Report Overview:
Total Clips (27)
Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Office of the University Architect; Renovation at KSU (1)
Athletics (5)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Financial Aid (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Office of the Provost; University Health Services (7)
Geography (1)
Higher Education; Residence Services (1)
History of Kent State University (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Office of the President (1)
Psychology (1)
Public Safety (1)
WKSU (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Architecture students show designs for Habitat (Ferut) 01/12/2013 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

SALEM - Future homes built by Habitat for Humanity of Northern Columbiana County will take on a different look, with designs by Kent State University students as the guide. Fourth-year students in the KSU College of Architecture and Environmental Design at the Kent campus...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Office of the University Architect; Renovation at KSU (1)
Kent State to put architecture building designs on display (Lefton, Steidl) 01/12/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University will display the four possible designs for a new architecture building, which university officials hope will become a community...


Athletics (5)
Kent State's Dri Archer says he's coming back for his senior season 01/14/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio - Kent State junior slotback Dri Archer has decided to pass up the NFL draft and return to Kent State for his senior season. The 5-8,...

Kent State football: Dri Archer announces on Twitter he is returning for senior season 01/14/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Dri Archer had until Tuesday to make a decision as to whether he would return to Kent State for his senior season or declare himself eligible for the NFL...

ALONG THE WAY 'Three-peat' for Dick Kotis 01/14/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

As last Sunday's GoDaddy.com Bowl approached, retired business executive Dick Kotis of Twin Lakes sensed he might become the only person to have attended...

Haynes picks familiar faces to highlight first staff (Haynes) 01/14/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State head coach Paul Haynes has officially announced the retention of four assistant coaches and the appointment of seven new members to his football...

Archer chooses to return to Kent for senior season (Haynes) 01/14/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

An opportunity to start his NFL career a year early offered a tempting bait for Dri Archer. But Kent State's junior blur refused to bite. Archer...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
University Park Alliance announces 2013 'Urban Innovators' speakers 01/12/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Vacant Spaces: Creating Value from Vacancy in the Urban Footprint. Terry Schwarz from Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. Schwarz is the director of Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. Her work there includes neighborhood and campus planning, commercial and residential...


College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
Kent Artist Named 2013 Ohio Governor's Award Winner 01/14/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Emeritus Kent State arts professor to receive award at May luncheon in Columbus Renowned northeast Ohio artist and emeritus art professor at Kent State...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Dialogue to kick off MLK Day events at KSU (Garcia) 01/12/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and the Kent State Latino Networking Caucus will host the Black and Brown...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Financial Aid (1)
Kent State Announces 'First Choice' Initiative To Provide Larger First-Year Merit Scholarships (Lefton, Garcia) 01/13/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has undertaken an initiative to provide more incoming freshmen a significant increase in merit scholarships to ease the financial...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Office of the Provost; University Health Services (7)
Kent State, Akron hospital take steps to deal with flu (Diacon, DeJulius) 01/12/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Kent State University and Akron Children's Hospital took steps Friday to address the spreading threat from the influenza and related respiratory viruses....

Steps being taken to lessen impact of flu in Portage (Diacon, DeJulius) 01/12/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna has restricted visitation by children under 14 years of age and for people with any symptoms of the flu. And Kent State University is advising students with flu-like symptoms not to attend class or other public events during their illness. "We just want...

INTERACTIVE KSU To Flu Students: Stay Away Featured (Diacon, DeJulius) 01/11/2013 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Those with a cough and a sniffle now have a get-out-of-class card to play at Kent State University. In fact, the University would prefer you don't even play on Monday when the spring term begins. Students with "flu-like"...

Kent State warns students with flu symptoms to stay home as new semester approaches (Diacon, DeJulius) 01/11/2013 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

The start of the spring semester at Kent State is Monday, but the university is already warning sick students to stay away. The school said on Friday that students with flu-like symptoms...

(VIDEO) Flu Prompts College's Request to Professors (DeJulius) 01/14/2013 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — Some important advice for local college students as they prepare to return to class next week. “I think I have the flu,” said Christie...

Kent State: Students with flu-like symptoms advised to stay home (Diacon, DeJulius) 01/11/2013 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

As Kent State students prepare to begin spring semester class on Monday, Jan. 14, students are encouraged to be aware of the seriousness of the current...

(AUDIO) College campuses try to prevent the spread of flu among returning students (DeJulius) 01/14/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Kent State University and the University of Akron have both sent out warnings to their students Local college campuses are preparing for students' return...


Geography (1)
Experts divided on weather and flu link (Sheridan) 01/11/2013 Washington Post - Online Text Attachment Email

...about this in late November, see: Study: weather forecasting science can help predict flu outbreaks). Scott Sheridan, a professor of climatology at Kent State University, believes there is promise in Shaman's approach. “I've seen several papers that show a pretty convincing relationship between...


Higher Education; Residence Services (1)
OSU plan to add dorms, costs 01/14/2013 Dayton Daily News Text Attachment Email

college in the country to require sophomores to live on campus — a rule aimed at improving retention and graduation rates but one that will likely add...


History of Kent State University (1)
Myths and legends on college campuses resonate 01/14/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio - A cow in the cupola. A dog statue that barked and saved lives. A gargoyle on a church tower that glares at a portion of campus founded...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
DIRECTOR APPOINTED 01/11/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Tomas A. Lipinski was named the new director of the School of Library and Information Science at Kent State. He will earn $150,000 a year. He replaces Richard Rubin, who in 2010 became KSU associate provost for extended education. Associate...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Portman Visit Highlights Northeast Ohio's Liquid Crystal Assets 01/11/2013 Virtual Strategy Magazine Text Attachment Email

...cutting-edge liquid crystal technologies with representatives from regional companies in the field, as well as officials from the Greater Cleveland Partnership, Kent State University, NorTech and the City of Kent. The Senator is scheduled to be at AlphaMicron at 1950 State Route 59 in Kent from 3:30 to...


Office of the President (1)
Celebrations 01/14/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Education The eight Kent State employees who received 2012 President's Excellence Awards, which includes a $1,000 bonus, are: Veronica Cook-Euell, supplier...


Psychology (1)
Research reveals which learning methods get an "A" (Dunlosky) 01/11/2013 BabyCenter Magazine - Online Text Attachment Email

...programs to improve student achievement, even though evidence often isn't available to firmly establish that they work," study author John Dunlosky, of Kent State University, explained in a journal news release. "We wanted to take a comprehensive look at promising strategies now, in order to direct...


Public Safety (1)
New Stop Light to Greet Returning Kent State Students, Staff (Tondiglia) 01/14/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Students and employees returning to Kent State University for the spring semester will encounter a couple of new traffic situations as they navigate campus. A new traffic light has...


WKSU (1)
Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area 01/14/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

WKSU: Daniel Skinner was named general manager of Kent State University's NPR-affiliated radio station. Skinner has 32 years of experience in public radio....


News Headline: Architecture students show designs for Habitat (Ferut) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM - Future homes built by Habitat for Humanity of Northern Columbiana County will take on a different look, with designs by Kent State University students as the guide.

Fourth-year students in the KSU College of Architecture and Environmental Design at the Kent campus created 22 potential home designs last semester for the Habitat board to consider.

All the designs were on display this week at the Salem campus, with some of the students, their professors and the dean of their college present for a reception with representatives of Habitat and the public Thursday night. About half of the Habitat board traveled to Kent in December for a presentation of the designs.

Article Photos

Salem ReStore volunteer Mark Flake checks out one of the house designs for a lot which drops off from front to back, located in Leetonia and owned by Habitat for Humanity of Northern Columbiana County. Fourth-year students from the Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design submitted 22 potential house designs for Habitat to consider and had them on display at the Salem campus. The designs can still be seen from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today. (Salem News photo by Mary Ann Greier)

"We were so impressed at the results and their enthusiasm. They understood who they were building for," Habitat Executive Director Barb Loudon said.

The project came about through a local connection to KSU and a desire for a community project for the students to tackle. Habitat board member Judy Sicilia is the mother of George Bigham of the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology Construction Management Program.

Loudon and Habitat construction manager Scott Craven met with students in the construction management program and in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design to outline the parameters or limitations they would have to consider in their home design. They also explained what Habitat is, how the families are the clients and the need for energy efficiency and affordability.

A group of 44 fourth-year architecture students were split into pairs and came up with 22 designs for three actual lots -lots Loudon described as a challenge due to their layout. Habitat owns two of the lots, one which drops off from front to back on Ridge Street in Leetonia and one which is shaped like a piece of pie on Southeast Boulevard in Salem. The third lot hasn't been purchased, but was described as long and narrow.

Lots used by Habitat are normally about 50 feet wide and 100 feet deep, but Loudon said they're having a harder time finding lots that fit the current footprint of space in the home design they've been using.

Students had to keep in mind the following Habitat house design criteria: living space not exceeding 1,070 square feet for a three-bedroom or 1,230 for a four-bedroom; each house must have a covered, primary entrance; no garages or carports; and one bathroom unless the size of the family and the number of bedrooms qualifies for more bathroom space.

Their goals for the designs included comfort, cost efficiency, flexibility, having them be user friendly and recognize that volunteer labor would be building the homes. The designs also had to "address different site conditions, orientation, architectural character, and options for passive and renewable energy for both site and building," according to the outlined project goals.

Architecture instructor Lee Goodman said the students had to present one plan with both a traditional design and a contemporary design and incorporate ways to cut energy costs.

Assistant Professor Joe Ferut said the students found the project to be rewarding - they were doing something real. It has also provided an opportunity for collaboration between different departments. He called the project "successful - a blending of theory and practice."

"We teach our young architects social responsibility," Adjunct Professor Jack Hawk said, adding this type of program is a good teaching tool because the students have to work with client needs.

Students Trevor Donnelly of Boardman and Ryan Genther of Richfield both said the design parameters were challenging. Most of their projects are more theoretical and they thought more about what went into the design because they had an actual client this time and could visualize being in the homes. They were able to utilize the applications they were learning.

Douglas Steidl, Dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design, said there's something about designers and architects and social service and this project fits right into that. It's good for the students and good for Habitat.

Plans called for the Habitat board to select up to four designs, but Loudon said they'll also possibly look at incorporating elements of other designs. Architecture students will spend this semester refining the chosen designs and students from the construction management program will determine the costing options for building the designs.

The ultimate goal is for the designs to be used for construction of Habitat homes.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State to put architecture building designs on display (Lefton, Steidl) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will display the four possible designs for a new architecture building, which university officials hope will become a community landmark, at a public event Thursday.

The four finalists, selected from an international search with 37 applicants, will present their designs at 7 p.m. Thursday in Cartwright Hall, 650 Hilltop Drive, Kent. The event is free.

"Students, faculty, staff, alumni, Kent community members, professionals in architecture, interior design and other design professions, or those who have an interest in those areas, as well as the general public, are all invited to get a first look at what these world-class firms have developed for our new architecture building," said KSU President Lester Lefton. "This is an exciting time for Kent State as we transform our campus with new buildings and renovations and serve as a partner in the redevelopment of downtown Kent."

The four finalists are:

Cleveland-based Bialosky and Partners, the firm that designed the Hudson Community Chapel and the Progressive Insurance campus in Mayfield Heights. Bialosky and Partners has teamed with the New York-based Architecture Research Office, which has completed projects for Ivy League schools Princeton University and Brown University.

Toledo-based The Collaborative Inc., a practice that designed KSU's Student Recreation and Wellness Center on Ted Boyd Drive, renovations to Stopher and Johnson residence halls and the Esplanade walkway and its extension. It has partnered with Miller Hull, a Seattle firm that specializes in public projects.

Cleveland-based Richard L. Bowen and Associates, the firm hired by Portage County to design the new municipal courthouse building planned for East Main Street in Kent. The firm has partnered with Weiss/Manfredi, a multi-disciplinary practice based in New York, known for its design for the Seattle Art Museum's Sculpture Park among other work.

Cleveland-based Westlake Reed Leskosky, the firm that designed the KSU Math and Computer Science Building and oversaw the renovation of KSU's Franklin Hall, located off of South Lincoln Street.

The finalists will make a full presentation to KSU officials on their prospective designs Thursday before they make the public presentations. KSU is expected to select the final design of the building in February.

The new architecture building, with an estimated price tag of $40 million, will sit somewhere on the university's Esplanade walkway extension linking the northwest edge of campus to downtown Kent. The extension will cross South Lincoln and South Willow streets, and create a new intersection and pedestrian crossing to downtown Kent at Haymaker Parkway.

"It will be tremendously exciting to see how the four architecture firms conceptualize our college's new home," said Doug Steidl, dean of the KSU College of Architecture and Environmental Design, in a released statement. "During the two-month period between when the firms were notified that they were finalists and the Jan. 17 presentations, the four firms had opportunities to gather input from our students, faculty and staff members through web surveys, interviews and informal conversation sessions. The open dialogue sessions offered valuable insight as to what our constituencies need and want in a new building, so I'm anxious to see what the finalists have come up with to meet those requirements and requests."

Anyone interested in watching the public presentation online can see it at https://ksutube.kent.edu/watchlive.php?playthis=5049 from 7-9 p.m. Thursday.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State's Dri Archer says he's coming back for his senior season | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio - Kent State junior slotback Dri Archer has decided to pass up the NFL draft and return to Kent State for his senior season.

The 5-8, 175-pound consensus All-American with the 4.2 40-yard-dash speed said via Twitter that he has some unfinished business to accomplish with the Golden Flashes.

“The decision has been made 2013 I will be in a Kent State uniform for my senior season,” he posted. “A choice had to be made and I know this is a great choice I am making by comin back to school ... I got some things to accomplish before I leave we bout to win this MAC CHAMPIONSHIP and the bowl game.”

The speedster from Venice, Fla. finished the season with a single-season school-record 23 touchdowns. He also returned three kickoffs for touchdowns in the first five games of the season and rarely had a kick return opportunity the rest of the campaign.

Kent finished 11-3 on the season. winning the MAC East Divison title. The Flashes lost in the MAC title game to Northern Illinois in double overtime, then fell to Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State football: Dri Archer announces on Twitter he is returning for senior season | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dri Archer had until Tuesday to make a decision as to whether he would return to Kent State for his senior season or declare himself eligible for the NFL Draft.

But the versatile 5-foot-8, 175-pound Archer wasted little time once he made up his mind. About 1:30 p.m. Friday afternoon, he announced on Twitter that he was staying.

“The decision has been made 2013 I will be in a Kent State uniform for my senior season,” he posted on an Instagram picture he tweeted out to his followers. “A choice had to be made and I know this is a great choice I am making my comin [sic] back to school with that bein [sic] said I am going to work/train harder than I ever have before to make this last go around the best time of my life believe that! I got some things to accomplish before I leave we bout [sic] to win this MAC CHAMPIONSHIP and the bowl game. #Blessed and oh yeah #Heisman2013.”

Archer compiled a single-season school-record 23 touchdowns and had nearly 2,500 all-purpose yards in the regular season to help the Flashes (11-3) to their best season in program history.

Kent State (8-0 in the MAC) had its luck run out in the postseason. First, the Flashes fell to Northern Illinois in double overtime in the MAC Championship at Ford Field in Detroit. Then, on Jan. 6, KSU lost 17-13 to Sun Belt Conference champion Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala. — KSU's first bowl appearance in 40 years.

Return to Top



News Headline: ALONG THE WAY 'Three-peat' for Dick Kotis | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As last Sunday's GoDaddy.com Bowl approached,
retired business executive Dick Kotis
of Twin Lakes sensed he might become the only
person to have attended all three Kent State University
football bowl games, but just to be sure,
he called up Mike Lude, the former KSU , athletic
director, who's now retired and living with his
wife, Rita, in Arizona.

“Mike,” Dick said, “You're not coming to the
GoDaddy.com bowl, are you?”

“Why?” Mike asked.

“Because I want to be the only human being
who can claim to have attended all three Kent
bowl games,” Dick responded, only half in jest.

Mike confirmed he'd not be in Mobile last weekend
so Dick and his wife, Jeanne, headed south for
the big game, Dick assured his attendance would
set a remarkable record.

Mike Lude and Dick Kotis were
both assistant football coaches during
the 1954 season: Mike for the
University of Delaware, Dick for
Kent State. The Kent State Golden
Flashes and the University of
Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens, at
the season's end, met in Evansville,
Ind., for the Refrigerator Bowl.
The game was called the Refrigerator
Bowl because General Electric
was its sponsor and Evansville was where GE
had its largest manufacturing plant for refrigerators,
Dick said.

Kent State lost to Delaware 19-7 and Dick said
in retrospect some of the blame should perhaps
go to the coaches, who at half-time told the team
to change into fresh uniforms.

“It was raining and the field was a sea of mud,”
Dick recalled. “We thought it would boost morale
to begin the second half with clean uniforms.” Instead,
Dick said, it caused the team to play too
conservatively and, “I think that contributed to
our loss.”

Several Golden Flashes of that season were remarkable.
Luke Owens, a tackle, went on to play
for the Baltimore Colts after Kent State. Lou Mariano,
a lightning back from Canton McKinley, although
deaf, was able to communicate with his
teammates well enough to become one of Kent
State's all-time leading scorers.

“People were amazed we had a someone who
played so well with that handicap,” Dick recalled.

Twin half-backs Jim and Bill Whitley became
successful architects who helped design some of
the buildings on the KSU campus. An end, Alan
Kaupinen, of Ravenna, went on to enjoy a stellar
career with Proctor and Gamble and also served
as a deputy administrator on the White House
staff of President Richard Nixon.

Still another player, Jack Ritticher, had a career
in the Coast Guard. In the Vietnam war, trying to
rescue downed U.S. pilots, he lost his life.

“The team now has a special Jack Ritticher
Award,” Dick said.

Tangerine Bowl memories

By 1972, when Kent State won a trip to the Tangerine
Bowl in Tampa, Dick Kotis was president
and CEO of the Fred Arbogast Co., a premier manufacturer
of fishing equipment. He also served
as volunteer president of the Varsity K Club, the
booster organization for the Golden Flashes.

Mike Lude, that year, was Kent State athletic director.
Don James was the Flashes' head football
coach that season and compiled a 6-5 record. James
went on to become coach at the University of Washington
and his team won a national championship
in 1991. Earl Bruce, coach of the Tampa Spartans,
eventually succeeded Woody Hayes at Ohio State.

“We were invited to fly down to Tampa with the
team,” Dick said.

Although the Golden Flashes were bested by
the Tampa Spartans 21-18, it was quite a game.
The Spartans scored all 21 of their points in the
first half. Kent State scored all of its 18 points in
the second half.

“The outstanding player for the Flashes in that
game had to be Jack Lambert,” Dick said.

Lambert, a defensive middle linebacker, went
on to become an NFL Hall of Famer who played
for the Pittsburgh Steelers. Other Flashes in the
Tangerine Bowl went on to fame. Nick Saban,
for example, is now head coach for this year's National
Champions, the Alabama Crimson Tide.
Gary Pinkel is now head coach at Missouri. Wide
receiver Gerald Tinker won Olympic gold in the
400-meter relay in 1972.

GoDaddy.com Bowl

Last Sunday at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile,
Ala., the weather was better than it was 58
years ago when Dick Kotis coached in the Refrigerator
Bowl. The rain had let up, but temperatures
dropped into the low 40s by game time and
many of us on both sides struggled to keep warm.

Kent State's Golden Flashes might have won
had Quarterback Spencer Keith, who gave it his
all, succeeded in his final run for a first down on
a fourth and long pass play, with a minute to go.
Instead, the Red Hawks won 17-13.

“But it was a good game and it could've gone
either way,” Dick said.

On a positive note, Dick was encouraged by
the number of alumni from earlier KSU football
teams who turned out for the GoDaddy.com Bowl.
R-C reporter Allen Moff reported 55 team alumni
among the 300 or so fans in the Kent State tailgate
party tent prior to the game. Many came to support
not only the team, but its new head coach,
Paul Haynes, whom current KSU Athletic Director
Joel Nielsen introduced along with Coach
Haynes' wife, Danita, and their children: daughters
Jordyn and Kennedy Rose and son Tarron.

Dick called Haynes “almost a clone of Darrell
Hazell.”

The charismatic Darrell Hazell, after coaching
Kent State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl Sunday, was
departing to become the new head coach of the
Purdue Boilermakers. Paul Haynes, his successor,
is a Kent State alumnus who was a standout defensive
player for the Flashes in the late 1980s and
early 1990s. Haynes has had a successful coaching
career since graduation. Seven of his years in
coaching were at Ohio State where he and Hazell
were both assistant coaches under Jim Tressel.

Robert Starnes, a KSU alumnus and former
football player, at the GoDaddy.com Bowl Sunday
said his playing days at Kent State overlapped
those of Paul Haynes. Starnes and his teammates
thought so highly of Haynes they mounted a Facebook
campaign to urge his appointment.

“He'll do a great job,” said Starnes, a big hulk of
a guy who owns his own business designing and
installing T-shirt printing plants. In his playing
days, Starnes, a guard, was also the player who'd
make the long snap for the kickers of extra points
and field goals. Starnes said he was specially
trained for that assignment by Coach Tom Campana,
the educator, coach and athletic director
for Roosevelt High School, who after retirement
briefly helped KSU football teams.

The Arkansas Red Hawks, who defeated the
Flashes last Sunday, lost a year earlier in the Go-
Daddy.com Bowl so who knows? Maybe, under
their new coach, Paul Haynes, the Golden Flashes
will return to Mobile next year and win.

I hope so.

Return to Top



News Headline: Haynes picks familiar faces to highlight first staff (Haynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State head coach Paul Haynes has officially announced the retention of four assistant coaches and the appointment of seven new members to his football staff. Assembled together at the M.A.C. Center offices for the first time on Friday, the new staff will hit the recruiting trail Monday as they prepare for National Signing Day on Feb. 6.

The 2013 Golden Flashes will be led by familiar faces on both sides of the ball, as Brian Rock enters his third season as offensive coordinator and Brian George begins his first season as defensive coordinator after spending two seasons as Kent State's defensive line coach.

"I've seen the work that coach Rock has done to develop quarterbacks through the years," Haynes said. "And the opportunity to keep him will only enhance us as we move forward.

"I've known of coach George through the years, and two good football friends of mine spoke very highly of him. With his intelligence and ability to develop players, it was an easy choice."

Also entering their third year on staff will be safeties coach Jeff Burrow and special teams coordinator/tight ends coach Dave McMichael.

"In talking with all of the previous staff, the one thing that got so much better from the previous year was the special teams after coach McMichael was named coordinator," Haynes said. "He's a tremendous asset to this program.

"Everyone spoke so highly of coach Burrow not only as a football coach, but as a person. And I want to surround myself with positive people like him."

Staying in the Mid-American Conference will be cornerbacks coach Amp Campbell, who was the secondary coach at Western Michigan for the past three seasons.

"The first two people that called me after I took the job were Dean Pees and Mark Dantonio," Haynes said. "Both of them are my mentors, and when they gave their stamp of approval on coach Campbell, it was a no-brainer for me."

Ben Needham, who worked with Haynes at Arkansas and Ohio State, will now serve as Kent State's linebackers coach and recruiting coordinator.

"Coach Needham has been with me for a while and is a great person with a brilliant mind," Haynes said. "I knew I was going to hire him full-time the first chance I got."

Taking on the role of receivers coach is Doc Gamble, who most recently served as running backs/tight ends coach and recruiting coordinator at Alcorn State.

"I've known coach Gamble since he was a high school coach at Cincinnati Withrow," Haynes said. "His reputation in that area will help us tremendously with recruiting in that area, and he'll be a great asset to us."

Also on offense, Ted Bahhur returns to his alma mater as a running backs coach. Bahhur most recently served as offensive coordinator at Chattahoochee Tech.

"Coach Bahhur was actually in school while I was here," Haynes said. "He's got head coaching experience and did a great job of building a program at Clark Atlanta University."

The offensive line will be led by Shawn Clark, who spent the previous four seasons coaching Purdue's offensive line.

"I've known coach Clark since we were at Louisville in 2001," Haynes said. "He's one of the best offensive line coaches out there. He's developed a number of all-conference players and All-Americans at both Eastern Kentucky and Purdue."

The Flashes' strength and conditioning coach will be Antoine Sharp, who was on staff with Haynes at Arkansas, where he spent five seasons.

"Coach Sharp will definitely get our guys bigger, stronger and faster," Haynes said. "The thing I love about him is his energy and his passion, and our players will love that too."

Zack Tilves was elevated to full-time status as director of football operations after spending the previous six years as a student assistant and assistant director of football operations.

"He's a Kent State alum who knows the program, knows the city and is well connected, and that's what that position needs to be," said Haynes. "I was very impressed with him, and once I spent time around him it was obvious that he should get the job."

The Golden Flashes are coming off an unprecedented 11-win season, going 8-0 in Mid-American Conference play to capture the MAC East Division title. They also earned the program's first bowl berth in 40 seasons.

Return to Top



News Headline: Archer chooses to return to Kent for senior season (Haynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An opportunity to start his NFL career a year early offered a tempting bait for Dri Archer.

But Kent State's junior blur refused to bite.

Archer announced on Friday afternoon that he will return to the Golden Flashes for his senior season, spurning an opportunity to make himself eligible for the 2013 NFL Draft after leading Kent State to a school-record 11 wins and to its first bowl game in 40 years.

"I've been thinking about a lot of things. The main reason (I'm returning) is I've gotta finish strong with my boys," said Archer. "I didn't want to leave them. And I've gotta get this degree."

Archer flew back to his home in Florida following Kent State's 17-13 loss to Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl last Sunday, and had been considering his options along with his family ever since.

"Me and my mom (Valerie Hart) were deciding," said Archer. "She said at the end of the day it's my decision, and whatever I decided to do she was behind me 100 percent."

