Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Athletics (11)
College of Nursing (CON); Research (1)
Government Relations; Office of the President; Town-Gown (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Recreational Services (1)
Research (1)
Research; Sociology (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (11)
KSU football notebook - Day 2 in Mobile 01/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State's bowl appearance looks to be a sellout 01/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Coaches pick Kent State gymnastics team to win MAC championship 01/04/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State punter Anthony Melchiori has unique perspective on 2012 success thanks to father Ray's career with Flashes 01/04/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Allen Moff's Football Memoirs from Mobile 01/04/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Golden Flashes Arrive in Alabama for GoDaddy.com Bowl 01/03/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State kicker April Goss' GoDaddy.com Bowl blog: 'The perfect way to start off an amazing week' 01/04/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State Flashes' QB raised by Wolves: Kent State Bowl Insider 01/04/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

Dri Archer's versatility a key in Kent State's offensive attack (Hazell) 01/03/2013 al.com Text Attachment Email

KTHV News at 6 01/03/2013 KTHV News at 6 PM - KTHV-TV Text Email

...over .... But it's bowl season! And we're awaiting a pretty big game for the state of arkansas on sunday night. The asu red wolves will take on kent state in the go daddy dot com bowl. Thv 11's mark edwards is live thv 11's mark thv 11's mark edwards is live in mobile, alabama...

Fox 16 News at 5:30 01/03/2013 Fox 16 News at 5:30 PM - KLRT-TV Text Email

...In just 15 minutes the light delicate layers add a layer of warmth to your next dinner. Pillsbury Grands Biscuits Let the making begin. Ready for the kent state flash.. Jd mckissic out there at practice today, looking as healthy as he has all season long.. Poor guy was part of the walking wounded...


College of Nursing (CON); Research (1)
Research Results from Kent State University Update Knowledge of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders (Roller) 01/04/2013 NewsRx.com Text Email

...Many develop mental health disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)." Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "In response to PTSD, pregnant women survivors of childhood sexual abuse engage in negative perinatal self-care behaviors that...


Government Relations; Office of the President; Town-Gown (1)
On the Ground: The Unsung Heroes of District Offices and How They Work 01/04/2013 Roll Call - Online Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Kent State Journalism Student is News21 Fellow (Wasbotten) 01/04/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
Alignment of Curricula Progresses in Region 01/03/2013 Youngstown Business Journal Text Attachment Email

WARREN, Ohio -- High schools in Trumbull, Mahoning, Ashtabula and Columbiana counties, along with Kent State University Ashtabula, Eastern Gateway Community College, Youngstown State University, Eastern Ohio P-16 and the Trumbull County Educational...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Reynolds named director of county community and development agency 01/04/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Lawrence Township Industrial Park and worked on the Newcomerstown Industrial Park and later partnered with the County Community  Improvement Corp and Kent State University Tuscarawas to develop the Tuscarawas Regional Technology Park. Reynolds said his office undertook several CDBG projects,...


Recreational Services (1)
Paddling Traffic Down for Crooked River Adventures in 2012 (Herpy) 01/04/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Research (1)
Bad Cholesterol May Not Be So Bad 01/04/2013 Katy News - Online Text Attachment Email

...recent years and that new attitudes need to be adopted in regards to the substance.  His work, with help from colleagues from the University of Pittsburgh, Kent State University, the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center and the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, is published in the Journal of Gerontology....


Research; Sociology (1)
New Geriatrics and Gerontology Study Findings Have Been Reported by Investigators at Kent State University 01/04/2013 NewsRx.com Text Email

...Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a survey of Wisconsin high school graduates from 1957 to 2004." The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "We used data on EOLCP among older adults in the most recent (2003-2004) wave of this survey. Hierarchical logistic regression...


University Press (1)
Page Turners: Our Place in History 01/03/2013 www.ohiomagazine.com Text Attachment Email

...Christ Minister William H. Armstrong, gives perspective on the Niles native's experiences in battle and how they shaped his days in the Oval Office. (The Kent State University Press ) More than 4,400 Ohio soldiers participated in the battle of Gettysburg, 30 percent of whom were killed, wounded or...


News Headline: KSU football notebook - Day 2 in Mobile | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Stephanie Storm Published: January 4, 2013

After a two-hour practice Thursday morning at the University of South Alabama's practice field, 11 Kent State players visited with kids at Mobile's USA's Children's and Womens' Hospital as part of immersing themselves in the city's culture this week. The sick children received gifts and took pictures with the Flashes players and coaches.

* UP NEXT - After a quick, hour-long practice Friday morning at USA's practice field, the team will be honored at a luncheon at the downtown Mobile Convention Center. The guest speaker for the luncheon is comedian Larry the Cable Guy.

* DELAYED - The team's trip to Mobile got off to a slow start Wednesday when their flight from Akron Canton Airport was delayed for 90 minutes. The Flashes coaches and players sat on the tarmac for an hour and a half when it was determined their plane was too heavy with all the players and their equipment. Eventually the equipment was unloaded and flown to Mobile on a later flight.

* FAMILY AFFAIR - Kent State senior quarterback Spencer Keith is confident his family will be rooting for the Flashes Sunday when KSU (11-2) takes on Arkansas State (9-3) in the GoDaddy.com Bowl game despite the fact that their ties to the Flashes opponent run deep. That's because Keith's parents and brother all graduated from Arkansas State.

"There's a little connection there, but my family is defintiely rooting for Kent State in this game," Keith said.

* ALL ABOARD - The big event - aside from from Sunday's game - that the players are likely most looking forward to comes Saturday when the team is scheduled to enjoy lunch served to them aboard the USS Alabama battleship, the famous World War II battleship.

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News Headline: Kent State's bowl appearance looks to be a sellout | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Carol Biliczky
Beacon Journal staff writer
Published: January 3, 2013 - 10:24 PM

(PHOTO) Kent State head coach Darrell Hazell (left) and Arkansas State interim head coach John Thompson talk after a news conference for the Go Daddy.com Bowl NCAA college football game, Wednesday in Mobile, Ala. Kent State is scheduled to play Arkansas State Sunday. (AP Photo/AL.com, Bill Starling)
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The travel packages are gone, and game tickets are dwindling, if not gone, too.

“We'll be sold out,” of all 40,000 tickets, GoDaddy.com Bowl spokeswoman Julie Jeter said Thursday. “We've been sold out every year except our first year.”

Kent State's Sunday game against Arkansas State in the 15th annual GoDaddy.com Bowl is of peak interest to Kent State fans as it is the first time KSU has been to a bowl game in 40 years and only the third time it has been to a bowl game in its 100-year history.

Alumni and friends rushed to snap up about 100 packages for tickets, hotels, pre-game festivities and more that KSU offered through Premiere Global Sports of Champaign, Ill., said KSU associate athletic director Matt Geis.

