Report Overview:
Total Clips (14)
Athletics (7)
Communication Studies; Community Service, Learning and Volunteerism; Students (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Psychology; Research (1)
University Communications and Marketing (3)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (7)
Kent State's Dri Archer pondering jump to the NFL 01/08/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State kicker April Goss' GoDaddy.com Bowl journal: 'This whole experience has brought us all closer' 01/08/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State football: Haynes to put full-court press on Archer to stay for senior season (Haynes) 01/08/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State's historic season will soon outshine the late-season disappointments (Hazell) 01/08/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

(VIDEO) Kent State's creepy bowl helmets are watching you (Hazell) 01/08/2013 Yahoo! Sports Text Attachment Email

Kent State Wore Some Of The Strangest Helmets You Will Ever See At The GoDaddy.com Bowl 01/08/2013 Business Insider Text Attachment Email

What was with the Kent State helmets on Sunday? 01/08/2013 NBC Sports Network Text Attachment Email


Communication Studies; Community Service, Learning and Volunteerism; Students (1)
Kent State Students Raise $9,300 for Local Charities (Cline) 01/08/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...semester as part of the Communication in Small Groups and Teams course taught by Rebecca Cline, Ph.D., professor in the School of Communication Studies at Kent State University. Students designed projects to help people in poverty, people with cancer and their families, and the homeless. Each project...


KSU at Stark (1)
Kent State University at Stark Presents Panel Discussions on Best Practices in the Workplace 01/07/2013 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

The Corporate University, Kent State University at Stark is offering a series of four panel discussions to address best practices in the workplace. Each program is scheduled...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Pitfalls await those opening a business (Belinsky) 01/07/2013 Steubenville Herald-Star - Online Text Attachment Email

...Market St., Steubenville, as well as one-on-one counseling sessions to those who decide to follow their entrepreneurial dreams. Belinsky, based at the Kent State University-Tuscarawas campus in New Philadelphia, is shown here assisting clients. Jefferson County's next start-up class is set for Jan....


Psychology; Research (1)
Akron Children's Hospital receives $1.6 million grant for childhood trauma center 01/08/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...identify and be sensitive to children who may be traumatized. The grant also will fund a continued collaborative research effort at Akron Children's and Kent State University on the short and long-term effects of childhood trauma, said Sarah Ostrowski, pediatric psychologist and research program director....


University Communications and Marketing (3)
Kent State hires new VP for communications, marketing 01/07/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Rebecca Murphy is the new associate vice president for university communications and marketing at Kent State. She will make $135,000 a year. Murphy previously was assistant dean of marketing and communications, enrollment and student services...

Kent State University names Rebecca Murphy as associate vice president for communication and marketing (Harvey) 01/08/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Names New Communications VP (Harvey) 01/08/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Kent State's Dri Archer pondering jump to the NFL | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mobile, Ala. — If Kent State's Dri Archer needed anything to tip his decision between staying another season at KSU or jumping to the NFL, he should reflect on his GoDaddy.com Bowl experience. He also should ponder the fact the NFL is looking at doing away with kickoff returns, which is where Archer's speed shines best.

At a listed 5-8, 175 pounds, he took an early hit to his knees, tried to play through it, but ultimately sat during Kent's last two critical series as the Golden Flashes lost, 17-13, to Arkansas State on Sunday. Archer's last two plays when the ball touched his hands were a dropped pass that would have put KSU first-and-goal at the 3, and a short 3-yard reception. And his body language after each indicated something was not right.

Before that, Archer's 44-yard run and 16-yard TD on a reverse gave Kent its lone touchdown. An 18-yard reception in the second quarter helped set up the first of two Kent field goals, but that was apparently when Archer was dinged. In the second half, he just did not play through it.

Archer got his hands on the ball five times in the second half, never gained more than 3 yards on any play, went for minus-2 on one and dropped the pass on an other. That's it. Combined with Archer's inability to return punts, something that is more critical in the NFL than kickoffs, and whatever benefit and enticement the professional league might have with his 4.2 40-yard-dash speed is likely to dwindle significantly upon further inspection. And that would surely come if he declares for the NFL Draft.

Archer said earlier in the season he has never seen himself as a track-and-field diva, but as a true football player. Yet his bowl game performance may have left the NFL with the impression of the former.

There is little doubt Archer is going to make some money playing football when his Kent State playing days are done. But the questions are how much, for how long and where?

It is going to come one of three ways:

1. He will leave school early, get drafted late, sign a nice bonus check and probably get cut because he can't return punts and is a marginal NFL receiver. He will make training camp money for a few years and not be heard from much again.

2. He will play another year at Kent, learn to return punts and fine-tune his receiving skills, become a mid-to-high NFL Draft pick, sign a nice bonus check, and at worst, land on an NFL practice squad for a few years, honing his craft.

3. He ultimately will play many years in the Canadian Football League and make some nice money there.

Options two and three look to be Archer's most lucrative, but that would require him to play one more season at Kent State to become a bigger, better receiver, learn to return punts, then cash in on his talents.

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News Headline: Kent State kicker April Goss' GoDaddy.com Bowl journal: 'This whole experience has brought us all closer' | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Editor's note:April Goss, a freshman walk-on kicker on the Kent State football team, is sharing her experiences as she travels with her Golden Flashes teammates to the GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala. This is her final journal piece on her bowl experience. You can read past entries here at cleveland.com/sports

This experience in Mobile, Ala., has been absolutely amazing. I have had the opportunity to meet some incredible people and done some pretty awesome things. From touring the USS Alabama, to attending my very first Mardi Gras, and definitely eating some delicious Southern barbecue.

But most importantly the best part of it all was the chance to play football one more time as a team. It was the biggest game of any of our lives thus far, and even though the outcome was not what we had wanted, we still have accomplished so much as a team. We finally put Kent State back on the map and accomplished the feat of getting back to a bowl game after a 40 year drought. We brought back life into this program, this university, and this community, we gave them hope.

I am so blessed and grateful to be part of such an amazing team with such an amazing group of guys. This whole experience has brought us all closer which has also made it harder for us to part. The seniors gave it their all this season and showed us what it really meant to play with your heart. It is sad to see them go, especially as the leaders of this team but I know they have much better things ahead of them.

It will be hard to say goodbye to Coach Hazell who has done so much for this team, but he has taught us well. He taught us how to believe in ourselves and gave this team what it needed most, a vision of success. He laid the foundation and now it is up to us to keep building. This winning season does not end here, there is more work to be done and even more to be accomplished, so hang tight Flash Nation.

Thank you for all of your love and support, but expect more in 2013.

-- April Goss

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News Headline: Kent State football: Haynes to put full-court press on Archer to stay for senior season (Haynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MOBILE, ALA.: The curtain has come down on the 2012 Kent State football season and former coach Darrell Hazell, and new coach Paul Haynes knows exactly who he wants to star in his opening act.

The first order of business for Haynes is convincing Dri Archer to remain with the Golden Flashes for an encore senior season.

Archer, a 5-foot-8, 175-pound junior, will spend the next few days contemplating the best path for his future and whether that includes declaring for the 2013 NFL Draft.

t's a choice Archer hadn't considered until Hazell announced shortly after the Mid-American Conference Championship Game that he was leaving KSU for Purdue and a $2 million annual salary.

Archer decided to wait until after Sunday's 17-13 loss to Arkansas in the GoDaddy.com Bowl to really dig into the pros and cons of leaving school early, a move that gives Haynes a little time to make his case for why Archer should stay at KSU.

“I have talked to him, but I plan on talking to him when I get back,” Haynes said before Sunday's game, “to just give my advice on what I think. Ultimately it comes down to his and his family's decision. But I will definitely give my two cents in what I think is best for him. But with me not knowing him too well, I'm going to reach out to other people who do know him a little bit better and have them also talk to him.”

Haynes, a former KSU walk-on, was in Mobile to support his new team, but he intentionally kept a low profile. He did not want to interfere with Hazell and his staff as they were putting the final touches on a dream season that set several new program benchmarks, including a No. 25 ranking in the final regular season AP and coaches' polls.

But before he and his new staff (which is expected to be announced at the end of the week) turn their attention to new players, Haynes' best recruiting pitch will be directed at Archer.

“He's a dynamic player, he's a playmaker, he's productive and he has to touch the ball a lot for us,” Haynes said. “What I told him when I talked to him, that in the future that's what's going to happen. It can't just be kickoffs. We have to find creative ways to get the ball in his hands and not just jet sweeps so [opponents] can't key on that. He's too good a player to be on the sidelines or not having the ball in his hands.”

Archer clearly has the raw speed to succeed in the NFL, but he could benefit from an additional year of learning how to return punts (a skill more valued in the pros then Archer's forte of returning kickoffs) as well as an extra year in the weight room building his physique.

But the possibility of getting hurt as a senior and potentially delaying or derailing his entry into the professional ranks is a major reason why leaving school early could appeal to him.

The thought likely crossed Archer's mind Sunday night when he injured his knee in the second quarter and was unable to finish the game, missing time when the Flashes needed him most during their final drive.

“I landed on it on the ground in the first half and just tried to keep going,” a dejected Archer said afterwards. “I was hopping around the second half and I know I just hurt my team being out there so I just couldn't go anymore.”

Archer, the MAC Special Teams Player of the Year and All-American, entered the bowl game with 1,352 yards rushing and 15 touchdowns, 538 receiving yards and four touchdowns and 569 return yards with three kickoff returns for touchdowns.

In 202 touches, Archer had 70 plays of 10 or more yards and 39 plays for 20 yards or more.

He also led the nation in kick return average, was fifth in all-purpose yards and tied for 11th in scoring and is KSU's single-season touchdown record-holder (23).

“He can change the game every time he touches the ball,” Hazell said. “Every time.”

Receiver Tyshon Goode, who missed the season with a hamstring injury but said he plans to return next year for his fifth and final year, sounded as if Archer would return.

“Dri should come back,” Goode said. “If not, we'll work with what we've got. [But] I don't see any indications of him entering the draft. I'm pretty sure he wants to graduate. We talked about that, and he wanted to get his diploma.”

Junior defensive lineman Roosevelt Nix (another NFL prospect) hopes Archer returns. But he said he and his teammates are trying not to pressure him so they don't make the decision any harder on Archer.

“He's a man,” Nix said. “He has to make the best decision for himself and his family. Nobody has impact on that but himself.”

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News Headline: Kent State's historic season will soon outshine the late-season disappointments (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MOBILE, Ala. -- Slowly, the pain will subside.

Eventually, memories of all the incredible achievements reached by the 2012-13 Kent State football team will drown out the disappointment of closing the campaign with two gut-wrenching defeats, capped by Sunday's 17-13 loss to Arkansas State (10-3) in the GoDaddy.com Bowl -- at least to some extent.

But not yet.

As the Golden Flashes flew back to Kent from Mobile Monday morning, they were still consumed by the whys and what-ifs that always torture players and coaches after a narrow loss.

"I'm sure I will (appreciate the season) later on down the road," said senior quarterback Spencer Keith. "It was a great season. There hasn't been one like this ever at Kent State. I appreciate all the guys working hard and doing what they did to make this one special. We would have liked to finish with a win."

The Flashes (11-3) had a chance to do just that, driving deep into Red Wolves territory in the closing minutes. But on a fourth-and-8 play from the ASU 25-yard line, Keith attempted to scramble for the first down but was stopped three yards short.

Keith took a shot to the ribs a few plays earlier while converting a fourth-and-8 pass for 15 yards to wide receiver Matt Hurdle and missed one play, but said it did not affect him after he re-entered the game.

"I just saw an opening, and I thought they were deep enough to get the first down and they weren't," said Keith. "I just thought I could break that last tackle, and I came up a few yards short. Obviously, hindsight is 20/20, but looking back at it, I wonder if I should have sat back a little longer and tried to find someone (open). But I saw them dropping back really fast, and thought I could get the first down."

The failed fourth-down conversion signaled the end of a frustrating evening for the Golden Flashes' offense, which moved the ball well for most of the game, but failed to cash in on several key opportunities.

Kent State had a first-and-goal from the Arkansas State 1-yard line in the opening quarter, but two stuffed runs were followed by an interception. Keith tried to force a pass over the middle to junior tight end Tim Erjavec, but the ball was knocked away and actually bounced off Erjavec's arm as he was laying in the end zone before getting picked off by Red Wolves linebacker Nathan Herrold.

Trailing 17-10 in the third quarter, the Flashes had a chance to tie the game but a third-and-7 pass to junior speedster Dri Archer was dropped inside the ASU 5.

Then, in the fourth quarter, trailing 17-13 at around the four-minute mark, Keith lofted a perfect 44-yard bomb to Chris Humphrey in the end zone, but the freshman wide receiver could not bring it in.

The Flashes were forced to go the final drive without Archer, who suffered a knee injury in the second quarter. Archer returned to action, and caught a short pass early in the fourth quarter before leaving the game for good.

"It was tough," said Archer. "I had my head down the majority of the (final) series. I just wanted to be out there with my guys."

Archer must now make a decision on whether to stay with his teammates or declare himself eligible for the upcoming NFL Draft.

"I haven't told anyone what decision I'm going to make," said Archer, who finished the season with 1,429 yards rushing (9.0 yards per carry), 561 yards receiving and a school-record 23 touchdowns. "I will probably decide within the next couple days."

After falling just short in their bid to earn the program's first-ever bowl victory in just its third try, head coach Darrell Hazell and his 18 seniors will move on after leading Kent State to a school-record 11 wins, the Mid-American Conference East Division championship and to the program's first bowl appearance in 40 years.

Hazell actually flew to meet with his new employer, Purdue University, on Monday morning, while new Flashes head coach Paul Haynes flew home with the team.

An emotional Hazell had one last message for his players Sunday night.

"I told them to stay together, no matter what happens down the road," he said. "We're a team, and that's how we got to where we are. It's because we are a strong team."

QUICK-HITTERS

• Sophomore tailback Trayion Durham finished with 68 yards on 20 carries in Sunday's bowl game, and wound up with 1,316 yards rushing on 276 attempts for the season (4.8 ypc). Durham and Archer are the only duo in the nation to each finish with over 1,300 rushing yards.

• Senior left tackle Brian Winters made his school-record 50th straight start. He will return to Mobile to play in the Senior Bowl on Jan. 26.

• Senior kicker Freddy Cortez made both of his field-goal attempts, and closed the season by hitting eight in a row. He leaves as KSU's all-time career scoring leader with 299 points.

Kent State's defense allowed just 285 total yards, and 148 of those yards came in the last 12:02 of the first half, when the Red Wolves scored both of their touchdowns. Senior linebacker Luke Batton had 11 tackles, upping his total to 40 in his last three games, while senior nose tackle Dana Brown had seven tackles and a career-high three tackles for a loss.

• The Flashes' defense failed to force a turnover for only the second time this season, and the first since a Week 2 loss at Kentucky.

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News Headline: (VIDEO) Kent State's creepy bowl helmets are watching you (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! Sports
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Well, with Kent State putting eyes on the front of its helmets for the GoDaddy.com Bowl, we've pretty much seen it all now.

The Arkansas State players could always feel like somebody's watching them, considering every time they looked up they'd see those eagle eye stickers on Kent State's helmets.

Here's a video of coach Darrell Hazell, whose last game before headed off to Purdue was the GoDaddy.com Bowl, explaining the design of the helmet, which the players didn't see until game day:

It was creative, and a bit weird, but didn't freak out the Arkansas State players too much as the Golden Flashes lost the bowl game.

Here's a couple more looks at the helmet:

To view video, please click on link:
http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/ncaaf-dr-saturday/kent-state-creepy-bowl-helmets-watching-164854497--ncaaf.html

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News Headline: Kent State Wore Some Of The Strangest Helmets You Will Ever See At The GoDaddy.com Bowl | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Business Insider
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Last night's GoDaddy.com bowl was Kent State's first bowl game in 40 years. And to mark the special occasion they unveiled some truly odd helmets. While it looks like their helmets had eyebrows above the facemask, those are actually the "eyes" of a golden eagle (the Kent State mascot is the Golden Flashes, represented by an eagle).

You can see the back of the helmet in the second image as well as the helmet that is part of their normal uniform...

Here is the back of the helmet along with their normal helmet...

To view helmet, please click on link:
http://www.businessinsider.com/kent-state-bowl-game-helmets-2013-1

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News Headline: What was with the Kent State helmets on Sunday? | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: NBC Sports Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: No, those are not eyebrows on Kent State's football helmets. They are eyes — as in eye of the eagle — on special helmets for the GoDaddy.com Bowl on Sunday (Arkansas State won the game, 17-13). Here's a closer look, plus a view of the back of the helmet, which is also quite unique.

Of course this isn't the first go-round for this kind of design, as the baseball cap seen below (Lake Elsinore Storm, Single-A California League) demonstrates.

To view helmet, please click on link:
http://offthebench.nbcsports.com/2013/01/07/what-was-with-the-kent-state-helmets-on-sunday/

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News Headline: Kent State Students Raise $9,300 for Local Charities (Cline) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fall semester course part of communications college

Twenty-seven students in four small groups raised more than $9,300 in funds and canned goods for local charities in the fall semester as part of the Communication in Small Groups and Teams course taught by Rebecca Cline, Ph.D., professor in the School of Communication Studies at Kent State University.

Students designed projects to help people in poverty, people with cancer and their families, and the homeless. Each project benefitted a specific local population through donations to the Campus Kitchen on the Kent State University Campus, the Phyllis Zumkehr County Clothing Center in Ravenna, Stewart's Caring Place in Fairlawn and the ACCESS shelter for homeless women and children in Summit County.

Each of the four groups implemented an event or initiative. Class members held a bowling evening, led a Zumba instruction event, spearheaded a competitive canned food drive in Cardinal Local Schools and sold Project Poverty wristbands along with hosting a special donation night at Five Guys Burgers and Fries. The projects included support from numerous local businesses including Kent Lanes, Georgio's Pizza, Dick's Sporting Goods, The LeBron James Family Foundation, the Akron Zoo, Playhouse Square, Lia Sophia and many more

ACCESS is dedicated to addressing the plight of homeless women and children in our community. The agency encourages women to develop self-esteem and self-sufficiency through its programs. The Phyllis Zumkehr County Clothing Center provides free, gently used clothing and household items to residents in need. Stewart's Caring Place services cancer sufferers and their families in Summit, Medina, Stark, Portage and Wayne counties.

The Campus Kitchen Project (CKP) is a national organization that that provides meals to those in need, using student volunteers to prepare meals within their own communities. The CKP at Kent State is the first in Ohio. Student volunteers prepare meals for Kent Social Services, the Ronald McDonald House of Cleveland, the Freedom House and several other local partners.

Upon completing their projects, students analyzed their own communication successes and failures as they faced groupthink, the illusion of vulnerability and identifying roles.

Cline celebrated the accomplishments of her students in their final class, reminding them that they have “learned that they can do real things – amazing things.”

“We were very overwhelmed, but stuck together as a group. We're proud of ourselves and proud that we've helped people out,” said Taylor McLaughlin, a sophomore communication studies major.

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News Headline: Kent State University at Stark Presents Panel Discussions on Best Practices in the Workplace | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Corporate University, Kent State University at Stark is offering a series of four panel discussions to address best practices in the workplace. Each program is scheduled to take place from 7:30 - 9:30 a.m. at The University Center, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township.

The first panel discussion in the series, Best Practices in Sourcing New Hires, takes place on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013.

The challenge before all organizations is to find the right person with the right skills and the right attitude to fit into the right position to help move your organization forward. But where is that person? Using traditional sourcing techniques (i.e. want ads) may not be your best strategy as we move into the knowledge economy. Join our panel and learn how they use non-traditional methods to source the best candidates to position their organizations for the future.

Panelists include Meredith Soleau, human resources manager at Ed Schmidt Auto Group in Toledo, Ohio; Gayle Agahi, director of strategic partnerships at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation; and Joyce Rodek, Joyce Rodek, director of North Canton Executive Networking Group. Moderating the panel discussion will be Evelyn Hronek, the managing director of Creative Financial Staffing of Northeastern Ohio Ltd. at Bruner-Cox LLP.

The remaining panel discussions in the series will cover the following topics:

•     Best Practices in Retaining Talent on May 1, 2013;

•     Best Practices in Career Management on August 7, 2013; and

•     Best Practices to Impact Your Organization on November 6, 2013.

Registration for each panel discussion is $30 per person, per event, or $100 for the entire four-program series. To register, call 330-244-3508 or email Mona Zink at mzink@kent.edu. For additional information, visit www.stark.kent.edu/corporateu/best-practices.cfm.

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News Headline: Pitfalls await those opening a business (Belinsky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Steubenville Herald-Star - Online
Contact Name: LINDA HARRIS
News OCR Text: Center adviser says you must have a plan in place, money, or it's most likely you will fail

STEUBENVILLE - Joe Belinsky has a few words of advice for anyone thinking of jumping head-first into the entrepreneurial world: Don't.

Belinsky, small business development adviser for the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, said would-be entrepreneurs can spare themselves a lot of headaches by doing their homework before they take the plunge.

Belinsky, in fact, says the biggest mistake a prospective business owner can make is to rush into it.

HELP FOR BUSINESS — The Ohio Small Business Development Center offers assistance to those who are considering opening their own business. Certified Business Adviser Joe Belinsky, standing, offers a monthly start-up class at the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, 630 Market St., Steubenville, as well as one-on-one counseling sessions to those who decide to follow their entrepreneurial dreams. Belinsky, based at the Kent State University-Tuscarawas campus in New Philadelphia, is shown here assisting clients. Jefferson County's next start-up class is set for Jan. 24 from 1-3 p.m. - Contributed

"There are two key elements you need to be successful," he said. "You've got to have a plan, then you have to have money. Usually, you have to have the plan before you (can get) the money."

Belinsky, a certified business adviser operating out of the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University-Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia, helps prospective entrepreneurs in a 10-county region get their business enterprises off on the right foot.

"Our purpose is to help people who have an idea about starting up a business to be able to take that idea and build it into a business plan, and then to take the business plan and actually start working it so they can become successful," he said.

The process begins with a start-up class, offered monthly in each county in Belinsky's service territory. The next start-up class here in Jefferson County is set for 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 24 in the chamber offices, 630 Market St.

"A lot of people who get started have never managed a business or even a part of a business, so we help to shepherd them along," he said. "We tell them things to look out for, things to do, how to go about hiring people, things like that ... They come in and we tell them all the good and bad about starting up their own business, then we also tell them about all the resources that are available.

"The big thing is, we let them know there's lots and lots of help out there, it's just a question of being able to organize their thoughts to be able to do it."

At the end of the start-up class, he said the participants should have a pretty good idea of what to expect if they decide to push forward with their plans.

"Or if they have an idea but aren't sure it's workable, (the startup class) should help them," he added. "If they have a sketch of an idea and don't know where to go with it, I can help them develop the idea into something that's viable."

He said a lot of the things they cover in start-up class can help later on as they work on their business plan, a blueprint they can follow as their business evolves. Done properly, it's a guide a small business owner can use to figure out where their (market) is, how to attract and retain business so they can grow their own.

"There's so much stuff that can help them with their business plan that they'll have to make up later on," he said. "Plus, there's the interaction with other people - that helps, too. Everybody has some questions they might be like to explore, some ideas they might want to try - hearing from someone else can help, there's a lot of good interaction (that takes place)."

If they do decide to follow their entrepreneurial dream, Belinsky offers one-on-one counseling to help each of them develop that all-important business plan.

"(That) includes financial projections, which is usually one of the bigger parts of what I help them do," he said. "I think maybe 1 percent or 2 percent of the people I've worked with over the years actually had a grasp on financial projections - most people have no idea, it's really about education them as to what running a business is all about, all the financials and the cash flow."

How long it takes to develop a workable plan depends on the individual. Some people can get through it in a day, others need more time. Belinsky said he had a handful of entrepreneurs complete their business plans in 2012 who actually started the process five years earlier.

"An awful lot do (chicken out)," he said. "But I actually guide everybody through it. The majority of people are scared to death at doing it, even if you give them a template. What I try to do is help them with the first couple pages, give them a feel for how to do it, then let them do more research and do more work on their plan. Then, when they're done, they send it to me and I'll review it and edit it."

Belinksy said the template is easy to follow, and prospective business owners can do a lot of their research online.

"We use the template to spur them on," he said. "We give them a number of documents and stuff like that, examples ... that helps them out. Quite often, I even show them how to use the Internet, how to do the research on the Internet.

The one-on-one session is usually held at the chamber office, "but as they continue to develop their plan I have them send me stuff by e-mail or phone," he said. "That way, they don't always have to be making appointments to see me."

And, Belinsky said business prospects need to have a viable business plan before they go looking for backers.

"People trying to do it on their own often find it time-consuming and frustrating," he said. "Sometimes they'll start a business up without any kind of plan and then suddenly their funds are gone because they don't have one. A business plan provides a guide on how to be able to run their business. It will tell them what they need to do to prepare themselves."

Belinsky said the process helps people figure out if being a small business owner is really for them.

"Some people think they're not the right material for owning their own business, when they are. Others will think they're ready to go but really shouldn't be doing it. Part of the process is figuring out if you're the type of person who should be doing it. If so, here are things that are important for you to know, like the hours you'll work, the amount of money required for cash flow, how to do their market research.

"Sometimes we don't see them again; it's actually saving them a lot of time and money. On the other hand, those who are really interested in it will find it to be a much simpler, easier, more complete way of doing it. There are lots of different tools that we use to help them flesh it out."

And while no two businesses are alike, Belinsky said a good rule of thumb is that, "the more you plan, the more you're going to succeed."

To register for Belinsky's Jan. 24 start-up class call (330) 308-7434 to register. There is a $20 material fee.

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News Headline: Akron Children's Hospital receives $1.6 million grant for childhood trauma center | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Children who witness violence need specialized services to help them cope with their emotions after a traumatic event like the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown Conn. in mid-December. A federal grant will help Akron Children's hospital provide these services to Northeast Ohio children, while training the people who will care for them and funding research as well. AP Photo/The Journal News

CLEVELAND, Ohio-- Last month's tragic elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn. left hundreds of young children there traumatized. Teachers, counselors, social workers and doctors have stepped in to help these survivors cope with the aftermath.

The children at Sandy Hook are among the millions -- more than one in four children nationwide -- who experience a serious traumatic event before age 16, according to the federally-funded National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN).

In late December, Akron Children's Hospital received a $1.6 million grant to join this network of centers to provide services and support for children who have experienced psychological trauma in Northeast Ohio.

The four-year grant will create the Center for the Treatment and Study of Adverse Childhood Events at the hospital. The center's goal is to train doctors, mental health care providers and teachers to help children cope with trauma.

That trauma can range from the obvious -- school shootings and abuse, to the loss of a parent, a divorce, or even a sibling with chronic illness.

"We saw that there was a big gap in our community in terms of these services and there's so much research out there that connects mental health and other health problems in adulthood to childhood experiences," said Melissa Peace, program director and a social worker who spent 10 years leading the Summit County Children Who Witness Violence Program.

Akron Children's Center will become part of the NCTSN, established by Congress in 2000 as part of the Children's Health Act. The network includes more than 150 centers across the country and is coordinated jointly by UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute and the Duke University Medical Center.

Peace said the free training should begin at the hospital later this year. It will be available for healthcare providers, juvenile justice and social workers, schools, and child welfare agencies in the Northeast Ohio area.

"Right now there aren't a lot of providers who have evidence-based trauma treatment practices," she said. The center will focus on trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, an approach to helping children and their families cope with their emotions in the wake of a traumatic event.

Community Outreach coordinator Robin Tener said that there are many rural communities in Northeast Ohio area that do not currently have any services, and the grant may allow for education or treatment through telemedicine.

"This would really be a way to use technology to not only train people, but continue their training and support in the future," she said. "There's a great deal of excitement about it."

Another goal of the grant is to better identify children who need these services by screening them during primary care, psychiatric and emergency room visits, Peace said.

The center will work closely with schools to help teachers identify and be sensitive to children who may be traumatized.

The grant also will fund a continued collaborative research effort at Akron Children's and Kent State University on the short and long-term effects of childhood trauma, said Sarah Ostrowski, pediatric psychologist and research program director.

We're really looking forward to getting more evidence on how to identify children who are at risk, she said. "We know we don't have a lot of resources and we need to learn how to take them and apply them in an efficient manner."

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News Headline: Kent State hires new VP for communications, marketing | Email

News Date: 01/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Rebecca Murphy is the new associate vice president for university communications and marketing at Kent State.

She will make $135,000 a year.

Murphy previously was assistant dean of marketing and communications, enrollment and student services at the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University.

Before that she was senior director of marketing, communications and external relations at Case Western, associate director of marketing for the Cleveland Museum of Art, director of marketing and communications at Six Flags Worlds of Adventure in Aurora and promotions manager at Geauga Lake Amusement Park.

Her bachelor's and master's degrees in business administration are from the University of Akron.

This is the second major hire in KSU's promotions department in the past year.

Former WKYC reporter Eric Mansfield was named executive director of university media relations in March. His annual salary is now $110,000.

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News Headline: Kent State University names Rebecca Murphy as associate vice president for communication and marketing (Harvey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Rebecca Murphy has been named
associate vice president for
Un i v e r s i t y Communications
and Marketing at Kent State
University.

Murphy previously served as the
assistant dean of marketing and
communications, enrollment and
student services at Case Western
Reserve University's Weatherhead
School of Management. Iris Harvey,
KSU's vice president for university
relations, made the announcement.

Murphy will serve as a key
member of the leadership team
of Kent State's Division of University
Relations. She will help to
define, articulate and market the
KSU brand, and lead the development
of integrated marketing
strategies to advance the reputation
and image of the university's
eight-campus system.

“Rebecca is the right person to
join a great team during the most
significant wave of change in higher
education,” Harvey said. “She
brings significant higher education
experience as well as a successful
career with several of Northeast
Ohio's leading organizations and
notable brands. We look forward
to the contribution she can make
in helping to enhance our global
reputation and image.”

As assistant dean of marketing
and communications, enrollment
and student services at Case
Western Reserve's Weatherhead
School of Management, Murphy
was responsible for planning and
executing the school's marketing,
communications and brand management
initiatives. She also previously
served as senior director of
marketing, communications and
external relations at Case Western
Reserve, associate director of
marketing for the Cleveland Museum
of Art, director of marketing
and communications at Six
Flags Worlds of Adventure in Aurora
and promotions manager at
Geauga Lake Amusement Park.

Murphy is a member of the Public Relations
Society of America and the American
Marketing Association. She has bachelor's and
master's degrees in business administration
from the University of Akron.

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News Headline: Kent State Names New Communications VP (Harvey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Rebecca Murphy was dean at Case Western Reserve

Rebecca Murphy has been named associate vice president for University Communications and Marketing at Kent State University.

Murphy previously served as the assistant dean of marketing and communications, enrollment and student services at Case Western Reserve University's Weatherhead School of Management. Iris Harvey, Kent State's vice president for university relations, made the announcement.

Murphy will serve as a key member of the leadership team of Kent State's Division of University Relations. She will help to define, articulate and market the Kent State brand, and lead the development of integrated marketing strategies to advance the reputation and image of Kent State's eight-campus system.

“Rebecca is the right person to join a great team during the most significant wave of change in higher education,” Harvey said. “She brings significant higher education experience as well as a successful career with several of Northeast Ohio's leading organizations and notable brands. We look forward to the contribution she can make in helping to enhance our global reputation and image.”

As assistant dean of marketing and communications, enrollment and student services at Case Western Reserve's Weatherhead School of Management, Murphy was responsible for planning and executing the school's marketing, communications and brand management initiatives. She also previously served as senior director of marketing, communications and external relations at Case Western Reserve, associate director of marketing for the Cleveland Museum of Art, director of marketing and communications at Six Flags Worlds of Adventure in Aurora, Ohio, and promotions manager at Geauga Lake Amusement Park.

Murphy is a member of the Public Relations Society of America and the American Marketing Association. She has bachelor's and master's degrees in business administration from the University of Akron.

For more information about Kent State's University Communications and Marketing, visit www.kent.edu/ucm.

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