Archer has been struggling with the decision since Flashes coach Darrell Hazell accepted an offer to take over the Purdue program on Dec. 5. Archer applied for an NFL Draft analysis, which projected that the 5-foot-8, 175-pound speedster who has been consistently clocked in the 4.2s in the 40 would be drafted in the fourth round or lower.

"When I found that out, it made me think more about it," said Archer. "But (leaving early) wasn't what I wanted to do."

New Kent State head coach Paul Haynes reached out to Archer on several occasions. He promised to get the ball in Archer's hands more than ever next year, and even discussed starting a campaign to promote Archer for next year's Heisman Trophy.

"Dri's a great kid, and I'm sure there's a lot of other people that had more to do with (his decision) than I did," said Haynes. "I don't want to take any credit for his decision. I reached out to him not as the head coach but as a person with advice for him, because I've dealt with it before with different kids.

"I'm excited as heck that he came back and I'm excited as heck that I'm the head coach that he's coming back to, but I called him more as a person with advice than as a head coach."

Archer obviously liked what he heard from Haynes.

"He called me and told me he had a lot of good things planned for me, and he had a couple other coaches give me a call and tell me the plan," said Archer. "I feel like it's a good plan."

Plans to stop Archer were repeatedly foiled in 2012.

After missing the previous year because of an academic issue that had nothing to do with his grade-point average, Archer returned the opening kickoff of the '12 campaign 57 yards against Towson. And the Archer highlight reel continued to roll from that point on.

Archer wound up returning three kickoffs for touchdowns, all in the first five games of the season before teams stopped kicking to him. He averaged 36.9 yards per return for the year to earn Walter Camp First Team All-American and MAC Special Teams Player of the Year honors. He also led the Flashes in rushing with 1,429 yards, averaging an unfathomable 9.0 yards per carry, and added 39 catches for 561 yards. He scored at least once in every game this season while piling up a school-record 23 touchdowns.

However, two things Archer wasn't able to do motivated him to stay as much as anything. Archer was held to 15 yards rushing on 12 carries in Kent State's gut-wrenching 44-37 double-overtime loss to Northern Illinois in the MAC Championship Game, then was not on the field during the final drive of Sunday's 17-13 loss to Arkansas State in the GoDaddy.com Bowl due to a knee injury suffered earlier in the game.

"The bowl game and the MAC Championship Game, those really played into (the decision)," said Archer. "I want to go down as one of the first to win a MAC championship and the first to win a bowl game, and we weren't able to do that this year. People think Kent State is one and done, they can't do it again, and people probably think I can't do it again either."

With Archer and fellow 1,000-yard rusher Trayion Durham (1,316 yards, 4.8 ypc) now both returning, Haynes certainly believes the Flashes will prove to be no one-hit wonder.

"We have the tools, we have the talent," said Haynes. "We just have to continue to develop it and find creative ways for those two guys to get the ball, and we'll be fine."

The Flashes will have to find a quarterback to replace senior Spencer Keith, and they'll lose three starting offensive linemen -- including left tackle Brian Winters and left guard Josh Kline, who are expected to be taken in the 2013 NFL Draft.

"The quarterbacks we have in place, it's just a matter of who it's going to be," said Haynes. "The linemen have to get better. We're gonna fill the needs we have, but those young guys are going to develop. I'm really not worried about it. What everybody thinks is our weakness may become our strength."

If that happens, the Flashes' stunning rise into the MAC's elite may very well reach the top next year, thanks in major part to Archer's decision to return for his senior season.

"That's the plan," said Archer.

Return to Top



News Headline: University Park Alliance announces 2013 'Urban Innovators' speakers | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Three "urban innovators" will highlight this year's University Park Alliance Speaker Series.

UPA, a nonprofit group working on the redevelopment of 50 city blocks around the University of Akron, sponsors the speaker series each year to keep the dialogue going about the "issues that we think are critical for the Akron community," Director Eric Anthony Johnson said.

"It's important for us to continue to have these series to talk about, introduce new concepts and flesh out new ideas. It's not just for University Park, but anybody in the Akron area interested in these ideas and how it can help move the community forward," he said.

The alliance looks for speakers "who are considered some of the thought leaders on those subject matters."

The events are free to the public, but reservations are required and spaces fill quickly. Email info@upakron.com or call 330-777-2070 to reserve a seat.

The events are 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the Andrew Jackson House, 277 E. Mill St., Akron.

The speakers and their topics are:

• Jan. 30 - Redesigning the Urban Landscape: Developing a Natural Sense of Place. Sabrena Schweyer & Samuel Salsbury from Salsbury-Schweyer Inc.

Salsbury and Schweyer are international award-winning designers recognized for their use of nature's systems in the creation of beautiful, personal and earth-minded landscapes. For more than 15 years, they and their Akron-based firm have been at the forefront in advancing the field of landscape design toward sustainability and toward creating a "sense of place." They work with organizations and individuals throughout the country to devise ways to incorporate more sustainable and beautiful aspects into places.

• Feb. 20 - Transforming Vacant Spaces: Creating Value from Vacancy in the Urban Footprint. Terry Schwarz from Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative.

Schwarz is the director of Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. Her work there includes neighborhood and campus planning, commercial and residential design guidelines and ecological strategies for vacant land reuse. She launched the collaborative's Shrinking Cities Institute in 2005 in an effort to understand and address the implications of population decline and large-scale urban vacancy in Northeast Ohio. As an outgrowth of the Shrinking Cities Institute, she established Pop Up City, a temporary-use initiative for vacant and underutilized sites in Cleveland.

• March 20 - Cohousing: A Unique Approach to Alternative Housing. Sharon Sykora from Slippery Rock (Pa.) University.

Sykora is a professor in the university's political science department and specializes in American political behavior. In her 24 years at Slippery Rock, she created the course "Utopian Experiments," through which her professional and personal interest in co-housing has developed. Sykora recently was granted a yearlong sabbatical to investigate the principles and practicalities of co-housing communities across the United States.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent Artist Named 2013 Ohio Governor's Award Winner | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Emeritus Kent State arts professor to receive award at May luncheon in Columbus

Renowned northeast Ohio artist and emeritus art professor at Kent State University Joseph O'Sickey has been named a 2013 Governor's Award for the Arts in Ohio recipient.

O'Sickey, born in 1918, was named an award winner for the individual artist category.

The artist has been active in the Ohio arts scene for seven decades and taught at Kent State, the Cleveland Institute of Art, the Akron Art Institute and Ohio State University, according to a biography of O'Sickey provided by the Ohio Arts Council.

The Governor's Awards for the Arts in Ohio showcases and celebrates Ohio artists, arts organizations, arts patrons and business support of the arts, according to the Ohio Arts Council. Winners are selected in six categories: Arts Administration, Arts Education, Arts Patron, Business Support of the Arts, Community Development and Participation and Individual Artist.

O'Sickey will receive the award during a May luncheon in Columbus.

To see the other winners and to read a biography of O'Sickey click on this link.

Return to Top



News Headline: Dialogue to kick off MLK Day events at KSU (Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and the Kent State Latino Networking Caucus will host the Black and Brown Dialogue that kicks off commemorative events marking Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

The discussion will take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Kent Student Center Kiva. The event is open to all.

The discussion will center on African American and Latino communities in relation to King's legacy, and key civil and social justice issues facing the country today.

Kent State President's Ambassador José Feliciano, a Cleveland area attorney, will speak at the event. Panel members include T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management, and George Garrison, professor of Pan-African Studies.

"This event will give students an opportunity to hear from individuals who faced some of the same kinds of challenges many students of color are encountering today in college," Garcia said. "In addition, the format of this event allows for students to share their concerns or thoughts about their college experience.

"The Black and Brown dialogue is an excellent opportunity for all of us, regardless of ethnicity, socioeconomics or background, to come together and reinforce the necessity to help each other overcome challenges in order to graduate from college."

For more information about Kent State's 11th annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration and commemorative events, visit www.kent.edu/mlkevents.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Announces 'First Choice' Initiative To Provide Larger First-Year Merit Scholarships (Lefton, Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has undertaken an initiative to provide more incoming freshmen a significant increase in merit scholarships to ease the financial burden on successful students who see the university as their first choice for college.

The additional financial support follows a year in which KSU's incoming class boasted a highest-ever GPA and the second-largest enrollment of incoming freshman.

"We want to ease the financial burden on families so that we can continue to bring in the best of the best" said KSU President Lester A. Lefton. "These merit scholarships send the message that we recognize the hard work students have put in during high school and we want them to succeed with their first choice to attend Kent State."

To be considered for incoming freshmen scholarships at the Kent Campus, prospective students must submit a complete application for admission (including high school transcript, ACT or SAT scores and application fee) by Tuesday.