The events included everything from a Southern-style shrimp boil Wednesday to the mayor's luncheon today with Larry the Cable Guy as guest speaker.

The packages to Mobile, Ala., were gone about 10 days after they were offered.

“I would say that our expectations were met if not exceeded,” Geis said. “If you haven't been to a bowl game in 40 years you don't know what to expect. We were pleasantly surprised.”

For 1975 KSU alumnus Jim DeVincentis of Pittsburgh, it is almost the event of a lifetime.

He was practicing with the KSU swim team in Fort Lauderdale when the Golden Flashes last went to a bowl game in 1972.

It was bad enough that KSU lost the Tangerine (now the Capital One) Bowl to the University of Tampa. It was even worse that it took the Golden Flashes 40 years to get back to a bowl game, he said.

“Athletics was successful. You think, ‘This is how it is,' ” said DeVincentis, who co-owns a production company that makes Eat N Park and Auto Zone commercials. He's flying to Mobile on his own on Saturday. “The fact that we made it this year is huge.”

Still, Kent State didn't charter buses to ferry students to Mobile, an 830-mile trip in the midst of winter break.

KSU's Geis said it was impossible to know how many students would go to Mobile when class was not in session.

“We thought about it,” he said. “But it would have been cost-prohibitive for students to take advantage of it. We would have had to have multiple [bus] drivers.”

That may have been the right call. Mike Beder, owner of the Water Street Tavern in Kent, and John Caparulo, a blue-collar comedian and KSU alumnus, offered to subsidize a student bus trip to Mobile.

But they didn't get enough reservations for the $255 per-person trip so cancelled it last Friday.

The university sold game tickets to 50 KSU students at $20 each, less than half of the general admission price, Geis said. Students have to make their own travel arrangements.

KSU student trustee Chelsea Knowles of Kent is flying down Saturday.

“I wouldn't miss it,” said the graduate student in public administration. “I've always been a fan of Kent State football and I've missed most of the season this year for various reasons. It's just an exciting time.”

The Alumni Association has scheduled 12 watch parties nationwide on the night of the game. The Kent party is at the Water Street Tavern.

Kent State will make out, regardless of whether the team wins or loses.

The conference for each team will get $750,000, which will be divvied up among all the colleges in their respective conferences, with the bowl teams getting more of the share.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

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News Headline: Coaches pick Kent State gymnastics team to win MAC championship | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Allen Moff | Staff Writer

The Kent State Golden Flashes have been picked to win both the 2013 Mid-American Conference regular season title and the 2013 MAC Gymnastics Championship according to a preseason poll of the league's head coaches.

Kent State qualified for regionals for a fourth consecutive season last year, and finished second to Central Michigan at the 2012 MAC Gymnastics Championship. The Flashes return junior standout Marie Case, who was named the 2012 MAC Gymnast of the Year after a strong season as an all-around performer. A four-time MAC Gymnast of the Week, Case had the top averages in the MAC on the beam (9.753), floor (9.861) and all-around (38.947).

Western Michigan was tabbed second, followed by the defending champion Chippewas.

The 2013 MAC Gymnastics Championship will be held at Western Michigan University on March 23.

2013 MAC Gymnastics Preseason Coaches Poll

1. Kent State

2. Western Michigan

3. Central Michigan

4. Bowling Green

5. Northern Illinois

6. Ball State

7. Eastern Michigan

2013 MAC Gymnastics Champion: Kent State

-- Allen Moff/R-C

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News Headline: Kent State punter Anthony Melchiori has unique perspective on 2012 success thanks to father Ray's career with Flashes | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Allen Moff | Staff Writer Published: January 4, 2013 4:00AM

MOBILE, Ala. -- No player understands the overall magnitude of the Kent State football program's achievements this year better than Anthony Melchiori.

The Golden Flashes' freshman punter grew up in Aurora, about a 25-minute drive from Kent. Before starring as a wide receiver/kick returner/punter for the Greenmen he spent many childhood Saturdays at Dix Stadium watching Kent State football and his father Ray Melchiori, a Kent Roosevelt graduate who played for the Flashes back in the mid-1980s.

Together, the Melchioris witnessed a lot of KSU games. But they didn't see many wins.

"My dad always tells me you need to cherish every single moment, second, all the time you have down there because when he played at Kent they were never even close to a bowl game at all," said Anthony Melchiori following a Thursday morning practice on the campus of South Alabama in preparation for Sunday's GoDaddy.com Bowl. "I think they had one winning season while he played at Kent State.

"He reminds me every day that this is a special moment."

Ray Melchiori was actually fortunate to enjoy one winning season while with the Flashes. They had notched only two winning campaigns in the past 34 years before Anthony Melchiori stepped on campus as a freshman in 2012.

Then, the losing suddenly stopped.

Thanks in major part to a consistently stellar effort by special teams units anchored by senior kicker Freddy Cortez and Melchiori, the Flashes have enjoyed the best season in program history. They've earned a school-record 11 victories and captured the Mid-American Conference East Division championship, their first title of any kind since 1972. They will cap the banner campaign by ending a 40-year bowl drought by battling Sun Belt Conference champion Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Ala.

Anthony Melchiori's timing could not have been any better.

"Being a freshman and going to the first (KSU) bowl game in such a long time is just unbelievable," he said. "Right now I'm just really soaking it all in, taking in the experience. After the season's over and a month or so goes by you'll be able to sit back and think wow, that was one great year as a freshman."

While the winning was immediate for Melchiori, Cortez had to suffer through three consecutive mediocre 5-7 seasons before his breakout senior year.

"We were the No. 1-ranked recruiting class in the MAC, and who knew it would take us four years to get it done?" said Cortez. "We've been through some ups and downs. All three seasons we were 5-7, but people don't understand a lot of those games we lost were by three or seven points, just little mistakes that cost us. We always had talent, we just could never find that chemistry, what it takes to finish a game."

Part of the missing ingredient was inconsistency on special teams. But that certainly hasn't been the case this year.

Kent State leads the MAC in net punting (40.1 ypp) behind Melchiori, who is averaging 42.5 yards per punt with 15 boots covering 50 or more yards and 25 downed inside the opponent's 20-yard line. Meanwhile Cortez has made 15 of his last 18 field goals, including 13-of-14 overall inside 40 yards, and has notched 33 touchbacks on consistently booming kickoffs.

Toss in the leading kickoff returner in the nation in junior speedster Dri Archer (38.2 ypr), who returned three kickoffs for touchdowns in the first five games of the season before teams stopped kicking to him, and you have the premier overall special teams group in the MAC -- and one of the best in the nation.

"The only question (on special teams) we had coming into the year was the punter. And this man has stepped up big-time," said Cortez, pointing to Melchiori. "No one knew he was gonna come out and do what he's done."

Together, Melchiori and Cortez have helped bring an end to the losing ways they've witnessed, one as a kid and the other as a young player. Now they hope to help Kent State slap an exclamation point on the premier season in program history by earning its first-ever bowl victory on Sunday.

"This year we all bought into the system," said Cortez. "We had a lot of star players, but no one separated themselves. We were all a team and stayed together, and pulled off one season that I wouldn't trade for anything in the world. Now we want to end it the right way.

"This game, a lot of it's gonna come down to (special teams), whether it be a field goal, field position. It's gonna come down to us somehow, some way."

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News Headline: Allen Moff's Football Memoirs from Mobile | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Allen Moff | Staff Writer Published: January 4, 2013 4:00AM

THURSDAY'S ACTIVITIES

After practicing from about 10:15 until noon at the University of South Alabama's practice fields, 12 members of the team visited the University of South Alabama's Children's and Women's Hospital: Spencer Keith, Kent Cleveland, Freddy Cortez, Luke Batton, Sidney Saulter, Luke Wollet, Zach Hitchens, Anthony Meray, Chris Humphrey, Casey Pierce, Nate Vance and Anthony Melchiori. Both teams then attended a fun event featuring a hypnotist Thursday night.

MEMOIRS

The hospital visit was a touching experience for the Flashes. "It was awesome," said senior Kent Cleveland, the Flashes' starting right tackle, who also visited patients at Akron Children's Hospital a few weeks ago. "Every time you think football is hard or anything in life's hard, you think about those kids. They're so young and they're struggling. We have it so easy compared to them. Anything to help them get through what they're going through always feels good to do."

— Thursday's morning practice was once again held in cool, cloudy conditions. Temperatures were said to be in the mid-40s, but it certainly felt colder than that. The secretary at the University of South Alabama's field house tried to explain how the humidity somehow makes temperatures in the south feel colder than the same ones in the north. While I can't explain it, I agree with that assessment. The sun finally broke through in the afternoon, pushing the high temperature of the day to 48. Still not what I was hoping for, but I know -- much better than Ohio. The forecast for Sunday remains the same, cloudy and around 50 degrees at game time.

— Thursday's practice was cranked up quite a bit. Coordinators Brian Rock (offense) and Jon Heacock (defense) were obviously trying to reinforce the fact that there's a big game to be played on Sunday. Heacock was especially vocal while getting after his defenders after a second straight blown assignment.

— After practice head coach Darrell Hazell reminded his players that they have a chance to reach 12 wins. Only seven other teams will finish the season with a dozen or more victories: Ohio State, Notre Dame, Alabama, Northern Illinois, Stanford, Georgia, and the winner of Thursday night's Fiesta Bowl between Kansas State and Oregon.

— Senior kicker Freddy Cortez and Hazell's 11-year-old son Kyle stole the show at Wednesday night's Team Welcome Reception. Cortez and star junior defensive tackle Roosevelt Nix defeated a duo from Arkansas State in the Team Play-by-Play Contest after Cortez, while announcing the action of a televised football game in front of a huge crowd, excitedly switched languages from English to Spanish. "Of course I got a little nervous at first cause you gotta speak in front of everybody. But I like to have fun and have a good time, so I went up there just being myself," Cortez smiled. "I knew nobody was gonna understand what I was gonna say -- I could have went up there and said anything. It was definitely a great time." Meanwhile, Kyle Hazell was invited to the microphone by the host of the event, a local disc jockey, who pounded him with obscure sports questions. Kyle answered each one correctly, without hesitation. That comes as no surprise to anyone who knows Kyle, who has impressed us with his sports knowledge throughout the year. He even predicted Texas A&M's upset of Alabama earlier this season.

COMING UP

Kent State will practice this morning at about 9:45 a.m., then a Mayor's Luncheon featuring comedian Larry the Cable Guy is slated for noon. Saturday features a luncheon on board the famous World War II battleship the USS Alabama, a Mardi Gras parade with Grand Marshal Danica Patrick, and a Pep Rally at 8 p.m., followed by a Street Party.

Countdown To Kickoff: 2 days.

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News Headline: Kent State Golden Flashes Arrive in Alabama for GoDaddy.com Bowl | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Team will face Arkansas State Sunday

(VIDEO) http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=5ai8mp-11Io
Kent State GoDaddy.com Bowl
Members of Kent State Athletics talk about the team's arrival in Alabama for the GoDaddy.com Bowl.

The Kent State Golden Flashes were greeted with cheers and a police escort Wednesday as the football team arrived in Mobile, AL for its first bowl game in 40 years.

City leaders, local football fans, and representatives from the GoDaddy.com Bowl rolled out the red carpet for Kent State's players and coaches. The Golden Flashes took part in a welcome celebration Wednesday evening at Ladd-Peebles Stadium, and then had a chance to walk on the stadium turf.

Mobile Mayor Sam Jones presented the Key to the City to Kent State Athletic Director Joel Nielsen.

As part of the evening's entertainment, several members of the team took to the microphone and did their own play-by-play of the Sugar Bowl as it was projected on several big-screen televisions at the stadium.

Kent State (11-2) battles Arkansas State (9-3) Sunday at 9 p.m. on ESPN.

Head Coach Darrel Hazell and Nielsen met briefly with members of the local media prior to the welcome celebration.

Today, 10-15 members of the football team will visit with children at USA Children's and Women's Hospital, and the team will practice at the University of South Alabama.

Visit KentStatesports.com for more information on the Kent State Golden Flashes football team.

Visit GoDaddyBowl.com for more information on the game.

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News Headline: Kent State kicker April Goss' GoDaddy.com Bowl blog: 'The perfect way to start off an amazing week' | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: Thursday, January 03, 2013, 3:00 PM Updated: Thursday, January 03, 2013, 3:01 PM

(PHOTO) Kent State kicker April Goss is flanked by teammates Trayion Durham, left, and Anthony Meray on the field at Ladd Peebles Stadium, site of the GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile on Jan. 6.
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Editor's note: April Goss, a freshman walk-on kicker on the Kent State football team, is sharing her experiences as she travels with her Golden Flashes teammates to the GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala. You can follow her journal in The Plain Dealer at here at cleveland.com/sports/college/

So far, after the first day in Mobile, Ala., all I can really say is that I love it here! I could seriously get used to all this Southern hospitality. The people are all so kind, the air is warm plus there is no snow in sight, and the food is to die for.

Yesterday did get off to a bit of a rough start when our flight was delayed by about an hour and when we were told that some luggage would have to be taken off because of too much weight on the plane. But we didn't let any of that take away from this amazing week. Of course, jokes were made that it was the linemen's fault for being too heavy, but it's all OK because here, we encourage weight gain. It all worked out because after eating a nice lunch, we got right back on schedule.

We traveled to the University of South Alabama Practice Facility to get some work in for the game on Sunday. It was a light practice, just giving everyone a chance to run around. But we made sure to cover every special team, so for us specialists, it was a perfect practice. Although once the sun went down it did get a bit chilly, it was extremely rewarding to be able to practice outside without my toes going numb.

After practice, we went to a welcoming reception at Ladd-Peebles Stadium, where we will be playing on Sunday, for a shrimp boil. It was great to just kick back and relax with my teammates and wow, that food hit the spot. There was pulled pork, smoked sausage, corn on the cob, sweet tea, and even banana pudding. Exactly the kind of Southern food I was hoping for. It was the perfect way to start off an amazing week and I keep looking forward to what each day has in store.

-- April Goss

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News Headline: Kent State Flashes' QB raised by Wolves: Kent State Bowl Insider | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: Friday, January 04, 2013, 8:02 AM Updated: Friday, January 04, 2013, 8:09 AM

Mobile, Ala. — One might suspect the parents of Kent State quarterback Spencer Keith might be wearing a spot of red with their blue and gold this week as the No. 25 Golden Flashes prepare for Sunday's GoDaddy.com Bowl against the Arkansas State Red Wolves. Steve and Rhonda Keith are graduates of Arkansas State. But Kent's record-setting quarterback said don't bet on his parents showing split allegiance.

“They won't be doing that,” Keith said after Thursday's practice.

Spencer Keith, a senior, is a graduate of Pulaski Academy in Little Rock, Ark., where he led his school to an Arkansas 5A state title as a senior, setting a state record with 5,310 passing yards. However, Keith never received a scholarship offer from Arkansas State and Kent was Keith's only Division I offer.

While his parents will apparently be true blue, Keith said there will be a little Pulaski pride going on as two former high school teammates are now playing at Arkansas State.

“There are two freshmen there now that I played with a few weeks,” Keith said. “They moved up [to varsity] right at the end of my senior season.”

The Red Wolves (9-3) won the Sun Belt Conference title this season while Kent State (11-2) won the Mid-American Conference East Division crown before losing to Northern Illinois in the MAC title game.

Been there, done that: While this is Kent State's first appearance in a bowl game in 40 years, the Flashes do have a player on the roster with bowl-game experience. Senior receiver Eric Adeyemi, a transfer from Kentucky, played for the Wildcats in the 2009 Liberty Bowl, where he had two catches for 31 yards.

Adeyemi has 17 receptions on the season for Kent and 238 yards with three touchdowns. In Kent's last two regular-season games, including the MAC East Division clincher at Bowling Green, he had five receptions for 103 yards and two touchdowns.

No surprise: Guess what the big bowl sports story is in Mobile? The GoDaddy.com Bowl might as well be the “OutofSight Bowl” when it comes to the Mobile Register and Al.com. It's almost all about the Alabama-Notre Dame championship game coverage. The first 10 sports stories on Al.com are all Alabama or Auburn football-related, and 12 of the first 15 overall.

Very little mention of the Golden Flashes and Red Wolves being in town even as bowl officials anticipate a pretty good showing in the stands Sunday.

“In terms of ticket sales, it looks like this year's going to be one of our strongest years,” according to GoDaddy.com Bowl President Jerry Silverstein. Last year, the bowl game attracted 38,734 ticket buyers as Northern Illinois beat Arkansas State, 38-20.

Saving face: The MAC has been collecting egg on its face during the bowl season as six of the seven teams that advanced to bowl play had a combined record of 2-4, with the lone wins coming from Ohio, 45-14, over Louisiana-Monroe in the Independence Bowl, and Central Michigan, 24-21, over Western Kentucky in the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl.

The four losses from Bowling Green, Toledo, Ball State and Northern Illinois were by the average score of 34.7-15.5. For a league with a high-scoring reputation, averaging two touchdowns in four losses does not speak well for the league against outside competition. That leaves Kent State with the chore of saving face for the conference by beating Arkansas State.

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter:
ealexand@plaind.com, 216-999-4253

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News Headline: Dri Archer's versatility a key in Kent State's offensive attack (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: al.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Tommy Hicks | thicks@al.com al.com

(PHOTO) Kent State Golden Flashes running back Dri Archer (1) runs the ball during practice Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013, at the University of South Alabama in Mobile, Ala. Kent State faces Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl Sunday at Ladd-Peebles Stadium. (Mike Kittrell/mkittrell@al.com)

MOBILE, Alabama - A season away from the field, there was no one more ready for Kent State's season-opener against Towson this season than running back Dri Archer. The junior, who was forced to sit out the 2010 season because of an academic issue, wanted to make up for lost time.

Did he ever. Archer, the Golden Flashes' leading rusher and receiver this season, had quite the game, rushing for 54 yards and two touchdowns on just five carries and returning two kickoffs for 155 yards (including a 98-yarder for a touchdown). In total, Archer collected 217 yards and three touchdowns in his return.

He hasn't slowed down since.

A consensus All-America selection, Archer has led the Kent State offense all season and is expected to continue that trend Sunday when Kent State faces Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl game at Ladd-Peebles Stadium. He averages a whopping 9.0 yards per carry and 104 rushing yards a game, providing 1,352 rushing yards and 15 rushing touchdowns. He surpassed the 1,000-yard mark on just his 103rd carry.

He has also caught 35 passes for 539 yards and four scores, returned 15 kickoff for 573 yards, a 38.2 yards per return average and three touchdowns and scored 132 points, an average of 10 points per game. Archer offers 189.2 all-purpose yards per game.

His speed attracted a lot of attention from recruiters out of Venice High in Laurel, Fla.,but his size - 5-foot-8, 175 pounds - created concern for some. Kent State was the only Division I team to make a scholarship offer. Archer has made that decision pay off for the school.

"He's sensational,'' head coach Darrell Hazel, who will take over at Purdue after Sunday's game, said of Archer. "He's an unbelievable player with the ball in his hands. I think what makes him different and unique - a lot of people look at his top-end speed, he's a 4.2 (in the 40-yard dash) - I think what makes him different is how good he is in confined areas. He'll have three or four guys around him in a confined space and he'll make them miss. That's what makes him good.''

Archer's incentive was as much the result of inactivity as his preparations for the season.

"Coming into the season, I had high expectations for myself because I sat out last year,'' Archer said. "I wanted to start off great. Towson came in and I had a couple of touchdowns in that game and I just wanted to keep moving for the rest of the season.

"(Sitting out) was real difficult. It took a lot out of me watching every game on the sidelines. I think that's why I did so well this year, because me not playing last year made me work that much harder to play this year.''

And competition. At Venice High he finished second in the state in the 100-meter run his senior year. Third place went to Michigan's Denard Robinson. In football, he was the team's Most Valuable Player, rushing for 1,482 yards and 17 touchdowns his senior year. He also had 21 catches for 402 yards and five more scores.

He has shifted his impact to Kent State, a team that has won a school record 11 games heading into Sunday's matchup with Arkansas State, a No. 25 national ranking and the school's first bowl game appearance in 40 years.

"We set a lot of records this year,'' Archer said of the KSU offense. "It's been a great season and great to be a part of history. We've got another chance to go out and make some more history Sunday by going out and winning the first bowl game in Kent State history. It's a great feeling. ... It's been great, a great feeling being here, and we've had fun. But at the end of the day we came here for one reason and that's to win the game.''

Archer is expected to play a key role in Kent State's plans Sunday. And that's exactly how he wants it to be.

"I'm one of those guys who just loves having the ball in his hands any way possible,'' Archer said. "I like playing receiver and I like playing running back. I like being a kick returner even though I haven't done that in a couple of weeks. I just want the ball in my hands.''

It's a good bet Dri Archer will get his wish.

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News Headline: KTHV News at 6 | Email

News Date: 01/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: KTHV News at 6 PM - KTHV-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: bids, make sure the person is insured. If it's a whole tree removal, most tree companies can handle that, but make sure they are insured." slater says while most tree companies are good at what they do, it's always best to ask for a certified arborist if there's any question whether a tree should be removed. If you need more information on tree damage and survival potential - we've provided a link at todaysthv.com just visit our homepage and click on this story. Now lets send things out live to mark edwards it's the most wonderful time of the year! No, I know christmas is over .... But it's bowl season! And we're awaiting a pretty big game for the state of arkansas on sunday night. The asu red wolves will take on kent state in the go daddy dot com bowl. Thv 11's mark edwards is live thv 11's mark thv 11's mark edwards is live in mobile, alabama as the teams engage in the week long bowl festivities. Hey there mark!mark! Outcue: feel like we got a

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News Headline: Fox 16 News at 5:30 | Email

News Date: 01/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fox 16 News at 5:30 PM - KLRT-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Pillsbury Crescents on their own are fantastic But add some sauce, pepperoni and cheese and fold up the Crescent dough...and presto! Tuesday night just became Crescent Pizza Pocket-tastic Pillsbury Crescents. Let the Making Begin [ Female Announcer ] Why settle for plain bread? Here's a better idea. Pillsbury Grands! Flaky Layers Biscuits In just 15 minutes the light delicate layers add a layer of warmth to your next dinner. Pillsbury Grands Biscuits Let the making begin. Ready for the kent state flash.. Jd mckissic out there at practice today, looking as healthy as he has all season long.. Poor guy was part of the walking wounded at the end of the regular season.. So this past month has been key in getting the guys not only focused in on the bowl, but focused on getting healthy too.. John thompson says spirits are high.. Oc: know the gameplan trt: 23 on the other sideline, kent state is led by qb spencer keith.. If that name sounds familiar, it's because he was once singnal caller at pulaski academy.. Now a senior, this is his first bowl apperance, he says it's about time.. Oc: a little roll trt: 18 the fun begins sunday night.. 8:00 on espn.. Wolves 4 point favorties coming in.. It's being called one of the biggest upsets in bowl history, a day after saying they'd shock the world.. Number 22 louisville did just that, decking fourth ranked florida last night 33- 23.. Cardinals led by batesville native charlie strong, led from start to finish.. Punched the gators in the mouth..and the naysayers, they're eating their words the day after.. Oc: our peformance trt: 18 hog hoopsters with one last tuneup before they dive into the sec.. But mike anderson would rather you not refer to delaware state as a tuneup.. Like any coach, even the sisters of the poor are treated like elite level teams.. Head hog had this to say about the hornets - who were a tourney team a few years back.. Oc: for conference play trt: 20 we'll be right back with your hour by hour forecast and the results of our web poll.

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News Headline: Research Results from Kent State University Update Knowledge of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders (Roller) | Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 JAN 4 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- A new study on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders is now available. According to news originating from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx editors, the research stated, "Every ninth woman presenting for prenatal care reports having experienced childhood sexual abuse. Many develop mental health disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "In response to PTSD, pregnant women survivors of childhood sexual abuse engage in negative perinatal self-care behaviors that can lead to adverse perinatal outcomes. Currently, promotion of perinatal self-care does not consider childhood sexual abuse or PTSD. This study aimed to develop a Perinatal Self-Care Index, determine sensitivity of the index to differences in behaviors of childhood sexual abuse survivors (PTSD-affected and PTSD-resilient), and validate usefulness in relation to birth weight. Secondary analysis was conducted using data from a prospective cohort study of the effects of PTSD on pregnancy outcomes. The index explained 6.5% of variance in birth weight. Prediction improved to 9.4% once PTSD and socioeconomic status were considered."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The index is sensitive to differences in PTSD-affected versus PTSD-resilient survivors of childhood sexual abuse and a useful predictor of birth weight in this analysis."

For more information on this research see: The Perinatal Self-Care Index Development of an Evidence-Based Assessment Tool for Use With Child Sexual Abuse Survivors. Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, 2012;26(4):319-326. Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing can be contacted at: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA. (Lippincott Williams and Wilkins - www.lww.com; Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing - journals.lww.com/jpnnjournal/pages/default.aspx)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from C.G. Roller, Kent State University, Coll Nursing, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, PTSD, Pediatrics, United States, Mental Health, Child Sexual Abuse, North and Central America, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2013 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: On the Ground: The Unsung Heroes of District Offices and How They Work | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Roll Call - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Members' local offices create coalitions to rebuild, revitalize their hometowns

* By Rebecca Gale
* Roll Call Staff
* Jan. 3, 2013, 6:16 p.m.

(PHOTO) From right: Kent State University President Dr. Lester Lefton, Development Finance Authority of Summit County President Chris Burnham and Ryan at a construction site in Kent, Ohio. Ryan's district office organized stakeholders to appeal for the funding.
---
Jason Fabick had graduated from barber college and was looking for a place to open a shop in Kent, Ohio. He and his business partner, Jason Manion, wanted to wear sports jerseys, talk about football and cut hair at the same time.

“We moved into Acorn Alley,” Fabick said, referring to the development project in downtown Kent made possible with a Transportation Department grant. “This is an idea that Kent has had for a long time but didn't have the funds to get these things going.”

Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan's district office worked with Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown, the city, Kent State University and the Portage Area Regional Transit Authority to secure $20 million for Kent.

The role of the district office was to help organize a group of stakeholders to appeal to the Department of Transportation for funding. It worked.

Acorn Alley came to fruition and has brought in businesses such as Jasons' Barbershop, which has since expanded from two barbers to five, with room to grow. “We have a sixth chair,” Fabick said. “We will probably hire a sixth [barber] eventually.”

Not everyone sees this kind of federal spending as a good thing. Critics consider such grants to be one of the worst aspects of the legislative process. The House-passed fiscal 2013 Transportation-HUD bill would have eliminated the TIGER Grants program, which funded the Kent project.

But Fabick sees it as local politics at its best. And he has a lot of company among other Americans, whose views of their congressman — if not of Congress as a whole — are greatly shaped by their interactions with district and state offices.

Ask the workforce in West Virginia, where Sen. Jay Rockefeller traveled dozens of times to Japan to persuade Toyota to open a $400 million plant in the town of Buffalo. The Democrat's state staff organized the meetings in West Virginia and accompanied him on some overseas trips.

Or ask the residents of Joplin, Mo., who were struck by an F5 tornado May 22, 2011. Republican Rep. Billy Long was on the ground the next day, pitching a tent next to the Red Cross and helping facilitate communication among the local, state and federal agencies involved.

The district staffers have long been the unsung heroes of congressional work. District work does not get nearly the same coverage as Hill activity, but its role is just as vital to the function of Congress.
Different Types

District offices and D.C. offices have their own staffs — though occasionally traveling staffers go back and forth.

“In general, very different people are drawn to work in D.C. as compared to working in the district office,” said Susie Gorden, vice president of the nonpartisan Congressional Management Foundation.

District staffers tend to have a longer tenure and more work experience, and are more likely to have children and close ties to the district, the CMF has found.

While D.C. staff feel the pressure of the grinding schedule and political tension, those in the state and district offices feel the real and immediate pressures of constituents in need. “There is a human component to the work they do. Instead of making a decision on a piece of legislation, they are looking a person directly in the eye,” Gorden said.

“District staff are connected to the district in a way that the D.C. staff isn't,” she said. It is the district staff who find the “unforeseen consequences of legislation.” A prime example: “Any changes to veterans health coverage will be first reported to the district caseworker, not the military legislative assistant.”
Measuring Success

The CMF says successful district offices are clear in managing expectations and clear in procedures for casework.

“A good district office knows what they can and cannot do and communicates that effectively,” Gorden said. Another predictor of success is if the district director and the D.C. chief of staff have a good working relationship.

In addition to the day-to-day casework, district offices often play a strategic role in helping members secure “big wins” such as relocating a major business, saving an existing business or securing funds for economic development.

“Getting a major business to relocate is a multilevel team effort” that must be led by the member, Gorden said, but with staff playing crucial roles. “Extremely well-connected district staff will work with other state and local agencies to create business development opportunities,” she said.

Chris Cupples, Ryan's economic development coordinator, grew up near the lawmaker's northeast Ohio district and continues to be part of the effort to develop downtown Kent.

“It's great to see these cities that have gone through hardships over the last several decades expand, diversify and come alive again,” Cupples said. “Working with our constituents on a daily basis gives a perspective on how significant economic development efforts and resources from the federal government help local communities.”

And sometimes it can be the dogged determination of a member to make something happen. After 10 years and dozens of meetings in both Japan and West Virginia, Rockefeller — who spent three years as a student in Japan in the 1950s — persuaded Toyota that Buffalo, W.Va., was the ideal home for the company's $400 million plant to produce four-cylinder Corolla engines. The plant had a projected initial workforce of 350. Total employment now is around 1,200.
Emergency Responders

When an emergency hits home, it's the district office that is first to respond.

After the Joplin tornado, Long's district office was a communications hub, staying in contact with city officials and monitoring the rescue from the Emergency Operations Center. When the local fire department decided to barricade some streets, residents couldn't get in. Long learned of the problem and went to talk to the fire chief; the ban was quickly lifted.

“In those types of situations, you don't react, you just act,” said Long, who spent eight straight days in Joplin.

Long said facilitating communication during an emergency is one of the best things a district office can do.

“The role of the congressman is to coordinate and make sure we have an understanding of what each of the agencies are doing,” Long said. “If people come to us with a question — for instance, someone had a pile of debris in their yard — then I found out that the Army Corps was responsible for the debris removal, so we took care of that.”

“After that, there was a tornado in [Indiana Republican] Todd Young's district. My chief called his chief and went through what they should do and who they should reach out to,” Long said. “My office had already been there and done that. We could save them some steps and keep them from making missteps.”
RebeccaGale@cqrollcall.com | @Beckgale

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News Headline: Kent State Journalism Student is News21 Fellow (Wasbotten) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Daniel Moore earns prestigious fellowship

Daniel Moore, a junior majoring in newspaper journalism at Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication (JMC), has been awarded the prestigious News21 Fellowship. Moore is the first JMC student to receive this honor and one of only 25 student journalists in the country selected for the paid summer fellowship, which is annually awarded to the top student journalists in the country. News21 is funded by Carnegie-KnightInitiative on the Future of Journalism Education.

The fellowship gives next-generation journalism students the opportunity to cover a national issue and have their work published in national media. This year's program will focus on the re-entry into civilian life of returning veterans from Afghanistan and Iraq.

“I am thrilled to be the first student from Kent State to participate in News 21. I've always had a passion for in-depth journalism that sheds light on dark, difficult stories. This will allow me to continue this pursuit as I report on the issues these veterans face domestically after years of war,” Moore said. “I thank JMC Director Thor Wasbotten for having faith in me, as well as countless professors and advisers I've consulted about the program. I hope to represent Kent State well in the newsroom of the future.”

“This is a tremendous opportunity for Daniel to work with the best student journalists in the country as part of the News21 program,” said Wasbotten. “He will experience working with a team to produce stories that will be published on a national level and we could not be more proud of his success."

Moore, a former editor and reporter for the Daily Kent Stater, has previously interned with Kentucky's Lexington Herald-Leader and written for www.Kentucky.com and The News Outlet (www.thenewsoutlet.org). He is also a member of Investigative Reporters and Editors (www.ire.org).

Moore is a native of Lancaster, Ohio, and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Moore.

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News Headline: Alignment of Curricula Progresses in Region | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: Youngstown Business Journal
Contact Name: Tyler Clark Consulting.
News OCR Text: WARREN, Ohio -- High schools in Trumbull, Mahoning, Ashtabula and Columbiana counties, along with Kent State University Ashtabula, Eastern Gateway Community College, Youngstown State University, Eastern Ohio P-16 and the Trumbull County Educational Service Center, are completing the first year of a three-year grant designed to provide alignment of curriculum for students transitioning from high school to post-secondary education. The Alignment Team is focusing on aligning English and mathematics.

“We find that far too many of our brightest students, students with a 3.2 GPA or higher, enter college and need remedial help,” said Stephanie Shaw, executive director of the Eastern Ohio P-16 Partnership for Education and project co-leader. “The High School to Higher Education Alignment Team is focused on looking at why this is happening and developing solutions.

"We recently launched ALEKS, at no charge, to United Local High School in Columbiana County," Shaw continued.

ALEKS, she explained, is an online mathematics assessment and learning tool being used to in a support fourth-year math students who traditionally would not be calculus or trigonometry class. By implementing ALEKS, the teacher can gauge students' achievement and help them progress at their own levels. The tool also provides a look at the type of assessment tools they will use in college. Kent State University and other colleges and universities throughout the country use ALEKS.

The team also is planning a summit for fall 2013 on sustainability, Shaw said.

“The summit will provide a forum for the Alignment Team to reach a broader audience, and to continue the conversation, so we can help eliminate remediation in Eastern Ohio,” she explained.

Published by The Business Journal, Youngstown, Ohio.

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News Headline: Reynolds named director of county community and development agency | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Reynolds named director of county community and development agency

By Meghan Millea

TimesReporter.com staff writer

Posted Jan 03, 2013 @ 11:27 PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -

After 19 years of serving as the administrative coordinator for the Tuscarawas County Office of Community and Economic Development, Scott Reynolds was promoted to director by the Tuscarawas County commissioners.

Commissioners made the appointment recently, following the retirement of former Director George Reymond on Dec. 28.

Reynolds, 47, who has served in the office since its inception in 1994, said he appreciated the appointment and has a lot to achieve.

"I'm very grateful to the commissioners that they have confidence in me to appoint me to the position and I hope to continue to do a good job for them as I hope I have done for them in the past in the coordinator's position," he said.

Reynolds began his career in county government in 1991 when he worked for both the water and sewer departments, as well as the regional planning office. He received a degree in business administration and management from Malone College, now Malone University.

In 1994,  Reymond started the OCED, and Reynolds chose to join the effort.

"Our office really believes in the fact it takes both the community (and government) to have economic development - good schools, good infrastructure, are all items needed to attract business to the area," he said.

That belief system has led Reynolds and Reymond to tackling several aspects of community and economic development including the coordination of programs to develop industrial parks in the county, writing community and development block grants to help the cities, townships and villages improve infrastructure and partnering with several economic groups in the county to entice new businesses or encourage existing business expansion.

"Before the office even started, projects were done under the auspices of the regional planning office," he said.

As the transition took place, the OCED put together the Lawrence Township Industrial Park and worked on the Newcomerstown Industrial Park and later partnered with the County Community  Improvement Corp and Kent State University Tuscarawas to develop the Tuscarawas Regional Technology Park.

Reynolds said his office undertook several CDBG projects, which mostly included drainage issues, making improvements to blighted areas, paving streets as well as parks and recreation and building a senior center.

Reynolds said the OCED also partners with the Chamber of Commerce, Port Authority and Newcomerstown and Lawrence Township CIC. The office oversees CHIP - the Community Housing Improvement Program - as well.

Reynolds said he believes he should have a smooth transition into his new position as he has been involved with most of the projects.

"Hopefully, the transition will be a fairly easy one," he said. "I've learned quite a bit over the years from George."

Among the skill sets he picked up were grant writing, he said.

Recently, the OCED oversaw the renovation projects for the Tuscarawas County Justice Center and the Tuscarawas County Courthouse Annex, Reynolds said. He said the office used economic development bonds to fix the roofs for both buildings as well as the air conditioning systems.

Reynolds said his goal for 2013 and onward is to become more proactive in economic development. He said it is easy to get inundated with grant work, and he'd like to focus more on enticing businesses to move to Tuscarawas County. He'd also like to focus on existing business expansion.

"I'd like to see good planned growth in some of the industrial parks throughout Tuscarawas County," he said, adding "That's been our goal all along."

For now, Reynolds' former position remains open. He said he will probably have to find a replacement. Until then, he and his administrative assistant will keep plugging away at office duties. He said community and office development work is never done.

"I don't think we ever arrive," he said. "We need to keep learning."

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News Headline: Paddling Traffic Down for Crooked River Adventures in 2012 (Herpy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Like last year's water level, traffic in rented canoes and kayaks was down on the Cuyahoga River.

Fewer people took trips in 2012 with Crooked River Adventures, the canoe and kayak livery operated Kent State University downtown.

The livery reported close to 1,300 total trips from April to October of 2012, according to a year-end report on the livery by Kent State administrators.

In 2010 and 2011, the livery managed about 2,300 total canoe and kayak trips per year.

Dave Herpy, outdoor adventure coordinator for the Department of Recreational Services at Kent State University, said the near record low rainfall in the region contributed to the decline — and an average water depth of 1 foot on the stretch of the Cuyahoga River used by the livery.

"The river was the lowest that we'd ever seen it in our three years of operation, so it did take a toll," Herpy said. "There were some spots where there might have been pools of water maybe three feet deep, but there were other spots where the river was almost unnavigable. You had to get out and walk your kayak or canoe."

In 2010 Ohio marked the warmest year on record — a factor that contributed to little rain fall and thus shallower ponds, rivers and streams.

The shallow river meant the trips took longer, and as a result the livery cut its number of trips from four per day down to three.

But many people still enjoyed the scenic trip from John Brown Tannery Park, where the river is based, to two destinations in Cuyahoga Falls.

"We were able to still accommodate folks and get people on the river," Herpy said.

And 2013, which will mark the livery's fourth year in Kent, may bring yet another challenge as the city starts work to replace the Redmond Bridge connecting the Kramer Ball Fields to Fred Fuller Park.

Kent Parks and Recreation Director John Idone said the parks department, which leases use of Tannery Park to the livery, made them aware of the potential affect the bridge construction may have on recreational boaters.

Kent City Council voted this week to renew the lease with the livery.

"They're aware they may have to end up putting in at a different location," Idone said. "They've done a very good job of conducting the services there at a very reasonable price."

Herpy said they're prepared if the bridge construction has an affect.

"It all depends on the timing of that project," he said. "If construction does start and the river becomes unnavigable in the middle of the summer it will affect us, but it won't close our operation by any means. We already have a plan B."

New for 2013, the university's adventure center, which runs the livery, will be hiring a full-time employee to manage livery operations and other aspects of the adventure center. Previously, a graduate assistant managed the livery.

And a new element this year is the extension of The Portage Hike and Bike Trail via a link between Tannery and Full parks that was finished last fall. That link makes it possible to ride from Tannery Park to where Middlebury Road crosses the river — all on the bike trail — with the option to ride a short span on the road to The Freedom Trail, which is part of the Metro Parks Serving Summit County and travels into Tallmadge, OH.

"I'm really excited about the new bike trail being complete. That's going to be great for everyone," Herpy said. "I definitely hope to do a lot more bike rentals this season, more so than in years past."

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News Headline: Bad Cholesterol May Not Be So Bad | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Katy News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The so-called "bad cholesterol" - low-density lipoprotein  commonly called LDL - may not be so bad after all, shows a Texas A&M University study that casts new light on the cholesterol debate, particularly among adults who exercise.

Steve Riechman, a researcher in the Department of Health and Kinesiology, says the study reveals that LDL is not the evil Darth Vader of health it has been made out to be in recent years and that new attitudes need to be adopted in regards to the substance.  His work, with help from colleagues from the University of Pittsburgh, Kent State University, the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center and the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, is published in the Journal of Gerontology.

Riechman and colleagues examined 52 adults from ages to 60 to 69 who were in generally good health but not physically active, and none of them were participating in a training program.  The study showed that after fairly vigorous workouts, participants who had gained the most muscle mass also had the highest levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol, "a very unexpected result and one that surprised us.

"It shows that you do need a certain amount of LDL to gain more muscle mass. There's no doubt you need both - the LDL and the HDL -- and the truth is, it (cholesterol) is all good.  You simply can't remove all the ‘bad' cholesterol from your body without serious problems occurring.

Cholesterol is found in all humans and is a type of fat around the body.  A person's total cholesterol level is comprised of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) and HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol.

LDL is almost always referred to as the "bad" cholesterol because it tends to build up in the walls of arteries, causing a slowing of the blood flow which often leads to heart disease and heart attacks.

HDL, usually called the "good cholesterol," often helps remove cholesterol from arteries.

"But here is where people tend to get things wrong," Riechman says.

"LDL serves a very useful purpose.  It acts as a warning sign that something is wrong and it signals the body to these warning signs.  It does its job the way it is supposed to.

"People often say, ‘I want to get rid of all my bad (LDL) cholesterol,' but the fact is, if you did so, you would die," the Texas A&M professor adds.  "Everyone needs a certain amount of both LDL and HDL in their bodies.  We need to change this idea of LDL always being the evil thing - we all need it, and we need it to do its job."

According to the American Heart Association, about 36 million American adults have high cholesterol levels.

"Our tissues need cholesterol, and LDL delivers it," he notes.  "HDL, the good cholesterol, cleans up after the repair is done. And the more LDL you have in your blood, the better you are able to build muscle during resistance training."

Riechman says the study could be helpful in looking at a condition called sarcopenia, which is muscle loss due to aging. Previous studies show muscle is usually lost at a rate of 5 percent per decade after the age of 40, a huge concern since muscle mass is the major determinant of physical strength.  After the age of 60, the prevalence of moderate to severe sarcopenia is found in about 65 percent of all men and about 30 percent of all women, and it accounts for more than $18  billion of health care costs in the United States.

"The bottom line is that LDL - the bad cholesterol - serves as a reminder that something is wrong and we need to find out what it is," Riechman says.

"It gives us warning signs. Is smoking the problem, is it diet, is it lack of exercise that a person's cholesterol is too high? It plays a very useful role, does the job it was intended to do, and we need to back off by always calling it ‘bad' cholesterol because it is not totally bad."

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News Headline: New Geriatrics and Gerontology Study Findings Have Been Reported by Investigators at Kent State University | Email

News Date: 01/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 JAN 4 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Current study results on Geriatrics and Gerontology have been published. According to news reporting originating in Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Purpose of the Study: This study examines (a) the association between being a care recipient and end-of-life care planning (EOLCP) and (b) the extent to which personality traits moderate the relationship between care receipt and EOLCP. Data are drawn from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a survey of Wisconsin high school graduates from 1957 to 2004."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "We used data on EOLCP among older adults in the most recent (2003-2004) wave of this survey. Hierarchical logistic regression models are used to estimate the effects of care receipt and the moderating effects of personality. Compared with their peers who are not receiving care, care recipients are more likely to engage in informal discussion on EOLCP. This association between care receipt and informal EOLCP is strengthened when the individual scores high on openness."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Health practitioners should take into account older adults' care needs and differing personality traits while helping older adults make successful EOLCP."

For more information on this research see: Do Personality Traits Moderate the Impact of Care Receipt on End-of-Life Care Planning? Gerontologist, 2012;52(6):759-769. Gerontologist can be contacted at: Oxford Univ Press Inc, Journals Dept, 2001 Evans Rd, Cary, NC 27513, USA. (Oxford University Press - www.oup.com/; Gerontologist - gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.H. Ha, Kent State University, Dept. of Sociol, Kent, OH 44240, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, United States, North and Central America, Geriatrics and Gerontology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2013 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Page Turners: Our Place in History | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: www.ohiomagazine.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: July 2011 Issue

Page Turners: Our Place in History

Brush up your Civil War

knowledge with these riveting books. Each gives a fascinating glimpse into

Ohio's involvement in the conflict.

Linda Feagler

From the battlefields of Gettysburg and Antietam to the generals who plotted strategy, Blood, Tears & Glory: How Ohioans Won the Civil War , by historian James Bissland, chronicles the extraordinary circumstances created by heroic men, which helped bring victory to the North, as well as the sacrifices of the families who kept the home fires burning.. (Orange Frazer Press )

President William McKinley was the last of the Civil War veterans to reach the White House, and the only one who served in the ranks: He enlisted as a private in the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry (later commanded by another Ohioan and future president Rutherford B. Hayes). Major McKinley: William McKinley and The Civil War , by retired United Church of Christ Minister William H. Armstrong, gives perspective on the Niles native's experiences in battle and how they shaped his days in the Oval Office. (The Kent State University Press )

More than 4,400 Ohio soldiers participated in the battle of Gettysburg, 30 percent of whom were killed, wounded or captured. In Buckeye Blood: Ohio at Gettysburg, author Richard A. Baumgartner uses diaries and letters to paint a poignant portrait of the citizens who gave their all to the cause. (Blue Acorn Press )

During the Civil War, the women back home spent countless hours writing letters to lonely soldiers on the battlefield. The task clearly boosted troop morale. So much so that it often led to romantic relationships. And when Edwin Lewis Lybarger, a 21-year-old member of Company K of the 43rd Ohio from Knox County, placed a lonely-hearts ad, he was besieged with a deluge of responses. Wanted — Correspondence: Women's Letters to a Union Soldier , edited by Lybarger's granddaughter, Nancy L. Rhoades, and Oklahoma State University professor Lucy Bailey, offers insightful glimpses of women's lives as they waited, worked, worried and wrote from the home front. (Ohio University Press )

Akron native Simon Perkins Jr. and his fellow quartermasters helped make Union victory possible by ensuring that the Federal army had the equipment it needed. During his service with the Army of the Ohio, the Army of the Cumberland and the Department of the North, Perkins held key assignments in Tennessee and Alabama, directing wagon trains during the Kentucky campaign and managing railroad transportation in Nashville during the Chattanooga campaign. He also settled labor disputes and paid bills. In The Supply for Tomorrow Must Not Fail , Lenette S. Taylor, a member of the Summit County Historical Society, describes Perkins' never-a-dull-moment days behind the lines. (The Kent State University Press )

When his captain was killed during the Battle of Perryville — the largest Civil War battle fought in Kentucky — John Calvin Hartzell of Portage County was made commander of Company H, 105th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He led his men during the Battle of Chickamauga, the siege of Chattanooga and the Battle of Missionary Ridge. Ohio Volunteer: The Childhood and Civil War Memoirs of Captain John Calvin Hartzell , OVI, edited by Eastern Illinois University English professor Charles I. Switzer, documents his military strategies and the triumph and tragedy of life on the battlefield. (Ohio University Press )

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