronounced themselves more hungry — even if researchers behind the scenes were steadily refilling their bowls.

The next day, the subjects' memory of the soup's ability to satisfy continued to be coloured by the memory formed on the previous day: Those who “saw” a big bowl of soup the day before declared a medium-sized bowl of soup likely to fill them up; those who had been presented a small bowl of soup (even one that was furtively refilled) were more likely to say it would not.

The link between mental function and obesity is a complex one, which researchers are just beginning to capture. Neurologists have long known that people whose memories of recent events have been impaired by stroke or injury will often eat one meal after another: Without the memory of a recent meal, they seem inattentive to the hormonal cues that are sending “stop eating, I'm full” messages to the brain.

A study by Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad recently found that among people who had underwent weight-loss surgery, those with better memory and executive function went on to lose more weight than those with poorer cognitive skills. Finally, researchers have noted that mindless or distracted eating — the intake of food that might result in a fuzzy memory — also seems to override the effect of the body's satiety signals.

A 2006 study found that when people ate what was described as a “meal,” they consumed fewer calories at the next meal than people who were given the same amount of food described as a “snack.”

Our beliefs about the food we eat — and our ability to remember what we eat and how much we eat — appear to influence our eating behaviour powerfully when we eat again. Too much distraction, too little attention, food presentation — such as large dishes that distort our assessment of portion size — can play havoc with our food memories. And eventually, this study suggests, with our waistlines.

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News Headline: Fight at Kent State Bus Stop | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Reported robbery led to scuffle

Kent State University Police are investigating a fight and possible robbery that took place early Monday at a campus bus stop.

Kent Police Lt. James Prusha said officers responded to a report of a fight at the bus stop across from Circle K on East Main Street near White Hall.

Prusha said one person claimed another involved in the scuffle claimed he was robbed.

"Our cops detained a couple of people," Prusha said.

The case was handed over to Kent State Police because the fight and reported robbery happened on campus.

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