"We understand families are struggling to afford college, therefore, we are increasing merit aid for students who have worked hard to earn good grades," said T. David Garcia, KSU's associate vice president for enrollment management. "Sometimes, students forgo social events with their peers because of a big exam or a big project that is due. We want to recognize their sacrifice with a larger freshman scholarship because they have earned it."

More than $31 million in merit scholarships have already been offered to 6,328 incoming freshman compared to $24 million offered to 5,766 students last year during this same period.

University leaders anticipate making a few more rounds of scholarship offers for those who apply before the deadline.

For more information about KSU's "First Choice" Initiative, visit www.kent.edu/firstchoice

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State, Akron hospital take steps to deal with flu (Diacon, DeJulius) | Email

News Date: 01/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University and Akron Children's Hospital took steps Friday to address the spreading threat from the influenza and related respiratory viruses.

Kent State students are being encouraged to skip the start of the spring semester Monday if they're suffering flu-like symptoms.

KSU Provost Todd Diacon told students in a campuswide email they are "strongly advised" not to attend class or other public events if they have fever, cough and body aches.

"We'd rather they stay home and get better and make up the classwork," Diacon said.

The Ohio Department of Health reports 1,922 influenza-associated hospitalizations statewide as of Jan. 5, compared to 86 at the same time last year.

Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show 44 states are experiencing high levels of influenza-like illnesses.

Akron Children's Hospital's stricter visitor restrictions, effective immediately, include:

--All visitors should be healthy, free from fever, cough, colds or stomach virus symptoms.

--Visitation by children under the age of 14 years is limited to siblings only.

--No more than two visitors (in addition to parents/guardians) should be in a patient room at any time.

--Only parents or guardians should visit in the hospital's critical care areas -- PICU (pediatric intensive care unit), NICU (neonatal intensive care unit), Special Care Nurseries, Burn Center and Hematology/Oncology. Parents/guardians may arrange for visitors, on a limited basis.

--In general, only children seeking evaluation or treatment at the hospital should be brought to the facility.

--Playrooms are only open to patients and their parents/guardians. Siblings must remain in the patient's room.

"Patients are often surprised by how very ill they feel with influenza," said Dr. Angela DeJulius, Kent State's chief university physician. "Prescription antiviral medicines can sometimes help to reduce the duration of illness, but are not a cure."

Return to Top



News Headline: Steps being taken to lessen impact of flu in Portage (Diacon, DeJulius) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Health departments to hold vaccine clinics; officials advising sick people to stay home

In response to the unusually high and growing number of flu cases in the county, state and nationwide, the Portage County Health Department is holding additional flu shot clinics at both the Portage County Health Department and Kent Health Department.

"With the closing of Ravenna City Health Department's immunization clinic, we felt it necessary to offer city residents as well as county residents another opportunity for getting their flu shot" said DuWayne Porter, county health commissioner.

"It's not too late to get your flu shot" said Rosemary Ferraro, nursing director for the county health department. "We are seeing an increase in flu cases right now, but it is important to remember that flu season can last as late as May."

Ohio's flu activity is already at "widespread" levels according to the Ohio Department of Health, meaning there have been outbreaks of influenza and increases in flu-like illness in at least half the state.

ODH reported 1,922 flu-associated hospitalizations statewide since October, compared with 86 a year ago and 175 the previous flu season. A total of 192 of the cases last week were in the Northeast region.

Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna has restricted visitation by children under 14 years of age and for people with any symptoms of the flu.

And Kent State University is advising students with flu-like symptoms not to attend class or other public events during their illness.

"We just want to make sure that our students stay healthy," said Todd Diacon, KSU's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. "If students have flu-like symptoms, we'd rather they stay home and get better and make up the classwork."

"Patients are often surprised by how very ill they feel with influenza," said Dr. Angela DeJulius, KSU's chief university physician. "Prescription antiviral medicines can sometimes help to reduce the duration of illness, but are not a cure. The flu usually lasts at least a week."

The state health department says there is an adequate vaccine supply at this time. A particular office or location might run out, but there is an adequate supply in the supply chain, ODH spokesperson Tessie Pollock said.

Everyone is at risk for getting the seasonal flu. The CDC has recommended that all people aged 6 months and older should receive a flu shot, especially pregnant women, children 5 years of age and younger, adults 50 years of age and older, people with chronic health conditions, health care workers, and people who live and/or care for people who are at high risk for complications from the flu.

All clinics are walk-in, no appointment necessary. Cost is $10 for children and $20 for adults. Medicaid, Buckeye, Care Source, United Health, and Medicare Part B (as primary insurance) are accepted. Nasal flu vaccine is available for children 2-18 years of age.

Clinics are set for:

Monday, Jan. 14, 3 to 6 p.m. at the Portage County Health Department Nursing Clinic, 1st floor, next to WIC at the Portage County Administration Building, 449 S. Meridian St., Ravenna.

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 3 to 5 p.m., Kent City Health Department, 325 Depeyster St.

Every Wednesday in January, 8 a.m. to noon, Portage County Health Department

Nursing Clinic, 1st Floor, next to WIC at the Portage County Health Department Nursing Clinic, 1st floor, next to WIC at the Portage County Administration Building, 449 S. Meridian St., Ravenna.

Return to Top



News Headline: INTERACTIVE KSU To Flu Students: Stay Away Featured (Diacon, DeJulius) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Edward L. Esposito
News OCR Text: Those with a cough and a sniffle now have a get-out-of-class card to play at Kent State University.

In fact, the University would prefer you don't even play on Monday when the spring term begins.

Students with "flu-like" symptoms are being advised to skip classes or any other public events, and to contact their professors as soon as they can.

Ohio has seen a huge increase in influenza-type hospitalizations through the first week of the new year, ballooning to nearly two-thousand from the seven dozen of a year ago.

(Kent State University) As Kent State students prepare to begin spring semester class on Monday, Jan. 14, students are encouraged to be aware of the seriousness of the current flu strain.

Students who have flu-like symptoms are strongly advised not to attend class or other public events during the time of their illness. Students who need to miss classes or assignments due to flu-like illness are advised to contact their professors as soon as possible.

“We just want to make sure that our students stay healthy,” said Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. “If students have flu-like symptoms, we'd rather they stay home and get better and make up the classwork.”

The Ohio Department of Health reports 1,922 influenza-associated hospitalizations in the state as of Jan. 5, 2013, compared to only 86 at the same time last year.

While most people with influenza recover quickly, it can cause severe illness, hospitalization and even death. Typical symptoms are fever, cough, headache, sore throat and body aches. Students, faculty or staff members who experience a flu-like illness should rest, drink fluids and take over-the-counter pain relievers and cough medicines as needed.

“Patients are often surprised by how very ill they feel with influenza,” said Dr. Angela DeJulius, Kent State's chief university physician. “Prescription antiviral medicines can sometimes help to reduce the duration of illness, but are not a cure. The flu usually lasts at least a week.”

To prevent influenza and to reduce the spread of illness through the community, flu shots are recommended for all individuals over six months of age. It is not too late to get a flu shot, and it is always recommended to practice good hygiene, especially hand washing, covering coughs and sneezes, and staying home when ill with a fever.

“It is not too late to be immunized, as flu season often continues into February or even later,” DeJulius said.

A limited number of flu shots are still available at University Health Services. Many local pharmacies are also offering the vaccine.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State warns students with flu symptoms to stay home as new semester approaches (Diacon, DeJulius) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Jen Steer
News OCR Text: The start of the spring semester at Kent State is Monday, but the university is already warning sick students to stay away.

The school said on Friday that students with flu-like symptoms are advised not to attend class and contact their professors as soon as possible.

“We just want to make sure that our students stay healthy,” said Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost in a news release. “If students have flu-like symptoms, we'd rather they stay home and get better and make up the classwork.”

The Ohio Department of Health reports that Ohio is experiencing a widespread flu outbreak. There have been 1,922 influenza-related hospitalizations during this season, with one child death reported, as of Jan. 5.

“Patients are often surprised by how very ill they feel with influenza,” said Dr. Angela DeJulius, Kent State's chief university physician. “Prescription antiviral medicines can sometimes help to reduce the duration of illness, but are not a cure. The flu usually lasts at least a week.”

Kent State said there are a limited amount of flu vaccines available through the university's health services. DeJulius said since flu season continues into February, it is not too late to get the vaccine.

Earlier this week, a 22-year-old junior at Wright State University died after being hospitalized with flu-like symptoms.

Return to Top



News Headline: (VIDEO) Flu Prompts College's Request to Professors (DeJulius) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — Some important advice for local college students as they prepare to return to class next week.

“I think I have the flu,” said Christie Gigliotti, as she waited in the lobby of the Kent State University health center.

Even before the spring semester begins, students are already showing up at the health center on the Kent State campus, complaining of flu symptoms.

“I think it's a good precautionary just for students who are sick not to come to class 'cause you don't want to spread the flu, coughing and sneezing,” Gigliotti said.

The university sent out a notice to students and faculty, asking them not to attend class if they feel they have the flu.

“We have our students returning back to campus next week and we have so many who live here in the residence halls in close proximity to each other, and so if we have cases of flu, we might see a rapid spread,” said the chief university physician, Dr. Angela DeJulius.

“They're going to be returning from all parts of the country and so we don't really know what we'll have until they get here,” she added.

“I've been hearing so much about the flu this season and usually I'm not very particular about getting it because I had been hearing so much. I called to ask if they had some available and they said they were running out and not sure if they'd have some available on Monday,” said student Charu Shukla.

Some students are getting the flu shot as soon as they get on campus. The health center says they are already booked with flu-shot appointments next week.

“I had actually heard that the flu had been going around, it was actually going to be pretty bad this year, so decided to get a flu shot before coming back to Kent,” said student Grayson Ritch.

With more than 29,000 students and 4,000 faculty members, university officials want to make sure they keep the spread of the flu under control.

“Nobody should come, if you're sick don't come and I don't feel like you should penalized for getting sick either,” said student Braisha Owens.

“If you got the flu or any other type of sickness, you shouldn't come to class, especially the first week of school because especially the first day, the first day all we're gonna do is go through syllabus, probably not gonna do anything the first day,” said student Tavaughn Hayes.

University officials say they are encouraging professors to be flexible in allowing students to make up missed assignments.

To view video, please click on link:
http://fox8.com/2013/01/11/flu-prompts-colleges-request-to-professors/

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State: Students with flu-like symptoms advised to stay home (Diacon, DeJulius) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As Kent State students prepare to begin spring semester class on Monday, Jan. 14, students are encouraged to be aware of the seriousness of the current flu strain, college officials said Friday.

Students who have flu-like symptoms are strongly advised not to attend class or other public events during the time of their illness.

Students who need to miss classes or assignments due to flu-like illness are advised to contact their professors as soon as possible.

"We just want to make sure that our students stay healthy," said Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost.

"If students have flu-like symptoms, we'd rather they stay home and get better and make up the classwork."

A limited number of flu shots are still available at University Health Services. Many local pharmacies are also offering the vaccine.

For information about Kent State's University Health Services, you can call 330-672-2322 or visit www.kent.edu/uhs.

The Ohio Department of Health reports 1,922 influenza-associated hospitalizations in the state as of Jan. 5, 2013, compared to only 86 at the same time last year.

While most people with influenza recover quickly, it can cause severe illness, hospitalization and even death. Typical symptoms are fever, cough, headache, sore throat and body aches.

Students, faculty or staff members who experience a flu-like illness should rest, drink fluids and take over-the-counter pain relievers and cough medicines as needed.

"Patients are often surprised by how very ill they feel with influenza," said Dr. Angela DeJulius, Kent State's chief university physician.

"Prescription antiviral medicines can sometimes help to reduce the duration of illness, but are not a cure. The flu usually lasts at least a week."

To prevent influenza and to reduce the spread of illness through the community, flu shots are recommended for all individuals over six months of age.

It is not too late to get a flu shot, and it is always recommended to practice good hygiene, especially hand washing, covering coughs and sneezes, and staying home when ill with a fever.

"It is not too late to be immunized, as flu season often continues into February or even later," DeJulius said.

Return to Top



News Headline: (AUDIO) College campuses try to prevent the spread of flu among returning students (DeJulius) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University and the University of Akron have both sent out warnings to their students

Local college campuses are preparing for students' return next week and trying to prevent the further spread of flu this season.

Kent State University sent out a warning asking students who have flu-like symptoms to stay home and not attend classes or any events on campus. Any students who won't be able to go to class are advised to contact their professors as soon as possible.

Angela DeJulius, chief physician at Kent State, says that while the health center is doing all it can, people still need to be mindful of what they do on a daily basis.

“Well we do have flu shots at the health center, and we will plan to keep them in stock as long as there is demand. You can imagine there is quite a lot of demand right now. And then the other measures would just be common sense. Whether or not you got a flu shot, it still makes sense to wash your hands, cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue, stay home if you're ill with a fever. This should all be things we're doing anyway.”

The University of Akron's Health Services has also has e-mailed students, providing them with ways to prevent the spread of the flu.

Hospitals in Northeast Ohio have limiting visitors to try to limit the spread of the flu as well.

To listen to audio, please click on link:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/34336

Return to Top



News Headline: Experts divided on weather and flu link (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Washington Post - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A nurse injects a flu vaccine at the Whitman-Walker Health Clinic in Washington, DC on January 10, 2013. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has said that this year's flu season is expected to be one of the worst the country has seen in 10 years. (EVA HAMBACH - AFP/GETTY IMAGES) Flu has reached widespread levels in 47 states. Does cold, dry weather lead to flu outbreaks? The cold not so much. Dry weather may play a role, although it's a controversial one.

Some studies have found cold air may help flu linger in the air, but researchers tend to shoot down the idea cold weather causes flu to spread. They stress flu is mostly transmitted by children moving indoors during the cold months when germs are exchanged rather than by the cold itself.

Dr. Jon Abramson, a specialist in pediatric infectious diseases at Wake Forest Baptist Health, told ABC News the flu season better correlates with the timing of the school year than with temperature.

Rather than cold weather, it may be dry weather which can help predict flu outbreaks.

In 2010, Jeffrey Shaman and colleagues published research showing flu outbreaks often occurred immediately following a dry spell.

“This dry period is not a requirement for triggering an influenza outbreak, but it was present in 55 to 60 percent of the outbreaks we analyzed so it appears to increase the likelihood of an outbreak,” Shaman told Health magazine. “The virus response is almost immediate; transmission and survival rates increase and about 10 days later, the observed influenza mortality rates follow.”

Shaman, who works at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, relies - in part - on the dry weather and flu relationship in a state of the art model he developed which he claims can predict flu outbreaks more than 7 weeks ahead of time. (I wrote about this in late November, see: Study: weather forecasting science can help predict flu outbreaks).

Scott Sheridan, a professor of climatology at Kent State University, believes there is promise in Shaman's approach.

“I've seen several papers that show a pretty convincing relationship between the dew point measure of humidity] drop and influenza, and so would certainly believe this to be a plausible relationship to exploit,” Sheridan said.

But Adam Kalkstein, a climatology professor at the U.S. Military Academy, who is studying weather and flu linkages, questioned relying on a humidity and flu link as a key basis for making flu predictions.

“If bsolute humidity] was the sole factor in determining influenza, the rates and timing of the flu would vary tremendously across the country... this is simply not occurring,” Kalkstein said.

Similarly, Larry Kalkstein (incidentally Adam Kalkstein's father), a researcher professor at the University of Miami and an expert on weather, climate, and health, stressed the importance of non-weather factors in flu transmission.

“It has been difficult to develop an influenza/weather approach that has any degree of accuracy because of the many intervening variables that are not related to meteorology,” Kalkstein said

But Kristie Ebi, an epidemiologist who specializes in climate, said considering environmental factors like weather and human contact together may hold the key to understanding flu transmission: “Person-to-person transmission does not explain the start of the influenza epidemics, although it does explain transmission once an epidemic starts. Over the past couple of years, there have been significant advances in understanding the environmental determinants of influenza.”

Return to Top



News Headline: OSU plan to add dorms, costs | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Dayton Daily News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: college in the country to require sophomores to live on campus — a rule aimed at improving retention and graduation rates but one that will likely add to the financial burden faced by students.

OSU trustees in August approved $396 million to design and construct new dorms and a recreation center, adding 3,200 beds. The 56,000-student university — the nation's third largest — said keeping 5,200 sophomores in OSU housing will encourage them to stay involved in university activities and give the campus a smaller feel. The requirement is planned to take effect in fall 2016.

All told, OSU will knock down eight buildings and construct a dozen new ones, beginning later this year and wrapping up by August 2016. Two architecture firms — Acock Associates and Elkus Manfredi — have already been hired.

Ohio State plans to issue bonds, take out an internal loan and spend cash to finance the project. Room rates will go up as much as 6 percent per year; meal and recreation fee increases won't be capped but aren't expected to jump as much as room rates.

OSU also plans to use 1,000 beds in the Greek community, but only fraternities and sororities that comply with university programming rules will be allowed to house second-year students in their off-campus facilities.

Dorms vs. off-campus living

The dorm plan comes at a time when the cost of a college education is very much on the minds of students and families. The average OSU student owes $24,840 in loans at graduation, according to the Project on Student Loan Debt.

It is hard to say how much the sophomore rule might add to that total, but students say living off campus is generally less expensive while dorm life is more convenient. Dorm expenses range from $9,095 to $12,320 for two semesters, according to OSU data. Students willing to do without air conditioning, share a corridor bathroom, have three roommates and sign up for a 19-meals-per-week plan pay less than those in single rooms with air conditioning, semi-private baths and the most generous dining plans.

Richard Talbott, who co-owns 500 apartment units near campus, said his renters pay on average $520 a month for rent and utilities and spend about $200 a month on groceries — a total of $8,640 a year. The apartment rent is for a single room so students don't have to share a bedroom.

Talbott, who bought his first rental in 1969, said when the university imposes the rule, he'll lose 35 to 40 percent of his renters. He predicts that marginal properties in the neighborhoods around campus will be rented to non-students and blight and crime will go up.

“None of us have ever been concerned about fair competition,” Talbott said. “But when Ohio State uses decree to fill their buildings and charges more, that's not fair. And the students get less.”

Richard Vedder, director of the Center for College Affordability and Productivity, said Ohio State is using the “monopoly card they have over students” to require them to purchase OSU housing and food.

“They are using their market power to impose rather inefficient and costly services on students that they don't want,” said Vedder. “It seems to me that they ought to stick to what they're best at. Universities are best at educating students. They're losing focus.”

Ohio ACLU Director Christine Link believes public universities should let adult students live where they choose but doesn't see a solid legal challenge to OSU's sophomore rule. “I think it'd be a difficult case to make, particularly in this era when the courts aren't favorable to individual rights,” Link said.

The university has not determined which students will be exempt from the requirement, but universities typically exclude students who are married, older than 21 or whose parents live close by.

Sophomore rule stretches back decades

Schools that require sophomores to live on campus say their students do better academically, are more likely to graduate and feel more connected to their universities and their majors.

Ohio, Bowling Green State and Kent State universities — four-year public schools in small towns — have required sophomores to live on campus for decades. Miami University brought its sophomores back onto campus in 2009.

Miami has not seen an improvement to its retention rate since instituting its sophomore rule, but student satisfaction with the university experience is improving, said Barbara Jones, vice president for student affairs. Before the 2009 rule, students were choosing off-campus housing for their sophomore year just weeks after they arrived as freshmen.

The trend nationwide has been to focus more on the sophomore year, which is a time when students more seriously examine their choices and what they want for their futures, said Molly Schaller, a University of Dayton professor who studies the college experience. Schaller said at many schools, the sophomore year has not been well designed.

“What helps you stay in college when things get tough is feeling like you fit there. Residence halls do the best job of that. They make such a difference in students' sense of place and belonging,” she said.

Even with research showing the benefits of living on campus, there is a saying in higher education that “students don't do optional.” Requiring them to live on campus sends a clear message that a university is committed to the academic and social benefits of dorm life, said Jennifer R. Keup, director of the National Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Keup said, however, that not all schools can afford to build the dorms that would be required to house all sophomores.

OSU will spend $2 million in first year

OSU officials insist that the sophomore rule is for the good of the students and have branded it as the Second-year Transformational Experience Program, or STEP. The graduation rate for students who voluntarily live on campus a second year is slightly higher than those who live on campus just one year: 88.2 percent vs. 86.8 percent, according to OSU.

OSU will assign faculty mentors to the dorms as a way to foster student-teacher relationships and the university will offer $2,000 stipends to sophomores who want to study abroad, take internships, or experience other developmental programs. The university will spend $2 million in fall 2013 to pilot the program with 1,000 students on campus, said Javaune M. Adams-Gaston, OSU's vice president for student life.

“I think that folks here are trying to make this big place feel smaller,” said Susan Jones, OSU associate professor in higher education and student affairs. “In terms of student success, students feel like they belong. It is easier to feel like they belong when the place feels smaller.”

Students said they see both the benefits and drawbacks of the sophomore rule.

Jim O'Brien, an OSU sophomore from Hudson, Ohio, lived in a dorm as a freshman but is now renting a house with four friends. He enjoys the freedom of living off campus and choosing how to spend his money, but says residence halls are a great place to meet people. “A bunch of my friends didn't get as involved as I am and they're sitting on the couch at home, wondering what to do,” he said.

Kiersten McCartney, an OSU senior from New York, lived on campus for two years but now has an apartment, which is generally less expensive.

“Overall, (the sophomore rule) is a good decision for the university,” she said. “It will connect students and it will provide a better environment for the transition years. But (university officials) need to evaluate the cost of living on campus.”

2012-13 University room and meal plan rates
Ohio State University plans to require sophomores to live on campus starting in fall 2016. Here is a look at the costs for room and board at other Ohio colleges.

UNIVERSITY
Annual room rate ranges
Annual meal plan rate ranges

Bowling Green State University*
$5,040 - $7,410
$3,024 - $3,906

Kent State University*
$5,500 - $11,076
$3,230 - $5,020

Miami University*
$5,250 - $9,572
$4,546 - $6,746

Ohio State University
$5,618 - $7,696
$3,475 - $5,300

Ohio University*
$5,270 - $7,388
$3,528 - $6,024

University of Cincinnati
$6,030 - $7,796
$3,936 - $4,140

University of Dayton (private)*
$5,540 - $8,400
$3,900 - $4,720

Wright State University**
$2,220 - $4,019
Not required - $1,463

*Requires sophomores to live on campus
**Does not require any student to live on campus
Sources: Miami and Wright State universities

UNIVERSITY
Annual room rate ranges
Annual meal plan rate ranges

Indiana University
$5,144 - $9,592
$3,000 - $4,000

Purdue University
$2,492 - $10,132
$4,584 - $5,674

University of Illinois – Urbana Champaign
$4,578 – $8,498
$4,190 - $5,152

University of Michigan
$4,792 - $9,076
$3,830 - $4,920

Sources: Miami and Wright State universities

Return to Top



News Headline: Myths and legends on college campuses resonate | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio - A cow in the cupola. A dog statue that barked and saved lives. A gargoyle on a church tower that glares at a portion of campus founded by an atheist.

Those are among the legends that have persisted for generations on Northeast Ohio college campuses.

Baldwin Wallace University's cow

According to legend, members of a graduating class in the 1930s herded a cow into the tower of Marting Hall, the main academic building. At the time the area around the college in Berea was farmland.

Throughout the years, various students would proclaim they had done the deed.

But a cow only made it as far as Room 108 as an April Fool's prank in 1942, according to a student newspaper report at the time. Some administrators contend a cow was once found on the third floor of Marting, but that is a long ladder-climb from the cupola, said spokesman George Richard.

The fish fry that led to Kent State University

State commissioners visited Northeast Ohio on Sept. 27, 1910 to choose the site for a normal school to train teachers. At Kent, which was competing with cities including Wadsworth and Ravenna, it was so foggy and wet when the state officials arrived they could not see the William Kent farm proposed for the school.

They were anxious to leave but the local delegation convinced them to stay for an extended lunch, which included fresh, fried blue gill. While they relaxed and smoked cigars, the local supporters promoted their community.

The lunch delayed their arrival in Ravenna by four hours. While it is thought the fish sealed the deal, the commissioners chose the 53-acre site because it was large, close to town and had a free-flowing spring.

Tiberius, the campus protector.

Tiberius, a chocolate Labrador retriever, was owned by Harriet Young, a dean at Lake Erie College in Painesville. He attended class and visited with students at what was then a women's college.

Young had an iron statue made of the dog following his death. It was moved to the side of College Hall, the main building at the time, in 1910 when she retired.

On April 13, 1957, women sleeping in their rooms in Memorial Hall, attached to College Hall by a corridor, were awakened by barking. The building was on fire but all the occupants escaped safely. The hall was destroyed, but legend has it that it was Tiberius that protected the women because no real dog was ever found.

The current Tiberius statue is the third one at that site after one was stolen and its replacement destroyed. Students, including the entire football team, pat him on the head for good luck.

The gargoyle on Amasa Stone Chapel

Angels adorn three sides of the tower of Amasa Stone Chapel, completed in 1911 on the campus of Case Western Reserve University. But the west side features a menacing gargoyle. According to legend, trustees of Western Reserve University had the gargoyle placed there to face the campus of the Case School of Applied Science in their belief that Leonard Case Jr., who founded the school, was an atheist.

In its literature, CWRU says the chapel was given as a memorial to Amasa Stone by his two daughters and was designed by a Washington D.C. architect who likely knew nothing about the rivalry between Western Reserve and Case, which became the Case Institute of Technology. Architect Henry Vaughan based his design on English medieval churches, where it was common to place a gargoyle on the dark (west) side of the building.

In 1967, Western Reserve University and the Case Institute of Technology merged into CWRU.

Haunted buildings

Many buildings on college campuses are purported to be haunted.

There have been sightings of Helen Morley at Morley Music Hall at Lake Erie College and ghosts in residence halls.

Ghosts have long been reported at Mooreland Mansion at Lakeland Community College -- the former summer home of the Edward Moore family -- especially before it was restored in the 1990s. Maintenance workers have reported sightings throughout the years.

The legend of Ethel the ghost lives on at Hiram College. According to the story, a student named Ethel was killed in a fire in the Bowler Hall dormitory in 1913 and has been sighted in the rebuilt dormitory ever since. However, a check of the records shows no student by that name lived in Bowler.

Kohler Hall, a residence hall at BW, was used as a hospital during the Civil War and is considered haunted.

And workers said they have seen ghostly images of a soldier at Cuyahoga Community College's Western Campus, built on the site of the former Crile Hospital, which treated wounded soldiers during World War II.

Return to Top



News Headline: DIRECTOR APPOINTED | Email

News Date: 01/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tomas A. Lipinski was named the new director of the School of Library and Information Science at Kent State. He will earn $150,000 a year.

He replaces Richard Rubin, who in 2010 became KSU associate provost for extended education. Associate Professor Don A. Wicks has been serving as interim director of the library school.

Lipinski was executive associate dean of the Indiana University School of Library and Information Science.

He held an administrative post at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and was a librarian at the Milwaukee Public Library.

He has a doctorate from the University of Illinois, a master's degree from the University of Wisconsin, a master's degree in law from the John Marshall Law School, a law degree from Marquette University and a bachelor's degree from the University of Wisconsin.

Return to Top



News Headline: Portman Visit Highlights Northeast Ohio's Liquid Crystal Assets | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Virtual Strategy Magazine
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Senator Rob Portman to Attend Liquid Crystal Technology Roundtable at AlphaMicron in Kent

CLEVELAND, Jan. 10, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Recognizing Northeast Ohio as a global leader in the flexible electronics industry, U.S. Senator Rob Portman will attend a liquid crystal technology roundtable with NorTech staff and others at AlphaMicron in Kent, and tour the company's facilities during a visit to the region on Friday, Jan. 11.

Portman (R-Ohio) will have a discussion on Northeast Ohio's role in the development of cutting-edge liquid crystal technologies with representatives from regional companies in the field, as well as officials from the Greater Cleveland Partnership, Kent State University, NorTech and the City of Kent.

The Senator is scheduled to be at AlphaMicron at 1950 State Route 59 in Kent from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Both the roundtable and tour are open to the media.

The other companies joining the roundtable discussion are Akron Polymer Systems, Crystal Diagnostics, Hana and Kent Displays.

Portman's visit highlights the region's liquid crystal assets and its historical leadership in the flexible electronics industry. The flexible electronics science and manufacturing process produces ultra-thin electronic components and devices printed on materials that flex, bend, fold or stretch. It is used in products such as LCD display screens, which can be written on with either a stylus or finger.

A regional innovation cluster has emerged around the flexible electronics industry in Northeast Ohio. To recognize that cluster and accelerate its growth, NorTech launched its FlexMatters® initiative in 2010.

"The modern liquid crystal displays you see today had their beginnings right here in Ohio," says NorTech Vice President Byron Clayton, who heads the flexible electronics industry cluster. "We have a legacy."

That legacy emerged from the world-renowned work of the Liquid Crystal Institute (LCI) at Kent State University and the College of Polymer Science and Polymer Engineering at the University of Akron. From 1991 to 2002, the National Science Foundation funded the Center for Advanced Liquid Crystalline Optical Materials (ALCOM), a collaboration between the LCI, the University of Akron and Case Western Reserve University. ALCOM attracted more than $55 million in funding and created the technology and intellectual property used to spin off flexible electronics companies and attract existing companies to the field. Since 2002, the Ohio Third Frontier Program has invested more than $60 million in Northeast Ohio's flexible electronics cluster.

The FlexMatters cluster has over 50 members and is developing innovative technologies in multiple applications in five key markets: aerospace and defense, consumables, commercial and consumer electronics, and bioflex. It consists of businesses, suppliers, service providers and institutions focused on advanced manufacturing of flexible electronic devices and materials.

The cluster's potential to attract capital and create jobs in Northeast Ohio has been recognized by the Small Business Administration (SBA), which invested $1.2 million in 2010 and 2011 – $600,000 each year – to support entrepreneurial involvement in the cluster. Northeast Ohio also is one of only seven regions across the country that received a $385,000 Regional Innovation Cluster Contract from SBA last October.

One of the companies the FlexMatters® cluster has helped is Kent, Ohio-based startup AlphaMicron, which created a flexible film that when put on a visor can instantly change from light to dark with the press of a button. The technology is used in eyewear for the U.S. military and visors for motorcyclists.

In addition to visiting AlphaMicron during his trip to Northeast Ohio, Sen. Portman will also tour Dearing Compressor & Pump Co. in Youngstown and Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown.

Return to Top



News Headline: Celebrations | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Education

The eight Kent State employees who received 2012 President's Excellence Awards, which includes a $1,000 bonus, are: Veronica Cook-Euell, supplier diversity program manager; Marcy Curtiss, secretary, computer science; Thomas Farmer, maintenance repair worker, Student Center; Dan Karp, executive director, creative services; Marlo Kibler, coordinator, university benefits; Bryan Molnar, electronic technician supervisor; Anissa Strickland, associate director, student financial aid; and Cheryl Tennant, academic program specialist, library and information sciences.

Return to Top



News Headline: Research reveals which learning methods get an "A" (Dunlosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: BabyCenter Magazine - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fri, Jan 11, 2013 (HealthDay News) - Students, get out those flash cards: A new study finds that they may be a better study option than some of the more popular methods -- such as highlighting or rereading material.

The study appears in the January issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest.

"Schools and parents spend a great deal of money on technology and programs to improve student achievement, even though evidence often isn't available to firmly establish that they work," study author John Dunlosky, of Kent State University, explained in a journal news release. "We wanted to take a comprehensive look at promising strategies now, in order to direct teachers, students and parents to the strategies that are effective, yet underused," he explained.

Dunlosky and his colleagues found wide variations in the effectiveness of the 10 learning strategies they analyzed for the study. The two that received the highest rating were "practice testing" and "distributed practice."

Practice testing involves techniques such as using flash cards or answering the questions at the end of textbook chapters. Distributed practice involves spreading out studying over time and quizzing yourself on material before a test.

Five of the study strategies received a low rating. These included some of the most widely used methods, such as highlighting and underlining, rereading and summarization.

"I was shocked that some strategies that students use a lot -- such as rereading and highlighting -- seem to provide minimal benefits to their learning and performance. By just replacing rereading with [distributed] retrieval practice, students would benefit," Dunlosky said.

One reason why students are less likely to use the more effective learning methods has to do with teacher training.

"These strategies are largely overlooked in the educational psychology textbooks that beginning teachers read, so they don't get a good introduction to them or how to use them while teaching," Dunlosky said.

This means that teachers are less likely to pass these easy-to-use and effective study strategies on to their students.

But Dunlosky also stressed that student motivation to excel is key. He said that the learning methods cited as best by the study "will not be a panacea for improving achievement for all students, and perhaps obviously, they will benefit only students who are motivated and capable of using them. Nevertheless, when used properly, we suspect that they will produce meaningful gains in performance in the classroom, on achievement tests, and on many tasks encountered across the life span."

Return to Top



News Headline: New Stop Light to Greet Returning Kent State Students, Staff (Tondiglia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students and employees returning to Kent State University for the spring semester will encounter a couple of new traffic situations as they navigate campus.

A new traffic light has been installed at the intersection of Loop Road and Rhodes Road, near the Kent State Child Development Center. The new signal, which replaces the stop signs previously at that location, will be operational beginning this Friday, Jan. 11.

Dean Tondiglia, associate director of public safety for the Kent State Police Department, said the new device will allow for better traffic control at the busy intersection, which is also close to the new University Edge student housing development on Rhodes Road.

In addition, two stop signs will be installed tomorrow at the intersection of Loop Road and Jackson Road to assist pedestrian traffic across Loop Road.

“We are always looking for ways to improve public safety on campus, and both of these changes were made with that in mind,” Tondiglia said.

Classes at Kent State resume on Monday, Jan. 14.

A detailed map of the Kent State campus can be found at www.kent.edu/campuses/maps/map.cfm.

Return to Top



News Headline: Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WKSU: Daniel Skinner was named general manager of Kent State University's NPR-affiliated radio station. Skinner has 32 years of experience in public radio.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus