Report Overview:
Total Clips (28)
Athletics (14)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; KSU Museum (3)
Higher Education; Mathematics; Research (1)
Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (1)
KSU at Ashtabula; KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Tuscarawas; Regional Academic Center (1)
KSU at Stark (4)
Students (4)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (14)
On his first day, Paul Haynes fits like a glove at Kent State (Nielsen) 12/19/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

New Kent State football coach Paul Haynes emotional in his return to Golden Flashes (Nielsen) 12/19/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State doesn't branch out from Jim Tressel tree to find Paul Haynes (Nielsen) 12/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Paul Haynes returns to alma mater in dream job as new Kent State football coach 12/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Kent State brings Paul Haynes back home (Lefton, Nielsen) 12/19/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Kent State alum Paul Haynes named new football head coach (Nielsen) 12/19/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Reports: Kent State to Name Football Coach (Lefton) 12/19/2012 Kent Patch Text Email

Paul Haynes Named Football Coach at Kent State 12/19/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

New coach Paul Haynes introduced as Kent State Golden Flashes football coach (Nielsen) 12/19/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Paul Haynes Named Kent State's Head Football Coach 12/19/2012 Fox 8 News at 10 PM - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

Kent State hires Paul Haynes as head football coach (Nielsen) 12/19/2012 19 Action News at 11 PM - WOIO-TV Text Attachment Email

Kent State hires Paul Haynes as head football coach 12/19/2012 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

AUDIO: KSU likely to raise the MAC salary standards with new football coach 12/19/2012 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

AUDIO: Kent State alum Paul Haynes is new football coach 12/19/2012 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design and Merchandising; KSU Museum (3)
Clothing from the heart: Garments, on display at Kent State Museum, reflect personal feelings (Druesedow, Ohrn) 12/19/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

...bodice with sequins made of Pepsi bottles. This dress and several other garments created by Öhrn-McDaniel, a Tallmadge resident, can be seen at the Kent State University Museum through Feb. 10. "She is just very inventive," said Jean Druesedow, museum director. "She challenges herself to use...

Clothing from the heart: Garments, on display at Kent State Museum, reflect personal feelings (Druesedow, Ohrn) 12/19/2012 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

...bodice with sequins made of Pepsi bottles. This dress and several other garments created by Öhrn-McDaniel, a Tallmadge resident, can be seen at the Kent State University Museum through Feb. 10. "She is just very inventive," said Jean Druesedow, museum director. "She challenges herself to use...

On With The Show 12/19/2012 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

...Life," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques," "Fandemonium" and "Fashion Timeline," the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State campus off East Main Street in Kent.


Higher Education; Mathematics; Research (1)
Kent State to Get State Funding for Internships 12/18/2012 Youngstown Business Journal Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University has been chosen to receive $724,553 in state funding to support workforce development strategies and enhance student success...


Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (1)
Kent State Hotel Sign Plan gets OK 12/19/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


KSU at Ashtabula; KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Tuscarawas; Regional Academic Center (1)
KSU Tusc keeps accreditation for nursing program (Lappin) 12/19/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

NEW PHILADELPHIA - Kent State University at Tuscarawas has received continued accreditation for the Associate of Applied Science in nursing degree program by the Ohio...


KSU at Stark (4)
'Fiscal cliff' fosters uncertainty among area businesses (Engelhardt) 12/19/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...negatively, especially if consumers cut back on spending to compensate for higher taxes, according to Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at Kent State Stark. "(Recession) is certainly possible. At the moment, the recovery is slow. It would be easy for us to reverse for a bit," Engelhardt...

Mayan calendar just the latest 'doomsday' sign (Harkness) 12/18/2012 Taunton Daily Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

...about the world's end. Why the fascination with doomsday? “I haven't the foggiest idea,” said John Harkness, an adjunct professor of sociology at Kent State University's Stark campus. “In Christianity, we've had a lot of these periods, particularly  in the 19th and 20th centuries. What's...

Mayan calendar just the latest 'doomsday' sign (Harkness) 12/18/2012 Evening Telegram - Online Text Attachment Email

...about the world's end. Why the fascination with doomsday? "I haven't the foggiest idea," said John Harkness, an adjunct professor of sociology at Kent State University's Stark campus. "In Christianity, we've had a lot of these periods, particularly  in the 19th and 20th centuries. What's...

Mayan calendar just the latest 'doomsday' sign (Harkness) 12/18/2012 Evening Times - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...about the world's end. Why the fascination with doomsday? "I haven't the foggiest idea," said John Harkness, an adjunct professor of sociology at Kent State University's Stark campus. "In Christianity, we've had a lot of these periods, particularly  in the 19th and 20th centuries. What's...


Students (4)
19-year-old dies in fall at former Atlantic Foundry 12/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State student dies as vacant Akron warehouse 12/19/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State student Adrienne Ryba dies in fall while trying to watch meteor shower 12/19/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Sharon Twp. woman, 19, falls, dies at abandoned warehouse 12/19/2012 Gazette, The Text Attachment Email


News Headline: On his first day, Paul Haynes fits like a glove at Kent State (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Joel Nielsen was feeling the pressure.

How could the Kent State athletic director replace Darrell Hazell? It took Hazell only two seasons to lead the Flashes to an 11-2 record and their first bowl appearance in 40 years. Along came Purdue with a six-year, $12 million contract -- and Nielsen had to find a new coach.

"We wanted someone like Darrell Hazell," he said. "We didn't want to change things very much, not after all the work it took to get us to this point."

The warm, fuzzy story line is new head coach Paul Haynes, a Kent State graduate ('92), and later a Flashes assistant under Dean Pees (1999-2000).

"He really, really wanted the job," said Nielsen.

At his first team meeting, Haynes was able to stand in front of the Kent State football players and say, "I wore these colors. I went through three coaches when I was here. I know how you are feeling."

Haynes oozes sincerity. When he talks about going from a 168-pound walk-on safety in 1987 to one of the top 10 tacklers in school history, you can understand why his voice cracks when insisting, "I wanted this [job] so badly, I dreamed about it."

But that wasn't the main reason Nielsen turned to Haynes. It's what Haynes calls "the same coaching tree."

Hazell and Haynes not only were assistants under Jim Tressel at Ohio State, they also have the same approach to coaching. They were on the same Buckeyes staff from 2005-10. When Nielsen was hunting for a coach two years ago, Hazell was Tressel's top assistant. Nielsen said Haynes was on his list during the 2010 head coach search. They even had an informal discussion about the job on the phone.

"I didn't want to have two guys from the same staff [for final interviews]," Nielsen said. "Everyone told me that Darrell was ready to be a head coach."

Nielsen said every athletic director should keep a mental list of candidates, because you never know when you'll need another football coach. Haynes, the defensive coordinator at Arkansas this season, quickly emerged as a prime candidate when Hazell moved up.

"There won't be a lot of changes, philosophy-wise." Haynes said. He mentioned seeing many of the same motivational signs he likes already in the Flashes' locker room.

Haynes makes sense in many ways. He played high school football at Columbus St. Francis De Sales. He recruited and coached in the Mid-American Conference for the Flashes, and then recruited in Ohio when with the Buckeyes. He knows the schools, the coaches, the players in this state.

"We want to pound Ohio [for recruits]," he said.

It also is impressive to hear him discuss how his recruiting won't stress the rating "stars" next to a player's name, but how the players perform on the field: "Watch the tape. The tape doesn't lie." That's the approach that works best in the MAC.

Haynes gave a bowl-caliber performance at his first news conference. His excitement was genuine as he talked about Kent State alumni all over the country now proudly wearing their Flashes shirts and caps as the team prepares for the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Jan. 6.

Nielsen said there is some risk when you hire someone who hasn't been a head coach before: "But he's prepared. He has the background and leadership skills that the job needs."

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News Headline: New Kent State football coach Paul Haynes emotional in his return to Golden Flashes (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Paul Haynes wore a broad smile Tuesday when he was introduced as Kent State's new football coach.

For all the men in the football coaching profession with Kent State on their r sum s -- college and NFL --Haynes is just the second asked to come back home and lead the charge.

The first was Jim Corrigall, who was given the unenviable task of salvaging the end of the Pete Cordelli era.

Through the years, Nick Saban, Perry Fewell, Jon Hoke, Gary Pinkel and Lou Holtz, to name just a few, have been passed over in favor of others to coach the Golden Flashes.

Until Darrell Hazell, who recently became the head coach at Purdue, most Kent coaches failed.

Now one of Kent's own is expected to keep the suddenly good times rolling after an 11-2 regular season, at the cost of $375,000 per year with up to $200,000 in incentives.

"That's exciting," KSU junior defensive lineman Roosevelt Nix said. "He obviously knows what the tradition was. And I'm sure he aspired to come into the new Kent State. I know he didn't like the feeling of losing here. So he'll want to keep this thing going."

Many of the former Kent players who stood in the back of a news conference years ago, scowling with arms folded, when Pinkel and Saban, in particular, were passed over, sat in the front row for Haynes' announcement.

"This is as good as it gets," former Kent quarterback Joe Dalpra said. "He's the same guy we played with, the same guy we loved. We couldn't be more happy."

Only Haynes himself topped their glee. A very short introduction to the team -- less than 10 minutes -- spoke volumes.

"Very emotional," Kent defensive back Luke Wollet said.

"He gathered it back," Athletic Director Joel Nielsen said. "But it took a moment, because I thought he was done."

Haynes, who called the past few days a whirlwind of interviews, said the fact the job was his sunk in when he met the team and told them: "I know what you've been through. I wore these colors."

"I was trying to be tough," Haynes said of his introduction, "but I couldn't hold it back. It all hit me."

While there are now six alums coaching at Kent, Nielsen said the push to get Haynes into the football fold was privately intensive. The former players and coaches he heard from on Haynes' behalf was stunning.

"I got enough emails from them," Nielsen said. "Some people were writing two- and three-page letters."

Haynes said he will not take part in Kent's preparations for the Jan. 6. GoDaddy.com Bowl, but he will attend as he will focus on getting a staff together.

Haynes was the 2012 defensive coordinator at Arkansas, after spending seven seasons as an Ohio State assistant coach under Jim Tressel and Luke Fickell -- the last year as co-defensive coordinator with the Buckeyes.

Haynes is a Columbus native who walked on at Kent State in 1987. During his career he played for three head coaches (Glen Mason, Dick Crum and Cordelli), which should give Haynes credibility in the KSU locker room, as many of the players he inherits will also be playing for their third head coach at Kent State: Doug Martin, Hazell and now Haynes.

Haynes led Kent in interceptions as a freshman with three. As a sophomore in 1988 he led the Flashes in tackles with 116. Haynes missed 1989 with a knee injury, but led Kent in tackles again in 1990 with 133. He finished his career as the seventh-leading tackler in KSU history with 440.

Haynes has coached in the Big Ten at OSU and Michigan State. He coached at Kent State under Dean Pees in 1999 as associate head coach, and coached one season in the NFL with the Jacksonville Jaguars.

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News Headline: Kent State doesn't branch out from Jim Tressel tree to find Paul Haynes (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Paul Haynes doesn't mind being mentioned in the same breath with Darrell Hazell, whom he coached with for six of his seven years at Ohio State.

Paul Haynes doesn't mind being a branch of the Jim Tressel tree.

“Those are two pretty successful people; I kind of like to be in that group,” Haynes said.

Haynes doesn't bend the brim of his cap like Hazell or keep a lid on his emotions like Tressel. That was evident during his time at the microphone Tuesday as Haynes, 43, was introduced as Kent State's football coach. The former KSU walk-on got choked up a couple of times when he recalled his playing days.

“I'm trying not to get emotional because I don't want my wife to see me cry yet,” Haynes said of Danita, seated to his right.

But Haynes' connections to Hazell and Tressel helped him realize a long-held dream of coaching at his alma mater. As director of athletics, Joel Nielsen sought a successor for Hazell, bound for Purdue after coaching 11-2 KSU in the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Jan. 6 and Nielsen wanted a seamless transition. He felt picking another coach with the same roots and the same beliefs as Hazell was the best way to get it.

“I felt at this point it wasn't the right thing to totally blow it up and start all over,” Nielsen said. “If we could do things that were consistent for these young men because we've got a lot of talent coming back and a lot of talent coming up. ... That was a big factor, whether it was Paul Haynes or someone else off that Tressel tree.

“There were multiple Tressel tree people that had interest and that we may have spoken with along the line.”

As painful as it is for the Golden Flashes and Kent State to lose Hazell, going back to that tree was a wise move by Nielsen. It wasn't just X's and O's that helped KSU set a school record for victories and go to its first bowl in 40 years. It was the values Hazell instilled and the rift among players he bridged.

Nielsen believes Haynes, the defensive coordinator at Arkansas last season, can do the same.

“I'm all about building men; I'm all about building relationships,” Haynes said. “If I build a great man, I'm going to put a great product on the field and I'm not going to do it vice versa. We're going to have goals academically, we're going to be out in the community, we're going to give back.

“I learned so much in those seven years with [Tressel] on how to do it and how to do it right. Everyone looks at the wins as just winning. There was a reason why we won. Not only did we win, we produced a lot of academic All-Americans. So I know it works and I believe in it. I said, ‘When I become a head coach, I'm going to model my program after this.' ”

Haynes spent 2005-2011 at Ohio State, coaching defensive backs until he was elevated to co-defensive coordinator in 2011 after Tressel's firing. He said he still has his seven Winner's Manuals, 400-page binders of inspirational stories, sayings and goals that Tressel gave to his players and coaches each season, presumably the last one finished before Tressel's Memorial Day 2011 departure. Haynes said he will continue the concept in some fashion at Kent State, just as Hazell did with a pyramid of 15 fundamentals he labeled “Kent State Football is About.''

“We're going to have the wheel of life,” Haynes said. “And these kids are going to understand that their purpose in life is more important than their goals in life.”

He and Hazell's philosophies are so much alike that Haynes said when he toured Kent State's facilities with Nielsen on Monday night, he saw quotes he loves already posted.

“I was like, ‘Man, that's my sign. That's the sign I'm going to put up. It's already up,' ” Haynes said.

But Haynes didn't just benefit from his connection to Tressel, he consulted his mentor at every step along the way. Since he first e-mailed Nielsen about the job when the national buzz about Hazell began after an Oct. 25 victory at nationally ranked Rutgers, Haynes jokingly said he has called Tressel “about 20 times a day.”

“I don't know how Jim Tressel gets work done, between all the coaches and all the players who call him daily,” Haynes said. “Every time some type of job has happened, some type of move, some type of decision I have to make, he's the first person I call.

“Tress has a unique way of giving his opinion, but making it seem like it's your opinion. He would give you advice and tell you kind of what he thinks, but at the end of it, you think that's what you think. The big thing he said was to be myself. I know what I'm doing. I know how to do it. Attack it and have fun.”

Nielsen was also calling Tressel, speaking to him twice about Haynes.

Asked what Tressel told him, Nielsen said, “He's a very classy and genuine person. Great family, and that's important in today's world, and recruiting Ohio. He said that's Paul's strength. He knows Ohio, high school coaches know him, they like him.”

Haynes wasn't as polished as Hazell, saying, “[O]K?” at times and patting his chest, especially when his news conference began.

“Maybe when I leave Kent State in 20 or 30 years I'll be good at this,” he said, conceding his nervousness.

If he continues Hazell's success, Haynes' tenure won't be nearly that long. But if Haynes follows the principles he learned under Tressel, he should be good at what matters most. And young Golden Flashes will be all the richer for it.

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News Headline: Paul Haynes returns to alma mater in dream job as new Kent State football coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: One big reason Kent State Athletic Director Joel Nielsen hired Paul Haynes to be the 21st Kent State football coach is simple: it's hard to tell where former coach Darrell Hazell ends and the new one in Haynes begins.

With both men having served as longtime Ohio State assistant coaches under Jim Tressel, their coaching upbringing has left a deep impression on the right way to run a winning program.

That explains why during Haynes' introductory news conference Tuesday, his passionate thoughts about the importance of “a coach's relationship with his players” and “how you win with people” were echoes of the same words Hazell spoke when he was introduced two years ago.

The similarity between the two should help the Golden Flashes to continue the program's move forward with an 11-2
season under Hazell.

“When you change coaches when you're 1-10, you want change,” Haynes, 43, said. “But you change coaches when you're winning, you don't want a lot of change.”

But there's another thing about Haynes that endeared him to Nielsen and will likely do the same to the entire school community: Haynes is the team's first football head coach who played and graduated from Kent State.

Haynes readily called the new position his “dream job” and yet was still a bit surprised by the emotion that washed over him Tuesday afternoon, beginning with his first team meeting.

“I actually got emotional when I talked to [the players] just because I have a lot of pride in this place and I love this place,” Haynes said. “I got emotional because I was in their shoes, I wore these colors. I sat in these meetings and I went through three coaches while I was here, so I know what they're going through.”

Haynes, who spent two seasons as an assistant coach at KSU in 1999-2000 under former coach Dean Pees, replayed the tale of how he walked on to the team as a freshman in 1987 before going on to play four seasons and finish his college career as the Flashes seventh leading tackler.

“I blew my knee out as a senior [at St. Francis DeSales High School in Columbus] and only played four games,” Haynes said. “There were other opportunities I was looking for, but they didn't happen. So I came to Kent State as a preferred walk on and coach [Glen Mason] told me if I did a good job, I could earn a scholarship. Then a couple of guys got hurt and I ended up starting the first game of my freshman year. The last day of camp coach brought me into his office and offered me a scholarship.”

Now 25 years later, Haynes returns to his alma mater for a third turn, this time having agreed to a five-year contract with a $375,000 base salary and additional incentives still to be worked out. Nielsen said the Flashes assistant coaching pool would remain in the current $850,000 range.

“Paul's been a defensive coordinator in the SEC and the Big Ten along with working in the Big East and the MAC,” Nielsen said. “His experience as a coach and a recruiter, plus his knowledge of Ohio and along with his relationships with Ohio high school coaches, put Paul Haynes at the top of my list.”

In 2010 Haynes was with Hazell at Ohio State when Hazell first interviewed at Kent State.

“Of course you sit there at the time and say, ‘alright, let me go after it,' ” Haynes said. “But truly do I think I was ready? I don't know [if I was] at that time. I'm a Christian guy and I truly believe that God will put me where he wants me. Timing is everything and this is a perfect time for me now.”

Haynes knows replacing Hazell, who is the new coach at Purdue, won't be easy even coming off a season with the first bowl appearance in 40 years.

“I know it's going to be a hard job, but everybody thinks it's going to go back [to struggling like in previous years],” Haynes said. “They're sitting there saying, ‘Ah, this is a fluke. This ain't going to continue to happen.' But it is going to happen and it is going to continue. The reason I think it is because Darrell laid a great foundation and we will continue to build on that. These kids believe and we will continue to recruit kids who believe in Kent State.”

After meeting with Haynes, some of the players took to Twitter to voice positive opinions.

“Very impressed with coach Haynes. Looking forward to playing for him,” tweeted junior offensive lineman Patrick McShane.

“That went very well. I was super impressed!! Excited for the future,” tweeted freshman place kicker Brad Miller.

Despite Hazell and Haynes previous ties, the pair is going to great lengths to make sure they don't step on the other's toes in the coming weeks. Hazell politely declined to attend the news conference. Haynes later said he planned to stay away from team and practice until after its participation in the Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com bowl.

“To me, it's a respect thing,” Haynes said. “[Hazell and his staff] started this and I don't want the paper writing about me. I want them writing about him and the team because I have nothing to do with them getting to this bowl game. I want them to finish the right way and I don't want to be in the way.”

Haynes, who spent last season as the defensive coordinator/secondary coach at Arkansas, concede that it could take a few days before he comes back to earth.

“It might take me a little while to grasp that I'm the coach at Kent State, because this has been a dream of mine,” he said. “When I got into the profession, being the head coach of Kent State was one of my goals. And now my goal has been accomplished — and I still can't believe it.”

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News Headline: VIDEO: Kent State brings Paul Haynes back home (Lefton, Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When it comes to choosing head coaches, Kent State's football program has paid dearly for overlooking its own in the past.

Every loyal Golden Flashes follower will tell you the stories of Nick Saban and Gary Pinkel, members of the program's only Mid-American Conference championship team in 1972, who both clamored to become the leader of their alma mater back when their coaching careers were just beginning to bud.

Both of those men went on to become extremely successful head coaches, starting at MAC rival Toledo, while Kent State's football program crashed and burned after head coach Glen Mason was lured away by the University of Kansas following the 1987 season.

That's why the Flashes' faithful are especially fired up about the hiring of Paul Haynes.

Haynes was officially named head coach at Kent State on Tuesday, returning to his alma mater 25 years after he first joined the Golden Flashes football program as a preferred walk-on. He wound up receiving a scholarship before the first game of his freshman season in 1987, which he started at defensive back.

Haynes, known as ‘Ice' during his playing days, went on to become a four-year starter and led the team in tackles as a sophomore and junior. He finished his career as Kent State's seventh-leading tackler with 440 stops.

Eight of Haynes' former KSU teammates attended Tuesday's news conference: Andy Logan, Jamie Howell, Chip Curtis, Brien Naylon, Fermin Olivera, Ray Carroscia, Greg Wagner and Joe Dalpra. They spearheaded an onslaught of emails and Facebook posts directed at the KSU administration calling for the braintrust to choose one of their own this time around.

“Those guys are really high on (Haynes). They really like the man,” said Flashes Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen.

Haynes was well aware of all the support he was receiving.

“When I emailed Mr. Nielsen that I was interested in this job, two of (his KSU teammates) called me and asked if I was interested in it. Then the floodgates opened,” said Haynes. “I was waiting to pull that out of my pocket with Joel, that it's time to hire an alum. We passed on some other good ones.”

Nielsen wasn't around when those decisions were made, but he's well aware of what transpired.

“You're going back to Pinkel and Saban and some of those stories that we've all heard,” he said. “Those particular (decisions) didn't have any impact on hiring Paul, but what did have an impact was that you could tell he really wanted the job. He would have probably gotten this job without being an alum, but that was that extra ingredient, that sprinkle on top.”

With the hiring of Haynes, following a record-setting 2012 season, a long-divided Kent State football program may at last become united under a leader its faithful know and love. Then those past decisions, and all the losses that followed, can also finally be put to rest.

“We're dusting all of our Kent State stuff off now cause we're proud to wear it,” said Haynes. “People all over the country now are wearing their Kent State stuff with pride. And that's what I see coming back here, all the pride that this university has now.”

HAYNES' MENTORS

Former Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel headed the list of former mentors Haynes mentioned that have impacted him the most.

“There are a lot of coaches that have impacted me. First and foremost is Jim Tressel,” said Haynes, who served as an assistant under Tressel from 2005-10. “I've called him about 20 times a day. Every time some type of job has happened, some type of move has happened, some type of decision that I have to make, he's the first person I call.

“Also Dean Pees, Perry Fewell, Jon Hoke, John L. Smith, my high school coach Tony Pusateri, and also Stan Jefferson at Ohio State. All these guys have mentored me either has a coach or as a player to really teach me what coaching is about. It's about relationships with players. That's what I'm about.”

ARCHER UNCERTAIN ABOUT FUTURE

Kent State star speedster Dri Archer is still mulling whether to leave school after his junior season and enter the NFL Draft.

“I've been thinking about that for awhile. I get questions every day about it,” said Archer. “When I go home over break, I'll sit down with my mom and we'll talk about it. But I haven't really made a decision. You've gotta do what you've gotta do, but coach Hazell leaving definitely played a big part in it. If he would have stayed, my decision would have been a whole lot easier. Now we'll see what happens.”

Archer and the rest of the Flashes' returning upperclassmen will play for their third head coach at Kent State after Haynes takes over.

“I was sitting in my bed thinking about that last night,” said Archer. “It's pretty difficult. You've gotta get used to a whole (different) coaching staff, another (head) coach. It's the third coach since I've been here, so I've gotta build that relationship with him now. It's just hard. But it's a business.”

Ironically, Haynes also played for three coaches while he was at Kent State.

“I got emotional (during a team meeting before the news conference), cause I was in their shoes. I went through three coaches,” said Haynes. “I know what they're going through. They're sitting there wondering about who I am.”

STAFF DECISIONS

Haynes is familiar with many members of Kent State's current staff. Defensive coordinator Jon Heacock's brother Jim was on the Ohio State staff along with Haynes and Hazell.

“I will not hire anyone until I talk with this previous staff and give them a chance to interview with me,” said Haynes. “I know a lot of them. The job that they have done here, the respect that I have for them, I think I owe it to them first before I do anything else.”

KEEPING HIS DISTANCE

Hazell said on Tuesday that he didn't mind if Haynes attended practices leading up to the bowl game. However, Haynes said he plans to stay away.

“I'm not gonna screw it up,” said Haynes. “Out of respect to this staff and coach Hazell, they've done a great job this year and they need to finish it out. I watched Kent State every week. I know the names of these guys, just cause I'm a Kent Stater.”

Haynes did say he will attend the bowl game.

“I'll watch from the stands,” said Haynes. “Not from the sideline.”

Please click on link for video:
http://www.recordpub.com/sports/2012/12/19/kent-state-brings-paul-haynes-back-home

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News Headline: VIDEO: Kent State alum Paul Haynes named new football head coach (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Only one candidate to become Kent State University's next football coach can look fans squarely in the eye and declare that leading the Golden Flashes program is his “dream job.”

That man, Paul Haynes, saw that dream become reality when he was officially introduced as Kent State's 21st head football coach during a news conference Tuesday afternoon in the Governance Chambers at the Kent Student Center.

“I don't have words for it. I really haven't landed yet,” said Haynes, a 1992 KSU grad and former walk-on, who wound up starting four years at defensive back for the Golden Flashes from 1987-91. He also served as an assistant coach at KSU from 1999-2000. “It's gonna take me awhile to really grasp that I'm the head coach at Kent State, just because it's been a dream of mine. When I got into this profession, being the head coach at Kent State was one of my goals, and now that goal has been accomplished.

“I still can't believe it. But I'm excited about it, and I'm looking forward to doing a good job with it. I love this place. I love Kent State.”

The 43-year-old Haynes was presented with the No. 20 jersey he wore while playing for the Flashes after agreeing to a five-year contract worth $375,000 per season plus incentives, which are still being negotiated. His salary ranks in the middle of the pack among other Mid-American Conference football coaches. His predecessor, Darrell Hazell, was the lowest-paid coach in the MAC at $300,000 per season.

Haynes replaces Hazell, who accepted a six-year, $12 million offer to become head coach at Purdue University on Dec. 5 after leading the Golden Flashes to a school-record 11 wins and a MAC East Division championship in 2012 — its first title of any kind since 1972. Kent State also earned its first bowl bid since that same season, and will take on Sun Belt Conference champion Arkansas State (9-3) in the GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala. on Jan. 6.

When the search for Hazell's replacement began two weeks ago, Golden Flashes Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen said he'd “never find another Hazell.” But he's come about as close as possible by selecting Haynes, who served as an assistant coach at Ohio State, alongside Hazell under head coach Jim Tressel from 2005-10.

“Right now, the key to this program is consistency. And I think that's why Mr. Nielsen looked at me, because he knows that coach Hazell and I have a lot of the same philosophies,” said Haynes. “It has to do with these young men and the relationships with these (players). I think what these guys want to hear is that there aren't gonna be a lot of changes, and that's what I told them. We're gonna continue to move forward with my little bit of flavor.”

Hazell will coach the Flashes through the bowl game before giving way to Haynes, a Columbus native who spent the 2012 season as the defensive coordinator at Arkansas. He was the only candidate interviewed on campus.

Haynes and his wife Danita have three children: Daughters Jordyn and Kennedy Rose, and son Tarron.

Please click on link for video:
http://www.recordpub.com/news%20local/2012/12/19/kent-state-alum-paul-haynes-named-new-football-head-coach

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News Headline: Reports: Kent State to Name Football Coach (Lefton) | Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Former Golden Flash to take helm of 2012 MAC Championship runner-up

Multiple media outlets are reporting that former Golden Flashes player and Arkansas defensive coordinator Paul Haynes will be named the new head coach of the Kent State University football team.

ESPN, Fox 8 and Ohio.com reported Haynes will take over for Darrell Hazell, who announced this month he would be leaving Kent State for the top football job at Purdue for a reported $2 million salary — twice that of his predecessor.

A press conference is scheduled for 2:30 p.m. today to announce the news.

Haynes also previously served as an assistant head coach for Kent State.

The rush to find Hazell's replacement should come as no surprise.

Kent State President Lester Lefton told university trustees last week the administration was already interviewing potential candidates for the job.

"We will hire a coach sooner rather than later," Lefton said Wednesday.

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News Headline: Paul Haynes Named Football Coach at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Former Golden Flashes assistant coach and alumni will replace Darrell Hazell

Kent State University announced Tuesday that former assistant coach and alumni Paul Haynes will take over as head football coach following Darrell Hazell's departuer for Purdue.

Haynes, who played for Kent State 25 years ago, also worked as an assistant coach in 1999 and 2000 before moving on to Ohio State University and then Arkansas before coming back to Kent, according to Kent State Athletics.

Hazell announced this month he would be leaving Kent State for the top football job at Purdue for a reported $2 million salary.

Haynes said during a press conference Tuesday that he planned to let Hazell coach the Golden Flashes during their upcoming Jan. 6 appearance in the GoDaddy.com Bowl against Arkansas State, WKSU reported.

"They've done a great job this year," Haynes said, according to WKSU. "They need to finish it out."

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News Headline: New coach Paul Haynes introduced as Kent State Golden Flashes football coach (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Paul Haynes is right back where he was a skinny walk-on some 25 years ago.

Now, he's in charge of the program he loves so much, and has been given the task of keeping Kent State moving forward.

It won't be easy.

Haynes was formally announced as the new coach of the Golden Flashes on Tuesday, and immediately displayed a vibrancy equal of his popular predecessor, Darrell Hazell. He's going to need it. Not only did Hazell, who left for Purdue, establish a winning culture here, he led the program to the AP poll as well as a bowl berth.

"When I got into this profession, one of my goals was to be the coach at Kent State," said Haynes, who played here as a 168-pound defensive back in 1987-91. He was defensive coordinator at Arkansas this year after seven seasons as an assistant at Ohio State. "I can't believe it. It's a dream and I haven't landed yet. It's been a whirlwind. The last 48 hours have been crazy.

"But I'm ready."

Haynes, 43, will step aside so that Hazell, who became coach of the Boilermakers on Dec. 5, can guide the No. 25 Golden Flashes (11-2) to their first bowl game in 40 years. Kent State will meet Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Jan. 6.

"I probably won't even go to a practice. I don't want to screw it up," Haynes joked. "I respect Coach Hazell and his staff. They need to finish it out. They've done a great job."

Athletic director Joel Nielsen said Haynes was signed to a 5 1/2-year contract at $375,000 annually. Haynes also was an assistant at Michigan State, Louisville, Northern Iowa, Ferris State and Bowling Green.

Haynes and Hazell share similar football philosophies. Hazell's Golden Flashes found success with a strong running game. Haynes, who served with Hazell on Jim Tressel's staff with the Buckeyes, sees no reason to change.

"They have laid the foundation," Haynes said. "On offense, I believe in running the ball and not turning it over. Defensively, it is stop the run and create turnovers."

Nielsen interviewed several candidates, but said Haynes was clearly the best choice.

"His leadership quality kept coming out," Nielsen said. "We talked with Coach Tressel and many others. They all said he was ready. We talked to Paul two years ago when we hired Darrell. We thought Darrell was a little more ready then.

"Now, Paul has done the same. He really wanted this job. We're happy to have him."

Haynes intends to recruit heavily in Ohio, and will place academics on par with winning.

"First, I want to graduate all players with a meaningful degree," he said. "And I want to win. Everybody wants to win. I'm not going to sacrifice integrity to do it."

Kent State went 8-0 in the Mid-American Conference this season, but lost the league title game to then-No. 21 Northern Illinois, 44-37. One of the season's memorable moments, was an impressive 35-23 road win at then-No. 15 Rutgers on Oct. 27.

"I'm a little nervous addressing everyone today, but maybe when I leave Kent State in 20 or 30 years, I'll be good at this," he said. "I have a lot of Kent State pride. I love it here."

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News Headline: Paul Haynes Named Kent State's Head Football Coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 News at 10 PM - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT– Paul Haynes has been named Kent State University's new head football coach.

The announcement was made during a press conference Tuesday afternoon.

The one-time Kent State assistant coach spent two seasons in Kent, ‘99 and ‘00 when he was the assistant head coach and led the secondary.

Haynes also spent six seasons as defensive backs' coach with the Buckeyes, and in 2011 he was the co-defensive coordinator and coached the safeties.

Haynes will replace Darrell Hazell who left the University to become the new football coach at Purdue University.

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News Headline: Kent State hires Paul Haynes as head football coach (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: 19 Action News at 11 PM - WOIO-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent (WOIO) - Kent State officially introduced Paul Haynes as their new head football coach at press conference on Tuesday.

Haynes, who is a former walk-on football player and assistant coach at Kent State, was the defensive coordinator at Arkansas in 2011. Prior to coaching at Arkansas, he was an assistant under Jim Tressel and Luke Fickell at Ohio State. He was the defensive backs coach at Ohio State from 2004 to 2010 and was promoted to co-defensive coordinator and safeties coach under Luke Fickell.

"I am very excited to welcome Paul back to the Kent State family," said Kent State Athletic Director Joel Nielsen. "During our search for a new head coach, I was looking for someone who had the qualities that could carry on the recent success of the football program. Those qualities include leadership, a genuine interest in our student-athletes, integrity and an understanding of Kent State and the Mid-American Conference. Ohio recruiting ties were also very important. Paul hits on every one of those areas. In hiring Paul we are also making a significant investment in the head coaching position here at Kent State."

"This has been a whirlwind, and I can't begin to describe my excitement about the opportunity to come back to Kent State as head coach," said Haynes. "Being a former player and assistant coach here, and now coming back at a time where there is so much pride around the football program and the uni­versity, it is unbelievable. My family and I are excited about coming back to Ohio. I'm looking forward to getting involved with the players and embracing the Kent State alumni."

Haynes was the first candidate interviewed for the job.

The Golden Flashes will take on Arkansas State on January 6 in the GoDaddy.com Bowl. It's unclear if Haynes will coach the team or if former coach Darrell Hazell will. Hazell was hired as the head coach at Purdue two weeks ago.

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News Headline: Kent State hires Paul Haynes as head football coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State has hired Paul Haynes as its new head football coach.

Haynes spent this past season as the former defensive coordinator at Arkansas.

Haynes, 43, was also an assistant coach at Ohio State, Michigan State, Louisville, Kent State, Northern Iowa, Ferris State and Bowling Green. He served as a quality control coach on the staff of the Jacksonville Jaguars.

Haynes played defensive back at Kent State in the late 1980's.

He served as the Golden Flashes assistant head coach from 1999-2000.

Kent State is expected to introduce Haynes at a press conference on Tuesday afternoon.

Haynes replaces Darrell Hazell who took the head coaching job at Purdue University.

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News Headline: AUDIO: KSU likely to raise the MAC salary standards with new football coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State has hired Arkansas defensive coordinator Paul Haynes as its next head football coach, less than a month after Darrell Hazell announced he's leaving to coach at Purdue. Haynes is a 1992 Kent alum --- he was a walk-on on the football team and was defensive backs coach from 1999 to 2000. He also worked with Hazell at Ohio State under Jim Tressel.

Haynes will inherit a Kent State team that is coming off of its best season in school history. WKSU commentator Terry Pluto talks to Amanda Rabinowitz about what Haynes brings to the position, what Kent State is likely to pay him.

Please click on link for audio:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/34125

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News Headline: AUDIO: Kent State alum Paul Haynes is new football coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University introduced the new coach today (Tuesday) of its bowl-bound football team.

Paul Haynes was most recently defensive coordinator for the Arkansas Razorbacks. He was also part of Ohio State's coaching staff under Jim Tressel, and a former player and assistant coach for Kent State.

Haynes says that he won't join the team until after the upcoming GoDaddy.com Bowl. He says he wants to let outgoing coach Darrell Hazell and the team finish what they started this season.

“Hey I'm not gonna screw it up. I'm not gonna put my hands on it at all. Again, out of respect to this coaching staff and Coach Hazell, they've done a great job this year. They need to finish it out.”

Haynes says he doesn't plan on changing much of the team's direction, and that consistency is key to the success of the team.

Kent State went 11-2 this season and will face Arkansas State January 6th.

Please click on link for audio:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/34127

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News Headline: Clothing from the heart: Garments, on display at Kent State Museum, reflect personal feelings (Druesedow, Ohrn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When most people see a used dryer sheet, they see something for the trash bin.

But Linda Öhrn-McDaniel, associate professor of fashion design, took numerous dryer sheets and made them into a garment. In another recycling touch, Öhrn-McDaniel decorated the bodice with sequins made of Pepsi bottles.

This dress and several other garments created by Öhrn-McDaniel, a Tallmadge resident, can be seen at the Kent State University Museum through Feb. 10.

"She is just very inventive," said Jean Druesedow, museum director. "She challenges herself to use new technologies. She experiments and this assists her in encouraging her students."

Several pieces have a personal story, such as Öhrn-McDaniel's wedding dress. Visitors to the museum may recall one part of the dress, which has been on exhibit in the past, but, for the first time, the museum has displayed the overlay that went over the dress. Öhrn-McDaniel said she spent "several hundred hours" on her wedding dress. The dress includes a sleeveless dress embroidered with the memories she shared with her husband, and her thoughts of him, in both Swedish and English (Öhrn-McDaniel is originally from Sweden). Then she created a garment to go over top of this dress, which had holes to allow only glimpses of the thoughts and feelings captured in thread in the dress underneath. Öhrn-McDaniel said that the top garment is what her husband saw first during the wedding; the top part came off during the reception.

Öhrn-McDaniel said she has recently been experimenting with zero waste garment construction, where the patterns are cut in such a way that there is little to no waste of fabric.

"I admit I didn't think of it at first as stainability but as a way to save money," she said. "But I realized that this was a sustainable way to do things. It's a good pattern challenge to work with."

Several garments on display show Öhrn-McDaniel's sense of fun, Druesedow said. For example, there are two garments with black stitching, one in the shape of a face in profile, the other with short black stitching at the waist. Upon closer inspection, the black stitches are small black ants.

Another interesting garment is a dress made of pennies attached to black fabric. In an additional touch of whimsy, the heads of the pennies are shown on the front of the garment, and the tails in the back, Druesedow said.

Yet another was made using steel, leather and aluminum.

"I've seen her wear it," Druesedow said of the last dress. "It is very wearable."

Admission to the Kent State University Museum is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors and $3 for children under 18. The museum is free with a Kent State University ID and free to the public on Sundays. The museum also offers free parking. For more information call 330-672-3450 or visit www.kent.edu/museum.

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News Headline: Clothing from the heart: Garments, on display at Kent State Museum, reflect personal feelings (Druesedow, Ohrn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When most people see a used dryer sheet, they see something for the trash bin.

But Linda Öhrn-McDaniel, associate professor of fashion design, took numerous dryer sheets and made them into a garment. In another recycling touch, Öhrn-McDaniel decorated the bodice with sequins made of Pepsi bottles.

This dress and several other garments created by Öhrn-McDaniel, a Tallmadge resident, can be seen at the Kent State University Museum through Feb. 10.

"She is just very inventive," said Jean Druesedow, museum director. "She challenges herself to use new technologies. She experiments and this assists her in encouraging her students."

Several pieces have a personal story, such as Öhrn-McDaniel's wedding dress. Visitors to the museum may recall one part of the dress, which has been on exhibit in the past, but, for the first time, the museum has displayed the overlay that went over the dress. Öhrn-McDaniel said she spent "several hundred hours" on her wedding dress. The dress includes a sleeveless dress embroidered with the memories she shared with her husband, and her thoughts of him, in both Swedish and English (Öhrn-McDaniel is originally from Sweden). Then she created a garment to go over top of this dress, which had holes to allow only glimpses of the thoughts and feelings captured in thread in the dress underneath. Öhrn-McDaniel said that the top garment is what her husband saw first during the wedding; the top part came off during the reception.

Öhrn-McDaniel said she has recently been experimenting with zero waste garment construction, where the patterns are cut in such a way that there is little to no waste of fabric.

"I admit I didn't think of it at first as stainability but as a way to save money," she said. "But I realized that this was a sustainable way to do things. It's a good pattern challenge to work with."

Several garments on display show Öhrn-McDaniel's sense of fun, Druesedow said. For example, there are two garments with black stitching, one in the shape of a face in profile, the other with short black stitching at the waist. Upon closer inspection, the black stitches are small black ants.

Another interesting garment is a dress made of pennies attached to black fabric. In an additional touch of whimsy, the heads of the pennies are shown on the front of the garment, and the tails in the back, Druesedow said.

Yet another was made using steel, leather and aluminum.

"I've seen her wear it," Druesedow said of the last dress. "It is very wearable."

Admission to the Kent State University Museum is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors and $3 for children under 18. The museum is free with a Kent State University ID and free to the public on Sundays. The museum also offers free parking. For more information call 330-672-3450 or visit www.kent.edu/museum.

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News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES

Currently -- "Undress: Shaping Fashion and Private Life," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques," "Fandemonium" and "Fashion Timeline," the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State campus off East Main Street in Kent.

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News Headline: Kent State to Get State Funding for Internships | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Youngstown Business Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University has been chosen to receive $724,553 in state funding to support workforce development strategies and enhance student success through internship and co-op programs, the university reported Monday.

The co-op programs are linked to industries targeted for growth in Ohio, the university said. Among them are advanced manufacturing, aerospace and aviation, biohealth, energy, financial services, information technology and polymers. The funding, from the Ohio Board of Regents, will support up to 200 student interns.

Kent officials expect the funding will improve its intern-tracking system and allow the university to discover new opportunities and develop “a strong feedback loop” between the university and companies where the intersn are placed. This is contingent upon Controlling Board approval in January.

The university will create an intern advisory board as well.

The budget for this program, called Integrating Kent State University Learning Experiences and Business Work.

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News Headline: Kent State Hotel Sign Plan gets OK | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A comprehensive sign plan for the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center under construction in downtown Kent was approved by the Kent Planning Commission Tuesday.

The sign plan includes five signs total, three of which are identical. The three signs that match are rectangular with a color scheme that matches Kent State's blue and gold.

The two signs that are not alike are the flag-style sign that will be attached to the building's northwest corner and the 43-foot long sign that will wrap around the canopy above the main entrance to the conference center off Erie Street.

Lou Belknap, of Agile Sign and Lighting Company, the firm designing the signs, said they modified the signs following recommendations made by the Kent Architectural Review Board earlier this month.

"They felt it needed a little more appeal, and we had no problem changing that," Belknap said.

The sign plan approved by the commission does not include large, graphic banners as presented in earlier architectural depictions of the building. An initial rendering of the hotel and conference center included massive banners fixed to the building's brick facade on several of the elevations. But university officials have since nixed that element of the sign package.

All four members of the planning commission made positive comments about the sign plan.

Commission member Peter Paino said he liked the early graphic banners.

"But I think these are very nicely stated," Paino said.

The hotel is scheduled to open in June 2013.

Thanks to a full kitchen, all 94 rooms of the hotel will have full room service.

The 300-seat banquet center will include dividing walls so the room can be split for smaller weddings or parties.

And raised ceilings will highlight a 50 seat restaurant with a 20 seat, full-service bar all in the lobby area.

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News Headline: KSU Tusc keeps accreditation for nursing program (Lappin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA -

Kent State University at Tuscarawas has received continued accreditation for the Associate of Applied Science in nursing degree program by the Ohio Board of Nursing. The approval continues the existing accreditation for an additional five years and recognizes that the nursing program continues to be in full compliance with the rules of the Ohio Board of Nursing. The mission of the Ohio Board of Nursing is to safeguard the health of the public through effective regulation of nursing care.

"Kent State University at Tuscarawas is proud to be granted full approval by the Ohio Board of Nursing," said Joan Lappin, director of the Associate Degree in nursing.

There are nine rules set by the board that all pre-licensure nursing programs must meet for approval: organization and administration; qualifications of administrators, faculty, teaching assistants and preceptors; program policies; curriculum; evaluation plan; program contractual relationships; responsibilities for faculty teaching a nursing course; responsibilities of faculty, teaching assistants and preceptors in a clinical setting; and program records.

Other Kent State campuses receiving accreditation were Ashtabula, East Liverpool and the Regional Academic Center at Twinsburg.

Kent State Tuscarawas' nursing program began in 1968 when the campus opened and has grown steadily over the years.

"For the 2012-13 academic year, we have 80 first-year students and 90 second-year students. It has been the largest enrollment since the inception of the program," added Lappin. "In addition to the continued accreditation verifying the quality of our program, the number of partnering hospitals, extended care facilities and other special care centers are a testament to the quality and dedication of our students. We partner with more than 25 hospitals, extended care facilities and other special care centers in a multicounty area for nursing student hands-on clinicals, as a vital part of their education."

The Associate of Applied Science in nursing is one of the largest academic programs at Kent State Tuscarawas. The program is also accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. In addition to the associate degree program, a Bachelor of Science in nursing also is offered by Kent State Tuscarawas, which also is accredited by the Ohio Board of Nursing.

For more information about the Kent State Tuscarawas Associate of Applied Science in nursing  or the Bachelor of Science in nursing, visit www.tusc.kent.edu/academics/nursing. Kent State Tuscarawas is at 330 University Drive NE.

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News Headline: 'Fiscal cliff' fosters uncertainty among area businesses (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Businesses - uncertain of how their bottom lines will be impacted - are nervously waiting to see if the U.S. government falls over the so-called "fiscal cliff" 11⁄2 weeks from now.

Robert Sanderson, president of the Massillon Area Chamber of Commerce, said businesses are taking a cautious approach as they await the outcome of budget negotiations between President Barack Obama and congressional leaders.

"Nobody is panicking. Everyone has some level of confidence," Sanderson said.

"I think the economy has been pretty good over the last 18 months. (Businesses) want some concrete answers. It's tough to make decisions when you're not sure what you're facing. I'm hopeful that they can come to some agreement. They have to compromise. Hopefully, they are just posturing for position."

The cliff refers to the package of large tax increases and spending cuts that takes effect next year unless Congress and the White House can reach a budget agreement. If the federal government goes over the cliff, most Americans would pay more taxes and it could send the economy into a nosedive. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office has reported that leaving the combination of tax increases and spending cuts in place for a year would push the economy into a recession.

Unless a compromise is reached, income tax cuts that took effect in 2001 and 2003 and tax credits included in a 2009 economic stimulus package expire Jan. 1. Congress agreed to implement across-the-board spending cuts if a budget agreement wasn't reached by next year. In addition, a 2 percent cut in the Social Security tax rate would end. For example, the defense budget would fall nearly 10 percent and other domestic spending would be slashed by roughly 8 percent.

Business owners could become anxious if the markets react severely to the U.S. falls over the cliff, according to Sanderson.

"I think there will be some apprehension (if fiscal cliff is reached). Once it's settled and things are stable, they will know what direction to go," Sanderson said.

In the short term, the lack of an agreement could hurt businesses negatively, especially if consumers cut back on spending to compensate for higher taxes, according to Lucas Engelhardt, assistant professor of economics at Kent State Stark.

"(Recession) is certainly possible. At the moment, the recovery is slow. It would be easy for us to reverse for a bit," Engelhardt said.

In the long run, however, reaching the fiscal cliff would help to deflate the ballooning U.S. budget deficit and possibly stimulate economic growth, he said.

"At least the estimates I've seen, five years down the road, we're looking at a higher economic growth rate. The time between now and then would not be so pleasant," Engelhardt said.

Albert Smith, CPA and associate professor of business administration at Malone University, is convinced that going over the cliff will produce another recession. Even if the fiscal cliff wasn't a factor, some economists were predicting negative growth during the first quarter of 2013.  

"We are in a very, very tenuous position and a period of weak recovery," Smith said. "It seems to me that any shock to the economy could cause us to head toward a negative (growth)."

Engelhardt said he is optimistic that an agreement will be reached, adding he hopes that the White House and Congress are willing to address entitlement reform.

"Ultimately, in the long term that's where our troubles lie. We need to bring more balance into the Medicare and Social Security programs," he said.

Smith agreed.

"There are some helpful programs out there that help the people that need it. The word here is reform," he said.

Fiscal cliff Q & A:

Q: Will my taxes go up?

A: Probably. Roughly 90 percent of households would pay more. Middle income households would pay, on average, about $2,000 more, according to the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center. The top 20 percent would owe an average of about $14,000 more. The Social Security tax cut also is set to expire. Nearly every worker who gets a paycheck would receive less take-home pay. This change would cost someone making $50,000 about $1,000 a year, or nearly $20 a week.

Q: How bad would it be to go over the cliff?

A: It depends how long it lasts. If negotiations continue for a few weeks past Jan. 1 and a deal is in sight, it probably wouldn't slow the economy much. If negotiations collapse, however, and the measures take effect permanently, it could be painful. The stock market would likely plunge. Consumers would probably cut spending. Anticipating fewer customers, retailers, restaurants, hotels, auto makers and many other companies could cut jobs. And defense contractors and other companies hurt by the drop in government spending would lay off workers.

Q: When would most people begin to feel the effects from going over the cliff?

A: For most Americans, the tax hit would be modest at first. The expiration of Social Security and income tax cuts would be spread throughout 2013. For taxpayers with incomes from $40,000 to $65,000, paychecks would shrink an average of about $130 in January, according to the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center.

Q: With the budget deficit topping $1 trillion, shouldn't we welcome spending cuts and tax increases to reduce the red ink?

A: Most economists favor reducing the deficit. However, they would prefer to phase in spending cuts and tax increases slowly, particularly because the economy is still recovering from the Great Recession. The tax increases would be the largest tax increases in 60 years as a percentage of the economy. Most budget experts think spending cuts should be targeted and include entitlement programs such as Medicare and Social Security, rather than indiscriminate across-the-board cuts.

Source: The Associated Press

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News Headline: Mayan calendar just the latest 'doomsday' sign (Harkness) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Taunton Daily Gazette - Online
Contact Name: Charita Goshay
News OCR Text: Dec. 21 at 11:11 a.m. marks “The End of the World.” At least, that's what some folks fear.

A few years ago, the world was fascinated by the discovery of an ancient Mayan “long count” calendar that is being interpreted by some to suggest that a worldwide, cataclysmic event could occur.

The Rev. Leah Shafer, senior pastor at St. Jacob's Lutheran Church in Lake Township, Ohio, says “doomsday” is nothing new.

“Christians and others have been predicting ‘end times' stuff for centuries,” she said.

“We read in the Gospel of Luke that Jesus is going to return. I think we need to take the belief in Jesus' return very seriously. But what we also need to take  just as seriously is where Jesus said, ‘As for the day or the hour, no one knows. Only God the Father knows.' In other words, Jesus is coming. But exactly when, we cannot know.”

In 2011, Christian radio broadcaster Harold Camping predicted the world would end on May 21, prompting some frightened people to sell their possessions and quit their jobs. His error added to the list of previously wrong predictions he made about the world's end.

Why the fascination with doomsday?

“I haven't the foggiest idea,” said John Harkness, an adjunct professor of sociology at Kent State University's Stark campus.

“In Christianity, we've had a lot of these periods, particularly  in the 19th and 20th centuries. What's interesting about the Mayan calendar is, it isn't one of the faiths people are familiar with.”

Harkness noted the Maya measured their centuries in 394-year periods called b'ak'tuns —and used two calendars, including one for sacred events. The calendar in question, he stressed, only marks the end of one century, “to be followed by another.”

Harkness said he suspects the real source of speculation stems from the 2009 doomsday film, “2012.”

“Of course, they aren't going to say ‘We're basing this on nothing,' ” he said, laughing. “Why people are fascinated by these things, I honestly do not know.”

“I think it's because we're fallen creatures,” said the Rev. Dwight Mason, senior pastor of NewPointe Community Church, which has campuses in Dover, Millersburg and Jackson Township, Ohio.

“Is it easier to be negative or to be positive? It (doomsday) fights against the very fact that God is good; God is loving and kind. The Bible says Satan is the accuser of the brethren, that he is the father of lies. God has not given us the spirit of fear. All of these things go against the very nature of God.”

Dec. 21 at 11:11 a.m. marks “The End of the World.” At least, that's what some folks fear.

A few years ago, the world was fascinated by the discovery of an ancient Mayan “long count” calendar that is being interpreted by some to suggest that a worldwide, cataclysmic event could occur.

The Rev. Leah Shafer, senior pastor at St. Jacob's Lutheran Church in Lake Township, Ohio, says “doomsday” is nothing new.

“Christians and others have been predicting ‘end times' stuff for centuries,” she said.

“We read in the Gospel of Luke that Jesus is going to return. I think we need to take the belief in Jesus' return very seriously. But what we also need to take  just as seriously is where Jesus said, ‘As for the day or the hour, no one knows. Only God the Father knows.' In other words, Jesus is coming. But exactly when, we cannot know.”

In 2011, Christian radio broadcaster Harold Camping predicted the world would end on May 21, prompting some frightened people to sell their possessions and quit their jobs. His error added to the list of previously wrong predictions he made about the world's end.

Why the fascination with doomsday?

“I haven't the foggiest idea,” said John Harkness, an adjunct professor of sociology at Kent State University's Stark campus.

“In Christianity, we've had a lot of these periods, particularly  in the 19th and 20th centuries. What's interesting about the Mayan calendar is, it isn't one of the faiths people are familiar with.”

Harkness noted the Maya measured their centuries in 394-year periods called b'ak'tuns —and used two calendars, including one for sacred events. The calendar in question, he stressed, only marks the end of one century, “to be followed by another.”

Harkness said he suspects the real source of speculation stems from the 2009 doomsday film, “2012.”

“Of course, they aren't going to say ‘We're basing this on nothing,' ” he said, laughing. “Why people are fascinated by these things, I honestly do not know.”

“I think it's because we're fallen creatures,” said the Rev. Dwight Mason, senior pastor of NewPointe Community Church, which has campuses in Dover, Millersburg and Jackson Township, Ohio.

“Is it easier to be negative or to be positive? It (doomsday) fights against the very fact that God is good; God is loving and kind. The Bible says Satan is the accuser of the brethren, that he is the father of lies. God has not given us the spirit of fear. All of these things go against the very nature of God.”

“Why are people afraid? I think some people, even people of strong faith  — whatever their belief system may be — fear death, the unknown,” Shafer said. “I think some people are worried that if the Mayan calendar is correct, then their Christianity may be wrong.  Personally, if there is a divine ending of the world as we know it , as opposed to humans destroying creation, I will have no effect on such an ending, so I do not spend time worrying about it.

“I spend more time reading articles on steps my church building can take to be ‘more green' or better stewards of the world than I do on anything having to do with end-time predictions.”

Each major religion has its own beliefs about the world's end. In Islam, it is referred to as “The Hour,” the time when Jesus will return to Damascus and destroy the Antichrist. Jesus then will die a natural death, ushering the era leading up to The Hour.

Hindus believe that the god Vishnu will incarnate for the last time, as “Kulki,” a being who rides a white horse, and who will wield a sword to destroy evil.

Many Christians believe the world's end is detailed in Book of Revelation in the New Testament. Many believe the end will be preceded by Jesus' return for his church, and that “Armageddon,” the final battle between God and Satan, will usher in a “great tribulation.” Evangelicals Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins sold millions of copies of their 16-volume “Left Behind” series, based on Armageddon.

“I'm pan-tribulation; I think its all going to pan out,” Mason laughed. “I'm not convinced (apostle) John was writing the Book of Revelation about the future. Can and does that stuff still happen? Without a doubt. But many people probably thought the end was afoot with Hitler, and during slavery and the Civil War age.”

Mason said John likely was writing about his own era, “but that doesn't sell books.”

“My dad was a minister,” Harkness said. “I remember the Good Book saying no one knows the day or the hour. But it doesn't seem to deter people very much.”

“I like to say too many preachers want to try to scare the ‘hell' out of people,” Mason said. “Is there a negative side of the Gospel? Absolutely.”

He cites John 3:16 which states that non believers in Christ will perish but that believers will receive eternal life.

“It's sad to say the church has had a message of fear instead of love,” Mason said. “Fear only motivates you for so long. Love can motivate you for a lifetime.”

Harkness said fascination with the future is a cross-cultural phenomenon.

“I think we love — provided it's good — to know what the future holds,” he said.

He likens the latest doomsday predictions to those offered by psychics, “who miss on almost all of them, but nobody ever goes back and looks at the failed ones.' ” Mason said his job is to help show people “how do we live in this day and age?”

“I'm not into scaring people because if you scare them, you have to keep scaring them,” he explained. “The greatest motivating factor on earth is love. We try to be a church of grace and truth. Jesus did not try to balance the two. He was full of grace and full of truth. It's not about doomsday but hope.”

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News Headline: Mayan calendar just the latest 'doomsday' sign (Harkness) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Evening Telegram - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dec. 21 at 11:11 a.m. marks "The End of the World." At least, that's what some folks fear.

A few years ago, the world was fascinated by the discovery of an ancient Mayan "long count" calendar that is being interpreted by some to suggest that a worldwide, cataclysmic event could occur.

The Rev. Leah Shafer, senior pastor at St. Jacob's Lutheran Church in Lake Township, Ohio, says "doomsday" is nothing new.

"Christians and others have been predicting �end times' stuff for centuries," she said.

"We read in the Gospel of Luke that Jesus is going to return. I think we need to take the belief in Jesus' return very seriously. But what we also need to take  just as seriously is where Jesus said, �As for the day or the hour, no one knows. Only God the Father knows.' In other words, Jesus is coming. But exactly when, we cannot know."

In 2011, Christian radio broadcaster Harold Camping predicted the world would end on May 21, prompting some frightened people to sell their possessions and quit their jobs. His error added to the list of previously wrong predictions he made about the world's end.

Why the fascination with doomsday?

"I haven't the foggiest idea," said John Harkness, an adjunct professor of sociology at Kent State University's Stark campus.

"In Christianity, we've had a lot of these periods, particularly  in the 19th and 20th centuries. What's interesting about the Mayan calendar is, it isn't one of the faiths people are familiar with."

Harkness noted the Maya measured their centuries in 394-year periods called b'ak'tuns -and used two calendars, including one for sacred events. The calendar in question, he stressed, only marks the end of one century, "to be followed by another."

Harkness said he suspects the real source of speculation stems from the 2009 doomsday film, "2012."

"Of course, they aren't going to say �We're basing this on nothing,' " he said, laughing. "Why people are fascinated by these things, I honestly do not know."

"I think it's because we're fallen creatures," said the Rev. Dwight Mason, senior pastor of NewPointe Community Church, which has campuses in Dover, Millersburg and Jackson Township, Ohio.

"Is it easier to be negative or to be positive? It (doomsday) fights against the very fact that God is good; God is loving and kind. The Bible says Satan is the accuser of the brethren, that he is the father of lies. God has not given us the spirit of fear. All of these things go against the very nature of God."

"Why are people afraid? I think some people, even people of strong faith  - whatever their belief system may be - fear death, the unknown," Shafer said. "I think some people are worried that if the Mayan calendar is correct, then their Christianity may be wrong.  Personally, if there is a divine ending of the world as we know it , as opposed to humans destroying creation, I will have no effect on such an ending, so I do not spend time worrying about it.

 "I spend more time reading articles on steps my church building can take to be �more green' or better stewards of the world than I do on anything having to do with end-time predictions."

Each major religion has its own beliefs about the world's end. In Islam, it is referred to as "The Hour," the time when Jesus will return to Damascus and destroy the Antichrist. Jesus then will die a natural death, ushering the era leading up to The Hour.

Hindus believe that the god Vishnu will incarnate for the last time, as "Kulki," a being who rides a white horse, and who will wield a sword to destroy evil.

Many Christians believe the world's end is detailed in Book of Revelation in the New Testament. Many believe the end will be preceded by Jesus' return for his church, and that "Armageddon," the final battle between God and Satan, will usher in a "great tribulation." Evangelicals Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins sold millions of copies of their 16-volume "Left Behind" series, based on Armageddon.

"I'm pan-tribulation; I think its all going to pan out," Mason laughed. "I'm not convinced (apostle) John was writing the Book of Revelation about the future. Can and does that stuff still happen? Without a doubt. But many people probably thought the end was afoot with Hitler, and during slavery and the Civil War age."

Mason said John likely was writing about his own era, "but that doesn't sell books."

"My dad was a minister," Harkness said. "I remember the Good Book saying no one knows the day or the hour. But it doesn't seem to deter people very much."

"I like to say too many preachers want to try to scare the �hell' out of people," Mason said. "Is there a negative side of the Gospel? Absolutely."

He cites John 3:16 which states that non believers in Christ will perish but that believers will receive eternal life.

"It's sad to say the church has had a message of fear instead of love," Mason said. "Fear only motivates you for so long. Love can motivate you for a lifetime."

Harkness said fascination with the future is a cross-cultural phenomenon.

"I think we love - provided it's good - to know what the future holds," he said.

He likens the latest doomsday predictions to those offered by psychics, "who miss on almost all of them, but nobody ever goes back and looks at the failed ones.' " Mason said his job is to help show people "how do we live in this day and age?"

"I'm not into scaring people because if you scare them, you have to keep scaring them," he explained. "The greatest motivating factor on earth is love. We try to be a church of grace and truth. Jesus did not try to balance the two. He was full of grace and full of truth. It's not about doomsday but hope."

Return to Top



News Headline: Mayan calendar just the latest 'doomsday' sign (Harkness) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Evening Times - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dec. 21 at 11:11 a.m. marks "The End of the World." At least, that's what some folks fear.

A few years ago, the world was fascinated by the discovery of an ancient Mayan "long count" calendar that is being interpreted by some to suggest that a worldwide, cataclysmic event could occur.

The Rev. Leah Shafer, senior pastor at St. Jacob's Lutheran Church in Lake Township, Ohio, says "doomsday" is nothing new.

"Christians and others have been predicting �end times' stuff for centuries," she said.

"We read in the Gospel of Luke that Jesus is going to return. I think we need to take the belief in Jesus' return very seriously. But what we also need to take  just as seriously is where Jesus said, �As for the day or the hour, no one knows. Only God the Father knows.' In other words, Jesus is coming. But exactly when, we cannot know."

In 2011, Christian radio broadcaster Harold Camping predicted the world would end on May 21, prompting some frightened people to sell their possessions and quit their jobs. His error added to the list of previously wrong predictions he made about the world's end.

Why the fascination with doomsday?

"I haven't the foggiest idea," said John Harkness, an adjunct professor of sociology at Kent State University's Stark campus.

"In Christianity, we've had a lot of these periods, particularly  in the 19th and 20th centuries. What's interesting about the Mayan calendar is, it isn't one of the faiths people are familiar with."

Harkness noted the Maya measured their centuries in 394-year periods called b'ak'tuns -and used two calendars, including one for sacred events. The calendar in question, he stressed, only marks the end of one century, "to be followed by another."

Harkness said he suspects the real source of speculation stems from the 2009 doomsday film, "2012."

"Of course, they aren't going to say �We're basing this on nothing,' " he said, laughing. "Why people are fascinated by these things, I honestly do not know."

"I think it's because we're fallen creatures," said the Rev. Dwight Mason, senior pastor of NewPointe Community Church, which has campuses in Dover, Millersburg and Jackson Township, Ohio.

"Is it easier to be negative or to be positive? It (doomsday) fights against the very fact that God is good; God is loving and kind. The Bible says Satan is the accuser of the brethren, that he is the father of lies. God has not given us the spirit of fear. All of these things go against the very nature of God."

"Why are people afraid? I think some people, even people of strong faith  - whatever their belief system may be - fear death, the unknown," Shafer said. "I think some people are worried that if the Mayan calendar is correct, then their Christianity may be wrong.  Personally, if there is a divine ending of the world as we know it , as opposed to humans destroying creation, I will have no effect on such an ending, so I do not spend time worrying about it.

 "I spend more time reading articles on steps my church building can take to be �more green' or better stewards of the world than I do on anything having to do with end-time predictions."

Each major religion has its own beliefs about the world's end. In Islam, it is referred to as "The Hour," the time when Jesus will return to Damascus and destroy the Antichrist. Jesus then will die a natural death, ushering the era leading up to The Hour.

Hindus believe that the god Vishnu will incarnate for the last time, as "Kulki," a being who rides a white horse, and who will wield a sword to destroy evil.

Many Christians believe the world's end is detailed in Book of Revelation in the New Testament. Many believe the end will be preceded by Jesus' return for his church, and that "Armageddon," the final battle between God and Satan, will usher in a "great tribulation." Evangelicals Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins sold millions of copies of their 16-volume "Left Behind" series, based on Armageddon.

"I'm pan-tribulation; I think its all going to pan out," Mason laughed. "I'm not convinced (apostle) John was writing the Book of Revelation about the future. Can and does that stuff still happen? Without a doubt. But many people probably thought the end was afoot with Hitler, and during slavery and the Civil War age."

Mason said John likely was writing about his own era, "but that doesn't sell books."

"My dad was a minister," Harkness said. "I remember the Good Book saying no one knows the day or the hour. But it doesn't seem to deter people very much."

"I like to say too many preachers want to try to scare the �hell' out of people," Mason said. "Is there a negative side of the Gospel? Absolutely."

He cites John 3:16 which states that non believers in Christ will perish but that believers will receive eternal life.

"It's sad to say the church has had a message of fear instead of love," Mason said. "Fear only motivates you for so long. Love can motivate you for a lifetime."

Harkness said fascination with the future is a cross-cultural phenomenon.

"I think we love - provided it's good - to know what the future holds," he said.

He likens the latest doomsday predictions to those offered by psychics, "who miss on almost all of them, but nobody ever goes back and looks at the failed ones.' " Mason said his job is to help show people "how do we live in this day and age?"

"I'm not into scaring people because if you scare them, you have to keep scaring them," he explained. "The greatest motivating factor on earth is love. We try to be a church of grace and truth. Jesus did not try to balance the two. He was full of grace and full of truth. It's not about doomsday but hope."

Return to Top



News Headline: 19-year-old dies in fall at former Atlantic Foundry | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A 19-year-old Kent State student tumbled to her death early Saturday morning in the decayed shell of a former manufacturing plant.

Adrienne Ryba, her high school sweetheart and another couple walked across an elevated concrete walkway and climbed a fire escape to reach the roof of the former Atlantic Foundry on Annadale Avenue in Akron. There tragedy ensued.

“They wanted to see the lights of the city and the meteor shower,” said Ryba's mother, Jennifer, a chemist at Goodyear who lives in Wadsworth. “Teenagers do crazy things like that. You think you're invincible when you're a teenager.”

The manufacturing plant east of state Route 8 once housed the thriving Atlantic Foundry.

Since 1905, the company had employed as many as 450 in the manufacture of iron castings for the rubber, steel, automotive and mining industries in Akron. It closed in 1989.

The current owner is Beaver Street Investments, Inc. and the only occupant is Ohio Knife and Grinding, which makes machine knives for the plastic industry. A message was left seeking comment from Ohio Knife officials.

Most of the plant is a skeleton of its former self with broken windows, rusting machinery in the yard and weeds.

Chain-link fence and barbed wire surround the property bordered by Annadale Avenue to the west and Beaver Street to the east, so Ryba, Butler and their friends used an alternate entry — crossing a crumbling concrete walkway over Annadale to reach the industrial complex, Akron police said.

The skywalk led to an outside fire escape, which in turn led to the roof.

Theirs was not a new idea; others had been there before them, as graffiti was sprayed on the side of the building.

“They were exploring,” Akron police Lt. Rick Edwards said. “This is the first time I've ever heard of [people doing this].”

Some call this urban exploring, accessing abandoned or underground man-made facilities to see what's there or take pictures.

“I remember a guy coming through a skylight,” said Jim Slaughter, who has owned Slaughter's Tires next door to the complex since 1961. The intruder spent time in jail for his effort.

Vandals break out windows and spray-paint walls in the neighborhood, but Slaughter said he wasn't aware of anyone exploring the complex to the south of his property.

On Tuesday morning, workers were refastening the chain-link fence that police and paramedics cut to enter the property to respond to the tragedy.

Ryba's 20-year-old boyfriend, Hiram College student Collin Butler, was charged with misconduct in an emergency and obstructing official business after the accident.

“We made several attempts to question C. Butler on how he got in so we could enter the same way, but we got no cooperation,” police said in their report.

Butler spent a few hours in jail before posting his own bond, 10 percent of $800.

He was “so upset,” an understanding Jennifer Ryba said. “It happened fast and he couldn't catch her. They said they had to hold him back or he would have gone in after her.”

The couple were sweethearts at Medina County's Highland High School and had talked of a future together, Jennifer Ryba said. She didn't blame him for what happened.

She said her daughter had a “wonderful personality, vibrant” and aspired to own an interior design studio. She was on the varsity volleyball team at Highland High.

“Art and volleyball — those were her two loves,” her mother said.

Adrienne is the younger of Steve and Jennifer Ryba's two daughters. The family expects hundreds at the calling hours from 1 to 4 p.m. and 5 to 8 p.m. today at the Northside Christian Church in Wadsworth. Services will be there at 11 a.m. Thursday.

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News Headline: Kent State student dies as vacant Akron warehouse | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A 19-year-old Kent State University student was pronounced dead at the scene after falling about 100 yards through the rafters of a vacant warehouse at 219 Annadale Ave., near the University of Akron campus, Saturday morning, said Akron police Lt. Richard Edwards.

Sharon Township resident Adrienne Ryba, a sophomore architecture major, was climbing on the abandoned building with her boyfriend, 20-year-old Collin Butler of Hinckley Township, and a few others when she fell.

According to police reports, Butler began "yelling and cursing" at police and paramedics when they arrived. He refused to cooperate when he was questioned about how he got in the building so paramedics could enter the same way. Butler started threatening officers and refused to provide any information about the incident. He was arrested on one count each of misconduct at an emergency and obstructing official business. Edwards said he was booked at the Summit County jail and released on bond.

Alcohol was a factor in the incident, Edwards said. The investigation is being conducted by Akron police.

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News Headline: Kent State student Adrienne Ryba dies in fall while trying to watch meteor shower | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AKRON, Ohio - Authorities say a 19-year-old college student died last weekend in a fall while exploring the decayed shell of a former manufacturing plant.

The Akron Beacon Journal reports Kent State University student Adrienne Ryba was killed early Saturday at the former Atlantic Foundry in Akron.

Her mother told the newspaper that Ryba and her boyfriend, along with another couple, planned to go to the roof of the complex to see the city lights and meteor shower.

Police said she fell after they walked across an elevated concrete walkway and climbed a fire escape to reach the roof. Police said they had to cross the crumbling walkway over a road to get inside the fenced industrial complex.

A funeral service is planned for Thursday.

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News Headline: Sharon Twp. woman, 19, falls, dies at abandoned warehouse | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gazette, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A 19-year-old from Sharon Township died after falling through the roof of an abandoned building in downtown Akron this weekend.

Akron police said Adrienne L. Ryba, a sophomore architecture major at Kent State University, her boyfriend and another couple had been climbing on the roof of a warehouse at 219 Annadale Ave. shortly after midnight Saturday when the roof Ryba was walking on gave way.

Lt. Rick Edwards, an Akron police spokesman, said it appeared that alcohol was involved in the incident.

Ryba's boyfriend was arrested at the warehouse, accused of yelling and cursing at paramedics, and refusing to answer questions about the incident.

Collin M. Butler, 20, of Hinckley Township, was charged with misconduct at an emergency and obstructing official business.

He was booked into the Summit County Jail and released on bond several hours later, Edwards said.

Jason Grom, a forensic investigator for the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office, said the warehouse was locked, but the four young people accessed the roof through a fire escape.

Ryba fell between 40 and 50 feet, Grom said.

Her friends called 911, and first responders forced entry to the building, Grom said. Ryba was pronounced dead at the scene, he said.

Grom said the death was listed as an accident, caused by multiple blunt force traumas as a result of the fall.

Ryba graduated from Highland High School in 2011 with honors. She played on the school's volleyball team.

Calling hours for Ryba are 1 to 4 p.m. and 5 to 8 p.m. today at Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Services will be 11 a.m. Thursday at the church.

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