Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
Board of Trustees; Finance and Administration; Renovation at KSU (1)
Continuing and Distance Education (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Economics (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Office of the Provost; University Health Services (3)
KSU at Salem (1)
Psychology (2)
Students (3)
University Press (1)
Upward Bound (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Board of Trustees; Finance and Administration; Renovation at KSU (1)
Kent State Hires Firm to Manage $150 Million in Construction (Floyd) 01/15/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Ohio based Ruhlin Company will oversee campus renovation An Ohio firm will oversee close to $150 million in construction projects planned on the Kent State University main campus during the next several years. The university plans to hire Sharon Center, OH, firm The Ruhlin Company to oversee...


Continuing and Distance Education (1)
Courses are open sources of discussion (Kelly) 01/14/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...101, for example, we will grant you credit,'” Dr. Proenza said. Not for everyone Unsurprisingly, not everyone is on board with the MOOC concept. Kent State University, for instance, isn't ruling out the potential for delving into MOOCs in the future, but for now it's focused on developing smaller,...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
'Black and Brown' Dialogue Marks Start of MLK Events at Kent State (Garcia) 01/15/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Panel will talk about African American and Latino communities in relation to King's legacy Kent State University's Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and the Kent State Latino Networking Caucus will host the Black and Brown...


Economics (1)
Trade opportunities rise in Russia (Park) 01/14/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...Trade Assistance Center at Cleveland State University's Monte Ahuja College of Business. Buckeye bonanza Jooyoun Park, an assistant professor in Kent State University's department of economics, said Northeast Ohio is well-positioned to take advantage of greater trade with Russia, given the...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Office of the Provost; University Health Services (3)
Flu Still Hampering Kent Residents, Students (DeJulius) 01/15/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

City adds flu shot clinic, university tells sick students to stay home The Kent Health Department, via the Portage County Health Department, has added...

Flu Update: Schools, cities try to stop the spread (DeJulius) 01/15/2013 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

PORTAGE COUNTY -- Schools, businesses and area health departments are reaching out to encourage vaccination and keep those already ill from influenza at...

(VIDEO) Flu Update: Schools, cities try to stop spread of flu (DeJulius) 01/15/2013 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

Schools, businesses, area health departments reaching out to encourage vaccination and keep those already ill from influenza at home. To view video,...


KSU at Salem (1)
Howland park board proceeds with addition 01/15/2013 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...landscapes at their homes,'' she said. She said the pergola provides shade for the gardens. Brutz said the project is being done in conjunction with Kent State Salem students, who designed and constructed the pergola. In return the park board has agreed to help with grants for the students' tuition....


Psychology (2)
Research Reveals Which Learning Methods Get an 'A' (Dunlosky) 01/14/2013 WomensHealth.gov Text Attachment Email

...programs to improve student achievement, even though evidence often isn't available to firmly establish that they work," study author John Dunlosky, of Kent State University, explained in a journal news release. "We wanted to take a comprehensive look at promising strategies now, in order to direct...

What's the best way to learn? Psychologists tackle studying techniques (Dunlosky) 01/14/2013 EurekAlert! Text Attachment Email

...minimal benefits to their learning and performance," study author Dr. John Dunlosky, professor of psychology and director of experimental training at Kent State University, said in a written statement. "By just replacing re-reading with delayed retrieval practice, students would benefit." Ten...


Students (3)
Ohio College Students Search for their Sugar Daddies 01/15/2013 19 Action News at 5 PM - WOIO-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, OH (WOIO) - It's a website that many may find less than sweet. It's called seeking arrangement.com. It's a place where women can find a Sugar Daddy....

'Sugar Daddy' Dating Website Says A Lot More College Girls Are Signing Up To Help Pay For School 01/15/2013 Business Insider Text Attachment Email

College tuition is expensive, and more and more women are turning to "sugar daddies" for a leg up, claims Brandon Wade, founder of "sugar daddy" dating...

Parents Beware: Pay for Your Children's College Loans or Lose Them to Sugar Daddies 01/15/2013 Observer Text Attachment Email

SeekingArrangement.com, the Sugar Daddy website that hooks up poor/younger/more attractive women with rich/older/not so attractive men looking for a mature...


University Press (1)
Strongsville Author to Host Book Signing (Cash) 01/14/2013 Strongsville Patch Text Attachment Email

...bodies. A few hundred people braved the first winds of Hurricane Sandy Oct. 29 to gather at Old Town Hall for the party. The book was published by Kent State University Press, which has a large true-crime history series, according to Susan Cash, marketing director. "This fits right in," Cash...


Upward Bound (1)
MLK Breakfast set for Monday in Ravenna 01/15/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The Skeels' annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast will be held at 10 a.m. Monday at the Skeels- Mathews Community Center, 4378 Skeels Ave., Ravenna....


News Headline: Kent State Hires Firm to Manage $150 Million in Construction (Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Ohio based Ruhlin Company will oversee campus renovation

An Ohio firm will oversee close to $150 million in construction projects planned on the Kent State University main campus during the next several years.

The university plans to hire Sharon Center, OH, firm The Ruhlin Company to oversee renovations planned to the campus as part of Kent State's "Foundations of Excellence, Building the Future” initiative.

The company will oversee four of the construction initiative's largest projects: the new College of Architecture and Environmental Design building; a new facility for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology; a new multi-disciplinary research facility via renovations to several existing buildings; and construction and renovations for the School of Art.

Kent State Board of Trustees member Jacquline Woods said The Ruhlin Company was chosen by the university to manage the critical elements of the campus renovation after "an exhaustive interview process."

The university's board of trustees voted in December to give administrators the OK to contract with the firm for the construction.

At the time of the vote no contract yet existed between both Kent State and Ruhlin, so it's unclear how much the firm will be paid and for how long they will be under contract.

Gregg Floyd, vice president for finance and administration at Kent State, said both parties are finalizing the contract language.

"We've discussed two or three alternative strategies depending on how long the projects take," Floyd said.

The four projects Ruhlin will oversee, with budgets totaling near $150 million, will be paid for in part through the university's issuance of $170 million in general receipts bonds for other campus construction.

The company has experience building in the healthcare, government, higher education and heave manufacturing fields, according to its website.

Ruhlin's past projects in higher education include several new buildings for the University of Akron.

Return to Top



News Headline: Courses are open sources of discussion (Kelly) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Massive, free online classes have area colleges determining best way to proceed

A phenomenon that could disrupt dramatically the nature of higher education has reared its head, and Northeast Ohio's colleges and universities are grappling with how much skin to put in the game.

The recent surge of massive open online courses, or MOOCs, has ignited discussion in higher education circles across the country. In recent years, venture investors have pumped millions of dollars into so-called MOOC companies such as Udacity, edX and Coursera, which partner with elite institutions such as Harvard and Princeton to offer online courses to hundreds of thousands of students around the globe for free.

The industry's business model is still in flux, but Coursera last week announced plans to issue certificates of completion, which will carry the brand of their university partners, for a modest fee to students who complete courses and want something to show for their work.

Last September, Ohio State University — the largest higher education institution in the state — signed on with Coursera to offer a slate of courses, including one in calculus and an introduction to pharmacy. Local institutions, such as the University of Akron, Cleveland State University and Case Western Reserve University, now are weighing to what extent to take the plunge.

“Some of the faculty is beginning to see that this is an exciting possibility,” said University of Akron president Luis Proenza, who highlighted MOOCs in his State of the University address last November. “I think there's going to be a lot of experimentation and a lot of ideas tossed around. We need to be open to see how it works and, more importantly, be willing to look at the multiplicity of models.”

In the most dramatic sense, some higher education leaders fear the proliferation of MOOCs could nibble away at college enrollments, as students could flock to free sources of knowledge rather than fork over thousands of dollars for a college degree that — especially in this economy — doesn't guarantee a job. Also, an empty bank account and dismal high school grades are no longer barriers to getting a Harvard education, or at least a taste of one.

“We have built in this notion of the importance of face-to-face contact,” said John Green, a political science professor and director of the Ray C. Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron. “What the Internet, MOOCs and other websites are showing us is that there are equally valid ways of getting all kinds of information into the hands of students rather than through the bricks-and-mortar, face-to-face meetings.”

Where's the money?

It's difficult for those in higher education to object to the dissemination of knowledge for free by some of the world's leading academics. Still, colleges and universities are fueled in large part by tuition revenue, and any threat to the infusion of those dollars isn't something easily stomached. As such, local institutions are exploring how they might be able to monetize MOOCs.

Elad Granot, who oversees online learning initiatives at Cleveland State, likened the relationship between MOOCs and higher education to that of Napster — the now-shuttered file sharing service that led to the propagation of illegally downloaded mp3s — and the music industry.

At first, many in the music industry chided services such as Napster for not compensating the artists or record labels for their material. However, the music community has mitigated illegal file sharing to some extent with the growth of new services, such as Apple's iTunes or Spotify, which allow artists to be compensated somewhat for their work.

Dr. Granot said Cleveland State by next fall plans to launch two MOOCs — one course in nursing and another through the university's law school. He said the university is toying with the idea of allowing those who do well in the courses to buy the academic credits associated with them, which could be transferred to other academic institutions.

If the university goes that route, Dr. Granot said, the credit likely would be sold at a premium over the traditional cost of college credits, given the convenience factor of taking a course online.

“It's sort of like a free trial,” said Dr. Granot, Cleveland State's special assistant to the provost for eLearning development. “If you do well, you'll have the ability to buy.”

Differing models

Dr. Granot said the university hasn't decided whether to partner with one of the MOOC giants such as Coursera or to put the courses out there on its own. Dr. Proenza, though, said the University of Akron is in talks about licensing some of its courses through Coursera.

Lev Gonick, Case Western Reserve's vice president for information technology services, said in an email that the private university was “well aware of the evolving exploration of business models for MOOCs, and we are actively engaged in conversations with providers, peers and others on opportunities in this space moving forward.” He said the university plans to launch MOOC offerings in 2013, but he wouldn't offer any specifics.

Ohio State's arrangement with Coursera wasn't driven as a way to profit from the offerings, according to university spokeswoman Amy Murray. However, she said the terms of the agreement did suggest the possibilities for future revenue sharing, which would need to be negotiated at the time should any revenue be generated.

As a way to generate revenue, Dr. Proenza said he's encouraging his faculty and staff to explore the possibility of offering credit to students who come to the university with knowledge acquired through MOOCs or other sources. Those students, he said, could take a test for a fee, which would cost less than that of a traditional course. Consider it an extension of the advanced placement program that awards credits to students for certain courses completed in high school.

“The next step that has to happen is that somebody develops a business model or an approach that says to a potential student, "Regardless of where or how you obtained your knowledge, if you come to us and demonstrate the competency in Physics 101, for example, we will grant you credit,'” Dr. Proenza said.

Not for everyone

Unsurprisingly, not everyone is on board with the MOOC concept.

Kent State University, for instance, isn't ruling out the potential for delving into MOOCs in the future, but for now it's focused on developing smaller, higher-quality online classes, according to Valerie Kelly, the university's director of online learning.

“We've kind of gone in the other direction,” Ms. Kelly said. “We're working hard to develop these high quality courses, and we really feel strongly that interaction with the instructor and making sure each student can get feedback are important.”

Knowing the apprehension some faculty might have about the MOOC concept, Dr. Proenza is launching a campaign of sorts at the University of Akron to drum up support and ideas from university personnel about the evolution of online learning.

The university last week launched a web page with information about MOOCs, and Dr. Proenza sent the university community an e-mail asking for feedback. In the e-mail, Dr. Proenza said while computer-based instruction isn't a new development, this was the first time he's seen a “real sense of urgency among university leaders who recognize the opportunities in digital learning.”

Dave Witt, a University of Akron professor of family studies and spokesman for the faculty union, said it seems as if MOOCs could be the “great equalizer” for those who can't afford a college a degree. Still, he said given the financial pressures facing universities — especially those supported in part by tax dollars — it's hard to see how they might generate much-needed revenue.

“Proenza likes to be a visionary and look 15 or 20 years ahead and see where we could be,” Dr. Witt said. “Between here and there, there are a whole lot of details.”

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Black and Brown' Dialogue Marks Start of MLK Events at Kent State (Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Panel will talk about African American and Latino communities in relation to King's legacy

Kent State University's Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and the Kent State Latino Networking Caucus will host the Black and Brown Dialogue that kicks off commemorative events marking Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The engaging discussion will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 15, at 7 p.m., in the Kent Student Center Kiva. The event is free and open to all.

Kent State President's Ambassador and renowned Cleveland-area attorney, José Feliciano, will speak at the event. The discussion will center on African American and Latino communities in relation to King's legacy, and key civil and social justice issues facing the country today.

Panel members include T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management, and George Garrison, professor of Pan-African Studies.

"This event will give students an opportunity to hear from individuals who faced some of the same kinds of challenges many students of color are encountering today in college,” Garcia said. “In addition, the format of this event allows for students to share their concerns or thoughts about their college experience. The Black and Brown dialogue is an excellent opportunity for all of us, regardless of ethnicity, socioeconomics or background, to come together and reinforce the necessity to help each other overcome challenges in order to graduate from college.”

For more information about Kent State's 11th annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration and commemorative events, visit www.kent.edu/mlkevents.

Return to Top



News Headline: Trade opportunities rise in Russia (Park) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New legislation should help Eaton, other Ohio firms grow there; Putin voices opposition to deal

U.S. companies face fewer roadblocks when it comes to trading with Russia, and Northeast Ohio companies are poised to benefit.

Thanks to the passage last month of legislation to normalize U.S. trade with Russia, U.S. companies now are on the same playing field as other members of the World Trade Organization, which in August admitted Russia as a member.

“We're optimistic that Russia's going to be a good market for a lot of American companies, not just Eaton,” said Barry Doggett, senior vice president of public and community affairs for Cleveland-based Eaton Corp.

The diversified manufacturer already is “quite active” in Russia, Mr. Doggett said. Eaton recently opened a sales office in Moscow and operates a small manufacturing plant outside Moscow that makes electrical components. Eaton's Brooklyn plant also exports industrial clutches to customers in Russia.

“I think this will help,” Mr. Doggett said. “In general, just opening up the opportunity to trade and reducing trade barriers is a good thing.”

In passing the Russia and Moldova Jackson-Vanik Repeal Act of 2012, lawmakers eliminated Cold War-era sanctions tied to emigration rights that restricted trade with Russia. It should make it easier for U.S. companies to invest in Russian businesses and to enter into joint ventures with Russian companies, and it will lower tariffs on U.S. goods imported in Russia, said Nate Ward, director of the International Trade Assistance Center at Cleveland State University's Monte Ahuja College of Business.

Buckeye bonanza

Jooyoun Park, an assistant professor in Kent State University's department of economics, said Northeast Ohio is well-positioned to take advantage of greater trade with Russia, given the area's strength in the automotive and rubber industries, which are among the top imports in Russia.

“Out of all of the states, Ohio will matter,” she said. “If there's any big change in the export figure, it will be beneficial to Ohio.”

While U.S. exports to Russia only represented 0.7% of the country's total exports through the third quarter of 2012, exports are on the rise, including from Ohio, federal data show.

Ohio's exports to Russia through the third quarter of 2012 grew by 32% compared to the like period in 2011, while its exports to the rest of the world only increased by 7%, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Cleveland State's Mr. Ward, who is a business consultant with the Small Business Development Center, sees opportunities for Ohio companies in exporting automotive parts as well as aircraft and electrical machinery to Russia, which has the world's sixth-largest economy in terms of purchasing power.

Because Russia is looking to replace its outdated agricultural equipment and needs to support its rapidly growing demand for passenger air travel, Ohio can stand to provide products to meet those needs.

But it won't be easy.

Challenges await

Mr. Ward said he usually eases companies unfamiliar with exporting to countries such as Russia into places such as Poland as a first step. Poland has taken steps to improve doing business with that nation, such as making it easier to register property, pay taxes and enforce contracts.

“It's just not easy to get in there. You have to invest a lot of time, energy and money to break into that market,” Mr. Ward said of Russia. “Hopefully, normalization of trade will raise their status.”

Mr. Ward said U.S. companies have had goods lost in transit to Russia or held indefinitely in customs. He said some companies have developed alternate routes into the country, such as rerouting goods through Finland or Eastern Europe, because trucks entering Russia are less likely to be held up at customs than shipments arriving at ports.

“Hopefully, all of those things go by the wayside,” Mr. Ward said.

U.S. companies also could be at a disadvantage because the legislation approving permanent normalized trade relations with Russia contains a provision that allows the United States to withhold visas of Russian human rights violators and freeze their financial assets in U.S. banks.

After the law was passed, Russian President Vladimir Putin said the move “poisons” the relationship between the two countries. Russia also passed legislation prohibiting U.S. citizens from adopting Russian children and prevents Americans accused of abusing the rights of Russians from entering the country.

Return to Top



News Headline: Flu Still Hampering Kent Residents, Students (DeJulius) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: City adds flu shot clinic, university tells sick students to stay home

The Kent Health Department, via the Portage County Health Department, has added a flu shot clinic this week as cases of the flu remain high throughout Northeast Ohio.

Kent will host a flu shot clinic from 3 to 5 p.m. Wednesday at the health department, which is located at 325 S. DePeyster St. across from Kent Fire Station One.

The two-hour clinic does not require an appointment. The cost for a flu shot is $10 for children and $20 for adults.

Ohio's flu level activity has been deemed "widespread" with an unusually high level of cases tracked by the Ohio Department of Health, which reports there have been increases in the flu and flu-like illnesses throughout half the regions of the state.

So far this flu season, 1,922 people have been hospitalized statewide due to the flu as of Jan. 5, according to the ODH.

"The current number of hospitalizations compares to 175 in the 2010-11 season and 86 in the 2011-12 season," according to the ODH. "Flu season in Ohio does not usually go into high gear until January or February but this year the state saw the number of influenza-related hospitalizations almost triple by early December."

Because of the high level of cases administrators at Kent State University are telling students who are sick to stay home, as Monday marked the start of classes for the spring semester.

The university strongly encourages students with the flu or flu-like symptoms not to attend courses and other public events on campus. Officials advise students who miss courses to contact their professors.

“Patients are often surprised by how very ill they feel with influenza,” said Dr. Angela DeJulius, Kent State's chief university physician. “Prescription antiviral medicines can sometimes help to reduce the duration of illness, but are not a cure. The flu usually lasts at least a week.

“It is not too late to be immunized, as flu season often continues into February or even later,” DeJulius said.

Return to Top



News Headline: Flu Update: Schools, cities try to stop the spread (DeJulius) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PORTAGE COUNTY -- Schools, businesses and area health departments are reaching out to encourage vaccination and keep those already ill from influenza at home.

The first week of a new semester brings students back to Kent State University from all over the country. And this January, it's the germs coming back, too, that leave a campus concerned.

"The first week is always hectic. A lot of kids around, and like the bookstore's filled, a lot of kids, touching everything," said senior student Frank Schaefer.

"If we're going to have an influenza case, we're going to have more rapid spread in the community," said Kent State's Chief University Physician Dr. Angela DeJulius.

After the death of a Wright State University student, colleges are watching for an influenza epidemic that could spread quickly through residence halls and communal spaces.

"We tend to think of our college students as lower risk, but because of the other factors that we talked about, they all live here so close together, you know we're going to do everything we can to protect them," said DeJulius.

At Kent State, that means a "get out of class free card," encouraging ill students to stay home.

"Do everything you can to prevent getting the flu and to prevent giving it to others. So washing your hands, covering your coughs, staying home if you're ill, getting a flu shot if you have not done so yet," she said.

Students say it's not that simple when you're fighting to stay ahead.

"Me, personally, if I was sick, I'd still probably end up going to class, just to get that first start," said Jason Watkins, a junior.

"Even though I got the flu shot, it's one of those things I want to be on the lookout for, because I don't want to get sick," Melanie Nesteruk, a freshman.

Vaccines are still available on campus or at Portage County Health Department every Wednesday in January from 8 a.m. to noon.

It's located in the Nursing Clinic along 449 South Meridian Street in Ravenna.

There's also a special clinic at the Kent City Health Department on Depeyster Street Wednesday, Jan. 16, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Call 330-296-9919 for more information.

Medina County Health Department is offering pediatric vaccines Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. until noon, and 1 p.m. until 4 p.m.

Adult vaccines are not available. You can get more information by clicking here.
http://www.wkyc.com/news/article/278348/45/Flu-Update-Schools-cities-try-to-stop-the-spread

Return to Top



News Headline: (VIDEO) Flu Update: Schools, cities try to stop spread of flu (DeJulius) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Schools, businesses, area health departments reaching out to encourage vaccination and keep those already ill from influenza at home.

To view video, please click on link:
http://www.wkyc.com/video/default.aspx?bctid=2094224120001

Return to Top



News Headline: Howland park board proceeds with addition | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HOWLAND - The Howland Park Board is proceeding with additions to the township park.

So far, a pergola has been placed at the northeastern corner, and a walkway and garden will be installed later this year.

A pergola is a garden feature forming a shaded walkway or sitting area, often with a sturdy open lattice with woody vines. The area is 1,500 square feet for a garden.

Board Chairman Jim Brutz said the pergola was put up at the end of 2012. He said plans are to sell bricks in honor of someone for a brick walkway area by the pergola, which is north of the tennis courts.

Board Vice Chairwoman Jackie Mills said plans are also to put in various flowers, perennials and plants that are native to Ohio.

''We want the majority of plants there to be native to Ohio for low maintenance. These would be plants that residents could also have at their own landscapes at their homes,'' she said.

She said the pergola provides shade for the gardens.

Brutz said the project is being done in conjunction with Kent State Salem students, who designed and constructed the pergola. In return the park board has agreed to help with grants for the students' tuition.

Mills said members of the Trumbull County Master Gardeners program will be able to do service hours at the gardens and earn credit hours by helping and educating the public.

Brutz said the area will be ideal for people to sit and relax and enjoy the park

"I'm thrilled at what we have been able to accomplish,'' Mills said.

At the January park board meeting, James LaPolla was appointed by Judge Thomas Swift to a three-year term as a park commissioner.

Brutz was named chairman and Mills vice chairwoman.

Meetings will be at 5 p.m. the second Monday of each month.

Return to Top



News Headline: Research Reveals Which Learning Methods Get an 'A' (Dunlosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: WomensHealth.gov
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: FRIDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Students, get out those flash cards: A new study finds that they may be a better study option than some of the more popular methods -- such as highlighting or rereading material.

The study appears in the January issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest.

"Schools and parents spend a great deal of money on technology and programs to improve student achievement, even though evidence often isn't available to firmly establish that they work," study author John Dunlosky, of Kent State University, explained in a journal news release. "We wanted to take a comprehensive look at promising strategies now, in order to direct teachers, students and parents to the strategies that are effective, yet underused," he explained.

Dunlosky and his colleagues found wide variations in the effectiveness of the 10 learning strategies they analyzed for the study. The two that received the highest rating were "practice testing" and "distributed practice."

Practice testing involves techniques such as using flash cards or answering the questions at the end of textbook chapters. Distributed practice involves spreading out studying over time and quizzing yourself on material before a test.

Five of the study strategies received a low rating. These included some of the most widely used methods, such as highlighting and underlining, rereading and summarization.

"I was shocked that some strategies that students use a lot -- such as rereading and highlighting -- seem to provide minimal benefits to their learning and performance. By just replacing rereading with [distributed] retrieval practice, students would benefit," Dunlosky said.

One reason why students are less likely to use the more effective learning methods has to do with teacher training.

"These strategies are largely overlooked in the educational psychology textbooks that beginning teachers read, so they don't get a good introduction to them or how to use them while teaching," Dunlosky said.

This means that teachers are less likely to pass these easy-to-use and effective study strategies on to their students.

But Dunlosky also stressed that student motivation to excel is key. He said that the learning methods cited as best by the study "will not be a panacea for improving achievement for all students, and perhaps obviously, they will benefit only students who are motivated and capable of using them. Nevertheless, when used properly, we suspect that they will produce meaningful gains in performance in the classroom, on achievement tests, and on many tasks encountered across the life span."

The American Academy of Pediatrics offers 10 tips for your child's success in school.

Return to Top



News Headline: What's the best way to learn? Psychologists tackle studying techniques (Dunlosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: EurekAlert!
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CBS News:

What's the best way to study for a test? A new study says taking practice tests and engaging in distributed practice - which means sticking to a schedule of spreading out your studying over time - work the best.

Surprisingly, the methods that were least effective when it came to getting a good grade on the big test were: summarization, highlighting, keyword mnemonics, creating imagery for text and re-reading.

"I was shocked that some strategies that students use a lot - such as re-reading and highlighting - seem to provide minimal benefits to their learning and performance," study author Dr. John Dunlosky, professor of psychology and director of experimental training at Kent State University, said in a written statement. "By just replacing re-reading with delayed retrieval practice, students would benefit."

Ten different learning techniques were reviewed Dunlosky his team. Their review was published in the January 2013 issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest.

Return to Top



News Headline: Ohio College Students Search for their Sugar Daddies | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: 19 Action News at 5 PM - WOIO-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, OH (WOIO) - It's a website that many may find less than sweet. It's called seeking arrangement.com. It's a place where women can find a Sugar Daddy.

MOREAdditional Links"I think it's sending a bad message that you are just a piece of meat or you are a slut," says Aishling Mural.

On seekingarrangement.com women ask for a set amount of money and are matched up with a sugar daddy willing to help out. The founder says the men get friendship and companionship in return.

"My income fluctuates. I try to be honest about what expectations can be from me," said one woman who used the site.

Now the founder of seeking arrangement.com claims that more and more women on college campuses are using his site to get money for their education. The college where he sees the most growth - the most women signing up right now? Kent State University.

"A lot of the people here I'm friends with so it makes me leery," says Joey Courtney, a junior at Kent State.

No one we talked to at Kent said they knew anyone on the site.

"I kind of think it's an easy way out because I'm a college student, but I work two jobs and I go to school full time. So I feel like it's an easy way out.," adds Courtney.

Kent State University released a statement saying

"We respect the privacy of our students and we would only become involved if their actions were found to violate the student code of conduct."

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Sugar Daddy' Dating Website Says A Lot More College Girls Are Signing Up To Help Pay For School | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Business Insider
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: College tuition is expensive, and more and more women are turning to "sugar daddies" for a leg up, claims Brandon Wade, founder of "sugar daddy" dating website SeekingArrangement.com.
The sometimes controversial, always entertaining online dating guru just released a list of the 20 universities with the most "sugar baby" signups in 2012. Both Columbia and NYU made the list — perhaps not surprising considering they are some of the most expensive colleges in America.
According to Wade, the website saw a 58 percent increase in co-ed signups in 2012, and 44 percent of the "sugar babies" on the website are now college students. The site seems to be encouraging the trend: anyone who signs up for the website with a college ".edu" email address gets a free membership upgrade.
In a press release, Wade blamed colleges and their ever-increasing tuition rates for the rise of co-eds on his "sugar daddy" site.
"College should be an opportunity to expand the mind and experience new things," Wade said in the release. "Unfortunately, because of the of recent tuition hikes, the college experience has become greatly unbalanced."
The average cost of tuition and fees at a private, 4-year university were $29,056 in 2012, a 4.2 percent increase over the previous year, according to CNN Money.
The site, which claims to have over 2 million members worldwide, is based on the concept that it's perfectly OK to pay for relationships. It works by pairing "sugar babies" — cash-strapped women looking for companionship and cash — with "sugar daddies," benefactors who are willing to pay for their company.
Here are the universities with the most signups last year, according to the company. Southern schools dominate the list.
1. Georgia State University — 292 (#11 in 2011)
2. New York University — 285 (#1 in 2011)
3. Temple University — 268 (#5 in 2011)
4. University of Central Florida — 221 (#14 in 2011)
5. University of Southern Florida — 212 (#7 in 2011)
6. Arizona State University — 204 (#8 in 2011)
7. Florida International University — 187 (#20 in 2011)
8. University of Georgia — 148 (#2 in 2011)
9. Indiana University — 131 (#17 in 2011)
10. Texas State — 128
11. Kent State University — 123 (#15 in 2011)
12. Penn State — 121 (#13 in 2011)
13. University of North Texas — 112
14. Florida State University — 111
15. Tulane University — 109 (#4 in 2011)
16. Michigan State University — 108 (#9 in 2011)
17. University of Ohio — 103
18. Columbia University — 100
19. University of Alabama — 96
20. University of California Los Angeles — 91

Return to Top



News Headline: Parents Beware: Pay for Your Children's College Loans or Lose Them to Sugar Daddies | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Observer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SeekingArrangement.com, the Sugar Daddy website that hooks up poor/younger/more attractive women with rich/older/not so attractive men looking for a mature relationship-slash-good times, has come out with a new study titled “Fastest Growing Sugar Baby Colleges of 2012.” (We're guessing these occasional “studies” lend an air of legitimacy to the site, perhaps as a safeguard against the very obvious charge that their service promotes online prostitution and Internet solicitation services.)

While the list is topped by Southern schools, we want to preemptively apologize to parents of NYU and Columbia students.

From the press release:

Last year,
college student memberships increased by 58% on the mutually beneficial
relationship website, with more students from the South joining than any
other region. The average co-ed Sugar Baby receives approximately $3000 a
month in allowances and gifts from her Sugar Daddy, enough to cover
tuition and living expenses at most schools.

The following is the list of the Top 20 Fastest Growing Sugar Baby
Schools, by new sign ups in 2012:

1. Georgia State University 292
2. New York University 285
3. Temple University 268
4. University of Central Florida 221
5. University of Southern Florida 212
6. Arizona State University 204
7. Florida International University 187
8. University of Georgia 148
9. Indiana University 131
10. Texas State 128
11. Kent State University 123
12. Penn State 121
13. University of North Texas 112
14. Florida State University 111
15.Tulane University 109
16. Michigan State University 108
17. University of Ohio 103
18. Columbia University 100
19. University of Alabama 96
20. University of California Los Angeles 91

³It¹s tough. The South went from being the epitome of success and money
to faring the worst in terms of well-being,² says Founder and CEO,
Brandon Wade. ³Even if NYU is still our biggest Sugar Baby university,
the growth of southern female coeds seeking the Sugar Lifestyle is a move
in the right direction to bring back Southern charm.²

Last year, NYU was the top school for new sign ups, coming in second this
year with 1.5x more students joining the website than in 2011. Columbia
is the only Ivy league school to make the Top 20, but Cornell also showed
a significant increase in students looking for a Sugar Daddy.

New York Sugar Schools by new sign-ups and increase in memberships in
2012:

New York University 285 sign-ups 154% increase in sign
ups
Columbia University 100 sign-ups 69% increase in sign ups
Cornell University 40 sign-ups 85% increase in
sign ups
Syracuse University 48 sign-ups 123% increase in sign
ups

The study claims that young women in college enter “mutually beneficial” relationships so they can pay for tuition, which is a pretty large leap in logic to say the least. (It's also unoriginal, the whole “I'm only turning tricks to pay for my books” line.) SeekingArrangement has no idea what these women are spending their money on, or if they are even getting any money, since their list is comprised merely of women who have signed up for the free service, not those who have officially entered into an agreement or received payment.

Still, this is a great little tool for finagling a couple more bucks at out of your parents next semester. Just leave this article out around the house and wait for the wallets to come out.

Return to Top



News Headline: Strongsville Author to Host Book Signing (Cash) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Strongsville Patch
Contact Name: Debbie Palmer
News OCR Text: 'House of Horrors' takes a hard look at Anthony Sowell, the Imperial Avenue serial killer

Robert Sberna of Strongsville will sign copies of his book, "House of Horrors" from 6-9 p.m. Jan. 15, 2013 at Trivs, 17100 Royalton Rd.

UPDATE: Because the weather (Tropical Storm Sandy) kept many people from attending the book launch Oct. 29, the author will have another book signing 6-9 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 15 at Trivs, 17100 Royalton Rd., in the Borders Plaza This story originally ran Nov. 1, 2012.

Anthony Sowell, the man who killed 11 women at his Cleveland home and then lived among their remains, doesn't sound like a monster when you talk to him.

"He's charismatic, very glib and charming," said Robert Sberna, who interviewed Sowell a half-dozen times by phone as he researched his book. "I found him to be not unintelligent. I found him to be narcissistic, though."

Sberna, a longtime journalist who grew up in Strongsville, was captivated by the story of the serial killer who raped, tortured and murdered 11 women in his Cleveland home.

Days after the news broke in 2009, he visited Sowell's Imperial Avenue house, while police were still digging for more victims in the back yard.

"I knew it was going to be a big story," Sberna said. "I thought if I was ever going to write a book, this was my chance."

House of Horrors is a gripping account of the Imperial Avenue killings as the story unfolded, told in detail through Sberna's first-hand reporting and interviews with survivors, family members and investigators -- and with Sowell himself.

A Voice for the Victims

Sberna said as he investigated the story, he found people dismissing the victims -- crack addicts who were lured to Sowell's house by the promise of drugs.

"They were being demonized because of their lifestyle," Sberna said. "But when you start getting into it, you see crack is a nasty addiction."

He chose to tell their stories, painting portraits of troubled women whose disappearances over a two-year period caused no more than a ripple of concern for anyone other than their families.

He also spoke with survivors -- five women who were attacked by Sowell, but lived to talk about it.

The Killer's Own Words

And he interviewed Sowell from Death Row, where he discovered a killer willing to talk about his crimes, but not necessarily express remorse.

"He didn't really hold himself accountable for what happened," Sberna said.

The book details the interviews and includes letters Sowell wrote to the author, offering to exchange an in-person intervew for $300 worth of items from the prison commissary.

At one point, asked about what happened on Imperial Avenue, Sowell alludes to pressure that "just kept building."

"I just had to release it," Sowell said.

Sberna threw his book launch party, not coincidentally, on the third anniversary of the raid on Sowell's Imperial Avenue house that uncovered the first of 11 bodies.

A few hundred people braved the first winds of Hurricane Sandy Oct. 29 to gather at Old Town Hall for the party.

The book was published by Kent State University Press, which has a large true-crime history series, according to Susan Cash, marketing director.

"This fits right in," Cash said. "And Bob is a very good writer, so we were happy to publish it."

House of Horrors is available at bookstores, through Kent State University Press, on Sberna's website, Barnes & Noble and Amazon.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: MLK Breakfast set for Monday in Ravenna | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Skeels' annual Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Breakfast will be held
at 10 a.m. Monday at the Skeels-
Mathews Community Center, 4378
Skeels Ave., Ravenna.

The guest speaker will be Bonnie
F. Richardson, director of Kent State
University Upward Bound.

The breakfast is open to the public.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus