Report Overview:
Total Clips (75)
Aeronautics; Finance and Administration; KSU Airport; Office of the Provost (7)
Alumni Association (1)
Alumni; Athletics (2)
Architecture and Environmental Design (3)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Art, School of; College of Applied Eng, Sustainability and Tech; Renovation at KSU (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Board of Trustees; College of Public Health (COPH); Partnerships; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Athletics (14)
Board of Trustees (1)
Board of Trustees; Global Education; Office of the Provost (1)
Board of Trustees; Renovation at KSU (1)
Chemical Physics; Liquid Crystal Institute; Research; Third Frontier (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
College of the Arts (CotA); Institutional Advancement; Music (1)
Communication Studies (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Geography (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU and President Obama; Student Involvement, Center for (2)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSU at Stark (4)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
KSU Museum (2)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Nutrition and Dietetics (1)
Partnerships (1)
Political Science (3)
Psychology (1)
Students (4)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (3)
University Communications and Marketing (1)
University Libraries (1)
University Press (2)
WKSU (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics; Finance and Administration; KSU Airport; Office of the Provost (7)
KSU looks at airport's future (Friend, Floyd) 12/30/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: Eight years ago, Kent State wanted to decommission its airport and move elsewhere. But the Federal Aviation Administration, which has final say about the property,...

Kent State University Airport Initiates Development of a New Master Plan (Diacon, Floyd) 12/22/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Public meetings soon to be organized A steering team for the Kent State University Airport has begun planning the development of a new master plan. The public may help determine the future of the airport by...

Kent State Airport to Develop New Master Plan (Diacon, Floyd) 12/23/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Public meetings plan but not scheduled to talk about master plan A steering team for the Kent State University Airport has begun planning the development of a new master plan. The public may help determine the future of the airport by...

Steering team for KSU airport initiates development of new master plan (Diacon, Floyd) 12/26/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

A steering team for the Kent State University Airport has begun planning the development of a new master plan. The public may help determine the future of the airport by...

Kent State airport initiates development of new master plan (Diacon, Floyd) 12/26/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

A steering team for the Kent State University Airport has begun planning the development of a new master plan. The public may help determine the future of the airport...

KSU airport initiates development of new master plan (Diacon, Floyd) 12/27/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

A steering team for the Kent State University Airport has begun planning the development of a new master plan. The public may help determine the future of the airport by...

(Audio) Future of Kent State airport being studied (Mansfield) 01/02/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email


Alumni Association (1)
Alumni from Chester and Solon join Kent State University Alumni Board 12/30/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT - The Kent State University Alumni Association Inc. has named H. Scott Westover of Cleveland Heights as secretary of its National Alumni Board of Directors....


Alumni; Athletics (2)
Comedian, KSU grad Caparulo helping students get to Golden Flashes bowl game Jan. 6 01/02/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Comedian Subsidizing Bus Trip to Kent State Bowl Game 01/02/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Architecture and Environmental Design (3)
Akron sculpture garden gets 'substantial' pledge 12/22/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

...donations from trustees. Kahan wrote that a formal design process will begin in 2013, accompanied by an exhibition in August of design projects from Kent State University's third-year students in the School of Architecture that will examine the site of the garden, now a surface parking lot. ...

Akron Art Museum's 90th anniversary year crescendos with a pledge of a major gift 12/22/2012 Artdaily Text Attachment Email

...first event is a student exhibition opening August 10, 2013 in the museum’s Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation Gallery. During the 2012 fall semester, Kent State University’s third-year students in the School of Architecture were given the assignment of examining the site for the museum’s future...

Akron Art Museum announces seven-figure pledge from donors for a new sculpture garden 12/21/2012 Museumnews.net Text Attachment Email

...donations from trustees. Kahan wrote that a formal design process will begin in 2013, accompanied by an exhibition in August of design projects from Kent State University's third-year students in the School of Architecture that will examine the site of the garden, now a surface parking lot. ...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Art, School of; College of Applied Eng, Sustainability and Tech; Renovation at KSU (1)
OUR VIEW What 2013 might bring 01/02/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Architecture and Environmental Design; Board of Trustees; College of Public Health (COPH); Partnerships; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
ALONG THE WAY Good ideas that emerged in 2012 01/02/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Athletics (14)
Kent State offensive lineman Brian Winters ready to get back to football 01/02/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State's Paul Haynes already doing the work of a head football coach (Haynes, Nielsen) 01/02/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State athletes have excelled to new levels in the past 12 months (Nielsen) 01/02/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State's 2012 road to GoDaddy.com Bowl 01/02/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Top 10 Beacon Journal sports stories for 2012 01/02/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State football players shine in the classroom (Drummer, Andrassy) 01/02/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

How Paul Haynes plans to keep Kent State football trending upward (Haynes) 01/02/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Darrell Hazell pulls double-duty for Kent State, Purdue (Hazell) 01/02/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

2012 In Review: The Year of the Flashes (Nielsen, Page, Stricklin, Hazell) 01/02/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State men's basketball donates time on New Year's Eve (Senderoff) 01/02/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Editor's Picks: Dream Season for Kent State Football 01/02/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Editor's Picks: Kent State's College World Series Run 01/02/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State's Wolfe makes most of his senior season 01/02/2013 al.com Text Attachment Email

(VIDEO) Darrell Hazell still a rock star at Kent State 01/02/2013 jconline.com Text Attachment Email


Board of Trustees (1)
Kent State spends nearly $10 million for walkway to downtown (Lefton, Vincent) 12/26/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Kent -- Kent State University is continuing demolition and construction work on its Esplanade walkway extension, a project that has led the school to purchase...


Board of Trustees; Global Education; Office of the Provost (1)
Kent State to Open Brazil Office (Lefton) 12/26/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Establishment of legal entity lets Kent State start recruiting in country with more than 190 million residents In a few years residents of Brazil looking for an American college...


Board of Trustees; Renovation at KSU (1)
Kent State Board of Trustees Approves $150M in Campus Construction Projects 12/26/2012 Commercial Property Executive - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's board of trustees hired the Ruhlin Co. to manage the $150 million, four-year construction and renovation project known as...


Chemical Physics; Liquid Crystal Institute; Research; Third Frontier (1)
KSU TO RECEIVE STATE MONEY 12/28/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Kent State University was awarded three of nine Phase I awards given through Ohio's Third Frontier Technology Validation and Start-Up Fund. Kent...


College of Business (COB) (1)
Players: Upper Executive Appointments in Northeast Ohio 12/26/2012 Inside Business Magazine (Northeast Ohio) - Online Text Attachment Email

Education Deborah F. Spake has been named dean of Kent State University's College of Business Administration. Spake, a graduate of the University of South Alabama, previously served as associate dean...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Research Results from Kent State University Update Knowledge of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders 12/28/2012 OBGYN & Reproduction Week - Online Text Attachment Email

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders Research Results from Kent State University Update Knowledge of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders 2013 JAN 4 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Kent Health Dean Named to Akron General Board (Alemagno) 12/26/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Sonia Alemagno, Ph.D., dean of Kent State University's College of Public Health, has been appointed a member of the Akron General Hospitals' Board. Alemagno, a professor of health...


College of the Arts (CotA); Institutional Advancement; Music (1)
Kent State Music School Earns All-Steinway Honor (Seachrist, Crawford) 01/02/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's College of the Arts recently celebrated the successful conclusion of its Steinway Campaign that raised $2.7 million dollars...


Communication Studies (1)
Celebrations - Dec. 23 01/02/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Kent offers great holiday shopping and unique gifts for the holidays 12/25/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...recent trip to Kent, I wandered through Acorn Alley, a walkway right off Main Street that is packed with stores with unusual offering. There is the Kent State Fashion School Store operated by students and faculty of the Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design at the University....


Geography (2)
Winter storm slams Portage County 01/02/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

County hit hard by winter's first storm 01/02/2013 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

...had 10 plow trucks out on city streets the morning of the storm, said Broska. Thomas Schmidlin, local weather expert and professor of geography at Kent State University, said three inches of snow had fallen by 1 p.m. Dec. 26. The National Weather Service's Cleveland office cancelled a winter...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Judge in T.J. Lane's case puts restrictions on media; experts say he doesn't want media circus (Goodman) 01/02/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


KSU and President Obama; Student Involvement, Center for (2)
Editor's Picks: President Obama Rallies Kent 01/02/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

2012 Most-Read: No. 9 01/02/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
Ashtabula Growth Partnership Names Officers 12/23/2012 Youngstown Business Journal Text Attachment Email

...Telephone Co., Ashtabula County Commissioner Peggy Carlo, Tom Hough of Andover Bank, John Palo of The Robert S. Morrison Foundation, and Susan Stocker of Kent State University Ashtabula Campus, who also serves as past president of the committee. "The Growth Partnership looks forward to another great...


KSU at Stark (4)
Steve Paquette: It's all about entrepreneurship 12/26/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...working partnership with a number of key organizations throughout the county, including Stark State College; the Small Business Development Center at the Kent State University Stark Campus; Techalliance 2, a new incubator organization on the campus of the University of Mount Union; the Canton Regional...

Oil, gas series continues Jan. 24 at Kent State Stark 12/23/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Canton Small Business Development Center and Kent State University at Stark will present the second event in the four-part Oil and Gas Education Series Jan. 24. The program will explain property...

Oil, gas series continues Jan. 24 at Kent State Stark 12/23/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Canton Small Business Development Center and Kent State University at Stark will present the second event in the four-part Oil and Gas Education Series Jan. 24. The program will explain property...

Oil, gas series continues Jan. 24 at Kent State Stark 12/23/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Canton Small Business Development Center and Kent State University at Stark will present the second event in the four-part Oil and Gas Education Series Jan. 24. The program will explain property...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
After the Headlines: Performing Arts Center marks another successful year (Morelli) 12/22/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Behind nearly every headline written about the Performing Arts Center at the Tuscarawas Campus of Kent State University has been a successful production. Halfway into the center's third season, there have been plenty of highs and very few lows...

After the Headlines: Performing Arts Center marks another successful year (Morelli) 12/22/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Behind nearly every headline written about the Performing Arts Center at the Tuscarawas Campus of Kent State University has been a successful production. Halfway into the center's third season, there have been plenty of highs and very few lows...


KSU Museum (2)
On With The Show 12/26/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...Life," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques," "Fandemonium" and "Fashion Timeline," the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State campus off East Main St., east of downtown Kent.

New York exhibit celebrates Katherine Hepburn as a fashion icon (Druesedow) 01/02/2013 Kansas City Star Text Attachment Email


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
A tale that begs to be read aloud (Brodie) 12/21/2012 Chicago Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...adults read to children, says Carolyn Brodie, president of the Association for Library Service to Children and a professor at the library school program at Kent State in Ohio. "Especially if the reader reading has a dramatic flair for reading, we can experience the emotion of the book's excitement...

A tale that begs to be read aloud (Brodie) 12/21/2012 Pasadena Sun - Online Text Attachment Email

...adults read to children, says Carolyn Brodie, president of the Association for Library Service to Children and a professor at the library school program at Kent State in Ohio. "Especially if the reader reading has a dramatic flair for reading, we can experience the emotion of the book's excitement...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Blended learning helps students prepare for the real world, educators say (Kovalik) 12/26/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

...addition, Cain said 25 percent of the grant money is required to be used on professional development "so we can make it more interesting for the students." Kent State University Dr. Cindy Kovalik, who is working with the school district on professional development, said blended learning is "any combination...


Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Entrepreneurship series at Hudson library 12/28/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

... The Jan 28 session is Driving Change in Stable Organizations with Susan C. Hanlon, assistant dean of the College of Business Administration at the University of Akron. Financing for a Small Business will be offered Feb. 11, with PNC's Business Banking Officer Jon Novak. Value added IP:...


Nutrition and Dietetics (1)
Look closely at diet claims, expert endorsements in ads (VIncent) 12/25/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

Kathy Hodges is a busy woman. She's depicted as a TV reporter in Boston and a dietitian from Kent State University. On several different websites, she's quoted as an expert who "worries" that people who consume green tea extract or a raspberry...


Partnerships (1)
BRIEF: Minority mentoring program scheduled 12/29/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...program for people in Medina, Portage and Summit counties. The program combines the resources and expertise of the Akron Urban League, Akron SCORE and Kent State University. The partners offer a 15-month business accelerator program for African-American, Hispanic, Asian, Indian, Native-American,...


Political Science (3)
Gun control may be coming, local politicians, others say (Banks) 12/23/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...strictest standard of scrutiny our judiciary can apply." Public support needed Christopher Banks, an assistant professor of political science at Kent State University, thinks a groundswell of public support for gun control reforms will be needed to press Congress to action. Some of this has...

Politicians see gun control reforms coming, but specifics unclear (Banks) 12/22/2012 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...narrowly tailored and meet the strictest standard of scrutiny our judiciary can apply." Christopher Banks, an assistant professor of political science at Kent State University, thinks a groundswell of public support for gun control reforms will be needed to press Congress to action. Some of this has...

Gun control may be coming, local politicians, others say (Banks) 12/29/2012 Jefferson Gazette Text Attachment Email

...strictest standard of scrutiny our judiciary can apply." Public support needed Christopher Banks, an assistant professor of political science at Kent State University, thinks a groundswell of public support for gun control reforms will be needed to press Congress to action. Some of this has...


Psychology (1)
Reports from Kent State University Highlight Recent Research in Schizophrenia and Related Psychoses 12/31/2012 Mental Health Weekly Digest Text Email

...variance in speech disorder, but its nature and causes overall are not well understood." The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "This study rated speech samples from 60 schizophrenic outpatients for thought disorder, conceptual disorganization, linguistic...


Students (4)
5 burglary suspects, all Kent State University students, indicted for University Drive incident 01/02/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

2012 Most-Read: No. 6 01/02/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

2012 Most-Read: No. 5 01/02/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

2012 Most-Read: No. 2 01/02/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (3)
Teacher uses closed captions as learning aid 12/24/2012 Tennessean - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...action, to me, that sounds like free Hooked on Phonics!” She kicked off the no-budget movement around Shannon in November, the day after she heard Kent State University literacy professor Tim Rasinski speak in a reading seminar here. “That was Nov. 15,” Williamson said. “The next day, I announced...

Principal uses closed caption TV for literacy 12/24/2012 Knoxville News-Sentinel - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...documentation, signed by a parent, of their closed caption use. Williamson told The Commercial Appeal (http://bit.ly/10aPk3f) she got the idea from a Kent State University literacy professor Tim Rasinski. Rasinski said closed captioning is a way for children to see more words in print. Every...

Memphis principal promotes closed captioning on TV to help kids with reading (Rasinski) 12/24/2012 Commercial Appeal - Online Text Attachment Email

...action, to me, that sounds like free Hooked on Phonics!" She kicked off the no-budget movement around Shannon in November, the day after she heard Kent State University literacy professor Tim Rasinski speak in a reading seminar here. "That was November 15," Williamson said. "The next day,...


University Communications and Marketing (1)
Local TV personalities move on to other gigs 12/27/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

...spring to get out of the local news grind. The Akron native started work in June in the new position of executive director of university media relations at Kent State University. Channel 3 also took the loss when Mark Nolan, host of its morning show, decided to bag the TV business. Nolan, who joined...


University Libraries (1)
Kent State University Libraries 01/01/2013 Twinsburg Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Libraries offer a wide range of resources and books for students and residents of the community. The main library location is...


University Press (2)
New publishing pact 12/23/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...“Finding Utopia: Another Journey into Lost Ohio,” author Randy McNutt again explores the state's forgotten nooks and byways. The book, published by Kent State University Press (264 pages, $21.95), picks up where McNutt's previous book ended — on roads less traveled. The author explores ghost towns,...

About Books:Essays written over half century study Civil War 12/27/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The 150th anniversary of the Civil War is being studied in a 50-year collection of essays published by Kent State University Press. "Conflict & Command: Civil War History Readers, Volume 1," is an anthology - the first of several to be published...


WKSU (1)
WKSU Names New General Manager After National Search 01/02/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: KSU looks at airport's future (Friend, Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Eight years ago, Kent State wanted to decommission its airport and move elsewhere. But the Federal Aviation Administration, which has final say about the property, said the airport was too important to move and that it didn't want to waste the $3.9 million it had given KSU for improvements there.

Now, university officials are taking a fresh look at the 287-acre airport between state Route 59 and River Road in Stow in Summit County.

"We were stuck with a plan that we couldn't act on," airport operations coordinator Dave Paluga said. "Since the last plan, there has been a lot of economic changes. We've been stuck in a status quo."

The university has hired consultant C & S Cos., headquartered in Syracuse, N.Y., to conduct public meetings and develop a proposal for the KSU trustees and the FAA. Funding comes from a $600,000 FAA grant.

The main goal of the master plan will be to "determine what is needed to meet the current and future needs of the airport," according to the university.

The master plan will include an airport layout plan, a schedule of priorities and funding sources for proposed improvements, KSU said.

The airport is both a training ground for KSU flight students and a Stow community resource - plus sometimes a bone of contention for nearby residents who believe the aircraft are too noisy or fly too low.

Complaints reached a crescendo about eight years ago when KSU considered expanding or moving the airport. But Stow city officials, then as now, want the airport to stay right where it is.

"If there are ongoing concerns, I want the city to be a part of developing any changes," Stow Mayor Sarah Drew said this week. "The airport is an asset to Stow."

The airport, formally called the Andrew W. Paton Field after KSU's first flight instructor, was used as a landing field in World War I. KSU bought it in 1947.

One of 29 general service airports statewide, the facility serves twin- and single engine aircraft used for business, pleasure and training. A for-profit company, Commercial Aviation Corp., leases multiple hangars for aerial photography, flight training, charter flights and more.

Mostly, though, the airport is used by about 200 KSU students studying in what is the largest flight-training program in Ohio. The university has about 24 planes.

Expansion probably isn't in the offing, airport operations coordinator Thomas Friend said.

"We may get a few more aircraft and get rid of a few, but we don't have the facilities to expand," he said.

John Trew, president of the Portage County Regional Airport, said he would welcome the relocation of the KSU airport to his Ravenna facility, one of the options discussed in the last master plan. But that isn't to be, he said.

KSU officials "told us in the last two years that they're going to do whatever they have to do at their own field," he said.

What that will be isn't clear now.

Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for finance and administration at KSU, said in a media release that the university is deferring any reinvestments at the airport until the master plan is completed in 18 months, but that some improvements are needed.

"The needs are becoming urgent," he said.

Comments about the future of the airport should be directed to Aileen Maguire Meyer of C & S at 216-619-5449, 877-277-6583 or amaguire@cscos.com .

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News Headline: Kent State University Airport Initiates Development of a New Master Plan (Diacon, Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Public meetings soon to be organized

A steering team for the Kent State University Airport has begun planning the development of a new master plan. The public may help determine the future of the airport by participating in a series of public information meetings in early 2013.

Kent State University has owned the public-use, general aviation airport on Kent Road (S.R. 59) in Stow since 1942 and uses the facility to support its aeronautics program, one of 32 accredited aviation education programs worldwide.

"One of the many things that makes Kent State University a special place is its delivery of programs and majors not offered on other college campuses," said Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. "Having modern airport facilities is the basic building block for the continued excellence of this program."

In 2004, the airport completed a master plan, which was then updated in 2006. At that time, the university was considering closing the airport and moving operations to another nearby airport.

University leaders are now reassessing the recommendations of the previous plan, and a new plan is required to take a fresh look at the airport's assets and to determine its needs.

According to KSU officials, the airport is a significant economic driver locally, supporting not only the university's aeronautics program, but also local businesses, community services and private pilots. The new master plan must take into account how the airport can best serve the needs of all members of the community.

"I am pleased that the airport master plan is being developed to guide and support upcoming operating and investment strategies," said Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for finance and administration at Kent State. "We have deferred any reinvestments in the facilities and infrastructure until this master plan is completed, and the needs are becoming urgent."

For more information about the development of the master plan, visit www.KSUAirportPlan.com.

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News Headline: Kent State Airport to Develop New Master Plan (Diacon, Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Public meetings plan but not scheduled to talk about master plan

A steering team for the Kent State University Airport has begun planning the development of a new master plan. The public may help determine the future of the airport by participating in a series of public information meetings in early 2013.

Kent State University has owned the public-use, general aviation airport since 1942 and uses the facility to support its Aeronautics Program, one of 32 accredited aviation education programs worldwide. The airport is a critical asset for the Aeronautics Program, which serves more than 560 students in five areas of concentration under the Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautics.

“One of the many things that makes Kent State University a special place is its delivery of programs and majors not offered on other college campuses,” said Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. “As I like to say, ‘different is good,' and a strong aviation program makes Kent State a destination university for many of our students. Having modern airport facilities is the basic building block for the continued excellence of this program.”

In 2004, the airport completed a master plan, which was then updated in 2006. At that time, the university was considering closing the airport and moving operations to another nearby airport. University leaders are now reassessing the recommendations of the previous plan, and a new plan is required to take a fresh look at the airport's assets and to determine its needs.

The airport is a significant economic driver locally, supporting not only the university's Aeronautics Program, but also local businesses, community services and private pilots. The new master plan must take into account how the airport can best serve the needs of all members of the community.

“I am pleased that the airport master plan is being developed to guide and support upcoming operating and investment strategies,” said Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for finance and administration at Kent State. “We have deferred any reinvestments in the facilities and infrastructure until this master plan is completed, and the needs are becoming urgent.”

For more information about the development of the master plan, visit www.KSUAirportPlan.com

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News Headline: Steering team for KSU airport initiates development of new master plan (Diacon, Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A steering team for the Kent State University Airport has begun planning the development of a new master plan. The public may help determine the future of the airport by participating in a series of public information meetings in early 2013.

Kent State University has owned the public-use, general aviation airport since 1942 and uses the facility to support its Aeronautics Program, one of 32 accredited aviation education programs worldwide. The airport is a critical asset for the Aeronautics Program, which serves more than 560 students in five areas of concentration under the bachelor of science degree in aeronautics.

"One of the many things that makes Kent State University a special place is its delivery of programs and majors not offered on other college campuses," said Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. "As I like to say, 'different is good,' and a strong aviation program makes Kent State a destination university for many of our students. Having modern airport facilities is the basic building block for the continued excellence of this program."

In 2004, the airport completed a master plan, which was then updated in 2006. At that time, the university was considering closing the airport and moving operations to another nearby airport. University leaders are now reassessing the recommendations of the previous plan, and a new plan is required to take a fresh look at the airport's assets and to determine its needs.

According to the university, the airport is a significant economic driver locally, supporting not only the university's Aeronautics Program, but also local businesses, community services and private pilots. The new master plan must take into account how the airport can best serve the needs of all members of the community.

"I am pleased that the airport master plan is being developed to guide and support upcoming operating and investment strategies," said Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for finance and administration at Kent State. "We have deferred any reinvestments in the facilities and infrastructure until this master plan is completed, and the needs are becoming urgent."

For more information about the development of the master plan, visit www.KSUAirportPlan.com.

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News Headline: Kent State airport initiates development of new master plan (Diacon, Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A steering team for the Kent State University Airport has begun planning the development of a new master plan.

The public may help determine the future of the airport by participating in a series of public information meetings in early 2013.

Kent State University has owned the public-use, general aviation airport since 1942 and uses the facility to support its Aeronautics Program, one of 32 accredited aviation education programs worldwide.

The airport is a critical asset for the Aeronautics Program, which serves more than 560 students in five areas of concentration under the bachelor of science degree in aeronautics.

"One of the many things that makes Kent State University a special place is its delivery of programs and majors not offered on other college campuses," said Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost.

"As I like to say, 'different is good,' and a strong aviation program makes Kent State a destination university for many of our students," Diacon said. "Having modern airport facilities is the basic building block for the continued excellence of this program."

In 2004, the airport completed a master plan, which was then updated in 2006. At that time, the university was considering closing the airport and moving operations to another nearby airport.

University leaders are now reassessing the recommendations of the previous plan, and a new plan is required to take a fresh look at the airport's assets and to determine its needs.

According to the university, the airport is a significant economic driver locally, supporting not only the university's Aeronautics Program, but also local businesses, community services and private pilots.

The new master plan must take into account how the airport can best serve the needs of all members of the community.

"I am pleased that the airport master plan is being developed to guide and support upcoming operating and investment strategies," said Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for finance and administration at Kent State.

"We have deferred any reinvestments in the facilities and infrastructure until this master plan is completed, and the needs are becoming urgent," Floyd said.

For more information about the development of the master plan, visit www.KSUAirportPlan.com.

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News Headline: KSU airport initiates development of new master plan (Diacon, Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A steering team for the Kent State University Airport has begun planning the development of a new master plan. The public may help determine the future of the airport by participating in a series of public information meetings in early 2013.

Kent State University has owned the public-use, general aviation airport since 1942 and uses the facility to support its Aeronautics Program, one of 32 accredited aviation education programs worldwide. The airport is a critical asset for the Aeronautics Program, which serves more than 560 students in five areas of concentration under the bachelor of science degree in aeronautics.

"One of the many things that makes Kent State University a special place is its delivery of programs and majors not offered on other college campuses," said Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. "As I like to say, 'different is good,' and a strong aviation program makes Kent State a destination university for many of our students. Having modern airport facilities is the basic building block for the continued excellence of this program."

In 2004, the airport completed a master plan, which was then updated in 2006. At that time, the university was considering closing the airport and moving operations to another nearby airport. University leaders are now reassessing the recommendations of the previous plan, and a new plan is required to take a fresh look at the airport's assets and to determine its needs.

According to the university, the airport is a significant economic driver locally, supporting not only the university's Aeronautics Program, but also local businesses, community services and private pilots.

The new master plan must take into account how the airport can best serve the needs of all members of the community.

"I am pleased that the airport master plan is being developed to guide and support upcoming operating and investment strategies," said Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for finance and administration at Kent State.

"We have deferred any reinvestments in the facilities and infrastructure until this master plan is completed, and the needs are becoming urgent."

For more information about the development of the master plan, visit www.KSUAirportPlan.com.

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News Headline: (Audio) Future of Kent State airport being studied (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Part of new master plan, the first since 2004

The future of the Kent State University airport is being studied for the second time in a decade. WKSU's Kabir Bhatia reports.

In 2006, the university was considering closing the airport on Rt. 59 in Stow, a half mile from the Fishcreek Rd. intersection. The FAA said no, citing $3.9 million it had given Kent State for improvements. But the closure plan is still on the table as the school takes a fresh look at the future in changing economic times.

Kent State spokesman Eric Mansfield says the school's aeronautics program, one of 32 in the country, will remain.

“The curriculum is certainly important to more than 500 students who study in the aeronautics program. And to have that facility available as part of the university, of course, is a big draw. It's also something that's been accessible to local pilots. But the program will continue regardless.”

The 287-acre airport was used as a landing field in World War I before Kent State bought it in 1947. It has sometimes been a bone of contention for nearby residents in Stow, who believe aircraft are too noisy or fly too low. But Stow Mayor Sarah Drew told the Akron Beacon Journal that the airport is an asset to her city.

Syracuse-based C & S Consultants will conduct public meetings and develop a proposal for the Kent State trustees and the FAA in the next 18 months. A website, ksuairportplan.com, will keep the public updated.

For audio, please click on link:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/34211

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News Headline: Alumni from Chester and Solon join Kent State University Alumni Board | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Sun News staff
News OCR Text: KENT - The Kent State University Alumni Association Inc. has named H. Scott Westover of Cleveland Heights as secretary of its National Alumni Board of Directors.

Westover is curator for the Progressive Art Collection in Mayfield Village. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy in 1997 from Kent State.

In addition, two area residents have been appointed to serve a three-year term on the board, ending in 2015.

Joshua Jenkins of Solon is a partner with Ernst & Young LLP in Cleveland. Jenkins earned a Bachelor of Business Administration in accounting in 1996 from Kent State.

Lori Stevic-Rust of Chester is a board-certified clinical health psychologist for Stevic-Rust & Assoc. LLC Healthcare Consultants in Willoughby. Stevic-Rust earned a Master of Education in community counseling in 1986 and a Ph.D. in counseling psychology in 1990 from Kent State.

For more information about the Kent State University Alumni Association, visit ksualumni.org.

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News Headline: Comedian, KSU grad Caparulo helping students get to Golden Flashes bowl game Jan. 6 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Water Street Tavern in Kent is giving students a fun and easy way to get to Mobile, Ala. -- with the help of a famous friend.

Comedian and Kent State University graduate John Caparulo has donated money to offset the price of the trip for students to see the KSU Golden Flashes play in their first bowl game in 40 years. KSU will face Arkansas State in the Go Daddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala., on Jan. 6.

For $255, students will be taken to New Orleans for a Saturday night on the town, and then to Mobile to watch the game. The cost includes transportation, hotels, a game ticket and a commemorative T-shirt as well as some surprises. Complete details can be found at WaterStreetTavern.com/CapBus.

"I had a great time at Kent State and would have loved to see Kent State play in a bowl game," Caparulo said. "Back then, we were just happy to beat Akron! But I remember not having much money as a student, and that's when gas was only a dollar. So I'm happy to help anyone who wants to go to the game be able to make the trip. Go Flashes!!"

Water Street Tavern owner Mike Beder, a 2000 graduate of KSU, said he was thrilled to hear of Caparulo's interest in helping. "John's been a good friend to the bar and Kent State for a long time now," Beder said. "The money he donated made a huge dent in the cost of the bus trip. John really looks back at his time at Kent State fondly and loved the idea of giving students the opportunity to experience the first Kent State bowl game in four decades."

The Water Street Tavern is the Official Post Game Party Headquarters of KSU Athletics as well as its Official Watch Party location. On Jan. 6, the watch party will begin at 6 p.m. with the game starting at 9 p.m.

For those interested in following the exploits of the bowl game bus travelers, they will be using the Twitter hashtag #CapBus.

Caparulo, who got his start as a stand-up comedian working clubs in Cleveland and Pittsburgh, is best known for his appearances on the late night E! talk show, Chelsea Lately.

Caparulo will be featured on the Chelsea Lately roundtable on shows airing on Jan. 7 and Jan. 21.

For more information on Caparulo, including tour dates, visit www.JohnCaparulo.com.

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News Headline: Comedian Subsidizing Bus Trip to Kent State Bowl Game | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Water Street Tavern and funny man John Caparulo are offering college students a whirlwind bus trip to GoDaddy.com Bowl to cheer on Golden Flashes.

The Water Street Tavern in Kent is giving area college students a fun and easy way to get to the GoDaddy.com Bowl – with the help of a famous friend.

Tavern owner Mike Beder said comedian John Caparulo, a Kent State University graduate, has "donated a significant amount of money to offset the price of the trip for students to see the Kent State Golden Flashes play in their first bowl game in 40 years."

Kent State will face Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Jan. 6 at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile, AL.

For one low price, Beder said, "students will enjoy a whirlwind trip that will take them to New Orleans for a Saturday night on the town, and then to Mobile to watch the Golden Flashes in the big bowl game."

The subsidized price of $255 per person includes transportation, hotels, game ticket and commemorative T-shirt, as well as some surprises. Complete details can be found at WaterStreetTavern.com/CapBus.

Beder, who graduated from Kent State in 2000, said he was thrilled to hear of Caparulo's interest in helping.

“John's been a good friend to the bar and Kent State for a long time now," Beder said. "The money he donated made a huge dent in the cost of the bus trip. John really looks back at his time at Kent State fondly and loved the idea of giving students the opportunity to experience the first Kent State bowl game in four decades.”

Caparulo said he's happy to help out.

"I had a great time at Kent State and would have loved to see Kent State play in a bowl game," he said. "Back then, we were just happy to beat Akron! But I remember not having much money as a student, and that's when gas was only a dollar. So I'm happy to help anyone who wants to go to the game be able to make the trip. Go Flashes!"

Caparulo, who got his start as a stand-up comedian working clubs in Cleveland and Pittsburgh, is best known for his appearances on the late night E! talk show, Chelsea Lately.

On the Nov. 4, 2010, episode of Chelsea Lately, Caparulo announced that he had proposed to fellow Kent State alum Jamie Kelly. The couple were wed where they first met – at the Water Street Tavern – on May 27, 2012. The Ohio natives now reside in Los Angeles, Calif.

Caparulo will be featured on the Chelsea Lately roundtable on shows airing on Jan. 7 and Jan. 21. For more information on Caparulo, including tour dates, visit www.JohnCaparulo.com.

Tavern hosting Official Watch Party

The Water Street Tavern is the Official Post Game Party Headquarters of Kent State Athletics, as well as its Official Watch Party location. Fans are encouraged to gather at the tavern on Jan. 6 for the Official Watch Party. The doors open at 6 p.m the game starts at 9 p.m. A full menu will be available through the tavern's popular kitchen, Cajun Dave's.

Follow bus travelers' exploits via social meda

Can't make the trip but you're Interested in following the exploits of the bowl game bus travelers? They'll be using the hashtag #CapBus in their social media updates.

While the Go Daddy.com Bowl bus trip is open to everyone 21 and over, the Water Street Tavern posted this cautionary message on its website: Although the bus is technically open to everyone, due to the potentially rowdy nature of the trip we anticipate it to be almost entirely “student oriented.”

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News Headline: Akron sculpture garden gets 'substantial' pledge | Email

News Date: 12/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Litt, Steven
News OCR Text: The Akron Art Museum announced Friday that supporters Rick and Alita Rogers have pledged an unspecified amount of money as the lead gift for the design and construction of the museum's long-awaited sculpture garden.

A press advisory released Thursday by the city of Akron stated that the gift was a "very substantial (seven figure)" pledge, but a museum spokeswoman said Friday that the donors did not want the amount given. The museum offered no further explanation.

Museum officials scheduled a 3 p.m. news conference with Mayor Donald Plusquellic to make the announcement. The garden was left unfinished at the conclusion of the museum's $35 million expansion and renovation, designed by Coop Himmelb(l)au of Vienna, Austria, and completed in 2007.

The new garden will be named for Bruce and Susanne Rogers, Rick Rogers' parents. Alita Rogers serves on the museum's board of trustees.

Mitchell Kahan, the museum's outgoing director, who will retire in January after 26 years at the institution, prepared remarks for the news conference in which he said that nothing "could be more gratifying than to depart with an announcement that the institution will continue to move forward in brilliant new ways."

Kahan also wrote that the Rogers' gift will be augmented by other donations from trustees.

Kahan wrote that a formal design process will begin in 2013, accompanied by an exhibition in August of design projects from Kent State University's third-year students in the School of Architecture that will examine the site of the garden, now a surface parking lot.

In the fall, the museum will host a symposium on "The Urban Sculpture Garden in the 21st Century."

The museum also announced that Janice Driesbach, a native of Lakewood who joined the museum as its chief curator in August, will serve as the museum's interim director while trustees conduct a search for Kahan's successor.

The museum marked its 90th anniversary in 2012 with important exhibitions including a show on the sculptures of Ghanaian artist El Anatsui.

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News Headline: Akron Art Museum's 90th anniversary year crescendos with a pledge of a major gift | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Artdaily
Contact Name: Ignacio Villarreal
News OCR Text: AKRON, OH.- At the conclusion of its 90th anniversary year, the Akron Art Museum announced a pledge from museum supporters Rick and Alita Rogers as the lead gift for the design and construction of its long awaited outdoor sculpture garden. The completed outdoor gallery and multi-use space will bear the name of Bruce and Susanne Rogers, Rick’s parents, who are among Akron’s most devoted community boosters.

Dr. Mitchell Kahan, who is retiring next week after 26 years as director, praised the generosity of the Rogers family. “We are all so indebted to Rick and Alita for making it possible to undertake this next step in the museum’s growth. The new space will be an enormous contribution to Akron’s urban landscape and is something that our visitors have sorely missed since we closed the old Myers Sculpture Garden in 2004.”

The new space will be a place for art, for concerts and for a variety of community activities.

Alita currently serves on the board of trustees of the Akron Art Museum and is chair of its Governance Committee. Rick was president of the board when the museum broke ground in 2004 for the celebrated John S. and James L. Knight Building. B. W. Rogers Co., located in downtown Akron, is the economic engine that makes this gift possible. Started in 1928 by Rick’s grandfather to mainly serve the rubber industry, it has grown steadily over three generations.

“We are happy that this pledge will return money made in Akron to the community that helped make our success possible,” said Rick Rogers. “This is also an opportunity to say thanks to Mitchell before he retires, for the impact his creative vision and courage has had on the museum’s stellar reputation.”

Board President Dianne Newman said, “What a generous gift to our city during this holiday giving season! It is so appropriate that this will honor Bud and Susie Rogers, who have been lifelong volunteers and donors to Akron charities. This gift from Rick and Alita and their children is a multi-generational commitment to the art museum and the community at large. It demonstrates the key role of generous individuals in advancing Akron’s arts.”

“Under Mitchell Kahan’s direction, the Akron Art Museum has become a civic focal point for our residents, and its offerings continue to receive worldwide recognition,” said Mayor Don Plusquellic. “Now, thanks to the very generous and substantial gift from dedicated Akronites Rick and Alita Rogers, the museum’s future sculpture garden and multi-use outdoor gathering space will certainly be a thrilling addition to downtown Akron.”

Planning will begin in 2013 after a new museum director is appointed. As the full scope of the project unfolds, museum trustees will raise additional funds to operate and endow programs for the space. In the meantime, related activities are planned as part of the project’s development.

The first event is a student exhibition opening August 10, 2013 in the museum’s Mary S. and David C. Corbin Foundation Gallery. During the 2012 fall semester, Kent State University’s third-year students in the School of Architecture were given the assignment of examining the site for the museum’s future sculpture garden and asked to develop concepts based on a program established by museum staff. From 80 student proposals, approximately 20 will be featured in three-dimensional models, elevations, plans and electronic media.

The second event will be a symposium in fall 2013 to be called “The Urban Sculpture Garden in the 21st Century.” Noted thinkers in the design field will come together to offer a vision of the next step in the evolution of a building type that extends through centuries in different forms: from the royal gardens filled with statuary at Versailles to the 20th century version exemplified by the Museum of Modern Art’s courtyard filled with bronze figures. “Akron Art Museum will pioneer the development of a new model for outdoor sculpture appropriate to the internationally acclaimed Knight Building and the dramatically changing environment of the 21st century,” noted Kahan.

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News Headline: Akron Art Museum announces seven-figure pledge from donors for a new sculpture garden | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Museumnews.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Akron Art Museum announced Friday that supporters Rick and Alita Rogers have pledged an unspecified amount of money as the lead gift for the design and construction of the museum's long-awaited sculpture garden.

A press advisory released by the City of Akron Thursday stated that the gift was a "very substantial (seven figure)" pledge, but a museum spokeswoman said Friday that the donors did not want the amount given. The museum offered no further explanation.

Museum officials scheduled a 3 p.m. press conference with Mayor Donald Plusquellic to make the announcement.

The garden was left unfinished at the conclusion of the museum's $35 million expansion and renovation, designed by Coop Himmelb(l)au of Vienna Austria, and completed in 2007.

The new garden will be named for Bruce and Susanne Rogers, Rick Rogers's parents. Alita Rogers serves on the museum's board of trustees.

Mitchell Kahan, the museum's outgoing director, who will retire in January after 26 years at the institution, prepared remarks for the press conference in which he said that nothing "could be more gratifying than to depart with an announcement that the institution will continue to move forward in brilliant new ways."

Kahan also wrote that the Rogers' gift will be augmented by other donations from trustees.

Kahan wrote that a formal design process will begin in 2013, accompanied by an exhibition in August of design projects from Kent State University's third-year students in the School of Architecture that will examine the site of the garden, now a surface parking lot.

In the fall, the museum will hose a symposium on "The Urban Sculpture Garden in the 21st Century."

The museum also announced that Janice Driesbach, a native of Lakewood who joined the museum as its chief curator in August, will serve as the museum's interim director while trustees conduct a search for Kahan's successor.

The museum marked its 90th anniversary year in 2012 with important exhibitions including a show on the sculptures of Ghanian artist El Anatsui.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW What 2013 might bring | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Although precise
forecasts about the New Year are
made at one's peril, here's a few
themes that appear to be emerging.

1) Local government
fund cuts felt in Portage:
At the state level,
although Ohio operates
with a balanced
budget, one of the ways
it has achieved this is by cutting the local
government fund and state aid to education.
Local governments, local libraries
and school districts in Portage County
are struggling to operate in the black and
provide adequate levels of service. Kent
has already tried to recoup some of these
losses with a boost in the income tax that
failed last November. Ravenna, citing its
rapidly shrinking rainy day fund, says it
cannot continue without substantial reductions
in benefits and possibly layoffs.
Kent Schools have placed an 8.9-mill levy
on the May ballot. Waterloo has a levy up
for a special February vote. All are symptomatic
of what befalls not only Portage
County, but much of the nation.

2) A Kent issue, the Kent Police Department:
Clearly inadequate, Kent would be better
off constructing an entirely new one. Persuading
the voters to take on new taxes to
do so is going to be difficult. Our suggestion
would be to try a sunset clause on a new tax
proposal that would specify the cost of the
proposed police department along with language
that the new tax would expire as soon
as the new facility would be paid off. Another
option would be a partial sunset clause
that would cause the amount of the tax to go
down after the department is built and paid
for with the remaining funds earmarked for
capital improvements in perpetuity.

3) A Portage County jail issue: Our
growing female inmate population. Sheriff
David Doak has said the county needs to
expand the Justice Center, which houses
inmates convicted of misdemeanors and
adults awaiting trial mainly because of a
growing female inmate population. How
to fund such an expansion is an issue the
commissioners will soon face.

4) Strengthening the area industrial
base: The county and municipal governments
are making headway in this. Using
tax incentives and its great highway access,
Streetsboro has become the undisputed
industrial hub of Portage County.
Mayor Glenn Broska has said his focus will
be retention, hoping to keep those industries
that over the last 20 years have located
in Streetsboro. Ravenna is studying
the possibilities of a medical science
corridor that would run north-south from
NeoMed to Robinson Memorial Hospital.
It is also seeking to create an enterprise
lane on Cleveland Road going from the
downtown to S.R. 14. Kent is promoting
development in the old Ametek facility on
Lake Street and in the Mogadore Road
area where RB&W once loomed large.
Brimfield is benefitting from its Joint Economic
Development Districts, particularly
the one it shares with Tallmadge where
Newell Rubbermaid is opening its new
800,000 square foot distribution center.

5) Kent State rebuild and NEOMED:
Perhaps the surest good news for 2013
is the start of a massive program to rejuvenates
the main campus of Kent State
through a bond funded program that will
focus on improving or adding to KSU's
science facilities, building an entirely new
School of Architecture building, replacing
or improving the School of Art building
and adding an academic center for
the School of Applied Engineering, Sustainability
and Technology. The New Year
will also see the completion and opening
of an 80,0000 sq. ft. Research and Graduate
Eduction building on the NEOMED
campus where 90 new permanent jobs in
research and graduate education are to be
stationed. This is the first of several steps
to expand NEOMED's Rootstown campus,
the second being student residential
village, currently under construction.

6) Fracking: Drilling is likely to pick up
in Portage County, a portion of which appears
to be rich in Utica Shale gas and oil.
Carrying on fracking in a manner that is
safe for the community at large is going
to be key to this enterprise that otherwise
promises wealth and jobs for those areas
where it will occur.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY Good ideas that emerged in 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Every year produces good ideas in the public
arena. Here are a few we reported about
this past year.

1) Sharing resources: Early in 2012, the cities
of Ravenna, Kent, Twinsburg, Hudson, Stow,
Aurora, and Streetsboro and the villages of
Mantua and Hiram informally agreed to share
equipment and other resources. Streetsboro
Mayor Glenn Broska hosted the first gathering
of the group early in 2012 and since then
they have been joined by Tallmadge, Munroe
Falls and Cuyahoga Falls.

Kent Service Director Gene Roberts set up a
wiki page in which those with access can share
information about their needs and available
equipment. The city of Ravenna is upgrading
this so that answers to questions will automatically
be emailed to those asking. Here
are a couple of good results so far. Ravenna
and Stow are sharing an arborist. Kent, needing
an asphalt recycling machine, was able to
buy a better one because both Ravenna and
Stow have agreed to pay for one third of it in
exchange for use thereof.

The idea for the sharing may have been
spurred by longtime mutual aid between communities
for fire and police protections, Roberts
said. “These have been around for decades,”
he said.

2) Ravenna Brownfields Study: Kerry Mc-
Comber, the city's economic development director,
is spearheading this effort that with
a grant from the Ohio Development Services
Agency, is focusing on downtown Ravenna
and a neighborhood immediately to the
west. There have been two public meetings
and each had a positive tone. Ideas included
getting the county and Robinson Memorial
Hospital, two of the city's most important
economic anchors, involved in a dialogue not
unlike the one that led to the great partnership
between the city of Kent and Kent State
University; connecting the downtown with the
Portage Hike and Bike Trail; taking pride in
the city's distinctive 19th and early 20th century
architecture.

“Good enough isn't good enough. We can do
better,” one participant said

3) Save the Flagpole: This is an effort by
a group of volunteers to repair the steel box
lattice flagpole currently owned by Ravenna
Township that stands in front of the Portage
County Courthouse. The volunteers are doing
a good job of raising awareness about the significance
of the flagpole, one of the few survivors
of a type of flagpole that was erected in
communities throughout the United States in
the second half of the 19th century. A goal of
raising $150,000 is a large amount, but volunteers
are more than halfway there.

4) Expanding the Kent Esplanade: Kent
State University has invested nearly $10 million
in acquiring property to link the campus
with the downtown to make both pedestrian
friendly. This will help undergird the success
of rejuvenation efforts in the downtown. The
university brings more than 2,000 employees
and 20,000 students to the campus Monday
through Friday. They help provide the critical
mass needed to support retail and service
businesses in the downtown. The presence of
Ametek and Davey Tree in the downtown will
help too. Kent State's lease-buy arrangement
of the DuBois property utilizing the services of
the Portage County Port Authority will protect
the campus from developments that might
undermine the Esplanade.

5) Refurbishing the old Kent Hotel: This idea
is 30 years old, but it took Ron Burbick to step
up to the task. He is turning the city's biggest
eyesore into an attractive focal point that enhances
Kent's early 20th century architectural
heritage. Many have contributed to the rejuvenation
of Kent's downtown, but no one any
more so than Burbick. His Phoenix Properties,
Acorn Alley and now the hotel are so artfully
done and help make Kent a destination point.

6) A community college at beautiful old
Ravenna High: This idea originated with Helen
Jane Wilson, a longtime Ravenna High School
teacher and wife of the late Don Wilson Jr., a
developer. Kent State University sent a team
to look at old Ravenna High and found it too
expensive to save. It did not entirely rule out a
community college, but said, “Not now.” Without
a deep-pocketed white knight, the effort
to spare old Ravenna High from demolition
has failed, but the idea of a community college
in the downtown should be pursued. The
University of Akron operates one called Summit
Community College utilizing the old Polsky
Building for some of its classrooms. Why
not a Portage County Community College in
Ravenna, possibly shared by Kent State, Hiram
College and NeoMed?

7) A Marshall Plan for Kent neighborhoods:
Editor Roger Di Paolo credits Sandra Halem,
president of the board of trustees of the Kent
Historical Society, for the catchy label of this
good idea. Downtown has been the correct priority
of Kent, but once it's completed, Kent
and its partners including Kent State University
need to look at the residential neighborhoods
and the community's housing stock.
Streets and sidewalks and well-maintained,
single family homes may not seem glamorous
undertakings, but they're important in attracting
and keeping good talent. Though not a residential
development, the new Kent municipal
court branch can help preserve the city's historic
Main Street neighborhood.

8) Kent State University's $170 million campus
rebuild: Credit President Lester Lefton and
his trustees for embarking on a huge rebuild
of the campus, its academic buildings getting
the lion's share of attention. These include the
most heavily used science buildings (Cunningham,
Smith and Williams halls) and a multidisciplinary
research addition in the science mall
area; construction of a new building for Kent
State's nationally respected College of Architecture
and Environmental Design near the
Kent State University Hotel and Conference
Center; the rehabilitation, reconstruction or
replacement of the art complex; and construction
of a new building on the science mall to
house the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability
and Technology. Collectively, this is
the biggest KSU capital program on the Kent
campus since the Bowman-White era. It will
make KSU more competitive.

9) Non-Profit Status for Robinson Memorial
Hospital: The Portage County Commissioners,
urged by Robinson Memorial Hospital President
and CEO Steve Colecchi, approved leasing
the hospital as a not-for-profit operation,
which by the middle of next year will lead to
Robinson Memorial becoming a not-for-profit
hospital. The change frees Robinson Memorial
from cumbersome restrictions and gives it
more flexibility in the rapidly changing world
of health care. Most Cleveland-Akron-Canton
hospitals are non-profit. America's hospitals
face financial challenges that are forcing alliances
of smaller ones with bigger ones to survive.
Robinson Memorial has an alliance with
Akron's Summa Health System, but even Summa
is looking for partners bigger than itself.

10) Merging the Ravenna and County Health
Departments: Their proximity makes this intuitively
logical and Ravenna officials foresee
substantial annual savings should it occur.
Kent State University's College of Public
Health has helped study this concept, which
for a time included Kent, although Kent has
since backed out. The city of Akron's health
department and the Summit County Health
Department have merged to save money. The
finances need to be worked out, but Ravenna
should not wait for Kent.

Those are some ideas that caught my attention
this year, but there were hundreds of good
ideas. I'd be interested to know what you think.

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News Headline: Kent State offensive lineman Brian Winters ready to get back to football | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Kent State senior offensive tackle Brian Winters has no complaints about the on-again, off-again practice schedule for the Golden Flashes' Jan. 6 bowl game being back on, beginning today.

Since the season ended Nov. 30 with Kent's 43-37 overtime loss to Northern Illinois in the Mid-American Conference championship game, the team has had a sporadic practice schedule.

And in between, there have been the emotional ups and downs of first losing head coach Darrell Hazell to Purdue, the wait during the coaching search, and then the hiring of former Kent player Paul Haynes as the Flashes' next head man.

"It's a good thing," said Winters, a Hudson native. "We get some rest from a long season. I know everyone's body is beat up. Being off three, four, five days at a time has been awesome to have the break to rest your body for the bowl game.

"It's definitely good to get the mental break. Everyone needs it. The bodies are beat, but their minds have been beat, too. It's a long season, and this is a great break, for sure."

But now the focus turns back to the challenge at hand as Kent travels to Mobile, Ala., to face Arkansas State (9-3) in the GoDaddy.com Bowl (Jan. 6, 9 p.m., ESPN). This will be Kent's first bowl appearance in 40 years, and just the third in school history. It also will be Hazell's final game as head coach, with Haynes sitting in the stands as a proud alum and coach-in-waiting.

Winters said with so much history tied into the contest, the players have just one focus.

"Everyone wants to go out, the last game of the season, with a 'W,' " he said. "Everyone is fully focused on what is at hand. We realize what's in front of us. We are appreciative that we finally made a bowl game and want to come back to something like this. So we're going to fight to get the 'W.' "

Win or lose, football will not stop for Winters. The 6-4, 315-pound lineman is projected to be taken in the NFL Draft, and has been selected to play in the Senior Bowl, Jan. 26.

Winters will be the only player from the MAC in the Senior Bowl.

"It's pretty crazy," Winters said. "Right after the bowl game, I have to go start training 20 days for the Senior Bowl. Busy schedule. It's a lot of football, but it's all for my future. So it's a good thing."

Adding to his challenge will be the good chance he will see action at a new position in the Senior Bowl, at least during the highly scrutinized practices by NFL personnel.

"The majority of the teams are saying guard," Kent's four-year starter at tackle said. "A lot of people are also saying it depends on the team that I go to and the style of offense. But right now, it looks more like offensive guard, which I'm totally fine with."

A ranking of draft prospects on cbssports.com rates Winters as the 11th best tackle available and projects he will be drafted in the third or fourth round.

MAC bowl update: Four games done and the MAC stands 1-3 in bowl games. Central Michigan picked up the first MAC win, 24-21, in the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl in Detroit on Wednesday. Bowling Green lost to San Jose State, 29-20, in Thursday's Military Bowl in Washington.

The MAC has three more bowl games to go: the Independence Bowl tonight in Shreveport, La. (Ohio vs. Louisiana-Monroe), the Orange Bowl on New Year's Day (Northern Illinois vs. Florida State) and the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Jan. 6 (Kent State vs. Arkansas State).

GoDaddy.com Bowl

Who: Kent State vs. Arkansas State.

When: Jan. 6.

Where: Ladd-Peebles Stadium, Mobile, Ala.

When: 9 p.m.

TV: ESPN

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News Headline: Kent State's Paul Haynes already doing the work of a head football coach (Haynes, Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Behind the scenes, Paul Haynes is hard at work as the next head football coach at Kent State. He has met with the current coaching staff, looking to see who he would like to retain. He has met with the outgoing KSU seniors and the junior who'll be back next season. He has made phone calls to recruits who had already committed.

Woven through all that has been the holidays with his wife and children, house hunting and meetings on top of meetings. Yet even with all that, Haynes, 43, still has to pinch himself.

"I don't think it has hit me, yet, that I am the head coach at my alma mater," he said. "There is a lot of new going on with this thing."

New for Haynes, but not for Kent State -- he is the sixth alum coaching a sport for the Golden Flashes.

Athletic Director Joel Nielsen has locked in on a Kent State formula rather fast. When possible find a coach that has worn the fabric of Kent State, or at the very least touched it. The simple truth is, across the board, the money has never been great at Kent State and the facilities for the major sports are average at best. One has to want to be there to have success.

"I saw the same thing in the interview process, that fire and that love," Nielsen said of hiring the former KSU defensive back and most recently, defensive coordinator at Arkansas. "He truly wanted, really wanted, the job."

After Kent's appearance in the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Jan. 6 in Mobile, Ala., Haynes will get down to finalizing his staff, recruiting, and most importantly connecting with his team.

"The first thing is, I want to make sure I embrace this team," the Columbus native said. "I got to be around the team for me to get to know them. I'll be down in the weight room, being around campus, walking in classes. The next thing of course is recruiting. We have to attack recruiting, and attack the state of Ohio.

"Then my next goal is to get around as many alumni as I can, and get our guys out in the community as much as possible. This is the time right now we can pay forward, because kids in the schools, hospitals, those folks are excited about the chance to see Dri Archer and (Roosevelt) Nix, and the players they have heard and read about. And it's twofold, as this also prepares our players to be comfortable and successful, in front of other people outside of athletics."

Haynes will be in the stands for the bowl game against Arkansas State as outgoing head coach Darrell Hazell wraps up what is already the best football season in Kent State history, complete with an 11-2 record and Mid-American Conference East Division title.

Some might consider it unique that Haynes would be cheering, instead of coaching on the sidelines, for the third bowl game in KSU history and the first in 40 years. But Haynes said being in the stands serves two purposes. "First, I don't want to make it uncomfortable right now for anybody," Haynes said.

"Let the coaches finish their jobs, let the seniors finish their jobs. And I actually think it will be a great introduction, a good connection with Kent alumni and fans. There are a lot of people who have reached out to me since I got this job who will be at the game that I can't wait to see.

"Now once we win it, you might see me hop down to the sidelines."

The Golden Flashes are on a winning track and although it's only one-year deep, Haynes is responsible for building on the foundation Hazell created. But the former defensive coordinator at Ohio State feels he is the right man at the right time for this job.

"These last two years have taught me so much," Haynes said of the somewhat lame-duck 2011 season at OSU, as NCAA sanctions hung over the Buckeyes' program. That was followed a year of turmoil at Arkansas, starting with former Arkansas coach Bobby Petrino being fired amidst a sex scandal.

"More than once I found myself saying, 'If I was in charge. . .' " he said.

Haynes believes the past two years were the final prep for a job he had applied for in the past, but did not get. Looking back, Haynes said both he and Kent State are in a better position now, going forward together, than perhaps coming together in the past.

"No doubt," he said. "Two years ago, when this job came about, looking back I would say, 'I wished I would have got it.' I don't know if I was ready for it, or even really wanted it. But I wished for it. This time, I wanted this job, because I knew I was ready. That was the difference in those two years. I needed those two more years of growth.

"God has a mysterious way sometimes of saying, 'I'll give it to you later, but you're not ready right now. And it will be in a better place when I give it to you,' which Kent State is right now. I can't wait to really get started."

After the bowl game, the Kent State Golden Flashes are all his.

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News Headline: Kent State athletes have excelled to new levels in the past 12 months (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, OHIO -- The past 12 months have been stellar ones for Kent State athletics.

Golden Flashes baseball advanced to the College World Series, golf finished tied for fifth in the nation, wrestling was ranked at No. 13 in the nation, men's basketball topped 20 wins for the 13th time in the last 14 seasons, and the football team is going to a bowl game for the first time in 40 years.

Those teams not only carried the Kent State brand into the national spotlight, but they helped athletic director Joel Nielsen generate over $3.5-million in fundraising for Kent football and baseball alone, most of it over the past 12 months. Fundraising for the other programs remains high as well.

While Nielsen is only into his third year as Kent's athletic director, he has quickly realized the keys to most of the on-field success have been fundraising and relatively consistent coaching, with much of it led by alums or former assistants steeped in Kent's formula for success. Of those five sports four -- golf, wrestling, baseball and now football, are led by KSU alums. "And Rob (Senderoff, basketball coach) has seven or eight years of experience here," Nielsen said.

Here, Nielsen looks at the building blocks of some of Kent's more successful teams:

Football The No. 25-ranked Golden Flashes sit with an 11-2 record and Mid-American Conference East Division title, and Nielson has collected $2.5-million through fundraising and received an almost immediate return, as Kent goes to its first bowl game in 40 years Saturday at the GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala.

Prior to hiring former coach Darrell Hazell in 2010, KSU football coaching salaries not only ranked last in the MAC, but last in the country among Football Bowl Subdivision teams. When Nielsen hired Hazell he bumped the coaching salary to $300,000, and now with the hiring of Kent alum Paul Haynes -- after Hazell left for the Purdue job -- Nielsen bumped it again to $375,000 with at least $75,000 more available in incentives.

"When we arrived, we talked a lot about what it would take to have football success," Nielsen said. "One of the things we looked at was that we were poorly resourced in football, primarily with our people. President (Lester) Lefton gave us the green light to go out there and talk to football donors, talk to people who wanted to see football be successful. We had about 20 people step up that first year, some significantly. That allowed us to pay some competitive salaries.

"We decided, instead of investing in bricks and mortar, we would invest in people. And as you see now, we returned that investment fairly quickly with the success we had this season. Now we're starting to see that continue on and perpetuate itself. Those who came on early, are even giving more, and those who had not come on board before are now joining us, financially.

"We aren't that far behind everyone else, facility-wise. But we think our people will out-do our facilities. They will out-recruit our facilities."

Wrestling Kent ranked No. 13 in the nation following the 2012 regular season.

"Coach Jim Andrassy has built an outstanding program here and it gets lost sometimes in the success of our other teams," Nielsen said of the Kent alum. "He's built a consistent Top 25 program here with multiple qualifiers each and every year."

"Wrestling has done a great job of fundraising, even before I got here. They have, I believe, the largest endowment of all of our programs. Certain sports are like that. . . . Wrestlers support wrestlers. They understand that's not only key to keeping that sport afloat, but to also being successful."

Golf Kent finished in the Top 5 in 2012.

"Golf, like wrestling, was ahead of the curve fundraising wise, primarily because of coach Herb Paige," Nielsen said of yet another Kent alum. "Years ago Herb understood how important that would be to the development of his program. He took it upon himself. . . . Herb was fundraising years before any of us even thought about fundraising.

"You see the results now in the facilities he has developed -- the practice and learning center. Our ability to sustain an ACC/SEC-type program . . . takes a lot of money. Our men's and women's programs get on a plane and travel all over the country. That is unlike most of our peers. That's unlike most Big Ten schools.

"Out of that, we get a team capable of a Top 5 finish, and this points to Herb's recruiting and his ability to go into Canada and right now have, I believe, at one point last year three of the top five ranked amateur players from Canada were on the Kent State roster. And he has done that for years."

Baseball Baseball is another sport where the fundraising is high, $1-million since last June, coming off Kent's first ever College World Series appearance. This has allowed Nielsen to give coach Scott Stricklin, another Kent alum, a six-year contract extension at $300,000 per year, with additions still coming by spring to Schoonover Stadium, including lights for night games.

"Just knowing how difficult it is to get into that Final Eight for Omaha," Nielsen began. "Let's face it, for a program like ours, that will basically play the entire way on the road, you've got to have some luck. It was probably one of the most rewarding experiences I have had in this business. . . .

"We were fortunate a few years ago (2005) in baseball to have the Steve Schoonover Family come on board (financially, $1.5 million), then Olga Mural (2006, $1-million)." Nielsen said. "When they stepped up with their contributions to essentially redo our entire park, and add an artificial turf surface, the clubhouse, the stands, you started to see the success that began in 1992, that we were able to sustain, and now go to another level. . . . Overall, those are resources that are available to us that very few in our conference have."

Basketball On the positive side, men's basketball won at least 20 games for the 13th time in 14 years in 2012, coming off MAC Championships won in 2011 and 2010, and an NCAA Tournament appearance in 2008. But unlike the other sports, where donors are available to make big contributions, basketball has not been the same.

"Lately, in basketball, people have used (seat licenses) to raise money in basketball. That's the culture of basketball, to raise money with seats, not donors," Nielsen said.

So where other programs are bringing in millions, Nielsen admitted it took "three or four donors" to come up with the roughly $100,000 last summer to redo the combined men's and women's basketball offices. This is combined with the fact Kent basketball has been successful for so long, it is the underground foundation that has become easy to overlook.

"It's hard to win 20 games, much less in the fashion we've done it the last 13 of 14 years," Nielsen said. "But a lot of times I catch myself forgetting about basketball, because it doesn't jump off the page anymore.

"And it should jump off the page, so that is something we have to address, because it is so unfair to that team and that program which has carried the torch for this place for so many years. The coals are still hot with Rob and our basketball program. We have to stoke the embers there."

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News Headline: Kent State's 2012 road to GoDaddy.com Bowl | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As Kent State's football team prepares to take on Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Sunday, we take you down the path the Golden Flashes followed to get there. Go to http://Ohio.com/ksufootball to look back at the 2012 season that resulted in a bowl bid.

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News Headline: Top 10 Beacon Journal sports stories for 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 1. Kent State football team wins 11 games, goes to its first bowl game in 40 years.

2. Jimmy Haslam buys the Browns from Randy Lerner, takes over midseason.

3. Kent State baseball team goes to the College World Series.

4. Caleb Porter leaves University of Akron soccer program for a shot as coach of the Portland Timbers of MLS.

5. Cavs guard Kyrie Irving wins NBA Rookie of the Year, and does well practicing against U.S. Olympic team.

6. Browns' draft-day maneuvers land running back Trent Richardson and quarterback Brandon Weeden in the first round.

7. Darrell Hazell, after leading Kent State to its best football season since 1972, leaves to become head coach at Purdue. Paul Haynes replaces him.

8. LeBron James wins his first NBA title, his third NBA MVP, an Olympic gold medal in London and is named the Sports Illustrated Athlete of the Year.

9. Indians hire Terry Francona to replace Manny Acta as part of a retooling process that includes the addition of Mark Reynolds, Drew Stubbs and pitching prospect Trevor Bauer.

10. Ohio State, led by Urban Meyer in his first season, goes 12-0 in football but because of probation status does not go to a bowl game.

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News Headline: Kent State football players shine in the classroom (Drummer, Andrassy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: After setting new milestones on the field throughout the 2012 season, Kent State's football team also broke new academic ground during the fall semester.

The Golden Flashes put together their highest in-season grade-point average in recorded program history (since 1982), with 45 players carrying a GPA of 3.0 or better.

"I am very proud that our guys did not get distracted by such a great season," said Talea Drummer, athletic academic counselor for football.

The Dean's List (3.4 or higher) includes 18 football players, while freshman Jordan Italiano made the President's List (4.0).

The Flashes' best in-season performance in the classroom comes on the heels of a spring semester that produced 50 GPAs of 3.0 or better.

"The entire coaching staff emphasizes academics," Drummer said. "And players are coming in a lot more any time they have a question or concern. The 3.0 wall inside the football office makes a statement, and everyone wants to be on it."

The Flashes (11-2) earned a school-record 11 wins and captured the Mid-American Conference East Division title in 2012. They will battle Sun Belt Conference champion Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl Jan. 6 in Mobile, Ala.

WRESTLING

Kent State picked up where it left off last season in MAC duals with a 29-9 victory over Northern Illinois last Tuesday. The Flashes took 7-of-10 matches, including six straight from 149 to 197 pounds.

Senior Dustin Kilgore (197) earned his 51st straight dual victory in impressive fashion, taking down Parker Settecase three times then pinning him in 47 seconds.

"He pins people," KSU coach Jim Andrassy said. "That's what he talks about and that's what he does."

The string of victories began with redshirt freshman Nick Carr (149), who overcame an early 3-2 deficit to top Rob Jillard 10-4. Senior Mallie Shuster (157) and sophomore Caleb Marsh (165) followed with 8-2 victories.

Redshirt freshman Sam Wheeler (174) made his first M.A.C. Center appearance a memorable one. He trailed 4-1 after two periods and 5-3 in the third before recording a takedown and pin of Matt Mougin with 52 seconds left in the match.

Senior Casey Newburg (184) made it five straight wins with a 13-4 major decision over Bryan Loughlin, and senior Stevie Mitcheff (125) started the match with a 10-0 shutout of Derek Elmore.

Kent State returns to action Dec. 29 at the Brute Invitational in Lock Haven, Pa.

BASEBALL

Kent State junior Tyler Skulina has been named a Pre-Season Second-Team All-American by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association after an impressive 2012 season.

Skulina went 11-3 in 18 starts for the Flashes. The righty struck out 106 batters in 107.1 innings while issuing 45 walks.

The Walsh Jesuit High School product was a big part of Kent State's historical postseason run to the College World Series. He went six innings, allowing just four baserunners and two hits in the Flashes' MAC Tournament win over Buffalo. Skulina also threw 5.2 scoreless innings against Oregon in the NCAA Super Regionals, allowing just two hits.

Skulina, who sat out the 2011 season after transferring to Kent State from Virginia, was named MAC East Pitcher of the Week on three occasions last year. He went 26-0 at Walsh Jesuit, and was drafted by the Oakland Athletics in the 46th round of the 2010 Major League Baseball Draft.

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News Headline: How Paul Haynes plans to keep Kent State football trending upward (Haynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Paul Haynes was announced as the new head football coach at Kent State University on Dec. 18.

The former Flashes standout and KSU alum enters to replace Darrell Hazell, who quickly turned the program's long traditioned losing history into the greatest season the school has ever seen.

Here is a look at the core components of how Haynes plans to keep Kent State atop the Mid-American Conference.

HIS BACKGROUND

Age 43; born in Columbus, graduated from St. Francis DeSales High School in 1987; four-year starter at defensive back for Kent State from 1987-91; assistant coach at Kent State (1999-2000), Ohio State (2005-11) and Arkansas (2012, defensive coordinator).

HIS GOALS

“I have three basic goals. I wanna graduate all players, so they can be respectable citizens of this great country. I want to win, I want to be successful. The last thing, I want this football program to have a positive impact on this university, this community and this state.”

HIS PHILOSOPHY

“We're gonna focus and concentrate on what got us on top, the little things. I know Darrell Hazell and I know his philosophies, and his philosophies are a lot of my philosophies. We come from the same (coaching) tree. They're all about building men. If I build great men I'm gonna put a great product out on the field. We're gonna do the little things right, then we'll find out how we can improve on everything else. Our philosophy works. I've seen it work for a long time.”

HIS RECRUITING STRATEGY

“We're gonna pound Ohio. We can win with Ohio kids. We're gonna recruit our kind of guys, not get caught up in stars and all that. I've had more success with two-stars than I have five-stars. Let's recruit two- or three-stars and coach them into five-stars.”

HIS MISSION

“These kids are gonna understand that their purpose in life is more important than their goals in life. We're gonna get out in the community, we're gonna read to kids, visit hospitals.

“We'll make sure these kids understand that it is a privilege to be a Kent State football player. We're gonna pay forward for sure.”

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News Headline: Darrell Hazell pulls double-duty for Kent State, Purdue (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Keeping two employers content at the same time has offered a unique and admittedly difficult challenge for Darrell Hazell.

Since accepting an offer to take over the Purdue football program on Dec. 5, then gaining permission to coach Kent State in its upcoming bowl game, Hazell has been juggling a slew of vital responsibilities at both schools to the very best of his abilities.

"Obviously it's a lot," said Hazell. "There's a lot of things that you have to do for both sides to not cheat either side. And I'm not gonna cheat either side."

Next week's schedule features a stop in Dallas on New Year's Day, where his Boilermakers will battle Oklahoma State in the Heart of Texas Bowl, then a flight back to Ohio so he can depart along with his Golden Flashes on Jan. 2 for the GoDaddy.com Bowl that will be played on Jan. 6 in Mobile, Ala.

"We'll practice (today) and Saturday, then have a real quick one on Sunday (in Kent)," said Hazell. "Then I'm flying to Dallas to just watch (Purdue's) bowl game. Then I'm flying back on the 1st after their bowl game for our bowl game. So it'll be pretty busy."

Busy days are obviously nothing new to Hazell.

"Your mind's constantly racing," said Hazell. "You're thinking what needs to be done, did I forget anything? But you've got good people around you that keep you going, telling you what needs to be done. That's what it's all about, relying on your help and making sure that what we need to have done for both Kent State and Purdue gets done."

Hazell has been working off a separate list of priorities for both schools.

"I try to stay ahead from the Kent State side in terms of practice structure and bowl responsibilities that we have, making sure our coaches get what they need early enough and making sure the players are well informed on what they need to do," said Hazell.

"From the Purdue side, the three things I'm concentrating on are first getting a staff together. I've been interviewing people, and I've had to travel some to do that."

He refused to elaborate on staff decisions that have been or will be made.

"I'm gonna have a staff release the week after the bowl game," he said.

"I've also spent a lot of time talking to the recruits that have committed (to Purdue), and I still have to evaluate the guys that we need to go after. Then I'm also trying to do some things to upgrade the offices out there just a little bit. There's not a whole lot that needs to be done, but you want to try to put your own little touch on it. So those are the things that I'm trying to balance."

While his focus continues to teeter between Kent State and Purdue, Hazell plans to make sure his Golden Flashes are focused entirely on their first bowl game in 40 years -- which is now just 10 days away.

"We'll make the message loud tonight, where it's been kind of a soft leaning into it before because we were so far away.," said Hazell. "We'll make the message loud about how important this game is to this program.

"But those kids have been the same all season long, They've been so locked in and so mature and so focused that I don't have any doubt that they'll be ready to play."

TORNADOES HIT MOBILE AGAIN

Hazell will coach his first and last games for Kent State in the state of Alabama. Ironically, tornadoes struck the area before both games.

A tornado ripped through Tuscaloosa before the Flashes opened last season against the Crimson Tide on Sept. 3, causing major damage. Kent State actually sent some players to Alabama early so they could help with the rebuilding efforts.

On Christmas Day, a tornado touched down in Mobile, where the Flashes will play Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Jan. 6.

"I don't know what the severity of the tornado was, but if we can lend a hand we certainly will," said Hazell. "When we get down there we'll put together a little crew if there's something that needs to be done, and we'll go to work."

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News Headline: 2012 In Review: The Year of the Flashes (Nielsen, Page, Stricklin, Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: You could say 2012 was a dream year for the Kent State University Intercollegiate Athletics Program, but that really wouldn't be accurate.

That's because you really couldn't even dream this stuff up.

A first-ever trip to the College World Series for head coach Scott Stricklin's Golden Flashes baseball team, complete with a thrilling victory over top-ranked Florida. A school record fifth-place finish by Herb Page's perennial national power men's golf team at the NCAA Championship, including a sudden-death playoff victory over Florida State that vaulted them into match play. Then last but certainly not least, a record-shattering season by the much-maligned Kent State football program that no one besides head coach Darrell Hazell and his players saw coming, featuring a school-record 11 wins and the program's first championship and bowl berth in 40 years.

All among the premier achievements in the history of KSU athletics. All in one season.

“I don't think anyone could have imagined this at the beginning of the year,” said Flashes Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen. “Obviously we knew we were gonna be really good at golf and really good at baseball; football there's always that uncertainty, because we had never done it before.

“But then to see golf take it to the level they took it to and getting into the final eight was outstanding. Then I flew right from that to baseball, and that run … wow. The Omaha experience really united the whole Kent State alumni group and our fan group.

“Then in football we just continued to win and win each week.”

SWINGING TO NEW HEIGHTS

The fun started last spring in typical fashion, with Stricklin's baseball team and Page's golf squad dominating MAC foes.

The Flashes golfers claimed their fourth straight conference title by blitzing the field at the 2012 MAC Championship with a 40-shot victory in Sugar Grove, Ill. Sophomore Corey Connors shot 7-under to earn medalist honors, while junior Kevin Miller (2nd, 5-under) and senior Mackenzie Hughes (4th, 1-over) also finished among the top four.

Kent State advanced to the NCAA Central Regional, and qualified for the NCAA Championship for the third consecutive season by placing third with a three-round total of 8-under par in Ann Arbor, Mich. Miller led the way by finishing 11th at 3-under 210, cracking the top 20 at the regional tournament for the third straight year, while teammates Connors (13th, 2-under), Hughes (19th, even-par) and sophomore Taylor Pendrith (19th, even-par) were also among the top 20.

The Flashes entered the NCAA Championship at Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Cal., as one of only 10 teams in the country to have finished in the top 20 the past two seasons. Kent State stood in 13th after the first of three rounds used to narrow the 30-team field to eight for match play, then moved into a tie for the crucial eighth spot after round two.

After three rounds the Flashes found themselves still tied for eighth thanks in major part to a late birdie by Connors, who fired a final-round 2-under 69, setting up a sudden-death one-hole playoff with Florida State for the eighth and final match-play spot. A birdie by sophomore Kyle Kmiecik lifted the Golden Flashes to a one-stroke victory over the Seminoles, vaulting them into the match-play quarterfinals against No. 2 Alabama.

Kmiecik, who had the only birdie among the 10 players, hit a 5-iron on the 199-yard 18th hole at Riviera to 12 feet and nailed the putt.

“That's a shot we'll remember forever,” said Page.

Connors won his match 4 & 2 and Hughes earned a half-point, but a narrow 2 & 1 loss by Pendrith helped the Crimson Tide secure a 3-1-1 triumph.

The Flashes wound up in a tie for fifth at the NCAA Championships, edging their previous best-ever finish of sixth in 2008. Connors finished the 54 holes of regulation at 1-over and tied for fourth individually, the best-ever showing at the NCAA Championship by a KSU golfer. Kmiecik (37th) and Hughes (50th) were also among the top 50.

“Just a great year. A very resilient group of young men,” said Page. “To get this far is a great accomplishment, and I'm very proud of them. We're gonna keep battling til we win the whole thing.”

IMPROBABLE RUN TO OMAHA

Kent State's golf team secured its record-setting finish on June 1, the same day the Flashes baseball team won the wildest game in its storied history.

Stricklin's troops had advanced to the NCAA regional tournament by dominating MAC competition for the fourth consecutive season. They won the MAC East Division and earned the top seed for the MAC Tournament by going 24-3 in league play, closing with 14 straight wins, then waltzed to the tourney title with four consecutive victories.

Senior ace David Starn became the first two-time MAC Tournament MVP after earning a pair of victories. He blanked Buffalo for eight innings in the opener, then came out of the bullpen three days later to toss three more scoreless frames and lift Kent State past Central Michigan 3-1 in the championship game. Sophomore T.J. Sutton doubled home the first two runs and scored the third against the Chippewas.

Kent State advanced to the Gary Regional as the No. 3 seed, and was pitted against second-seeded Kentucky in its opener.

That matchup, played on June 1, took a whopping 21 innings, 182 at-bats, 678 pitches and some six hours and 37 minutes to decide. The Wildcats tied it twice with single runs in the ninth and 18th innings, but the Flashes pushed across a run in the 21st on an RBI triple to center by Alex Miklos to win the second-longest game in NCAA Tournament history 7-6.

“That might not have been the longest game in college baseball history, but it was certainly the best baseball game in college baseball history,” Stricklin said. “There were so many twists and turns. The game was just unbelievable.”

The next day, junior Ryan Bores tossed a complete-game to lift Kent State over host and top-seed Purdue 7-3 and into the regional final for the second straight year. Senior shortstop Jimmy Rider delivered the big blow, a three-run double during KSU's five-run second inning.

A rematch with the Wildcats materialized in the regional final, and the Flashes captured another thriller to earn the first regional title in program history. Junior centerfielder Evan Campbell broke a scoreless tie with a three-run homer in the eighth, then made a leaping catch at the wall in deep center to preserve Kent State's 3-2 victory.

Next came the Flashes' first-ever trip to the Super Regionals, where they were pitted against host and 10th-ranked Oregon, with the winner of the best-of-3 series advancing to the College World Series.

Campbell once again made a game-saving catch, this one a leaping, turn-around grab in deep left-center that closed out a 7-6 triumph in the opener. The Ducks fought back to earn a 3-2 win in the second matchup, setting up a winner-take-all Game 3 showdown in Eugene.

The Ducks scored two runs in the eighth to tie the contest 2-2, but a bloop single down the left-field line by Rider scored Derek Toadvine from second in the bottom of the ninth to give Kent State a 3-2 victory and its first-ever berth in the College World Series.

The Flashes were heading to Omaha, college baseball's promised land.

“To take a team to Omaha … I wish I could find the words to describe for you, but I can't,” said Stricklin, whose Flashes became the first MAC team to reach the CWS in four decades.

Thousands of Kent State fans made the trip to Nebraska to watch their beloved squad, which had become a national media darling after earning so many heart-stopping victories on its way to the College World Series.

The Flashes opened the CWS against Big East Tournament champion Arkansas, and fell 8-1. Kent State was then pitted against No. 1 ranked Florida in an elimination game. Rider, senior catcher David Lyon, and junior first baseman George Roberts ripped three consecutive RBI singles to help Kent State take a 4-0 lead after two innings, then freshman reliever Josh Pierce escaped a pair of bases-loaded jams in the ninth as KSU held on for a heart-stopping 5-4 victory that knocked the No. 1-ranked Gators out of the tournament.

The Flashes' dream season ended three days later with a 4-1 loss to two-time defending CWS champion South Carolina, but not before they had collected a school-record 47 wins (47-20) and captured the hearts of fans throughout the country.

“I'm very proud of my team and Kent State University, just an unbelievable year,” said Stricklin. “It was a season that no one expected. In our best years in the past, Omaha was really a pipe dream. It's just a testament to our kids, how tough they are and how bad they wanted this. I think we made a statement that we belonged here.”

Little did Flashes fans know, but perhaps the most shocking season of all was still to come.

FOOTBALL FUTILITY SUDDENLY ENDS

Kent State entered the 2012 football season coming off a 5-7 campaign in Hazell's first season the previous fall, which included a 1-6 start.

The season started innocently enough, with a 41-21 win over Towson in the opener that featured junior speedster Dri Archer's 98-yard kickoff return for a touchdown, followed by a 47-14 loss at Kentucky.

Next came a tough road test at Buffalo, which Kent State passed with flying colors as a dominant defensive effort keyed a 23-7 triumph. But the turning point of the season was about to come.

After leading Ball State for most of the game, a late rally by the Cardinals put the Flashes' backs to the wall. They trailed 43-42 with just 2:05 remaining when senior quarterback Spencer Keith led the offense onto the field some 94 yards from paydirt with no timeouts remaining.

Keith's status as the starting quarterback was in question heading into the contest, and although he'd enjoyed his best game of the season by far — tossing his first three TD passes of the season — he'd also just thrown an interception minutes earlier that set up Ball State's go-ahead touchdown.

After Keith's first pass of the drive was nearly picked off, there was little reason for Flashes fans to believe they were about to witness anything but just another tough early-season loss that would trigger another losing season.

Instead, Keith engineered a stunning drive that finally changed the Flashes' fortunes — on that day, throughout the rest of the season, and possibly beyond.

Keith converted a third-and-10 pass to senior wideout Matthew Hurdle, then hit Hurdle once again on a do-or-die fourth-and-10 play to advance the ball near midfield. A 20-yard pass to freshman Josh Boyle and a bulldozing 20-yard run by sophomore tailback Trayion Durham took the ball to the BSU 5, setting up senior Freddy Cortez's chip-shot 25-yard field goal with six seconds left that gave Kent State a stunning 45-43 victory.

Suddenly, the most beaten-down college football program in the country over the past four decades found the key element to winning that had been missing all along.

Belief.

The Flashes rolled over host Eastern Michigan the following week 41-14, as Archer returned his third kickoff for a touchdown. Kent State then earned its first non-conference road win since 2007, a convincing 31-17 triumph at Army.

Homecoming Saturday followed, and the Flashes found themselves in a jam trailing by seven late in the fourth quarter. But they reeled off 24 straight points in the final 16 minutes to win 41-24, earning their sixth win and bowl eligibility while offering more proof of their legitimacy.

If there were any doubters remaining, they were gone a week later.

Kent State travelled to New Jersey — Hazell's home state — to take on No. 18 Rutgers, the unbeaten leader of the Big East. The Flashes were double-digit underdogs and given little chance against a Scarlet Knights squad that featured one of the nation's toughest run defenses.

But Kent State stunned Rutgers with three quick scores to grab a 21-3 lead, and kept the advantage in double-figures the rest of the way. The Flashes rolled up 224 yard rushing and forced seven turnovers while earning a 35-23 triumph, their first-ever win against a top-25 team after 22 straight losses.

Before Rutgers, KSU fans were thinking winning season and bowl game. Afterward, they were thinking championship.

Kent State came out slow the following week against backyard rival Akron, falling behind 14-0 after one quarter, but bounced back by blanking the Zips 21-0 in the second half to earn a 35-24 victory — overcoming a 14-point deficit for the first time since 2003.

The Flashes then needed a victory at Miami to give themselves an opportunity to clinch the MAC East Division championship in the next game at Bowling Green, and they took care of business quickly. Durham scored on a 10-yard run just over three minutes into the game, and Archer added TD runs of 35 and 43 yards just minutes later as Kent State opened up a 21-0 lead and cruised to a 48-32 victory.

Up next, the Flashes' biggest football game in 40 years.

Kent State, which had just entered the AP Top 25 poll for the first time since 1973 at No. 25, travelled to Bowling Green to meet the Falcons with the MAC East Division title on the line. The Flashes entered the showdown riding a school-record eight-game winning streak, while the Falcons had won six straight and were unbeaten at home.

The game lived up to its billing, and then some. Highlight-reel touchdown runs of 79 and 74 yards by Archer were immediately answered each time by touchdown passes of 72 and 81 yards, respectively, from BG quarterback Matt Schilz to wideout Chris Gallon. The second Gallon TD catch tied the contest at 24 with 14:11 remaining.

Minutes later, Kent State star junior defensive tackle Roosevelt Nix tipped a pass that was picked off by junior end Richard Gray at the BG 20-yard line. Four plays later, Keith faked an inside handoff to Archer, took off to the left and dove into the end zone for a 7-yard touchdown — Kent State's biggest score in 40 years.

Junior strong safety Luke Wollet iced it by picking off a fourth-and-long pass in his end zone with just 21 seconds to play as the Flashes clinched the MAC East Division championship and a berth in the MAC Championship Game. They also earned a school-record 10th win, and clinched their first title of any kind and first bowl berth since 1972.

“What a wonderful win for this football program and all the people who have ever put on football uniforms, even everyone who has ever put on a Kent State sweatshirt,” said Hazell. “To think of what our team has accomplished here this season and the end of last season is mind-boggling to me.”

Kent State closed the regular season the following week with a methodical 28-6 home win over Ohio, becoming the first team to go 8-0 in the MAC East Division since Ben Roethlisberger-led Miami in 2003. Moments after that game ended, attention quickly turned to their MAC Championship Game opponent: Defending champion Northern Illinois.

There was no question in anyone's mind that the MAC's top two teams were meeting for the title in Detroit. The Flashes entered the championship contest ranked 18th in the country and riding a school-record 10-game winning streak, while the 19th-ranked Huskies had won 11 in a row, including eight of their last nine by double-digits.

Kent State turned a pair of early special teams blunders by Northern Illinois into 10 quick points, but the Huskies quickly recovered. They thoroughly dominated the middle two quarters behind star quarterback Jordan Lynch, outscoring KSU 24-3 during that stretch, and held a seemingly comfortable 27-13 lead when the Flashes took over at their own 4 with 7:46 remaining in regulation.

Kent State suddenly sprung to life when Keith hooked up with a streaking Archer on a 60-yard pass to the NIU 22. Keith later scored on a 5-yard run, trimming the deficit to 27-20 at the 4:53 mark of the fourth quarter.

Moments later, destiny appeared to be firmly on the Flashes' side when Lynch and tailback Akeem Daniels fumbled a handoff exchange. Kent State junior end Zack Hitchens scooped up the loose pigskin and sprinted 22 yards for the game-tying score.

In a mere 15 seconds, a game that seemed to be over was all tied up.

Northern Illinois answered with a touchdown on its following drive, but the Flashes responded. Facing a third-and-seven, Keith looked to his left then scrambled right and hit junior tight end Tim Erjavec in the end zone for a 19-yard touchdown that knotted the contest at 34 with 44 seconds left, forcing overtime.

Kent State opened the first overtime by marching to the NIU 5, but a fumble on an end-around play on third-and-short forced the Flashes to settle for a 33-yard Cortez field goal. The Huskies also had to try a field goal on their initial OT possession, and Mathew Sims' 40-yarder barely snuck inside the left upright to force a second extra session.

Northern Illinois had the ball first and Lynch quickly scored on a 2-yard run, but this time the Flashes could not answer as a desperation fourth-down pass by Keith from the NIU 9 was intercepted in the end zone.

Despite the gut-wrenching defeat, Kent State still finished the season with a school-record 11 wins and earned its first bowl berth since 1972. The Flashes (11-2) will battle Sun Belt Conference champion Arkansas State (9-3) on Jan. 6 at the GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala.

“This year the stars aligned, everything worked out for us,” said Hazell, who accepted a six-year, $12 million dollar offer to coach Purdue on Dec. 5, and was replaced as KSU head coach by former Flashes star defensive back Paul Haynes two weeks later. “We had a lot of good players, and we made plays when we had to. When you think about how far this team has come in the past two seasons, it's truly incredible. This was a phenomenal year.”

A phenomenal year indeed for the Flashes athletics program as a whole, one that will be incredibly tough to top.

“The year was just outstanding,” said Nielsen. “It's obviously setting high expectations for future years, but that's what we're all about.”

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News Headline: Kent State men's basketball donates time on New Year's Eve (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State's men's basketball team spent New Year's Eve at the Cleveland Hope Lodge, serving dinner and playing Bingo with guests.

The American Cancer Society's Joseph S. and Jeannette M. Silber Hope Lodge, which is located on Mayfield Road in Cleveland, is a unique home away from home for people who need temporary, comfortable, supportive accommodations offered free of charge during cancer treatment.

It offers 31 guest rooms with a private bedroom/bathroom suite and shared kitchen, library, dining room, living room and surrounding gardens.

Kent State's men's basketball team has been an active supporter of the American Cancer Society.

On Oct. 31, head coach Rob Senderoff joined Akron head coach Keith Dambrot, Cleveland State head coach Gary Waters and Youngstown State head coach Jerry Slocum in hosting the first Coaches vs. Cancer of Northeast Ohio Tip-Off Breakfast in Cuyahoga Falls.

"I learned about Hope Lodge at the Coaches vs. Cancer event," said KSU head coach Rob Senderoff. "I told them we would come one night and serve dinner to the residents. It was a nice thing for us to do. The people that were there took a lot of pictures of our guys. I think they were appreciative that there were people there, especially young people, sharing New Year's Eve with people that are obviously going through some tough times."

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News Headline: Editor's Picks: Dream Season for Kent State Football | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Patch gives you the editor's picks for top 10 stories of 2012.

Editor's note: the Kent State Golden Flashes football team had an incredible season in 2012 — and it's not over yet.

The team will face Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl Jan. 6 after tearing it up in the Mid American Conference by winning the MAC East title and earning a spot in the 2012 MAC Championship Game.

Kent State may have lost the MAC title game, but the GoDaddy.com Bowl marks the team's first bowl game in 40 years.

The winning season has drawn tighter the ties that bind town-gown relations in Kent and helped elevate Kent State on the national sports stage, but sadly it also meant the departure of head coach Darrell Hazell.

For 2012, this Cinderella story is one of my picks for top 10 stories of the year.

RELATED COVERAGE:

Golden Flashes Sign Autographs, Kent State Flags Raised Downtown for Send-Off
Dream Season for Golden Flashes to Culminate at GoDaddy.com Bowl
Kent State Loses MAC Championship to Northern Illinois in OT
UPDATE: Darrell Hazell Tells Kent Coaching Staff, then Players of Purdue Job
About this column: Kent Patch editor Matt Fredmonsky names his picks for top stories in Kent in 2012.

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News Headline: Editor's Picks: Kent State's College World Series Run | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Editor's note: this year marked an incredible season for the Kent State Golden Flashes men's baseball team, which made the university's first-ever appearance in the College World Series.

Baseball fans from Kent and beyond cheered the team on as they made the historic run.

The run ended when Kent State lost to the South Carolina Gamecocks, but not before beating the No. 1 national team Florida in dramatic fashion.

For 2012, this story is one of my picks for top 10 stories of the year.

RELATED COVERAGE:

VIDEO: Kent State Baseball Welcome Home
Kent State Falls to South Carolina, Ending College World Series Run
Celebration for Kent State Baseball Team is Thursday
About this column: Kent Patch editor Matt Fredmonsky names his picks for top stories in Kent in 2012.

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News Headline: Kent State's Wolfe makes most of his senior season | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: al.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MOBILE, Alabama - Kent State defensive back Norman Wolfe had to run before he could walk.

He had to run a lot and take a longer path than most. He also had to learn to study before he could walk. But in the end, it has all proved worth the extra work, the extra running, the extra time, all the effort. All that provided a little greater pride, a little greater appreciation for all that came to the Akron native this year. And it has been quite a year.

He will be part of the Kent State team that arrives in Mobile on Jan. 2 to take part in this year's GoDaddy.com Bowl game at Ladd-Peebles Stadium against Arkansas State on Sun., Jan. 6 at 8 p.m. The game, Kent State's first bowl appearance in 40 years, will be televised by ESPN.

Wolfe earned his degree from Kent State and earlier this month he "walked'' during his graduation ceremony. It was a big moment and achievement for Wolfe, who overcame bad study habits in high school to earn his college diploma. He admits he didn't apply himself in high school as he should have. He did enough in high school in the classroom to graduate but he didn't pass the Ohio Graduation Test. He spent the summer after his senior year at another school across town, receiving tutoring. At the end of the summer he passed the graduation test and had his diploma.

But as someone who wanted to play college football, he was missing something - scholarship offers - based on his academic troubles. So he enrolled at Kent State, a school that had shown some interest in him, and he walked into the football office and told the coaching staff he wanted to join the program as a walk-on.

He was allowed walk-on status, but was well back on the depth chart.

"The spring camp before my freshman camp was a long road,'' Wolfe, a 5-foot-8, 165-pounder, said. "I was fourth team behind the second guy on the fourth team. Looking at that, I thought, I might not have a shot. But I was consistent in what I was doing. I had confidence in myself and that helped me along.''

With each day he improved and learned, both on the field and in the classroom. As he continued, his improvement became noticeable on both fronts.

"When you first start walking on you don't get that much respect,'' he said. "You have to work hard every day and show everybody that you can be accountable and that you can play. I have a scholarship now because I put in all the hard work. I have everybody's respect now, from the coaches to the players.

"Other players that didn't take that road, that can take things for granted like their scholarship and the right to be on the team. Being a walk-on, I've seen so many people come and go and a lot of them don't stay, so I think the ones that have scholarships now, they don't take it for granted.''

The academic responsibilities aren't taken for granted either, at least not by Wolfe. But as was the case with proving himself on the field, Wolfe said the main thing in getting the work done academically was learning how to go about the work itself, then working hard.

"I took the long road,'' he said. "Academically, I didn't apply myself coming into college out of high school. I wanted football to support my education through a scholarship, so I had to show that I could do the work. I had a 3.0 my first two semesters, so that gave me a lot of confidence coming from high school to Kent State.

"My biggest problem was I never knew how to study for a test. I never studied for a test until I got into college. All I did in high school was homework. College, that's really all it is is (writing) papers and (taking) exams and such, so I had to get better at taking exams.

I'm proud. I knew it was going to be a long road, but I saw the light. I didn't know how long it was going to take to get there.''

Because of the path he took in the classroom and on the football field, Wolfe said he believes he has a greater appreciation for both than the average scholarship player.

"I have uncles who walked on and told me what to expect and showed me the ropes and how to earn a scholarship. They always told me to get my degree, that that was the important thing.''

So earlier this month, just like running onto the field for the start of a game, Wolfe had a big moment when he made his walk across the stage to receive his college diploma. "It was a good feeling,'' he said. "I had my family there. They didn't see me (walk at graduation) in high school, but they got to see me walk here. I wasn't nervous about it. I was a little nervous about starting (at defensive back) in college. I was only nervous about being accountable for my teammates. That was the only nervousness I had. I knew I could play, I just wanted to be accountable for the seniors and everyone else.''

He has been accountable. This season Wolfe ranked ninth on the team in total tackles with 40. He had 27 solo stops, one tackle for a loss, two interceptions, five pass breakups and one forced fumble. He has also been part of the first Golden Flashes team to win 11 games in a season and has a chance to be part of a team that increases that number to 12.

"Everything was worth it - lot of hard work, staying late, first one in and the last one out,'' Wolfe said of the season and his journey to this season. "My first few years it seemed like it prepared me for this last year. Everything that I went through, it seems like it was all worth it for this last year.''

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News Headline: (VIDEO) Darrell Hazell still a rock star at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: jconline.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Even with his bags packed, new Purdue coach is revered in northeast Ohio

Seated on the second floor of Laziza — a downtown Mediterranean-style restaurant — Darrell Hazell and a handful of his Kent State football players warmly welcomed a steady stream of fans wearing blue and gold attire.

About 15 minutes before Hazell arrived, the line had already started forming.

They wanted keepsakes from a memorable 2012 season. They came from all around northeast Ohio — some even farther — seeking autographs on posters, footballs and T-shirts. Hazell posed for pictures with children of all ages, and even some adults. They had a chance to interact and say “thank you” to the man who quickly reversed the fortunes of a downtrodden program.

Dawn Semple nearly stayed away Wednesday night. It wasn't because the Kent State graduate and season ticket-holder of 10 years had last-minute Christmas shopping.

“I wasn't going to come tonight,” said Semple, bowing her head. “We're going to miss him a lot.”

At Kent State, football seasons haven't been memorable in 40 years. The last time the program played in a bowl game, Don James was the head coach and the roster featured linebacker Jack Lambert, current Alabama coach Nick Saban and current Missouri coach Gary Pinkel.

Hazell changed the culture in just two seasons. A roster that was once divided was brought together by the 48-year-old native of New Jersey, who had no previous head coaching experience before accepting the job following the 2010 season.

As the Golden Flashes were capturing the Mid-American East Division championship, winning 11 straight games, cracking the top 25 and nearly earning a spot in the Orange Bowl, Hazell became a rising star in the coaching profession.

“We only wish we could've kept him one more year,” said Glenn Peterson, a 1984 Kent State graduate who lives in Vermillion, Ohio. “Just a quality individual who has elevated the whole football program to new levels.”

Those who support Kent State's program are disappointed but happy for Hazell and his new job at Purdue. They grasp the significant bump in pay — from $300,000 to $2 million per year — but wanted his tenure to last longer. You won't find anger amongst the fan base that Hazell is leaving.

(Page 2 of 5)

“He brought respect to the team,” said 1959 Kent State graduate Peter Panis, who flew from Naples, Fla., to see Hazell on this night. “He's a super guy. We're going to miss him. There's nothing high-hat about him. He's down to earth. He's aces high. Purdue is getting a great guy.”

This wasn't Tommy Tuberville accepting the Cincinnati job in the middle of a recruiting dinner at Texas Tech. This wasn't Bobby Petrino placing a four-sentence farewell in each Atlanta Falcons player's locker when he bolted for Arkansas in 2007.

They appreciate Hazell's character and demeanor in how he's conducted himself and run the program. They genuinely wish him nothing but success with the Boilermakers.

“It's sad to see him leave, but it's great for him,” said Matt Phillips, who traveled from Warren, Ohio, with his young son to obtain autographs. “As he grows at Purdue, he'll remember his time here.”

Open practice
For the most part, practices at Kent State are open to the media. It will be the same at Purdue, different from Danny Hope's four seasons.

Earlier Wednesday, it's 9:43 a.m., and Hazell looks at his watch inside Kent State's Field House. A whistle remains in his mouth, ready to signal the start of another practice as the Golden Flashes continue preparations to face Arkansas State in the Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala.

Kent State didn't have to let Hazell coach in the bowl game, the program's first since 1972. Athletic director Joel Nielsen asked the team's seniors about Hazell sticking around.

“He turned this whole program around and got it started and left his mark on it,” fifth-year offensive lineman Kent Cleveland said. “He helped to get us there. Why not finish it?”

At 10 a.m., music begins to play. “Gangnam Style” is blaring throughout the field house, which was built in 1990. Two more songs play, including one by Adele, before the music fades away. Hazell implemented music into the practice routine to help his team concentrate and communicate, but also for enjoyment.

(Page 3 of 5)

Music comes and goes throughout the 90-minute practice. Expect music at Purdue's practices next season.

“I have it on specific periods. I don't have it on all the time,” Hazell said. “During teaching periods, I don't keep it up very loud. There are some other periods where I want them to be in the fire and make them concentrate.”

Hazell allows Tommy Cook, the program's director of football operations, to make the selections.

“I just tell him no profane language,” Hazell said.

Variety is the theme. Hazell cites Rascal Flatts as one of his favorite groups, but is open to suggestions. At 10:23 a.m., another set begins playing. During this past Friday's practice, Christmas music was scheduled to be played.

“We don't mind,” senior defensive lineman Dana Brown Jr. said. “It gives us some entertainment during practice. It started when we played bigger schools with bigger crowds, and helped us focus more.”

Smooth transition
Brown Jr. and Cleveland were recruited to Kent State by previous head coach Doug Martin, who won 29 games in seven seasons.

Hazell had to sell the current players about his vision for the program and why his methods would be different.

“As soon as he walked in, he lit up the room,” said Brown Jr., who is from McKeesport, Pa. “He let it be known from Day 1 this is one team and we were going to play together. He took on the challenge of being the Kent State head football coach when nobody really wanted us. He let us know we could be winners.”

Winning hasn't been part of Kent State's tradition. The Golden Flashes had suffered through four straight losing seasons before Hazell arrived. The program had experienced only seven seasons with a .500 or better record since 1973. Even in Hazell's first season, Kent State was 5-7.

Cleveland recognized there was something different about Hazell during the first team meeting.

“Right off the bat, you could tell he cared about everybody on the team,” Cleveland said. “Before he got here, we were separated. It was offense versus defense. The first thing he did was make everyone one team. That was the biggest thing. We played together and we play off each other.

(Page 4 of 5)

“He cares about everybody. He's the best coach I've ever had.”

Hazell's job was just beginning. He convinced recruits of his plan to turn around a program that wasn't highly thought of, not only nationally but around the Mid-American Conference. He didn't have any head coaching experience, but his mentors include Jim Tressel at Ohio State, Greg Schiano at Rutgers and Don Nehlen at West Virginia.

Winning was embedded in his thinking.

“He was determined to turn this program around and turn it around quickly,” freshman kicker/punter Anthony Melchiori said. “That was one of the things he stressed on my visits. When I would come to spring practice, he would say this program is headed in the right direction.”

Players and fans share the same sentiments about Hazell's demeanor, both on and off the field. Calm, level-headed and easygoing.

“You'll never see him upset or never see him yelling,” said Melchiori, who is from Aurora, Ohio. “No matter if it's a good play or bad play, he keeps his composure.”

Familiarity
Brian Rock knows Hazell and understands Purdue.

Rock served as the receivers coach with the Boilermakers under Joe Tiller and Hope for a combined six seasons. He's in his second year as Hazell's offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach.

Rock called Hazell a “Pied Piper” in his ability to surround himself with the right people.

“He's very charismatic,” he said. “He will attract good players and also have good people around him. I think there are great people at Purdue, always has been. He's a team-first guy, which is how I see Purdue. When I say team, I mean everybody in the department, the university and the community. That's how you get things going. He'll be a great ambassador.”

'We do care about him'
One of Hazell's last stops Wednesday night was his radio show at the Water Street Tavern.

Following the autograph session, fans filed into the downtown establishment to hear Hazell recap the 11-2 season and look ahead to the bowl game. The fact that Hazell is coaching in the bowl game and remains visible in the community is leaving a lasting impression.

(Page 5 of 5)

At the end of this radio show, the crowd gives Hazell a standing ovation.

“He doesn't have to be here,” Peterson said during the autograph session. “For him to stay around and take the team to the bowl game is important.”

Cleveland said the community treats Hazell like a rock star.

“He'll never let you know that,” he said. “He's very humble.”

Of course, Hazell downplays even the slightest notion of being idolized.

“I am not a rock star,” he said. “I'm the same guy I was when I was 14 years old. Just trying to be part of the group.”

As the Golden Flashes were winning every week, they knew success could have consequences. Hazell's name was bound to be connected to other jobs. Along with Purdue, 26 other schools were looking for new head coaches, either due to resignations or dismissals.

“You have to be realistic,” Cleveland said. “When you start winning in the MAC, most coaches don't stay around very long. We're all happy for him. It's sad to see him go, because we do care about him.”

The university and the community didn't want to stand in Hazell's way of advancing up the coaching ladder. Sure, they wanted him to stay and see if he could end the MAC championship drought, but they are sincerely grateful for the last two seasons.

“I think this community has been unbelievable with me in terms of supporting me with my decision,” Hazell said. “They understand the decision. You form bonds with the people here. It's hard, but they understand. You're going to miss people. I don't know if they're going to miss me or not, but they're great people. I've been very blessed to be in this situation.”

To view video, please click on link:
http://www.jconline.com/article/20121222/SPORTS020101/312200040/Purdue-football-Darrell-Hazell-Kent-State?nclick_check=1

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News Headline: Kent State spends nearly $10 million for walkway to downtown (Lefton, Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: THOMAS GALLICK
News OCR Text: Kent -- Kent State University is continuing demolition and construction work on its Esplanade walkway extension, a project that has led the school to purchase more than $9.7 million in real estate near the northwest edge of campus in the past four years.

Kent State's board of trustees agreed to purchase a house at 213 S. Willow St. recently from the Portage Metropolitan Housing Authority for $200,000. It was the 42nd property the university has purchased in the area for its Esplanade extension project, which will carry the university's walkway from its current endpoint at the intersection of South Lincoln Street and Hilltop Drive across Haymaker Parkway into downtown Kent.

With the purchase of the PMHA house, Kent State has spent $9,737,000 on properties located on East College, College Court, East Erie, South Lincoln, East Main and South Willow.

Kent State has paid an average of about $232,000 per property it has purchased in the area.

The most expensive property the university bought for the project -- Cutler Real Estate at 414 E. Main St. -- cost the university $610,000. The cheapest property, a vacant plot on East Erie, formerly owned by Pierre DuBois, cost Kent State $10,000.

Most of the homes KSU has purchased have been slated for demolitions to make way for the Esplanade, while others have been purchased to prevent development near the path.

KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said nine houses on College, Lincoln and Willow were targeted for expedited demolition after a suspicious fire occurred at a vacant home the school owned at 128 S. Lincoln St. in early November.

"A couple of the houses were taken down recently," Vincent said. "The remaining houses will be down by the end of the month."

The nearly $10 million in purchases does not include the money Kent State agreed to spend on leasing the DuBois Book Store site just south of the Esplanade project. Trustees agreed to a 15-year lease on the 3.75-acre site at South Lincoln and East Summit streets at a rate of about $23,000 per month to keep the site away from other potential developers.

If Kent State pays $23,000 per month to lease the site for 15 years, the total cost to the university would be more than $4 million. Kent State will then have the option to purchase the site for a nominal fee, possibly $1, according to Kent State officials.

Kent State President Lester Lefton said the university has no short-term plans for the DuBois Book Store site, except possibly for use as a staging ground for construction equipment when it builds a new architecture building on or around the Esplanade extension in the next few years.

The school will have the right to demolish the book store, which operated on the site for 75 years before closing in June 2011, but Lefton said a decision has not yet been made to raze the structure.

HE SAID school officials made the move to lease the property because they did not want to see a retail complex, self-storage facility or any type of development on the DuBois site that would not match the aesthetic of the Esplanade or the northwest corner of campus.

He added while the university may not have a long-term plan for the property now, that could easily change in 15 or 20 years.

"It's likely that we'll have a very important use for that strategically placed piece of land," Lefton said.

Beyond the land purchases, Kent State is also paying for the bulk of the estimated $2.5 million in construction costs for the walkway. While the university is spearheading the effort to build the walkway, the city of Kent will oversee the construction because of conditions of $700,000 in grant funding it received from the Ohio Department of Transportation to go toward the project.

University officials expect the project to wrap up in late spring 2013, in time for the opening of the KSU Hotel and Conference Center.

The Esplanade extension will end at the intersection of Haymaker Parkway and DePeyster Street -- the location of the hotel -- near more than $100 million in public and private redevelopment work in downtown Kent including retail, office space and a parking deck.

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News Headline: Kent State to Open Brazil Office (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Establishment of legal entity lets Kent State start recruiting in country with more than 190 million residents

In a few years residents of Brazil looking for an American college degree could find themselves strolling one of the Kent State University campuses.

The university's board of trustees voted to establish a legal entity in one of the largest countries in South America.

The new legal entity, which will be overseen by the Kent State Office of the Provost, is similar to other Kent State legal entities in Florence, Italy; Geneva, Switzerland; and New Delhi, India, according to the university.

The difference is that, unlike in Italy and Switzerland, there will be no campus in Brazil.

Kent State President Lester Lefton said the legal entity allows the university to establish an office with one employee for recruiting purposes.

"We have campuses in Europe and Asia, we have recruiting offices in India and China," Lefton said. "The one place we have not made strategic investments are in the Americas, meaning South American in particular."

Kent State has about 20 Brazilian students enrolled in classes.

"There's a lot of head room to bring in 20 or 40 or 100 students over the next year or two," Lefton said.

This fall, enrollment of international students was up 19.1 percent to 2,217 students compared to 1,862 in the previous year.

Marcello Fantoni, Kent State's associate provost for global education, said the university's plan is to have the entity set up in Brazil by March or April. Kent State's trustees approved the measure in early December.

The overall estimated yearly budget for the Brazil office is $125,000, according to Kent State.

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News Headline: Kent State Board of Trustees Approves $150M in Campus Construction Projects | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Commercial Property Executive - Online
Contact Name: amaties
News OCR Text: Kent State University's board of trustees hired the Ruhlin Co. to manage the $150 million, four-year construction and renovation project known as the “Foundations of Excellence, Building the Future.” The Sharon Center, Ohio-based company was selected after a competitive bidding and interview process.

During the next four years, Ruhlin will manage these four primary projects:

The renovation of the Cunningham, Smith and Williams halls, the most heavily used science buildings. The project also calls for the construction of a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) addition to increase academic and research spaces.
The construction of a new College of Architecture and Environmental Design building. The 120,000-square-foot building will be located near the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, which will open next June.
The rehabilitation, reconstruction or replacement of the arts complex.
The construction of a new three-story building for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology. It will stand three stories tall and will be between 40,000 and 50,000 square feet.

The projects total nearly $150 million. They are financed in part through the university's issuance of $170 million in general receipts bonds.

Kent State's board of trustees approved a number of other actions, as well, including $5.9 million in bond revenue funds to be used for a project to renovate the Olson Center for Undergraduate Studies, built in 1961. The 10,000-square-foot Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center (MACC) Annex will be renovated using $2.5 million of the $170 million bonds acquired for campus-wide construction and is expected to be completed by next summer.

Almost $7 million will be used to upgrade the four buildings that make up the Eastway Residential Complex, a $2.6 million project that will bring the showers and restrooms in the 53-year-old Prentice hall in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, while another $4.5 million will go to the renovation and expansion of the Field House locker rooms.

The board also voted to purchase a 0.27-acre property located at 213 S. Willow St. in Kent for $200,000, authorizing the university to enter into a 15-year lease with the Portage County Port Authority. The lease includes an option to buy the property and will allow the the university to use the 3.75 acres at the corner of Summit and Lincoln streets in Kent.

Photo credits: www.facebook.com/kentstate

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News Headline: KSU TO RECEIVE STATE MONEY | Email

News Date: 12/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: staff, Compiled from
News OCR Text: Kent State University was awarded three of nine Phase I awards given through Ohio's Third Frontier Technology Validation and Start-Up Fund.

Kent State will receive $137,571 for three projects led by faculty research investigators in the Liquid Crystal Institute/Chemical Physics Interdisciplinary Program. The awards are contingent upon state controlling board approval.

The Third Frontier fund's goal is to create greater economic growth in Ohio-based start-up companies that commercialize technologies developed by Ohio institutions of higher education and other Ohio not-for-profit research institutions.

Kent State was awarded $50,000 for its Lightweight and Biocompatible Soft Piezoelectric Fiber Mats project; $38,590 to create a better way to view three-dimensional images on a liquid crystal display without special glasses, and $48,981 to develop liquid crystal window technology that does not require a continuous electrical current.

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News Headline: Players: Upper Executive Appointments in Northeast Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Inside Business Magazine (Northeast Ohio) - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Education

Deborah F. Spake has been named dean of Kent State University's College of Business Administration. Spake, a graduate of the University of South Alabama, previously served as associate dean and professor of marketing at the Mitchell College of Business at the University of South Alabama.

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News Headline: Research Results from Kent State University Update Knowledge of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: OBGYN & Reproduction Week - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders

Research Results from Kent State University Update Knowledge of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders

2013 JAN 4 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- A new study on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders is now available. According to news originating from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx editors, the research stated, "Every ninth woman presenting for prenatal care reports having experienced childhood sexual abuse. Many develop mental health disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "In response to PTSD , pregnant women survivors of childhood sexual abuse engage in negative perinatal self-care behaviors that can lead to adverse perinatal outcomes. Currently, promotion of perinatal self-care does not consider childhood sexual abuse or PTSD. This study aimed to develop a Perinatal Self-Care Index, determine sensitivity of the index to differences in behaviors of childhood sexual abuse survivors (PTSD-affected and PTSD-resilient), and validate usefulness in relation to birth weight. Secondary analysis was conducted using data from a prospective cohort study of the effects of PTSD on pregnancy outcomes. The index explained 6.5% of variance in birth weight. Prediction improved to 9.4% once PTSD and socioeconomic status were considered."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The index is sensitive to differences in PTSD-affected versus PTSD-resilient survivors of childhood sexual abuse and a useful predictor of birth weight in this analysis."

For more information on this research see: The Perinatal Self-Care Index Development of an Evidence-Based Assessment Tool for Use With Child Sexual Abuse Survivors. Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, 2012;26(4):319-326. Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing can be contacted at: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA. (Lippincott Williams and Wilkins - www.lww.com; Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing - journals.lww.com/jpnnjournal/pages/default.aspx)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from C.G. Roller, Kent State University, Coll Nursing, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, PTSD, Pediatrics, United States, Mental Health, Child Sexual Abuse, North and Central America, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

More Psychology News and Research

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News Headline: Kent Health Dean Named to Akron General Board (Alemagno) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Kent State University
News OCR Text: Sonia Alemagno, Ph.D., dean of Kent State University's College of Public Health, has been appointed a member of the Akron General Hospitals' Board.

Alemagno, a professor of health policy and management, joined Kent State in 2009. She previously served as interim vice president for research, and later became dean of the College of Public Health in July 2011. Before joining Kent State, she was the chair of the Department of Public Administration and Urban Studies, and director of the Institute for Health and Social Policy at the University of Akron.

“I am very honored to serve on the board of Akron General Hospital,” said Alemagno. “Akron General Hospital is an excellent resource to our community and is committed to health and wellness. As a dean and faculty member in the Kent State College of Public Health, I hope to introduce Akron General Hospital to our new faculty and students as they seek research and internship opportunities.”

Alemagno has earned recognition for her work, including a National Institutes on Health Career Development Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the University of Akron Outstanding Researcher Award in 2005. She was principal investigator on several research projects, including the Small Business Innovation Research funded by the National Institutes on Health, the Centers for Disease Control, the National Institute of Justice and the SAMSHA Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.

She earned a master of arts in sociology from Kent State in 1984 and a doctor of philosophy degree in medical sociology from Case Western Reserve University in 1991. She resides in Russell, Ohio.

For more information about Akron General Hospitals, visit www.akrongeneral.org.

For more information about Kent State's College of Public Health, visit www.kent.edu/publichealth.

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News Headline: Kent State Music School Earns All-Steinway Honor (Seachrist, Crawford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's College of the Arts recently celebrated the successful conclusion of its Steinway Campaign that raised $2.7 million dollars – enough to purchase nearly 70 new pianos.

The All-Steinway School designation is a prestigious honor that places Kent State in a select group of 150 global institutions of higher education that exclusively feature Steinway & Sons pianos in their recital halls, faculty studios, practice rooms and classrooms.

Gifts such as those from the estate of Elizabeth Fennell, Audio-Technica, the Kent State University Foundation Board, David and Carol Pulk and many others enabled the college's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music to be designated as an All-Steinway School.

“The faculty and staff of the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music are dedicated to providing our students with the best opportunities to succeed,” said Denise Seachrist, director of Kent State's School of Music.

“Being an All-Steinway School is a significant way in which we can help our students achieve their goals. Through this designation, the School of Music visibly and aurally demonstrates its commitment to 'Excellence in Action' by providing our students and faculty with top-quality teaching and performing instruments which challenge and enhance our talent, learning and teaching,” Seachrist said.

All-Steinway Schools demonstrate a commitment to artistic and educational excellence by providing their students and faculty with the best equipment possible for the study of music. Attaining the designation emphasizes the value the university places in the future of music education and artistic expression.

“We are absolutely thrilled to have obtained this designation for the School of Music,” said John Crawford, dean of Kent State's College of the Arts. “We are so appreciative to the many donors who helped make this happen.”

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News Headline: Celebrations - Dec. 23 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Education

Daniel Smith of Akron was recognized as a Senior Scholar by Kent State's School of Communication Studies. Students are nominated by faculty for their academic success and potential for excellence in their future career or graduate education.

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News Headline: Kent offers great holiday shopping and unique gifts for the holidays | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Neil Zurcher
News OCR Text: Acorn Alley is filled with many unusual shops.

Christmas week in Kent is a quiet time. Many of the students are away for the holidays and the community shrinks to become the small town that it really is.

There are signs of the season. Neighborhoods are bright with lights, and the unique stores of this college town offer some one-of-a-kind holiday gifts.

On a recent trip to Kent, I wandered through Acorn Alley, a walkway right off Main Street that is packed with stores with unusual offering.

There is the Kent State Fashion School Store operated by students and faculty of the Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design at the University. The store, at 175 E. Erie Street or Acorn Alley, sells some original designs by students and their faculty. The proceeds go to the school.

There is another store, Dr. GreenBee, that bills itself as a sustainable living store that specializes in all things green for the home, garden and office. It has everything from bamboo dinnerware to a portable worm factory that will turn table scraps into potting soil. Dr. GreenBee is located at 164 East Main Street.

But my favorite stop was at a small store called Off The Wagon. It sells “toys for the young at heart.”

Owner Michelle Sahr told me she opened the store in 2009 and began by selling quirky and weird gifts that you cannot find anywhere else. The store has become so popular that it has expanded to nearly twice its original size.

“Some of our best-sellers are things like bacon-flavored candy canes and bacon-flavored candy mints. We even have bandages that look like strips of bacon,” said Michelle.

There are also bacon magnets, a Mr. Bacon board game for the family, and a really creepy pig mask for those that want to dress up like bacon. While they don't sell the actual pork product, they do have just about everything else that smells, tastes or looks like bacon.

“Everyone loves bacon. It's the perfect gift,” said Michelle.

In addition to those really different kind of gifts or stocking-stuffers, Michelle has classic toys like sock-monkeys, replicas of tin spinning tops, Jack-in-the Boxes, Tiddlywinks, and other board games right out of the 1940s and 1950s.

“When it comes to games, we are fans of using brain power and not batteries.”

Michelle also showed me a yodeling pickle that is a holiday ornament. She pointed out that a lot of the items are under $10 to $15 so it also makes shopping financially less painful.

What is her favorite item in the whole store? She immediately took us to a wall of action toys and she pointed to a small model of a Narwhal. A Narwhal is a large whale with a huge tusk sticking out of its mouth.

“They are the unicorns of the sea. Some people don't realize that they are real. They do exist and I just think they are neat.”

Off the Wagon is usually open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. during the week. During the holidays, the store has expanded hours. The store is located at 152 East Main Street, Kent. Call (330) 474-1330 or visit www.offthewagonshop.com.

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News Headline: Winter storm slams Portage County | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Snow started falling heavily across Portage County before 11 a.m. Wednesday, covering roads and putting a damper on after-Christmas shopping trips.

By afternoon, Kent, Ravenna, Stow, Cuyahoga Falls, Tallmadge and Mogadore had announced emergency parking bans and Portage County Sheriff Dave Doak had issued a Level 1 snow emergency for the county. A Level 1 emergency means "roadways are hazardous with blowing and drifting snow. Roads may also be icy. Motorists are urged to drive very cautiously."

Thomas Schmidlin, local weather expert and professor of geography at Kent State University, said three inches of snow had fallen by 1 p.m. Wednesday. He said local residents could see anywhere up to a foot of snow by this morning.

The National Weather Service's Cleveland office cancelled a winter storm warning for Portage County at about 6 p.m. Wednesday, replacing it with a winter weather advisory, which alerts residents to the potential for light, blowing snow, strong winds and sleet.

The weather service predicted less than one inch of new snow would fall Thursday. Schmidlin said Portage County residents should get a short break from the snow for most of Thursday and Friday before it starts back up again this weekend.

"We'll probably see another lighter snow event on Saturday with an inch or two coming," he said.

The storm Wednesday caused a number of closures and parking bans, many of which remain in effect Thursday.

Shortly before 2 p.m. Wednesday, the Portage County Board of Commissioners announced it was closing all county buildings until noon Thursday.

Parking bans are in effect in Kent until further notice, Stow until 9 p.m. Thursday and Ravenna until 7 p.m. Thursday, including the city's Central Business District.

The bans are to allow city crews to clear snow and ice from city streets. During a snow emergency, parking on all city streets is banned to provide for snow and ice removal.

Numerous weather-related traffic crashes and instances of cars sliding off of roadways were reported throughout Wednesday. Ohio Edison reported that about 240 people in Portage County, mostly Suffield residents, lost electricity during the afternoon due to power outages caused by the storm.

Travelers can check with the Ohio Department of Transportation's web site (www.buckeyetraffic.org) for road conditions throughout Ohio.

ODOT spokesman Brent Kovacs said the agency had 16 plow trucks "prepped and ready to go" before snow started to fall heavily across Portage and other northeast counties. ODOT maintains 500 miles of state roads in Portage.

"Our crews have been pretreating with brine over the past 24 hours. This prevents the snow from bonding to the pavement. Local, county and state road crews were already on the roads by late morning Wednesday," Kovacs said.

Kovacs reminded motorists to drive carefully for changing conditions and, "Don't crowd the plows. Please give the plows their space to work."

Portage County Engineer Michael Marozzi said Wednesday morning that all county crews were out by 11 a.m., doing preventive salting where needed.

Marozzi cautioned drivers to allow extra time and to watch for changing road conditions as the storm progressed.

"If it comes with the intensity predicted, it could exceed our capability for some time," he said. "We can't be everywhere at the same time."

Streetsboro had 10 plow trucks out on city streets Wednesday morning, according to Mayor Glenn Broska.

Some stores closed early and events were canceled because of the weather.

The snowfall was expected to let up early Thursday as the storm center moved off to the northeast.

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News Headline: County hit hard by winter's first storm | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Streetsboro reports no major accidents

The first major storm of the season hit the day after Christmas, and, though hit hard, Streetsboro weathered it well.

Snow started falling heavily across Portage County before 11 a.m. Wednesday, covering roads and putting a damper on after-Christmas shopping trips.

By afternoon, Kent, Ravenna, Stow, Cuyahoga Falls, Tallmadge and Mogadore had announced emergency parking bans and Portage County Sheriff Dave Doak had issued a Level 1 snow emergency for the county. A Level 1 emergency means "roadways are hazardous with blowing and drifting snow. Roads may also be icy. Motorists are urged to drive very cautiously."

Despite the weather, Streetsboro Mayor Glenn Broska said there were no serious car accidents in Streetsboro, due to the wintry weather.

However, Streetsboro Police Lt. Darin Powers said there were some accidents.

"We did have a few minor crashes and cars in ditches, but, given the amount of snow, we did not handle as many traffic incidents as expected," he said.

Broska said Streetsboro was mentioned on WKYC Channel 3's local news as one of the three best communities in the area at maintaining their roads during the storm.

"I was very pleased with that," he said, adding the purchase of two new trucks helped the city keep more trucks on the road than in the past. "I went out at 8 p.m. [Dec. 26] and we had wet streets. That's a compliment to the service department guys."

Streetsboro had 10 plow trucks out on city streets the morning of the storm, said Broska.

Thomas Schmidlin, local weather expert and professor of geography at Kent State University, said three inches of snow had fallen by 1 p.m. Dec. 26.

The National Weather Service's Cleveland office cancelled a winter storm warning for Portage County at about 6 p.m. Dec. 26, replacing it with a winter weather advisory, which alerts residents to the potential for light, blowing snow, strong winds and sleet.

Shortly before 2 p.m. Wednesday, the Portage County Board of Commissioners announced it was closing all county buildings through noon Dec. 27.

Parking bans in some area cities enabled city crews to clear snow and ice from streets. During a snow emergency, parking on all city streets is banned to provide for snow and ice removal.

Numerous weather-related traffic crashes and instances of cars sliding off of roadways were reported throughout the day Dec. 26. Ohio Edison reported that about 240 people in Portage County, mostly Suffield residents, lost electricity during the afternoon due to power outages caused by the storm.

Travelers can check with the Ohio Department of Transportation's web site (www.buckeyetraffic.org) for road conditions throughout Ohio.

ODOT spokesman Brent Kovacs said the agency had 16 plow trucks "prepped and ready to go" before snow started to fall heavily across Portage and other northeast counties. ODOT maintains 500 miles of state roads in Portage.

"Our crews have been pretreating with brine over the past 24 hours. This prevents the snow from bonding to the pavement. Local, county and state road crews were already on the roads by late morning Wednesday," Kovacs said.

Kovacs reminded motorists to drive carefully for changing conditions and, "Don't crowd the plows. Please give the plows their space to work."

Portage County Engineer Michael Marozzi said all county crews were out by 11 a.m. Dec. 26 doing preventive salting where needed.

Some stores closed early and events were canceled because of the weather.

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News Headline: Judge in T.J. Lane's case puts restrictions on media; experts say he doesn't want media circus (Goodman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHARDON, Ohio -- The shooting rampage at Chardon High School is the biggest case to hit the tiny courthouse in Geauga County.

And a judge's restrictions on how the media handles the case will hamper the reporters, TV cameramen and photographers collecting news.

Common Pleas Judge David Fuhry, who has been on the bench since 2005, issued a 15-page order detailing the rules media must follow during the T.J. Lane case. The trial is set to begin Jan. 14, and could last at least six weeks. The proceedings are sure to capture national attention, especially after the recent shootings in Connecticut.

Lane, 18, is accused of killing three students and shooting three others in the school cafeteria Feb. 27. He is charged with three counts of aggravated murder, two counts of attempted aggravated murder and one count of felonious assault.

Fuhry's order includes when reporters can enter his courtroom (15 minutes before proceedings begin), where they can conduct interviews (only outside of the courthouse), what can be photographed and recorded in the courtroom (no conferences between the judge and lawyers for fear someone might read their lips), and whose picture cannot be used (witnesses who don't want their pictures taken).

The media also cannot bring cellphones or laptop computers into the courthouse.

Photographers must use a silent shutter to avoid disrupting the proceedings. Reporters and photographers also will be given only half of the available seating in Fuhry's small, first-floor courtroom. Those not inside can go to a media room, which will have a closed-circuit feed.

For the most part, legal experts say Fuhry's directive is justified to keep order in a high-profile case and give Lane a fair trial. But they are concerned with some of the restrictions.

"Clearly, the judge is trying to keep order and make sure the defendant has a fair trial," said Kevin Shook, a Columbus lawyer who specializes in media law and has represented CNN in obtaining access to Lane's judicial proceedings. "But when you start talking about what reporters can do outside the courtroom, that becomes a little too broad."

Others said Fuhry is just being careful.

"Nobody wants the next O.J. Simpson case because proper courtroom decorum wasn't set," said Mark Goodman of the Media Law Center for Ethics and Access at Kent State University.

Michael Benza, a law professor at Case Western Reserve University, said Fuhry's decision wasn't an easy one.

"It's a real juggling act to respect the privacy of the people involved and the defendant's right to a fair trial with the media's right to cover what's happening and the public's right to know," he said.

Simply put, Fuhry is trying to prevent the media from overrunning the trial. His order makes it clear that reporters and photographers cannot harass or chase people outside the courthouse while seeking interviews.

It will focus on Lane's mental state at the time of the shooting. Defense attorneys have stressed that Lane is mentally ill, that he has suffered from auditory hallucinations. He has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.

If convicted, Lane faces life in prison without parole.

A police report said Lane admitted firing 10 shots from a .22-caliber semiautomatic Ruger handgun, a weapon he told authorities that he obtained from an uncle's home the night before the shooting. Three shots took the lives of Demetrius Hewlin, 16; Russell King Jr. 17; and Daniel Parmertor, 16.

Two other students were shot: Joy Rickers has been released from the hospital, while Nick Walczak is undergoing rehabilitation to recover from his wounds. A sixth student, Nate Mueller, was grazed on the ear by a bullet.

After his Feb. 27 arrest, Lane told Geauga County Sheriff's Deputy Jon Bilicic that he had "killed a bunch of people" but that he didn't know why he fired the shots, according to Bilicic's testimony at a hearing in December.

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News Headline: Editor's Picks: President Obama Rallies Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Patch gives you the editor's picks for top 10 stories of 2012.

Editor's note: as a journalist I've covered presidents and presidential candidates before.

But the fever that swept Kent this fall truly was something to witness.

It started when word broke that President Barack Obama would make a campaign stop at Kent State University.

It ballooned when thousands lined up to get tickets for the campaign rally, which packed the MACC.

And it ended when 73 percent of the city's voters picked Obama over Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

For 2012, this story is one of my picks for top 10 stories of the year.

RELATED COVERAGE:

Kent Picked Obama in Landslide
Obama Rally at Kent State Touches on Themes of Opportunity, Success (VIDEO)
UPDATE: Huge Crowds Seek Tickets to Obama's Kent State Stop Wednesday
About this column: Kent Patch editor Matt Fredmonsky names his picks for top stories in Kent in 2012.

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News Headline: 2012 Most-Read: No. 9 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Patch is counting down the top 10 most read stories of 2012 with the story that had the most readers to be announced on New Year's Eve

Editor's note: In our second year reporting on Kent, Kent Patch produced 2,000 news articles — excluding events and announcements — about everything from lost pets to the city budget.

But only 10 of those stories were the most read on our site after having received thousands of individual readers each.

Counting down to New Year's Eve, Kent Patch will announce the top ten most-read stories of the year with the story that received the most readers announced on Dec. 31.

UPDATE: Obama to Stop in Kent
Click on the link above to read the original article.

RELATED COVERAGE:

PHOTOS: Obama's Kent State Campaign Stop
UPDATE: Huge Crowds Seek Tickets to Obama's Kent State Stop Wednesday
Kent Picked Obama in Landslide
Presidential Visit Cost City, Kent State About $8,500
About this column: Kent Patch's most-read stories of 2012 garnered more readers than any other stories this year. We're counting the stories down from No. 10 to No. 1.

Today we're revealing story No. 9, which originally appeared Sept. 20, 2012, and received almost 800 Facebook recommendations.

The ninth most-read story of 2012 on Kent Patch broke the news that President Barack Obama was planning a re-election campaign rally on the campus of Kent State University.

UPDATE: Obama to Stop in Kent
Click on the link above to read the original article.

RELATED COVERAGE:

PHOTOS: Obama's Kent State Campaign Stop
UPDATE: Huge Crowds Seek Tickets to Obama's Kent State Stop Wednesday
Kent Picked Obama in Landslide
Presidential Visit Cost City, Kent State About $8,500
About this column: Kent Patch's most-read stories of 2012 garnered more readers than any other stories this year. We're counting the stories down from No. 10 to No. 1.

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News Headline: Ashtabula Growth Partnership Names Officers | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Youngstown Business Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JEFFERSON, Ohio – Scott Strayer of Cristal will serve as president of the Growth Partnership for Ashtabula County for 2012-2013, the partnership announced thisweek.

The committee also named Jeff Jenks of Truckmen Corp. as vice-president, Martin Kuula of First Energy Corp. as secretary and Craig Parker of Wenpro as treasurer.

The partnership also noted the addition of Jack Nettis, the administrator for the village of Orwell, to its executive committee, replacing AnnMarie Mihoci of Mohawk. Nettis joins Scott Becker of Chromaflo Technologies, Ken Johnson of the Conneaut Telephone Co., Ashtabula County Commissioner Peggy Carlo, Tom Hough of Andover Bank, John Palo of The Robert S. Morrison Foundation, and Susan Stocker of Kent State University Ashtabula Campus, who also serves as past president of the committee.

"The Growth Partnership looks forward to another great year of helping Ashtabula County grow,” said Brian Anderson, executive director. “We have a diverse executive committee that offers a unique set of backgrounds and skill sets to assist our efforts. Their service and dedication to our organization is greatly appreciated."

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News Headline: Steve Paquette: It's all about entrepreneurship | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MAKING CHANGE: This is not business as usual

Second in a series

In early 2013, the Stark Development Board will be helping to launch a new economic development partnership, the Stark Entrepreneurship Alliance. The alliance will coordinate and provide assistance to small technology-based companies that are seeking to grow their businesses, or to potential entrepreneurs who are judged to have high potential to start new companies.

The Entrepreneurship Alliance represents a new working partnership with a number of key organizations throughout the county, including Stark State College; the Small Business Development Center at the Kent State University Stark Campus; Techalliance 2, a new incubator organization on the campus of the University of Mount Union; the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce; ystark!; JumpStart, a regional business development group based in Cleveland; and the Stark Development Board.

Funding to help establish the new alliance is being provided to SDB over the next three years by the Stark Community Foundation. At the same time, the group has been working to identify capital, in the form of low-interest loans and grants, to help to jump-start companies that are looking to grow their business.

The Entrepreneurship Alliance is being launched early next year as a result of successful events and activities that have take place over the past two years. We believe these activities demonstrate positive momentum for entrepreneurship in general and the need for the new program.

NEW PROGRAMS

These activities have included:

• A series of new entrepreneurial programs hosted by the Kent Stark Small Business Development Center and Stark Development Board that have attracted more than 200 people

• A Homegrown Entrepreneurs Program at Stark State College that has brought in a number of Stark County's successful business executives to

talk to students and guests of the college about entrepreneurship

• Construction and opening of a Business & Entrepreneurship Center at Stark State

• Creation of a new technology incubator program, Techalliance 2, sponsored by the City of Alliance, the Alliance Area Development Foundation and the University of Mount Union

• Canton's Entrepreneur Launch, created by the city of Canton in partnership with the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, ystark!, JumpStart and the Kent Stark Small Business Development Center.

The Canton Entrepreneur Launch was successful in identifying more than 60 companies that were seeking seed capital to help grow new businesses.

It awarded $50,000 to a start-up company, Jack Hooks, which developed a new line of easy-to-tie fishing hooks that are being manufactured and marketed worldwide.

ANOTHER EXAMPLE

Another activity involves a Massillon company, Tesla Nanocoatings. The company has been in business for five years, working out of the owner's home. Corrosion is a major problem, and Tesla Nanocoatings, in conjunction with the U.S. Army, has developed a highly effective corrosion-control coating for structural steel utilizing carbon nanotubes. Tesla is seeking to significantly grow its business.

Tesla Nanocoatings came to SDB as a referral from a Massillon business leader who felt we could help. Through assistance by Stark State College; ECOTAF, a technology "angel fund" in East Central Ohio; and the development board, the company has been awarded $100,000 by the Innovation Fund, a 21 county Northeast Ohio regional fund focused on supporting technology-based entrepreneurial endeavors and emerging technology-based businesses.

The Innovation Fund is supported and administered through a regional and state network of higher education, government and economic development partners to nurture a technology-based entrepreneurial environment for wealth creation and job growth in Northeast Ohio. Locally, Stark State College is a member of the Fund. In addition, ECOTAF has provided seed capital to the company to support its efforts. Tesla Nanocoatings has recently moved to the campus of Stark State, where it is now able to conduct more intensive product research and testing to develop new coating products.

The Stark Entrepreneurship Alliance recognizes the importance of new development and job creation for Stark County. The alliance will be focused on marketing its services to entrepreneurs such as Jack Hooks, and Tesla Nanocoatings.

Steve Paquette is president and CEO of Stark Development Board at www.starkcoohio.com .

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News Headline: Oil, gas series continues Jan. 24 at Kent State Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Canton Small Business Development Center and Kent State University at Stark will present the second event in the four-part Oil and Gas Education Series Jan. 24.

The program will explain property and mineral interests, exploring different types of ownership, such as property, mineral and royalty, as well as additional topics, including curing land titles, types of conveyances and the laws governing oil and gas ownership and development.

The public presentations are designed to provide education to members of the community. Presented by attorneys at Roetzel & Andress, each event will provide a factual forum, with an opportunity for attendees to ask questions regarding the subject matter.

Each event in the series will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Kent State Stark's Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. Register online for $10 per person or $15 per couple at www.cantonsbdc.org .

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News Headline: Oil, gas series continues Jan. 24 at Kent State Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Canton Small Business Development Center and Kent State University at Stark will present the second event in the four-part Oil and Gas Education Series Jan. 24.

The program will explain property and mineral interests, exploring different types of ownership, such as property, mineral and royalty, as well as additional topics, including curing land titles, types of conveyances and the laws governing oil and gas ownership and development.

The public presentations are designed to provide education to members of the community. Presented by attorneys at Roetzel & Andress, each event will provide a factual forum, with an opportunity for attendees to ask questions regarding the subject matter.

Each event in the series will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Kent State Stark's Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. Register online for $10 per person or $15 per couple at www.cantonsbdc.org .

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News Headline: Oil, gas series continues Jan. 24 at Kent State Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Canton Small Business Development Center and Kent State University at Stark will present the second event in the four-part Oil and Gas Education Series Jan. 24.

The program will explain property and mineral interests, exploring different types of ownership, such as property, mineral and royalty, as well as additional topics, including curing land titles, types of conveyances and the laws governing oil and gas ownership and development.

The public presentations are designed to provide education to members of the community. Presented by attorneys at Roetzel & Andress, each event will provide a factual forum, with an opportunity for attendees to ask questions regarding the subject matter.

Each event in the series will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Kent State Stark's Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. Register online for $10 per person or $15 per couple at www.cantonsbdc.org .

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News Headline: After the Headlines: Performing Arts Center marks another successful year (Morelli) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Behind nearly every headline written about the Performing Arts Center at the Tuscarawas Campus of Kent State University has been a successful production.

Halfway into the center's third season, there have been plenty of highs and very few lows for general manager Mike Morelli.

"I would have to say Bill Cosby's appearance here at the beginning of this season was a definite high point," said Morelli. "And, selling out in four hours was outstanding, as well."

Since the Performing Arts Center opened in the fall of 2010, Morelli said the big thing he has learned about area audiences is that they love a Broadway show.

"Our folks love Broadway and the bigger the title of the show the better," Morelli said. "When you put a Broadway cast in this amazing and wonderful hall you get spectacular results."

Morelli also said entertainers who have appeared at the Performing Arts Center love the facility.

"They love the place, the sound and acoustics, the audience and the facilities," Morelli said. "The also love the food provided by Trax Diner and they like coming back."

Morelli said individuals performers and show casts enjoy working with the center's crew, which is made up of students and area residents.

"Crew members are trained by Dave Glowacki and Velda Lyness, who are both on the center's staff," said Morelli. "Crew members are paid."

Although things such as ballet and dramas are not as popular as musicals, Morelli said the center has a very dedicated and loyal audience for those types of performances.

"We have a very dedicated group of about 300 who always attend those types of show, and we will continue to give those folks what they want as well," Morelli said.

Morelli said he only books quality entertainment and shows that have "cut their teeth elsewhere."

When the Performing Arts Center opened, shows were booked on a "one night only" basis. However, Morelli said he has discovered that multiple performances definitely work for some acts.

"Two performances for Mannheim Steamroller really weren't enough," said Morelli. "Blue Man Group could have sold out a third performance."

For the 2013-14 season, Morelli said he has negotiated with several agencies, taking two performances with an option on a third. The new 2013-14 season will be announced in July.

"The center was guided by a feasibility study," said Morelli. "And, that study has born fruit. The study showed we could bring in an audience, and we have done just that."

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News Headline: After the Headlines: Performing Arts Center marks another successful year (Morelli) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Behind nearly every headline written about the Performing Arts Center at the Tuscarawas Campus of Kent State University has been a successful production.

Halfway into the center's third season, there have been plenty of highs and very few lows for general manager Mike Morelli.

“I would have to say Bill Cosby's appearance here at the beginning of this season was a definite high point,” said Morelli. “And, selling out in four hours was outstanding, as well.”

Since the Performing Arts Center opened in the fall of 2010, Morelli said the big thing he has learned about area audiences is that they love a Broadway show.

“Our folks love Broadway and the bigger the title of the show the better,” Morelli said. “When you put a Broadway cast in this amazing and wonderful hall you get spectacular results.”

Morelli also said entertainers who have appeared at the Performing Arts Center love the facility.

“They love the place, the sound and acoustics, the audience and the facilities,” Morelli said. “The also love the food provided by Trax Diner and they like coming back.”

Morelli said individuals performers and show casts enjoy working with the center's crew, which is made up of students and area residents.

“Crew members are trained by Dave Glowacki and Velda Lyness, who are both on the center's staff,” said Morelli. “Crew members are paid.”

Although things such as ballet and dramas are not as popular as musicals, Morelli said the center has a very dedicated and loyal audience for those types of performances.

“We have a very dedicated group of about 300 who always attend those types of show, and we will continue to give those folks what they want as well,” Morelli said.

Morelli said he only books quality entertainment and shows that have “cut their teeth elsewhere.”

When the Performing Arts Center opened, shows were booked on a “one night only” basis. However, Morelli said he has discovered that multiple performances definitely work for some acts.

“Two performances for Mannheim Steamroller really weren't enough,” said Morelli. “Blue Man Group could have sold out a third performance.”

For the 2013-14 season, Morelli said he has negotiated with several agencies, taking two performances with an option on a third. The new 2013-14 season will be announced in July.

“The center was guided by a feasibility study,” said Morelli. “And, that study has born fruit. The study showed we could bring in an audience, and we have done just that.”

Behind nearly every headline written about the Performing Arts Center at the Tuscarawas Campus of Kent State University has been a successful production.

Halfway into the center's third season, there have been plenty of highs and very few lows for general manager Mike Morelli.

“I would have to say Bill Cosby's appearance here at the beginning of this season was a definite high point,” said Morelli. “And, selling out in four hours was outstanding, as well.”

Since the Performing Arts Center opened in the fall of 2010, Morelli said the big thing he has learned about area audiences is that they love a Broadway show.

“Our folks love Broadway and the bigger the title of the show the better,” Morelli said. “When you put a Broadway cast in this amazing and wonderful hall you get spectacular results.”

Morelli also said entertainers who have appeared at the Performing Arts Center love the facility.

“They love the place, the sound and acoustics, the audience and the facilities,” Morelli said. “The also love the food provided by Trax Diner and they like coming back.”

Morelli said individuals performers and show casts enjoy working with the center's crew, which is made up of students and area residents.

“Crew members are trained by Dave Glowacki and Velda Lyness, who are both on the center's staff,” said Morelli. “Crew members are paid.”

Although things such as ballet and dramas are not as popular as musicals, Morelli said the center has a very dedicated and loyal audience for those types of performances.

“We have a very dedicated group of about 300 who always attend those types of show, and we will continue to give those folks what they want as well,” Morelli said.

Morelli said he only books quality entertainment and shows that have “cut their teeth elsewhere.”

When the Performing Arts Center opened, shows were booked on a “one night only” basis. However, Morelli said he has discovered that multiple performances definitely work for some acts.

“Two performances for Mannheim Steamroller really weren't enough,” said Morelli. “Blue Man Group could have sold out a third performance.”

For the 2013-14 season, Morelli said he has negotiated with several agencies, taking two performances with an option on a third. The new 2013-14 season will be announced in July.

“The center was guided by a feasibility study,” said Morelli. “And, that study has born fruit. The study showed we could bring in an audience, and we have done just that.”

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News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES

Currently -- "Undress: Shaping Fashion and Private Life," "Life, Thoughts & Garments: Linda Ohrn-McDaniel Recent Works," "Resist: A World of Resist Dye Techniques," "Fandemonium" and "Fashion Timeline," the Kent State Museum, front campus at Kent State campus off East Main St., east of downtown Kent.

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News Headline: New York exhibit celebrates Katherine Hepburn as a fashion icon (Druesedow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kansas City Star
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW YORK -- A new exhibition is hailing the fashion sense of Katharine Hepburn, whose trademark khakis and open-collar shirts were decidedly unconventional in the 1930s and 40s, when girdles and stockings were the order of the day.
The fiercely independent Hepburn famously once said: “Anytime I hear a man say he prefers a woman in a skirt, I say, ‘Try one. Try a skirt.' ”
But skirts and dresses abound in “Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen” at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, which opened last month.
Hepburn, who died in 2003 at age 96, saved almost all the costumes from her long career that included four Oscars and memorable films such as “The Philadelphia Story,” “The African Queen,” “Guess Who's Coming to Dinner” and “On Golden Pond.” Forty are on view at the exhibition, which runs through Jan. 12.
One of the first things you'll notice is how slender Hepburn was — she had a 20-inch waist — and a grouping of seven khaki pants artfully arranged on a pair of mannequin legs.
“The fact that she wore slacks and wanted to be comfortable influenced women's ready-to-wear in the United States,” said Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum, which was given 700 items from Hepburn's estate. “That image said to the American woman ‘Look, you don't have to be in your girdle and stockings and tight dress. You can be comfortable.' That was probably the first aspect of becoming a fashion icon,” said Druesedow, a co-curator of the exhibition.
The strong-willed actress known for taking charge of her career worked closely with all her designers to decide her performing wardrobe.
“They understood what would help her characters, what she would feel comfortable wearing … how it would support the story,” Druesedow said.
When she really liked a costume she had copies made for herself, sometimes in a different color or fabric. A silk dress and coat by Norman Hartnell from “Suddenly, Last Summer” and a green raw silk jumpsuit by Valentina from “The Philadelphia Story” were among the pieces she had copied.
Comfort was paramount to Hepburn, who liked to be able to throw her leg over a chair or sit on the floor. She always wore her “uniform,” khakis and a shirt, to rehearsals and pant ensembles to publicity appearances.
A companion book, “Katharine Hepburn: Rebel Chic,” describes how RKO executives hid Hepburn's trousers in an effort to persuade her to abandon them.
“Her response was to threaten to walk around the lot naked. Though she only stripped down as far as her silk underwear before stepping out of her dressing room, she made her point — and she got her trousers back,” fashion writer Nancy MacDonell wrote in an essay for the book.
But comfort didn't mean sacrificing style, and she certainly knew how to be glamorous — especially when a role called for it.
In her private life, she shopped at the major cutting-edge New York couturiers and worked with the best costume shops of the period, including Muriel King and Valentina, said Cohen-Stratyner.
“She really appreciated good fabric and good construction,” she said. “Even her trousers are couture.”

‘Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen'
Where: New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, 40 Lincoln Center Plaza (65th Street west of Broadway), New York City

When: Open noon to 6 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday and Friday-Saturday, and noon to 8 p.m. Monday and Thursday. The exhibit runs through Jan. 12.

Cost: Free

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News Headline: A tale that begs to be read aloud (Brodie) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Chicago Tribune - Online
Contact Name: Mark Guarino
News OCR Text: Bilbo Baggins, the head hobbit in J.R.R. Tolkien's 1937 novel, may be diminutive in stature, but the marketing blitz associated with this month's film treatment of his adventures is as tall as the starting lineup of the Chicago Bulls: a Middle-earthsmartphone from Microsoft, "Hobbit"-related block sets from Legos, video games for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 and even a "Hobbit"-inspired menu at your neighborhood Denny's.

"Gandalf's Gobble Melt" anyone?

Of course, when Tolkien first published "The Hobbit," all of this was hard to conceive. Marketers had faint reach into living rooms, and besides the radio console and phonograph, the greatest mass entertainment families turned to for enjoyment in the home was reading.

The magical lure of "The Hobbit" is that, despite its continued stature as a fantasy classic, it remains decidedly old-fashioned. Tolkien was a classics scholar intent on creating an adventure tale that incorporated elements of epic Norse and Anglo-Saxon legends — "Beowulf," "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" and others. But while the archaic prose of those works continues to weigh down English lit majors as much as their hardbacks of "The Norton Anthology of English Literature," "The Hobbit" is immensely readable, especially out loud and to another person hungry to hear a story.

Tolkien meant it that way. The narrative voice in "The Hobbit" is similar to that of other children's literature of his day: A.A. Milne's "Winnie the Pooh" stories, J.M. Barrie's "Peter Pan" and George MacDonald's "The Princess and the Goblin." But Tolkien pushed his narrator one step further by fashioning him as a kind of gentle intruder to the reader's inner circle. Starting with the novel's opening paragraphs, Tolkien's narrator speaks directly to us, pausing to ask questions we might ask — "What is a hobbit? I suppose hobbits need some description nowadays since they have become rare and shy of the Big People, as they call us." Then he is off, making the unfamiliar perfectly recognizable, so much so that a hobbit hole sounds like a place we might want to retire to someday.

Corey Olsen, an English professor at Washington College in Chestertown, Md., who operates a website on Tolkien research, considers Tolkien's voice as "very distinctive from other books of his day because it speaks to the reader as a modern person," Olsen says. "That's why 'The Hobbit' is so good read out loud."

Throughout the novel, Tolkien takes the reader aside to whisper a secret, warn them of what danger lies ahead, assure them there are consequences to the described action and even console them when tragedy strikes. The voice is often written to sound breathless, as if the narrator himself can't keep pace with the latest crisis to pivot into the path of his heroes.

"Indeed he could do lots of things, besides blowing smoke-rings, asking riddles and cooking, that I haven't had time to tell you about," the narrator says of Bilbo as a nasty spider horde prepares to devour his friends, trapped in cocoons of webs. "There is no time now."

His narrator gets so intimately bound with us, he is not immune to scolding at certain points, lest there is the sense we begin to feel superior to the First World dangers of Middle-earth.

Just when Bilbo helps the dwarves escape the elves by concealing them in barrels, Tolkien writes: "It was just at this moment that Bilbo suddenly discovered the weak point in his plan. Most likely you saw it some time ago and have been laughing at him; but I don't suppose you would have done half as well yourselves in his place."

Tolkien's narrator also moves things along by borrowing metaphors from modern-day life to frame the action — telling us that the pine trees Bilbo and his dwarf companions scramble up to escape a wolf pack resemble "an enormous Christmas tree" with branches "sticking out at intervals like the spokes of a wheel." Another time, when Bilbo wails at the prospect of never returning to the shire, his shrieks "burst out like the whistle of an engine coming out of a tunnel."

Bilbo isn't likely to recognize cars and freight trains, and would have no idea how to celebrate Christmas, but no matter: His readers would.

"Just as a parent telling a story to a child might pause and explain things, the metaphors help the child relate to the action, possibly even answer questions the child might ask, or anticipate questions they might ask," says Olsen.

While sculpting the Hobbit, Tolkien tested sections out by reading them out loud to his four children, a scenario that makes me think of a friend who works for a truck dispatch company on Chicago's West Side. Every week, during a lunch break, he heads to the nearby library branch to stock up on children's books. Last month a co-worker spied the stack in my friend's back seat and asked what gives. When my friend replied that they're for reading to his precocious 4-year-old son, the co-worker frowned.

"I never thought of that," he said.

How far we've come from Tolkien's time, when families came together through the recitation of words, says Anita Silvey, the editor of "Children's Books and Their Creators," an overview of 20th century children's books and a former vice president at Houghton Mifflin Co., also Tolkien's publisher, where she oversaw its children's books division.

"Tolkien himself comes out of the age when families read together in the evening and books were considered valuable for being read out loud," she says. "There is no question, 'The Hobbit' is a book created by somebody who came out of that tradition, and he felt he was exercising that tradition when writing it."

As any early child development will tell you, reading out loud to children fast-tracks their critical thinking skills, which come in handy for future tasks such as getting into very important colleges or impressing co-workers at cocktail parties.

But nighttime storytelling also has a valuable consequence in the here and now: It makes imagined worlds very real, and entering them a shared ticket.

"We're drawn into those worlds together" when adults read to children, says Carolyn Brodie, president of the Association for Library Service to Children and a professor at the library school program at Kent State in Ohio.

"Especially if the reader reading has a dramatic flair for reading, we can experience the emotion of the book's excitement and the scariness together while being in a comfortable environment," she says. "It provides a real connection between the reader and the listener, which provides a model for children. If we see adults reading, it looks good, and we want to read on our own."

Getting parents to understand the power they possess in this simple and unassuming way may be as great a challenge as anything Bilbo faced on Lonely Mountain, especially with the specter of visual and interactive media looming in every room, on every wall, in every palm.

Even Tolkien, late into his life, had a moment where he didn't trust the potency of his narrator. After the success of his epic work "The Lord of the Rings," he returned to "The Hobbit" in 1960, determined to rewrite the novel with the narrator rubbed out, so as to strengthen its appeal for adults and make it more consistent with "Rings," a work in which the narrator remains largely invisible.

After showing the reboot to a friend for thoughts, Tolkien abandoned the project immediately. According to Olsen, the feedback that helped preserve one of the most remarkable works of children's literature was polite but succinct.

"It's very interesting," the friend said. "But it's not 'The Hobbit.'"

Mark Guarino is a staff writer with the Christian Science Monitor.

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News Headline: A tale that begs to be read aloud (Brodie) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Pasadena Sun - Online
Contact Name: Mark Guarino
News OCR Text: Bilbo Baggins, the head hobbit in J.R.R. Tolkien's 1937 novel, may be diminutive in stature, but the marketing blitz associated with this month's film treatment of his adventures is as tall as the starting lineup of the Chicago Bulls: a Middle-earthsmartphone from Microsoft, "Hobbit"-related block sets from Legos, video games for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 and even a "Hobbit"-inspired menu at your neighborhood Denny's.

"Gandalf's Gobble Melt" anyone?

Of course, when Tolkien first published "The Hobbit," all of this was hard to conceive. Marketers had faint reach into living rooms, and besides the radio console and phonograph, the greatest mass entertainment families turned to for enjoyment in the home was reading.

The magical lure of "The Hobbit" is that, despite its continued stature as a fantasy classic, it remains decidedly old-fashioned. Tolkien was a classics scholar intent on creating an adventure tale that incorporated elements of epic Norse and Anglo-Saxon legends — "Beowulf," "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" and others. But while the archaic prose of those works continues to weigh down English lit majors as much as their hardbacks of "The Norton Anthology of English Literature," "The Hobbit" is immensely readable, especially out loud and to another person hungry to hear a story.

Tolkien meant it that way. The narrative voice in "The Hobbit" is similar to that of other children's literature of his day: A.A. Milne's "Winnie the Pooh" stories, J.M. Barrie's "Peter Pan" and George MacDonald's "The Princess and the Goblin." But Tolkien pushed his narrator one step further by fashioning him as a kind of gentle intruder to the reader's inner circle. Starting with the novel's opening paragraphs, Tolkien's narrator speaks directly to us, pausing to ask questions we might ask — "What is a hobbit? I suppose hobbits need some description nowadays since they have become rare and shy of the Big People, as they call us." Then he is off, making the unfamiliar perfectly recognizable, so much so that a hobbit hole sounds like a place we might want to retire to someday.

Corey Olsen, an English professor at Washington College in Chestertown, Md., who operates a website on Tolkien research, considers Tolkien's voice as "very distinctive from other books of his day because it speaks to the reader as a modern person," Olsen says. "That's why 'The Hobbit' is so good read out loud."

Throughout the novel, Tolkien takes the reader aside to whisper a secret, warn them of what danger lies ahead, assure them there are consequences to the described action and even console them when tragedy strikes. The voice is often written to sound breathless, as if the narrator himself can't keep pace with the latest crisis to pivot into the path of his heroes.

"Indeed he could do lots of things, besides blowing smoke-rings, asking riddles and cooking, that I haven't had time to tell you about," the narrator says of Bilbo as a nasty spider horde prepares to devour his friends, trapped in cocoons of webs. "There is no time now."

His narrator gets so intimately bound with us, he is not immune to scolding at certain points, lest there is the sense we begin to feel superior to the First World dangers of Middle-earth.

Just when Bilbo helps the dwarves escape the elves by concealing them in barrels, Tolkien writes: "It was just at this moment that Bilbo suddenly discovered the weak point in his plan. Most likely you saw it some time ago and have been laughing at him; but I don't suppose you would have done half as well yourselves in his place."

Tolkien's narrator also moves things along by borrowing metaphors from modern-day life to frame the action — telling us that the pine trees Bilbo and his dwarf companions scramble up to escape a wolf pack resemble "an enormous Christmas tree" with branches "sticking out at intervals like the spokes of a wheel." Another time, when Bilbo wails at the prospect of never returning to the shire, his shrieks "burst out like the whistle of an engine coming out of a tunnel."

Bilbo isn't likely to recognize cars and freight trains, and would have no idea how to celebrate Christmas, but no matter: His readers would.

"Just as a parent telling a story to a child might pause and explain things, the metaphors help the child relate to the action, possibly even answer questions the child might ask, or anticipate questions they might ask," says Olsen.

While sculpting the Hobbit, Tolkien tested sections out by reading them out loud to his four children, a scenario that makes me think of a friend who works for a truck dispatch company on Chicago's West Side. Every week, during a lunch break, he heads to the nearby library branch to stock up on children's books. Last month a co-worker spied the stack in my friend's back seat and asked what gives. When my friend replied that they're for reading to his precocious 4-year-old son, the co-worker frowned.

"I never thought of that," he said.

How far we've come from Tolkien's time, when families came together through the recitation of words, says Anita Silvey, the editor of "Children's Books and Their Creators," an overview of 20th century children's books and a former vice president at Houghton Mifflin Co., also Tolkien's publisher, where she oversaw its children's books division.

"Tolkien himself comes out of the age when families read together in the evening and books were considered valuable for being read out loud," she says. "There is no question, 'The Hobbit' is a book created by somebody who came out of that tradition, and he felt he was exercising that tradition when writing it."

As any early child development will tell you, reading out loud to children fast-tracks their critical thinking skills, which come in handy for future tasks such as getting into very important colleges or impressing co-workers at cocktail parties.

But nighttime storytelling also has a valuable consequence in the here and now: It makes imagined worlds very real, and entering them a shared ticket.

"We're drawn into those worlds together" when adults read to children, says Carolyn Brodie, president of the Association for Library Service to Children and a professor at the library school program at Kent State in Ohio.

"Especially if the reader reading has a dramatic flair for reading, we can experience the emotion of the book's excitement and the scariness together while being in a comfortable environment," she says. "It provides a real connection between the reader and the listener, which provides a model for children. If we see adults reading, it looks good, and we want to read on our own."

Getting parents to understand the power they possess in this simple and unassuming way may be as great a challenge as anything Bilbo faced on Lonely Mountain, especially with the specter of visual and interactive media looming in every room, on every wall, in every palm.

Even Tolkien, late into his life, had a moment where he didn't trust the potency of his narrator. After the success of his epic work "The Lord of the Rings," he returned to "The Hobbit" in 1960, determined to rewrite the novel with the narrator rubbed out, so as to strengthen its appeal for adults and make it more consistent with "Rings," a work in which the narrator remains largely invisible.

After showing the reboot to a friend for thoughts, Tolkien abandoned the project immediately. According to Olsen, the feedback that helped preserve one of the most remarkable works of children's literature was polite but succinct.

"It's very interesting," the friend said. "But it's not 'The Hobbit.'"

Mark Guarino is a staff writer with the Christian Science Monitor.

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News Headline: Blended learning helps students prepare for the real world, educators say (Kovalik) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Streetsboro -- Online learning is here to stay.

So says Maureen Haska, the instructional technology specialist for Streetsboro City Schools.

"If we don't teach our students how to successfully use learning management systems, they will struggle when they go to college and or enter the real world," she said.

A learning management system, in which students can participate in a class from anywhere they have Internet access, took a step forward this school year after the Streetsboro City Schools received an $80,000 blended learning grant last spring from ETech of Ohio, which is part of the Ohio Department of Education. Streetsboro was one of only six high schools in the state to receive the grant.

It allowed the district to acquire, among other things, 30 computers for students and 16 laptop computers for the teachers who are participating in the program along with a wall projector and a "distance learning unit," which is a "real-time video conferencing system in high definition, according to Steve Cain, the district's technology director. "It's remarkable technology," Cain said. "Instead of watching something on the Internet, it allows you to interact."

In addition, Cain said 25 percent of the grant money is required to be used on professional development "so we can make it more interesting for the students."

Kent State University Dr. Cindy Kovalik, who is working with the school district on professional development, said blended learning is "any combination of traditional classroom student-teacher interaction coupled with many or few online components."

"Blended learning can be designed so that students do some activities on their own online and some activities in the classroom," said Kovalik, a KSU assistant professor in lifespan development and educational sciences.

"For example, a teacher may structure a class so that students are in the classroom two or three times a week, and on the other days, students complete what they need to do online," Kovalik said. "If you envision a horizontal line with traditional classroom instruction on one end and a 100 percent online course at the other end, blended learning can be anywhere between those two points."

Starting Jan. 8, the computer technology lab at Streetsboro High School where the new computers are located will be open to the public every day that school is in session. Hours are Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 2:45 to 4:45 p.m., and Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4 to 7 p.m. A teacher will be there to assist anyone with questions.

"It's going to be a big help to our students who choose to take advantage of it," Streetsboro High School Principal Eric Rauschkolb. "It's a resource they can use after school. Also, some students may have access to the Internet but may not have a printer, which they can have access to at the high school."

A second grant received

Cain said the district received an additional $50,000 grant from ETech of Ohio in October for the second year of the program.

"It is targeted for the 2013-2014 school year," Haska said.

Haska said she expects the money to be used to expand the computer program to Streetsboro Middle School and Henry Defer Intermediate School, adding, "Next spring, we should know exactly how we'll expand the program."

Meanwhile, the new computer program at the high school continues to be an upgrade, officials said.

"Many teachers at Streetsboro High School offered a self-blend learning environment beginning in this school year to provide students with a more personalized education experience and to prepare students for real-life learning opportunities," Haska said.

"The structure of the traditional class room environment will incorporate more online opportunities and resources as the teachers receive training in online teaching and in online educational resources," Haska said.

Haska, who wrote the majority of the grant, said many high school staff members wanted to incorporate online components into their classes long before the grant was available.

"The grant has provided us with tools and professional development to put quality online components into our traditional courses," Haska said. "As we wrote [in the grant application], we focused on our needs as a district for online learning to be a success.

"Two key components came from those needs -- a computer lab open in the evenings and an 'expert' to guide us in creating and in teaching online classes," Haska said. "Dr. Kovalik agreed to work with us as an 'expert.'"

Kovalik said there are many advantages to a blended learning approach. She said they depend on how the blended learning environment is structured.

"For example, in a science class, the teacher may record a lecture and compile resources on a specific topic and post those materials on the Internet," Kovalik said. "Students may be asked to review these materials prior to class. In class, students can engage in an experiment, do collaborative work or be involved in inquiry-based learning rather than listening to a lecture.

"Thus, students read, listen and learn about a topic prior to coming to class," Kovalik said. "In class, students are able to engage in scientific work where they can pose a hypothesis and then design an experiment to test their hypothesis."

Kovalik said in a social studies class, the teacher may compile resources related to a particular historical topic and ask students to use the materials to prepare for a debate.

"So instead of using class time to teach students about the topic, students prepare ahead of time and use class time to discuss the topic in-depth, helping them become knowledgeable and critical thinkers," she said.

Internet access at any time

Another advantage, Kovalik said, is that once the materials are on the Internet, students have access to them at any time, enabling students to listen and read through materials as many times as they need to help them learn.

"Educators also benefit from preparing materials that can be posted on the web," she said. "When an educator prepares quality teaching materials and makes the materials available by posting them online, these materials can be easily shared with students and with other educators.

"For example, an educator may know that many students have trouble with a particular mathematical calculation," she said. "The teacher can record a short narrated video that takes students through the math problem step-by-step, thus providing a resource that students can use over and over to better understand the process."

Kovalik said using course management systems, where access to course materials are secure and available to only those with log-ins and passwords, educators may want to use online assessments, where students can take a test or quiz online.

"These online assessments are automatically scored by the course management system, with grades automatically entered into a grade book," she said. "Online assessments free up class time because students do not need to take a quiz or test in the traditional class room setting. They can take it anytime and anywhere."

Blended learning also helps differentiate the learning experience, Kovalik said.

"Students learn in different ways," she said. "Having different types of materials available online for students allows them to use what is most beneficial to their learning."

"For example, one student may learn best by reading information from a textbook," she said. "Another student may need to hear the information presented as opposed to reading it. A third student may need to watch a process to fully understand it.

"All of these learners can be accommodated by providing multiple resources and making them available 24-7," she said. "Having these materials available also helps students learn about how they learn and make decisions on what to use based on what is most helpful to them."

"In all instances," Haska added, "the goal is to improve student learning through the use of real world experiences and the development of 21st century skills as students become actively involved in the learning process."

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News Headline: Entrepreneurship series at Hudson library | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Hudson Library & Historical Society's Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship Research will offer a free series of advanced MBA-related programs for the small-business community.

The four-part series will have one workshop Jan. 28 followed by three in February. The MBA-Lite: Renew Your Business program will feature presenters from area businesses and universities.

The Jan 28 session is Driving Change in Stable Organizations with Susan C. Hanlon, assistant dean of the College of Business Administration at the University of Akron.

Financing for a Small Business will be offered Feb. 11, with PNC's Business Banking Officer Jon Novak.

Value added IP: Why Intellectual Property Adds Value to Small Business is Feb. 13 with Howard Wernow and John Gugliotta, registered patent attorneys.

The final session on Feb. 25 is Entrepreneurial Marketing: How to Market the "New" with Denise Easterling, CPA, entrepreneur faculty adviser for Collegiate Entrepreneurs Organization for Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation at Kent State University.

To earn a certificate, registrants must attend each session. The programs will begin at 6:30 p.m. and last 75 minutes.

Programs are free but require registration. To register, call 330-653-6658, ext. 1010, or register online at www.hudsonlibrary.org .

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News Headline: Look closely at diet claims, expert endorsements in ads (VIncent) | Email

News Date: 12/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Theiss, Evelyn
News OCR Text: Kathy Hodges is a busy woman. She's depicted as a TV reporter in Boston and a dietitian from Kent State University.

On several different websites, she's quoted as an expert who "worries" that people who consume green tea extract or a raspberry ketone supplement "will lose too much weight."

So-called fat-busting supplements are big business, especially online. But who are the people endorsing them?

"My issue isn't necessarily that the supplement causes weight loss, but rather how much it causes," says Hodges on the websites. "Research shows the nutrient increases the fat-burning hormone adiponectin, resulting in a significant amount of weight loss within a period of only one week - that's more than most prescription diet pills."

While it is true that the hormone adiponectin burns fat - and you may have seen Dr. Mehmet Oz talking about this on his TV show - it's not that simple, says Kristin Kirkpatrick, a registered dietitian with the Cleveland Clinic.

"Raspberry ketones may potentially contribute to weight loss. However, it has not been proven in clinical trials," she says. "Several studies demonstrate that raspberry ketones may promote fat breakdown, but consumers need to keep in mind that these studies have only been conducted in animals, not humans.

"Until there is solid evidence in humans, no one knows for certain. At the end of the day, the strongest evidence for sustainable weight loss points to gradual changes in eating habits and behaviors along with a regular exercise routine."

And, of course, dietitians like Kirkpatrick say there's no guarantee that a supplement contains what it says it does, or in the amount indicated - because nutritional supplements are not regulated the way drugs are by the Food and Drug Administration.

Hodges' statement, of course, is a backhanded pitch to those looking for a way to lose weight.

When an intrepid colleague pointed out two such statements for two different products, both from the same Kathy Hodges, we thought we'd do some investigating. Who is this Kathy Hodges, whose apparent expertise is being leveraged to sell dietary supplements for a company called Applied Nutritional Research?

M.S. and C.P.T. are the credentials listed after Hodges' name. M.S. stands for master of science degree, though the field is not stated. C.P.T. is a designation for certified personal trainer or certified performance technologist.

So we called Kent State University, where spokeswoman Emily Vincent did some checking.

"We went through all employees listed, both current and in our archives," says Vincent. No hit on a Kathy Hodges. It's possible, of course, that Hodges might have been a maiden name, said Vincent. "But no such person rang a bell for people in our diet or nutrition programs."

And, says Vincent, "Certified personal trainer [the C.P.T.] is not a credential for being a registered dietitian or licensed dietitian."

Kathy Hodges, if she exists and lives here, would be violating Ohio law if she is calling herself a dietitian and isn't one. In Ohio, you must be licensed to use the credential. There is no Kathy Hodges listed on the state database.

"Nutritionist," on the other hand, can be used by anyone. "We frown on such deception," says Vincent. She has forwarded the matter to the university's general counsel, to possibly pursue the matter legally.

Applied Nutritional Research, according to its supplement-selling website, is in Westminster, Colo. We left a detailed message with an operator at the phone number listed but have not heard back. The Better Business Bureau in Denver has had several complaints against the company and its website, including some in the "false or unsubstantiated claims in advertisement" category, says Megan Herrera, that bureau's public relations specialist.

"The main reason for Applied Nutritional Research's F rating with the BBB is due to our concerns with its advertising," Herrera says. "Additionally, almost all of the complaints we've received against Applied Nutritional Research allege that the product did not work as advertised."

Applied Nutritional Research's website features a picture of a brightly lit, multistory, modern office building (which is not the structure shown for the company's address on Google Maps). It also has a photo tagged "Our People," resembling a group of professional models.

As for Kathy Hodges, "reporter at News 4 in Boston"?

You guessed it. There is a Channel 4 station in Boston, but no "News 4."

Reminder: When it comes to websites hawking such supplements, buyer beware.

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News Headline: BRIEF: Minority mentoring program scheduled | Email

News Date: 12/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dec. 29--The Partnership for the Minority Business Accelerator (PMBA) is accepting applications for its business accelerator and mentoring PMBA Class V program for people in Medina, Portage and Summit counties.

The program combines the resources and expertise of the Akron Urban League, Akron SCORE and Kent State University.

The partners offer a 15-month business accelerator program for African-American, Hispanic, Asian, Indian, Native-American, veteran and women business owners doing business in Medina, Portage and Summit counties.

Partnership staff identify and address each business owner's specific needs and goals through evaluations, counseling, mentoring and workshops.

Application are due on or before Friday, Jan. 4. The application is available online for downloading at www.pmba1.org/Apply_Now.html.

Address applications to Tobin R. Buckner, Akron Urban League, c/o PMBA, 440 Vernon Odom Blvd., Akron, OH 44307 or email a PDF document to tbuckner@akronurbanleague.org. Businesses will be notified in January regarding the selection process.

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News Headline: Gun control may be coming, local politicians, others say (Banks) | Email

News Date: 12/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Warsmith, Stephanie
News OCR Text: Dec. 23--Local politicians and those on each side of the gun control issue expect reforms in the wake of the shooting deaths at a Connecticut elementary school.

What the changes will be, though, is unclear.

U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Warrensville Heights, called for gun control reforms on the House floor last week, saying the nation can't wait for another incident like in Newtown, Conn., or earlier this year in nearby Chardon.

"The issue of eradicating gun violence is ripe, and we must act now," Fudge, who heads the Congressional Black Caucus, told colleagues. "The first thing we must do is ban assault weapons of all types. Their only purpose is to kill the largest amount of people in the shortest amount of time."

Fudge, citing news sources, said there have been more than 60 mass murders committed with firearms since 1982 and 19 mass shootings in the past five years.

"It is time for us to have a serious and deliberate conversation about a comprehensive national gun policy that eliminates loopholes and requires uniform background checks," she said. "Enforcing current laws is not getting the job done."

President Barack Obama has formed a task force, with Vice President Joe Biden as chair, that will develop a list of proposed reforms by the end of January. Obama urged Congress in a news conference last week to vote "in a timely manner" on gun control measures supported by a majority of Americans, including banning assault weapons and ammunition clips and requiring background checks.

The Beacon Journal attempted to contact both Ohio senators and the four U.S. representatives who represent Summit County to ask them whether they think the Connecticut shootings will spur gun control measures. The response was mixed.

Rep. Tim Ryan, in an interview between House votes, said he thinks Congress will have an "intense conversation" about gun control, mental health and education.

"I definitely think there needs to be a broad discussion about gun safety and the issues around it," said Ryan, D-Niles. "Also mental health. Also, I think the school curricula and how a kid like this falls through the cracks and becomes so disconnected going through school in America. It's really sad. It needs to be that kind of comprehensive conversation."

U.S. Sens. Sherrod Brown's and Rob Portman's offices emailed responses.

Brown suggested that a bipartisan commission to "examine how to prevent gun violence" is needed, an idea echoed last week in a letter to Obama and congressional leaders from Akron Mayor Don Plusquellic and seven other former and current leaders of the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

"We should also work to reduce the stigma attached to mental-health treatment and to inform parents of mentally ill children that they are not alone," Brown said. "Finally, I hope responsible gun owners will take steps voluntarily to keep their firearms out of the hands of unstable individuals."

Portman was less committal, expressing sympathy for the families in Newtown, but never using the words "gun control."

Fudge's office forwarded a YouTube video of the comments she made on the House floor and provided a written statement expanding on her remarks.

"We have a very good chance of at least doing what I believe has long been needed, and that is to ban weapons of war that have no place on our streets," she said in an email. "The moment is now. If we can't regulate assault-type weapons and high-capacity rounds of ammunition after the school house massacre in Newtown, then we never will."

Geauga County Prosecutor David Joyce, who was elected in November to take over the 14th District seat for retiring Rep. Steve LaTourette, was busy in court with a hearing related to the Chardon shooting from February in which a gunman killed three students at the high school.

"I look forward to learning more about the president's task force and working together to ensure our children are protected," Joyce, R-Novelty, said in an emailed statement.

Rep. Jim Renacci, R-Wadsworth, said in a prepared statement that mental health should be a priority.

"As we consider what actions can be taken to prevent incidents like this in the future, it is important to keep in mind that these murders were carried out by a madman, not by our Founding Fathers or our Constitution," he said. "The common thread between this incident and others like it before is the growing mental-health epidemic that is plaguing our country. How we as a nation identify and treat mental-health conditions must be the top priority as we take action to address this growing threat.

"In regards to our constitutional rights, when acts of violence are carried out in the name of religion, as we witnessed on 9/11, we did not move to erase our First Amendment right to the free exercise of religion. The same standard applies to the Second Amendment, and any restrictions on our Second Amendment rights must be narrowly tailored and meet the strictest standard of scrutiny our judiciary can apply."

Public support needed

Christopher Banks, an assistant professor of political science at Kent State University, thinks a groundswell of public support for gun control reforms will be needed to press Congress to action. Some of this has begun, with groups starting petitions, including on Change.org, and many emailing and calling their congressional representatives.

"This needs to come up from the citizen who expresses a certain amount of passion," said Banks, a professor at KSU for seven years and a Stow resident. "This is such a tragedy that it might start that. ... It's not going to happen -- unless people do it."

Banks, in a personal capacity, wrote to each of his state and national representatives last week, urging them to support gun control measures. He got back only one response -- from Portman, who focused on the need to reduce crime and improve mental health services.

"We must take a comprehensive review of the availability of current mental-health services and examine the important role of government agencies, community groups, and faith-based organizations can play to help provide the care and protection for those in need of services," Portman wrote.

Banks said he thinks the issue that gets lost in the gun control debate is that this is about public safety.

"This is as much of a public-safety threat than the right to have a gun," he said. "The representatives don't engage in this. They represent the people -- represent everyone. This includes those who don't care for guns or [who] feel threatened. Maybe this will start that dialogue again. I hope it does."

Any effort at gun control might face opposition from the powerful gun lobby, whom Banks called a "major player in the debate." He said his sense, though, is that the National Rifle Association might be softening its stance from the days of Charlton Heston saying they could pry his gun from his "cold, dead hands."

On Friday, the NRA called for armed officers to be stationed in schools. The group also blamed video games, movies and music videos for exposing children to a violent culture.

Gun control questioned

Jeff Garvas, president of Ohioans for Concealed Carry and a Summit County resident, questioned what gun control and new laws would accomplish.

"You can't prevent things by passing more laws," he said. "If you were able to magically wave a wand and 280-some million firearms in the United States disappeared, the people who wanted to do this would find other ways to do it."

The public and media also shouldn't focus on gun control, but on how to train teachers and other school staff to defend themselves before authorities arrive, Garvas said. Even if people don't want school workers armed with guns because of students being around, there are other nonlethal options, such as chemicals and stun guns, he said.

Garvas said the country has done nothing to tackle the issue of how to stop an individual "in a manner that puts the issue to rest before it gets to the point where he can kill 30 people, let alone one."

"I think that is where you're going to see [any weapons in schools] be such a politically incorrect topic that it won't even be seriously considered," he concluded.

The idea drew support, however, from Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, who said last week he backed allowing trained school officials to have access to weapons. He said he thinks such decisions should be left to districts.

The two largest teacher's unions oppose the idea of arming teachers.

"Guns have no place in our schools. Period," National Education Association President Dennis Van Roekel and American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten said in a joint news release. "We must do everything we can to reduce the possibility of any gunfire in schools, and concentrate on ways to keep all guns off school property and ensure the safety of children and school employees."

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News Headline: Politicians see gun control reforms coming, but specifics unclear (Banks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Sacramento Bee - Online, The
Contact Name: STEPHANIE WARSMITH AND RICK ARMON
News OCR Text: AKRON, Ohio -- Local politicians and those on each side of the gun control issue expect reforms in the wake of the shooting deaths at a Connecticut elementary school.

What the changes will be, though, is unclear.

Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, called for gun control reforms on the House floor last week, saying the nation can't wait for another incident like in Newtown, Conn., or earlier this year in nearby Chardon, Ohio.

"The issue of eradicating gun violence is ripe, and we must act now," Fudge, who heads the Congressional Black Caucus, told colleagues. "The first thing we must do is ban assault weapons of all types. Their only purpose is to kill the largest amount of people in the shortest amount of time."

Fudge, citing news sources, said there have been more than 60 mass murders committed with firearms since 1982 and 19 mass shootings in the past five years.

"It is time for us to have a serious and deliberate conversation about a comprehensive national gun policy that eliminates loopholes and requires uniform background checks," she said. "Enforcing current laws is not getting the job done."

President Barack Obama has formed a task force, with Vice President Joe Biden as chair, that will develop a list of proposed reforms by the end of January. Obama urged Congress in a news conference last week to vote "in a timely manner" on gun control measures supported by a majority of Americans, including banning assault weapons and ammunition clips and requiring background checks.

The Akron Beacon Journal attempted to contact both Ohio senators and the four U.S. representatives who represent Summit County to ask them whether they think the Connecticut shootings will spur gun control measures. The response was mixed.

Rep. Tim Ryan, in an interview between House votes, said he thinks Congress will have an "intense conversation" about gun control, mental health and education.

"I definitely think there needs to be a broad discussion about gun safety and the issues around it," said Ryan, a Democrat from Niles, Ohio. "Also, mental health. Also, I think the school curricula and how a kid like this falls through the cracks and becomes so disconnected going through school in America. It's really sad. It needs to be that kind of comprehensive conversation."

U.S. Sens. Sherrod Brown's and Rob Portman's offices e-mailed responses.

Brown suggested that a bipartisan commission to "examine how to prevent gun violence" is needed, an idea echoed last week in a letter to Obama and congressional leaders from Akron Mayor Don Plusquellic and seven other former and current leaders of the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

"We should also work to reduce the stigma attached to mental-health treatment and to inform parents of mentally ill children that they are not alone," Brown said. "Finally, I hope responsible gun owners will take steps voluntarily to keep their firearms out of the hands of unstable individuals."

Portman was less committal, expressing sympathy for the families in Newtown, but never using the words "gun control."

Fudge's office forwarded a YouTube video of the comments she made on the House floor and provided a written statement expanding on her remarks.

"We have a very good chance of at least doing what I believe has long been needed, and that is to ban weapons of war that have no place on our streets," she said in an e-mail. "The moment is now. If we can't regulate assault-type weapons and high-capacity rounds of ammunition after the school house massacre in Newtown, then we never will."

Geauga County Prosecutor David Joyce, who was elected in November to take over the 14th District seat for retiring Rep. Steve LaTourette, was busy in court with a hearing related to the Chardon shooting from February in which a gunman killed three students at the high school.

"I look forward to learning more about the president's task force and working together to ensure our children are protected," Joyce, R-Novelty, said in an emailed statement.

Rep. Jim Renacci, a Republican from Wadsworth, Ohio, said in a prepared statement that mental health should be a priority.

"As we consider what actions can be taken to prevent incidents like this in the future, it is important to keep in mind that these murders were carried out by a mad man, not by our Founding Fathers or our Constitution," he said. "The common thread between this incident and others like it before is the growing mental-health epidemic that is plaguing our country. How we as a nation identify and treat mental-health conditions must be the top priority as we take action to address this growing threat.

"In regards to our constitutional rights, when acts of violence are carried out in the name of religion, as we witnessed on 9/11, we did not move to erase our First Amendment right to the free exercise of religion. The same standard applies to the Second Amendment, and any restrictions on our Second Amendment rights must be narrowly tailored and meet the strictest standard of scrutiny our judiciary can apply."

Christopher Banks, an assistant professor of political science at Kent State University, thinks a groundswell of public support for gun control reforms will be needed to press Congress to action. Some of this has begun, with groups starting petitions, including on Change.org, and many e-mailing and calling their congressional representatives.

"This needs to come up from the citizen who expresses a certain amount of passion," said Banks, a professor at KSU for seven years and a Stow resident. "This is such a tragedy that it might start that. . . . It's not going to happen . . . unless people do it."

Banks, in a personal capacity, wrote to each of his state and national representatives last week, urging them to support gun control measures. He got back only one response - from Portman, who focused on the need to reduce crime and improve mental health services.

"We must take a comprehensive review of the availability of current mental-health services and examine the important role of government agencies, community groups, and faith-based organizations can play to help provide the care and protection for those in need of services," Portman wrote.

Banks said he thinks the issue that gets lost in the gun control debate is that this is about public safety.

"This is as much of a public-safety threat than the right to have a gun," he said. "The representatives don't engage in this. They represent the people - represent everyone. This includes those who don't care for guns or (who) feel threatened. Maybe this will start that dialogue again. I hope it does."

Any effort at gun control might face opposition from the powerful gun lobby, whom Banks called a "major player in the debate." He said his sense, though, is that the National Rifle Association might be softening its stance from the days of Charlton Heston saying they could pry his gun from his "cold, dead hands."

On Friday, the NRA called for armed officers to be stationed in schools. The group also blamed video games, movies and music videos for exposing children to a violent culture.

Jeff Garvas, president of Ohioans for Concealed Carry and a Summit County resident, questioned what gun control and new laws would accomplish.

"You can't prevent things by passing more laws," he said. "If you were able to magically wave a wand and 280-some million firearms in the United States disappeared, the people who wanted to do this would find other ways to do it."

The public and media also shouldn't focus on gun control, but on how to train teachers and other school staff to defend themselves before authorities arrive, Garvas said. Even if people don't want school workers armed with guns because of students being around, there are other nonlethal options, such as chemicals and stun guns, he said.

Garvas said the country has done nothing to tackle the issue of how to stop an individual "in a manner that puts the issue to rest before it gets to the point where he can kill 30 people, let alone one."

"I think that is where you're going to see (any weapons in schools) be such a politically incorrect topic that it won't even be seriously considered," he concluded.

The idea drew support, however, from Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, who said last week he backed allowing trained school officials to have access to weapons. He said he thinks such decisions should be left to districts.

The two largest teachers' unions oppose the idea of arming teachers.

"Guns have no place in our schools. Period," National Education Association President Dennis Van Roekel and American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten said in a joint news release. "We must do everything we can to reduce the possibility of any gunfire in schools, and concentrate on ways to keep all guns off school property and ensure the safety of children and school employees."

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News Headline: Gun control may be coming, local politicians, others say (Banks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Jefferson Gazette
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dec. 23--Local politicians and those on each side of the gun control issue expect reforms in the wake of the shooting deaths at a Connecticut elementary school.

What the changes will be, though, is unclear.

U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Warrensville Heights, called for gun control reforms on the House floor last week, saying the nation can't wait for another incident like in Newtown, Conn., or earlier this year in nearby Chardon.

"The issue of eradicating gun violence is ripe, and we must act now," Fudge, who heads the Congressional Black Caucus, told colleagues. "The first thing we must do is ban assault weapons of all types. Their only purpose is to kill the largest amount of people in the shortest amount of time."

Fudge, citing news sources, said there have been more than 60 mass murders committed with firearms since 1982 and 19 mass shootings in the past five years.

"It is time for us to have a serious and deliberate conversation about a comprehensive national gun policy that eliminates loopholes and requires uniform background checks," she said. "Enforcing current laws is not getting the job done."

President Barack Obama has formed a task force, with Vice President Joe Biden as chair, that will develop a list of proposed reforms by the end of January. Obama urged Congress in a news conference last week to vote "in a timely manner" on gun control measures supported by a majority of Americans, including banning assault weapons and ammunition clips and requiring background checks.

The Beacon Journal attempted to contact both Ohio senators and the four U.S. representatives who represent Summit County to ask them whether they think the Connecticut shootings will spur gun control measures. The response was mixed.

Rep. Tim Ryan, in an interview between House votes, said he thinks Congress will have an "intense conversation" about gun control, mental health and education.

"I definitely think there needs to be a broad discussion about gun safety and the issues around it," said Ryan, D-Niles. "Also mental health. Also, I think the school curricula and how a kid like this falls through the cracks and becomes so disconnected going through school in America. It's really sad. It needs to be that kind of comprehensive conversation."

U.S. Sens. Sherrod Brown's and Rob Portman's offices emailed responses.

Brown suggested that a bipartisan commission to "examine how to prevent gun violence" is needed, an idea echoed last week in a letter to Obama and congressional leaders from Akron Mayor Don Plusquellic and seven other former and current leaders of the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

"We should also work to reduce the stigma attached to mental-health treatment and to inform parents of mentally ill children that they are not alone," Brown said. "Finally, I hope responsible gun owners will take steps voluntarily to keep their firearms out of the hands of unstable individuals."

Portman was less committal, expressing sympathy for the families in Newtown, but never using the words "gun control."

Fudge's office forwarded a YouTube video of the comments she made on the House floor and provided a written statement expanding on her remarks.

"We have a very good chance of at least doing what I believe has long been needed, and that is to ban weapons of war that have no place on our streets," she said in an email. "The moment is now. If we can't regulate assault-type weapons and high-capacity rounds of ammunition after the school house massacre in Newtown, then we never will."

Geauga County Prosecutor David Joyce, who was elected in November to take over the 14th District seat for retiring Rep. Steve LaTourette, was busy in court with a hearing related to the Chardon shooting from February in which a gunman killed three students at the high school.

"I look forward to learning more about the president's task force and working together to ensure our children are protected," Joyce, R-Novelty, said in an emailed statement.

Rep. Jim Renacci, R-Wadsworth, said in a prepared statement that mental health should be a priority.

"As we consider what actions can be taken to prevent incidents like this in the future, it is important to keep in mind that these murders were carried out by a madman, not by our Founding Fathers or our Constitution," he said. "The common thread between this incident and others like it before is the growing mental-health epidemic that is plaguing our country. How we as a nation identify and treat mental-health conditions must be the top priority as we take action to address this growing threat.

"In regards to our constitutional rights, when acts of violence are carried out in the name of religion, as we witnessed on 9/11, we did not move to erase our First Amendment right to the free exercise of religion. The same standard applies to the Second Amendment, and any restrictions on our Second Amendment rights must be narrowly tailored and meet the strictest standard of scrutiny our judiciary can apply."

Public support needed

Christopher Banks, an assistant professor of political science at Kent State University, thinks a groundswell of public support for gun control reforms will be needed to press Congress to action. Some of this has begun, with groups starting petitions, including on Change.org, and many emailing and calling their congressional representatives.

"This needs to come up from the citizen who expresses a certain amount of passion," said Banks, a professor at KSU for seven years and a Stow resident. "This is such a tragedy that it might start that. ... It's not going to happen -- unless people do it."

Banks, in a personal capacity, wrote to each of his state and national representatives last week, urging them to support gun control measures. He got back only one response -- from Portman, who focused on the need to reduce crime and improve mental health services.

"We must take a comprehensive review of the availability of current mental-health services and examine the important role of government agencies, community groups, and faith-based organizations can play to help provide the care and protection for those in need of services," Portman wrote.

Banks said he thinks the issue that gets lost in the gun control debate is that this is about public safety.

"This is as much of a public-safety threat than the right to have a gun," he said. "The representatives don't engage in this. They represent the people -- represent everyone. This includes those who don't care for guns or [who] feel threatened. Maybe this will start that dialogue again. I hope it does."

Any effort at gun control might face opposition from the powerful gun lobby, whom Banks called a "major player in the debate." He said his sense, though, is that the National Rifle Association might be softening its stance from the days of Charlton Heston saying they could pry his gun from his "cold, dead hands."

On Friday, the NRA called for armed officers to be stationed in schools. The group also blamed video games, movies and music videos for exposing children to a violent culture.

Gun control questioned

Jeff Garvas, president of Ohioans for Concealed Carry and a Summit County resident, questioned what gun control and new laws would accomplish.

"You can't prevent things by passing more laws," he said. "If you were able to magically wave a wand and 280-some million firearms in the United States disappeared, the people who wanted to do this would find other ways to do it."

The public and media also shouldn't focus on gun control, but on how to train teachers and other school staff to defend themselves before authorities arrive, Garvas said. Even if people don't want school workers armed with guns because of students being around, there are other nonlethal options, such as chemicals and stun guns, he said.

Garvas said the country has done nothing to tackle the issue of how to stop an individual "in a manner that puts the issue to rest before it gets to the point where he can kill 30 people, let alone one."

"I think that is where you're going to see [any weapons in schools] be such a politically incorrect topic that it won't even be seriously considered," he concluded.

The idea drew support, however, from Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, who said last week he backed allowing trained school officials to have access to weapons. He said he thinks such decisions should be left to districts.

The two largest teacher's unions oppose the idea of arming teachers.

"Guns have no place in our schools. Period," National Education Association President Dennis Van Roekel and American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten said in a joint news release. "We must do everything we can to reduce the possibility of any gunfire in schools, and concentrate on ways to keep all guns off school property and ensure the safety of children and school employees."

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News Headline: Reports from Kent State University Highlight Recent Research in Schizophrenia and Related Psychoses | Email

News Date: 12/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Mental Health Weekly Digest
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2012 DEC 31 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Mental Health Weekly Digest -- Investigators discuss new findings in Schizophrenia and Related Psychoses. According to news reporting originating in Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx editors, the research stated, "Speech of people with schizophrenia is often difficult to follow. There is evidence that neuropsychological deficits associated with schizophrenia explain some of the variance in speech disorder, but its nature and causes overall are not well understood."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "This study rated speech samples from 60 schizophrenic outpatients for thought disorder, conceptual disorganization, linguistic structural breakdown, and communication failure. A battery of neuropsychological tests potentially relevant to coherent speech production was administered, and associations between these variables and the speech measures were assessed. Consistent with previous research, the measure of functional effect, communication failure, was more highly associated with neuropsychological test performance than were the measures of putative cause: thought disorder, conceptual disorganization, or linguistic structural breakdown. Performance on tests of attention, immediate memory, working memory, organizational sequencing, and conceptual sequencing all were significantly related to the frequency of communication failures in the speech. In hierarchical regression, attention, working memory, and conceptual sequencing each contributed significantly and together explained 29% of the variance."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Some other potential contributors to test in future research include auditory attention, internal source memory, emotional disturbances, and social cognitive deficits."

For more information on this research see: On Identifying the Processes Underlying Schizophrenic Speech Disorder. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 2012;38(6):1327-1335. Schizophrenia Bulletin can be contacted at: Oxford Univ Press, Great Clarendon St, Oxford OX2 6DP, England. (Oxford University Press - www.oup.com/; Schizophrenia Bulletin - schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting N.M. Docherty, Kent State University, Dept. of Psychol, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, United States, Language Disorders, Communication Disorders, Nervous System Diseases, North and Central America, Language/Speech Disorders, Neurologic Manifestations, Neurobehavioral Manifestations, Schizophrenia and Related Psychoses

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2012 Mental Health Weekly Digest via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: 5 burglary suspects, all Kent State University students, indicted for University Drive incident | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Five Kent State University students who allegedly broke into a University Drive residence on Dec. 1 following a confrontation at an East Main Street fast food restaurant have been indicted by a Portage County grand jury on felony burglary charges.

Kwan L. Bailey, David D. Coleman and Dontell E. Higgins, all 21, as well as SeVaughn L. Knight and Austin S. Wilson, both 19, were indicted on one count each of burglary, a second-degree felony.

All five were released on personal recognizance bonds following their arraignments in Portage County Common Pleas Judge Laurie Pittman's courtroom. A condition of their bond is no contact with the alleged victims. If convicted, each could receive up to eight years in prison as a sentence. Trial dates were set in April.

According to Kent police, seven men allegedly were seen kicking and rocking a vehicle in the parking lot of the Burger King on East Main Street, before damaging the car's temporary license plate. The incident apparently started after the men had a "verbal dispute" with the passengers in the car, police said.

All seven -- two of the suspects have yet to be identified, police said -- then went to a house at 126 University Drive, went inside and forced their way into an apartment. A door was damaged and electronics and other items allegedly stolen from the house, according to Kent police.

All five initially were charged with aggravated riot, a fifth-degree felony, but the grand jury did not indict them on that charge.

Higgins is a sophomore education studies major and at the time was a member of the KSU track and field team. He and Bailey, a junior criminology and justice studies major who also is on the KSU wrestling team, both attended Groveport Madison High School in suburban Columbus together, according to their Facebook profiles. Wilson is a freshman architectural studies major, Knight a freshman technology major and Coleman is a sophomore criminology and justice studies major, according to Facebook and the university.

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News Headline: 2012 Most-Read: No. 6 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Patch is counting down the top 10 most read stories of 2012 with the story that had the most readers to be announced on New Year's Eve

Editor's note: In our second year reporting on Kent, Kent Patch produced 2,000 news articles — excluding events and announcements — about everything from lost pets to the city budget.

But only 10 of those stories were the most read on our site after having received thousands of individual readers each.

Counting down to New Year's Eve, Kent Patch will announce the top ten most-read stories of the year with the story that received the most readers announced on Dec. 31.

Today we're revealing story No. 6, with originally appeared June 6, 2012.

UPDATE: Kent State Student Killed by Train Identified
Click on the link above to read the original story.

About this column: Kent Patch's most-read stories of 2012 garnered more readers than any other stories this year. We're counting the stories down from No. 10 to No. 1.

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News Headline: 2012 Most-Read: No. 5 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Patch is counting down the top 10 most read stories of 2012 with the story that had the most readers to be announced on New Year's Eve

Editor's note: In our second year reporting on Kent, Kent Patch produced 2,000 news articles — excluding events and announcements — about everything from lost pets to the city budget.

But only 10 of those stories were the most read on our site after having received thousands of individual readers each.

Counting down to New Year's Eve, Kent Patch will announce the top ten most-read stories of the year with the story that received the most readers announced on Dec. 31.

Today we're revealing story No. 5, which originally appeared April 21, 2012, and received 140 Facebook recommendations and 10 tweets.

WATCH: 'College Fest' Ends in Tear Gas
Click on the link above to read the original story.

RELATED COVERAGE:

10 'Use of Force' Reports filed by Police from College Fest
'College Fest' Cost Estimated at $26,000 for Emergency Personnel
VIDEOS: College Fest from a Student Journalist's Point of View
About this column: Kent Patch's most-read stories of 2012 garnered more readers than any other stories this year. We're counting the stories down from No. 10 to No. 1.

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News Headline: 2012 Most-Read: No. 2 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Patch is counting down the top 10 most read stories of 2012 with the story that had the most readers to be announced on New Year's Eve

Editor's note: In our second year reporting on Kent, Kent Patch produced 2,000 news articles — excluding events and announcements — about everything from lost pets to the city budget.

But only 10 of those stories were the most read on our site after having received thousands of individual readers each.

Counting down to New Year's Eve, Kent Patch will announce the top ten most-read stories of the year with the story that received the most readers announced on Dec. 31.

Today we're revealing story No. 2, which originally appeared April 13, 2012.

UPDATE: Death Ruled Suicide at Kent State Dorm
Click on the link above to read the original story.

About this column: Kent Patch's most-read stories of 2012 garnered more readers than any other stories this year. We're counting the stories down from No. 10 to No. 1.

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News Headline: Teacher uses closed captions as learning aid | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tennessean - Online, The
Contact Name: Jane Roberts Memphis Commercial Appeal
News OCR Text: MEMPHIS — Raychellet Williamson is a one-woman crusader to promote the power of closed captioning on television.

With her blessing, every child at Shannon Elementary, where she is principal, is watching 60 minutes a day of child-friendly TV this holiday break — with the closed-captioning button turned on.

“You are actually reading while you watch TV,” Williamson said. “Hearing the word as it is said and then seeing the action, to me, that sounds like free Hooked on Phonics!”

She kicked off the no-budget movement around Shannon in November, the day after she heard Kent State University literacy professor Tim Rasinski speak in a reading seminar here.

“That was Nov. 15,” Williamson said. “The next day, I announced in our morning assembly, ‘We are going to be like the Finnish people this weekend, boys and girls. Let’s get started.’ ”

Finland, which has one of the highest literacy rates in the world, traces its success in part to a national promotion of closed captioning, Rasinski said in a phone interview.

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News Headline: Principal uses closed caption TV for literacy | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Knoxville News-Sentinel - Online, The
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Memphis elementary school principal Raychellet Williamson is using television to teach literacy — closed caption television that is.

Children at Williamson's Shannon Elementary will be watching 60 minutes of closed caption TV a day over the holiday break.

Every child is expected to bring documentation, signed by a parent, of their closed caption use.

Williamson told The Commercial Appeal (http://bit.ly/10aPk3f) she got the idea from a Kent State University literacy professor Tim Rasinski.

Rasinski said closed captioning is a way for children to see more words in print. Every time they see a word, it gets imprinted in their memories. Eventually it becomes a word they recognize immediately.

Williamson started promoting closed caption TV in November and some students say they already have seen an improvement in their reading.

Information from: The Commercial Appeal, http://www.commercialappeal.com

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News Headline: Memphis principal promotes closed captioning on TV to help kids with reading (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Commercial Appeal - Online
Contact Name: Roberts, Jane
News OCR Text: Raychellet Williamson is a one-woman crusader to promote the power of closed captioning on television.

With her blessing, every child at Shannon Elementary where she is principal is watching 60 minutes a day of child-friendly TV this holiday break ై€” with the closed captioning button turned on.

"You are actually reading while you watch TV," Williamson said. "Hearing the word as it is said and then seeing the action, to me, that sounds like free Hooked on Phonics!"

She kicked off the no-budget movement around Shannon in November, the day after she heard Kent State University literacy professor Tim Rasinski speak in a reading seminar here.

"That was November 15," Williamson said. "The next day, I announced in our morning assembly, 'We were going to be like the Finnish people this weekend, boys and girls. Let's get started.'"

Finland, which has one of the highest literacy rates in the world, traces its success in part to a national promotion of closed captioning, Rasinski said in a phone interview.

"We need to think of ways for kids to see more words in print," Rasinski said. "Every time you see a word, it gets imprinted in your memory. Eventually it becomes a sight word ై€” a word you recognize immediately. You don't have to analyze it."

English contains roughly 600 sight words (about, day, down, eat). The first 300 represent 67 percent of the most-used words. (They show up everywhere, including text messages, he says.)

"Ideally, we want kids to recognize them automatically by the end of second grade," Rasinski said.

Williamson directed the children to ask their parents for the TV remote. "Figure out where the closed captioning button is," she told them. If you want to watch a movie, it is in the setup for the movie. If it's regular TV, you may have to go through a few steps, depending on how old the TV is."

She tuned in first at home to judge the word crawl aggravation factor for herself.

"Because it was homework, I couldn't tell them to do it if I didn't do mine. In 10 minutes, I forgot the captions were on," she said.

For student Kevin Porterfield, 10, the first success was figuring out how to turn the captioning on. The second was seeing his reading speed increase.

"It helped me read faster than I usually can," he said. "At first it was really

hard to read because it was going so fast. Now, I can keep up with it."

Yasmine Evell, 10, who watches TV after school anyway, says the captions are helping her learn more words and read "a little better. I used to make 80s on reading. Now I am making 100s," she said.

"My mom is happy. She says it is helping me with my reading. My favorite programs are SpongeBob, Dora, My Little Pony, Hello Kitty and Strawberry Shortcake."

Which brings Williamson to her next point: "I've told the children they can watch any cartoon, children's program or shows that are on before 7 p.m. I do not want them watching after that and seeing that language in print on the bottom of the screen."

Every child is expected to bring documentation, signed by a parent, of their closed caption use over the break.

"Everyone who brings it back will get a treat," Williamson said. "And it will be noted on the bottom of their report cards.

"They will be away from school two whole weeks. I want to make sure their mind is on reading when they are away. We can't lose momentum. If Finland can do this, so can Shannon."

Rasinski has heard of individual teachers promoting closed captioning but never a whole school.

"I am very much interested to see what they find out," he said. With the "test culture in this country," he says, the first signs should show up in TCAP results this spring.

"I think what you would find is that some kids will make quite substantial improvement. The problem is teasing it out."

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News Headline: Local TV personalities move on to other gigs | Email

News Date: 12/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Feran, Thomas
News OCR Text: WHATEVER HAPPENED TO...?

The Plain Dealer catches up with local stories published in 2012 in a year-end series of "Whatever happened to . . . ?" articles running through Jan. 3. The weekly edition of the feature, which appears on Mondays and updates stories from the previous year and beyond, will resume Jan. 7.

Today, we answer these questions:

Whatever happened to . . .

. . . some of the local TV newscasters who left their stations, like Stacey Bell, Eric Mansfield, Mark Nolan, Lynna Lai and Sharon Reed?

. . . plans by the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Port Authority to buy two debris-catching boats to clean up the Cuyahoga River and the shoreline of Lake Erie?

Whatever happened to some of the local TV newscasters who left their stations, like Stacey Bell, Eric Mansfield, Mark Nolan, Lynna Lai and Sharon Reed?

You still can see or hear a couple of them on the air, after they all made moves over the past year or so, sometimes by choice.

Change has always been a constant in the business, but broadcasters say factors ranging from a stalled economy and decreased viewership to new technology contributed to a period of more instability than usual.

Stacey Bell, co-anchor of "Fox 8 News at Ten," left WJW late in 2011, after 13 years at the station that included two Emmy Awards and a Personality of the Year award from the Ohio Association of Broadcasters.

She joined her husband, New York Jets running backs coach Anthony Lynn, in New Jersey.

She is now an anchor at News 12 Long Island, a 24-hour regional cable news channel.

Eric Mansfield, a reporter and anchor at WKYC Channel 3 for 18 years, decided last spring to get out of the local news grind. The Akron native started work in June in the new position of executive director of university media relations at Kent State University.

Channel 3 also took the loss when Mark Nolan, host of its morning show, decided to bag the TV business. Nolan, who joined the station as a weather forecaster in 1994, moved to radio in February as the midday host on WMJI FM/105.7. He didn't drop from sight entirely, however. Clevelanders saw him co-hosting the Winterfest lighting festivities on Public Square in November with WMJI colleague Don "Action" Jackson and WEWS Channel 5 morning anchor Macie Jepson.

Anchor-reporters Lynna Lai and Sharon Reed both left WOIO Channel 19 when the station did not renew their contracts, after it announced the hiring of former Channel 3 anchor Romona Robinson in January.

Lai, who joined WOIO in 2001 and worked at WJW in the 1990s, found a new home in Cleveland at Channel 3, anchoring weekend evening news and reporting on weeknight newscasts.

Reed, who spent a decade at WOIO, became weeknight evening anchor this fall at KMOV TV, the CBS affiliate in St. Louis.

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News Headline: Kent State University Libraries | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/01/2013
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Libraries offer a wide range of resources and books for students and residents of the community. The main library location is based on Risman Drive and has all types of books, including research materials, biographies, maps, newspapers, ebooks, manuscripts and more. Other materials include music, CDs, videos and movies. The location also offers tutoring services, including programs for math and writing. Check the main site for details on tutoring or for information on the extensive catalog.

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News Headline: New publishing pact | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

In “Finding Utopia: Another Journey into Lost Ohio,” author Randy McNutt again explores the state's forgotten nooks and byways.

The book, published by Kent State University Press (264 pages, $21.95), picks up where McNutt's previous book ended — on roads less traveled. The author explores ghost towns, battlefields turned into corn fields and old memories, and finds a new cast of quirky people along the way who struggled to keep their towns on the map.

McNutt is a native of Hamilton. He has written 20 books and hundreds of features for newspapers and magazines.

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News Headline: About Books:Essays written over half century study Civil War | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 150th anniversary of the Civil War is being studied in a 50-year collection of essays published by Kent State University Press.

"Conflict & Command: Civil War History Readers, Volume 1," is an anthology - the first of several to be published by Kent State - of 15 essays from such scholars as Albert Castel, Gary Gallagher, Mark Neely, and Richard M. McMurry.

The book is edited by John Hubbell, editor of Civil War History for 35 years until 2000.

HALF-CENTURY'S WORK

"For more than 50 years the journal Civil War History has presented the best original Scholarship in the study of America's greatest struggle," notes publicity material from the publisher, explaining that Kent State will present a multivolume series reintroducing "the most influential of the more than 500 articles published in the journal.

"From military command, strategy, and tactics, to political leadership, abolitionism, the draft, and women's issues, from the war's causes to its aftermath and Reconstruction, Civil War History has published pioneering and provocative analysis of the determining aspects of the Middle Period."

Hubbell selected articles that "treat military matters in a variety of contexts," explains the publisher, "including leadership, strategy, tactics, execution, and outcomes. The editor writes introductions to each essay, and offers a general introduction for the collection.

ESSENTIAL COLLECTION

The book, published in June, is list priced at $29.95.

"Those with an interest in the officers and men, logistics and planning, and executions and outcomes of the battles in America's bloodiest conflict will welcome this essential collection.

Besides his work with the journal Civil War History from 1965 to 1999, Hubbell is professor emeritus of history at Kent State and director emeritus of Kent State University Press.

Kent State has published an impressive number of books through the years that detail the history of the Civil War. At its website, www.kentstateuniversitypress.com, the publisher lists the following three as related titles: "The First Day at Gettysburg: Essays on Confederate and Union Leadership" and "Three Days at Gettysburg: Essays on Confederate and Union Leadership," both produced by contributing editor Gary W. Gallagher. The publisher also lists "Antietam: Essays on the 1862 Maryland Campaign," which also is edited by Gallagher.

Gallagher is professor of history at the University of Virginia.

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News Headline: WKSU Names New General Manager After National Search | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Daniel Skinner takes helm at Kent State University's award-winning NPR-affiliated radio station on Jan. 2.

After conducting a national search WKSU-FM 89.7 – Kent State University's award-winning NPR-affiliated radio station – has hired Daniel E. Skinner as its new general manager starting Jan. 2.

Skinner brings with him 32 years of experience in all aspects of public radio, including more than 20 years as a general manager, and in-depth knowledge of public-radio operations in university settings. He has a strong track record in fundraising, strategic planning, programming and community outreach.

Skinner served as president and general manager of Texas Public Radio for more than six years. Based in San Antonio, TPR operates KSTX FM, an award-winning news and information station; KPAC FM, a classical music station; and KTXI FM, a news and classical music station in the Texas Hill Country.

Previously, Skinner was department head and general manager of Purdue University's WBAA AM & FM (1992-2006); program manager and then manager of internal operations and programming for Ball State University's WBST (1987-1992); and operations manager and then program director for Hutchinson Community College's KHCC (1980-1987).

A longtime advocate for public radio, Skinner has been a member of Public Radio in Mid-America (PRIMA) since 1995 and is its current vice president. The organization serves as a forum on issues in public radio, advances the public radio industry and its services, and offers numerous professional-development opportunities. He was also vice chair of the Indiana Public Broadcasting Stations, a statewide consortium of public television and radio stations, and served on its executive committee.

Throughout his career, Skinner has been active in cultural and community organizations, including the Cultural Alliance of San Antonio, the World Affairs Council of San Antonio, the Tippecanoe Arts Federation and the Civic Theatre in Lafayette, Ind.

The Kansas native holds a bachelor's degree in general studies with a focus on management from Wichita State University and a master's degree in executive development for public service from Ball State University.

WKSU was founded in 1950 as a student-operated public radio station, broadcasting five hours a day, five days a week. The station joined as an affiliate of the burgeoning National Public Radio network in 1974 and increased its power to 50,000 watts in 1980, growing to become one of the most influential public radio organizations in Ohio and across the country.

In 2003, the station launched FolkAlley.com, a folk music-based Internet radio stream and content provider. WKSU programming is produced at its primary facility in Kent, as well as in satellite bureaus in Akron, Cleveland and Canton. With five towers and a repeater signal reaching out to listeners in 22 Northeast Ohio counties and parts of Western Pennsylvania, WKSU has the largest broadcast footprint of any radio station in Ohio. Along with its on-air signal, WKSU offers four distinct programming streams online at WKSU.org and over HD Radio in its broadcast area.

WKSU broadcasts NPR & Classical Music at 89.7 FM. WKSU programming is also heard on WKRW 89.3 FM in Wooster, WKRJ 91.5 FM in Dover/New Philadelphia, WKSV 89.1 FM in Thompson, WNRK 90.7 in Norwalk and W239AZ 95.7 FM in Ashland. The station broadcasts four HD Radio channels – adding WKSU-2 Folk Alley, WKSU-3 The Classical Channel and WKSU-4 The News Channel to the analog broadcast schedule. The WKSU website is www.wksu.org.

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