Report Overview:
Total Clips (33)
Academics; Mathematical Science; Office of the Provost (1)
Aeronautics; KSU Airport (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Office of the University Architect; Renovation at KSU (4)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics; Institutional Advancement (1)
Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
College of Communication and Information (CCI) (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services; International and Intercultural Education (2)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (3)
Economics (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Higher Education (2)
Geography (1)
Government Relations; Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (3)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Psychology (1)
Psychology; Research (1)
Residence Services (1)
Students (1)
Town-Gown (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Academics; Mathematical Science; Office of the Provost (1)
Cleveland State University's efforts to help freshmen succeed are working 01/22/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio - Cleveland State University's focus on freshmen, especially those who need remedial courses, is paying off. This year's freshmen completed...


Aeronautics; KSU Airport (1)
Airports could be on borrowed time 01/21/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...underused airfields to close. Among the airports that will be included in the study are Ashtabula County Airport, Burke Lakefront Airport in Cleveland, Kent State University Airport and Lorain County Regional Airport. The study brought more than 75 airport managers, business owners, pilots and...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Office of the University Architect; Renovation at KSU (4)
KSU unveils 4 proposals for architecture school building Designers present range of concepts at public forum (Steidl) 01/19/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

The four concepts unveiled Thursday for a new architecture school building at Kent State University couldn't be more diverse. One calls for a nearly all-glass structure that emphasizes transparency. Another virtually eliminates...

OUR VIEW A landmark of the future for Kent and Kent State (Lefton) 01/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

DISTINCTIVE DESIGN APPROPRIATE FOR NEW ARCHITECTURE FACILITY The new building housing Kent State University's College of Architecture and Environmental...

Listening for a Design Solution; Kent State's New Architecture College and Downtown 01/22/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

One of the interesting things about being an architect is discussing the design of buildings with non-architects. After learning about the competition...

Proposals Unveiled for Kent State's new Architecture College 01/22/2013 ArchDaily.com Text Attachment Email

Yesterday, the shortlisted teams for Kent State University's new, $40 million College of Architecture and Environmental Design pitched their designs to...


Art, School of (1)
Kent painter to be honored by Ohio Arts Council 01/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent resident and painter Joseph O'Sickey, born in 1918, has devoted his lifetime to painting. This year he will mark two more milestones: "Unifying Art,...


Athletics; Institutional Advancement (1)
Flashes speeding up athletic donations (Nielsen, Geis) 01/22/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Kent State's success in baseball, football sparks $60 million fundraising drive Kent State University's trip last summer to the College World Series...


Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
Patent Application Titled "Devices and Methods for Detecting Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms" Under Review 01/21/2013 Biotech Week Text Email

...filed on May 31, 2012, was cleared for further review on January 10, 2013. The assignee for this patent application, patent serial number 485201, is Kent State University. Reporters obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "SNP is a common genetic...


College of Communication and Information (CCI) (1)
Gay Community Endowment Fund awards $26,900 to local programs 01/20/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...broadcast anti-bullying messages on KIDJAM! radio in Akron Public Schools. --Fusion Magazine, $3,000 for a marketing campaign that will expand the reach of Kent State University publication. --Jewish Family Service of Akron Ohio, $5,000 for counseling and support groups for LGBT senior citizens. ...


College of Education, Health and Human Services; International and Intercultural Education (2)
Teacher of Year will speak at KSU 01/19/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

...Rebecca Mieliwocki, who was recognized by President Barack Obama in 2012 as National Teacher of the Year, will speak at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29, at Kent State University's Student Center Kiva. Mieliwocki, who teaches seventh-grade English classes, has taught for 14 years. Her lecture is free....

Local news briefs - Jan. 21 01/22/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Lecture plans KENT: The 2012 National Teacher of the Year Rebecca Mieliwocki will present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished Lecture at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 29...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Tallmadge City Schools' relatively flu free 01/20/2013 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

...from these informal-type lessons," Dunbar Principal Courtney Davis said. Second-graders also learned about hand washing and hygiene when students from Kent State University's nursing program visited last October. But children aren't the only ones who can help prevent the spread of germs. Davis...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (3)
Martin Luther King Day events in Northeast Ohio 01/22/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Many local organizations will stage public events to mark the 84th birthday of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The official holiday for the civil rights...

Kent State MLK Celebration is Jan. 24 (Brown) 01/21/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

2013 theme is "Empowering the Individual, Strengthening the Community" Kent State University's 11th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration, themed “Empowering the Individual, Strengthening the Community,” will take...

Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Kent 01/21/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...aboutKing and his life's work. And for others, it's a time to just kick back and enjoy the prolonged weekend. Here are some MLK events in Kent: Kent State University's annual celebration is Thursday, Jan. 24, at 2 p.m. in the Kent Student Center Ballroom. Add your MLK event to Kent Patch's...


Economics (1)
Study shows Akron Marathon adds $6 million to economy (Rohlin) 01/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...2012, creating the equivalent of 60 full-time jobs. That's up $2 million from two years ago, according to an economic impact study conducted by the Kent State University's Department of Economics. The event drew 15,000 runners, bringing a boon to local hotels, gas stations, restaurants and...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Higher Education (2)
Universities facing drop in future enrollees (Garcia) 01/22/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

The heady days of surging enrollment might be over for now at Ohio's colleges and universities. The number of high school graduates are on a decade-long-plus...

Colleges bracing for declining enrollment (Garcia) 01/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

POPULATION SHIFT IN OHIO BLAMED FOR IT AKRON — Universities in Ohio are changing how they recruit students and rethinking their approaches amid ...


Geography (1)
Home and garden happenings -- week of Jan. 19 01/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...Botanical Garden, 11030 East Blvd. Theme: adjusting to climate change and unpredictable weather patterns in Northeast Ohio. Keynote speaker: Scott Sheridan, Kent State University climatology professor. $50 for members, $60 for others. Registration: 216-721-1600, ext. 100, or www.cbgarden.org. --Annuals...


Government Relations; Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (3)
Senator Sherrod Brown visits downtown Kent 01/20/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...community leaders, said using federal funding for projects like the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's new downtown parking deck and the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, was more effective at creating jobs than cutting taxes for individuals in the upper tax brackets....

Senator Sherrod Brown visits downtown Kent 01/20/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...community leaders, said using federal funding for projects like the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's new downtown parking deck and the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, was more effective at creating jobs than cutting taxes for individuals in the upper tax brackets....

Senator Sherrod Brown visits downtown Kent 01/20/2013 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

...community leaders, said using federal funding for projects like the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's new downtown parking deck and the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, was more effective at creating jobs than cutting taxes for individuals in the upper tax brackets....


KSU at Geauga (1)
Geauga Hunger Task Force to hold Incredible Edible art show in February 01/21/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

CHARDON - Several organizations are seeking participants in their Feb. 12-16 "Incredible Edible" sculpture show to be on display in the Commons at Kent State Geauga. The United Way Services of Geauga County, Kent State Geauga and the Geauga Hunger Task Force is holding the event to collect...


KSU at Stark (1)
ART EXHIBIT TO BEGIN 01/20/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

The annual Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Awards and Exhibit will be Wednesday through Jan. 30 in the Kent State University at Stark State Campus Center, Fine Arts Building, and the Main Art Gallery. The exhibit will feature more than 3,000 pieces...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Workshop for nonprofits offered 01/21/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...and Canton Regional Chapter of SCORE are offering a workshop for area nonprofits, both startups and existing organizations from 2 to 4 p.m. Feb. 15 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas Science and Advanced Technology Center Room 113/107. There is no charge for the event. The purpose is to help...


Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Hudson Library offers "MBA-Lite" Mini Series: Renew Your Business 01/20/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...leadoff session Jan. 28 will be "Driving Change in Stable Organizations" with Dr. Susan C. Hanlon, Assistant Dean, College of Business Administration at The University of Akron; "Financing for a Small Business" will be offered Feb. 11, with PNC's Business Banking Officer Jon Novak; "Value added IP: Why...


Psychology (1)
The Best and Worst Learning Techniques 01/21/2013 Michigan Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...psychologists have now done the job for us. In a comprehensive report released on Jan. 9 by the Association for Psychological Science, the authors, led by Kent State University professor John Dunlosky, closely examine 10 learning tactics and rate each from high to low utility on the basis of the evidence...


Psychology; Research (1)
Relationship Between Children, Dogs Topic of Kent State Study (Kerns) 01/22/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Families needed for psychology department research project How children relate to their pet dogs is the topic of a study by researchers in Kent State University's Department of Psychology. Professor Kathy Kerns is leading the study, in which researchers are trying to determine how...


Residence Services (1)
PLANNED TRANSITION OF KENT STATE'S VAN CAMPEN HALL CREATES SWING SPACE FOR 'FOUNDATIONS OF EXCELLENCE' INITIATIVE (Church) 01/18/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Jan.18 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's Department of Residence Services will turn control of Van...


Students (1)
College Students Seek Sugar Daddies on Dating Website 01/22/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University in Kent, OH was number 11 on SeekingArrangement.com's list of "Fastest Growing Sugar Baby Schools." An online dating service that...


Town-Gown (1)
Kent landmark 'saved,' but still not on new site 01/20/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Thurman said. "The substance that has been presented in court has been very strongly in our favor." The group has already moved the house once, with Kent State University's assistance, to a temporary home on KSU property at the dead end of College Avenue, where it sits today. The house was move...


University Press (1)
Book talk: Wildlife officer's memoir; Ohio's lost places 01/21/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...isn't "particularly gifted at putting words on paper." He tells a great story, though. Poachers Were My Prey (216 pages, softcover) costs $19.95 from Kent State University Press. Randy McNutt celebrates what remains In his previous books, like Ghosts: Ohio's Haunted Landscapes, Lost Arts,...


News Headline: Cleveland State University's efforts to help freshmen succeed are working | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio - Cleveland State University's focus on freshmen, especially those who need remedial courses, is paying off.

This year's freshmen completed their first semester with a higher GPA, more credits earned and a better academic standing than freshmen of 2011.

University officials credited a coordinated effort by faculty, staff and administrators for the improvements and cited the success of new initiatives including intensive advising, additional support for those in remedial courses and a focus on monitoring attendance.

"It is a very positive initial sign that if you put together the right system you can make progress," said President Ronald Berkman. "I will not run up the flag of victory after just one semester but you can't underestimate what occurred."

CSU, like other public universities, has targeted improving retention and graduation rates, because both will carry a lot of weight in future state funding.

And the effort starts with freshmen.

The average number of credits earned fall semester by CSU's 1,531 freshmen increased from 10.91 to 12.6 compared to last year. The percentage of students with a GPA of 2.0 or higher increased from 71 percent to 77 percent and the percentage of credits passed, compared to credits attempted, increased from 76 percent to 84 percent.

Credits attempted and obtained are the best predictors of college success, said Berkman and George Walker, interim provost and senior vice president of academic affairs.

"If you earn 20 credits the first year you are much more likely to continue," Walker said last week at a meeting of university trustees where he outlined the success of this year's freshmen. (See document below)

Much of the focus was on students who need remedial math or English because about half of all CSU freshmen need to take at least one such course. Students receive no credit for remedial classes and if they struggle they often drop out.

The university hired more advisors and lecturers for the writing and math courses. All freshmen who want to withdraw from a course must first meet with a staff member to discuss the repercussions.

Students take placement tests to determine if they need to enroll in remedial math and under a pilot program this fall some who scored high -- but normally still would have been assigned to remedial courses -- were placed in college-level math. The students received academic support and did well so the program will be expanded.

An optional support program for freshmen placed on academic probation will become mandatory in January of next year.

A key part of the program this fall was aimed at encouraging students to attend class regularly. Faculty who oversaw select courses were asked to take attendance and enter it into a new computer program. If a student missed two classes an e-mail alert was sent to the student and his or her advisor.

Walker said more than 3,000 alerts were issued. And they were effective, according to Rosemary Sutton, vice provost for academic affairs.

Of the freshmen placed in developmental courses, the percentage who had a GPA of 2.5 or higher with no course withdrawals at the end of fall semester increased from 19 percent last year to 42 percent this year. Pass rates in all remedial courses also increased compared to last year.

Officials were particularly pleased with the progress made by black freshmen, a group that has traditionally struggled. They improved in all categories. Those with a GPA of 2.0 or higher increased from 46 percent last year to 60 percent, while the percentage of students with a GPA above 2.5 and no withdrawn or failed courses increased from 13 percent to 32 percent.

"That is so gratifying and proof that shows we can do it if the system is in place," Berkman said.

Programs for freshmen have also been expanded and instituted at the University of Akron and Kent State University. Officials at both schools said they also have seen improvements.

All freshmen at the University of Akron this year are participating in MAPWorks, a new online student retention program that allows faculty and staff to submit and receive alerts on issues including attendance and academic updates.

Freshmen are also receiving intensive advising, peer mentoring and attend success workshops to develop academic plans.And all must declare a major or pre-major.

"We are no longer allowing students to declared an undecided major," said senior vice president and provost Mike Sherman. "We get them started toward a destination, even if they change trajectory."

Kent State University this year expanded its tutoring and supplemental instruction, a program in which students receiving tutoring and help from their peers, who even attend class with them. Students who participate in supplemental instruction learn study strategies and note- and test-taking skills.

The university also required all students to meet with advisors.

Kent's Math Emporium, which opened in it's the university's library in September, 2011, has been a great success, officials said. Students take developmental and basic math courses online. They learn at their own pace, completing sections with help from on-site advisors.

Cleveland State University plans to open a Math Emporium in its library this year.

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News Headline: Airports could be on borrowed time | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Study will determine needs of publicly owned aviation spots

Some of Ohio's 97 public general aviation airports may be running out of runway.

The state has embarked on an 18-month study to examine the economic impact and money needs of its publicly owned general aviation airports. The Ohio Department of Transportation says the review — dubbed the Ohio Airports Focus Study — is designed to see what roles these airports play in their communities and to identify the kinds of improvements that can be made with limited state and federal funds.

Because airports rely on public money for capital improvements, available funds could be focused only on the more robust airports, which could force some of the underused airfields to close.

Among the airports that will be included in the study are Ashtabula County Airport, Burke Lakefront Airport in Cleveland, Kent State University Airport and Lorain County Regional Airport.

The study brought more than 75 airport managers, business owners, pilots and public officials to the Brecksville Community Center last Monday, Jan. 14, for a meeting to hear what ODOT expects to accomplish. It was one of six such sessions this month around the state.

Those in the room clearly understood that without public money — which comes from aviation-user fees — their airports would not have the funds to lengthen runways to accommodate modern business jets or even just to keep runway pavement meeting safety standards.

“We want to see what role these airports play in each community,” said Marie Keister, a consultant working on the study for ODOT, in opening last week's meeting. “At the end of the study, there will not be a recommendation to close any airport, but there will be a recommendation for a framework of decision making.

“We may find that there is a (lack of service) in one area,” Ms. Keister said. “But there is another part of the state where there are (several) small airports and there are a lot of redundancies, and that is going to give ODOT and the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) pause.”

Economic propeller

It was clear from the questions and comments that many communities consider their airports vital economic development tools that should be kept open, even though it's a struggle to balance the books.

Chuck Wiedie, economic development director of Hudson, said after the meeting that he believed if nearby Akron Fulton International Airport closed it would make Hudson less attractive as a place to locate or expand a business, even though a number of airports are within a reasonable driving range.

But, Mr. Wiedie also realized that with fewer airports, the available public money would improve those that remained open.

Jeffrey Gorman, president and CEO of Gorman-Rupp Co., said his company relies on Mansfield Lahm Regional Airport to ferry customers to its Mansfield headquarters. He said his company pilot last year made about 50 trips into Mansfield with customers. The firm's airplane, he said, “is one of the most successful sales tools we've ever gotten.”

Gorman-Rupp makes industrial pumps and had sales of $359 million in 2011.

State money for capital improvements at airports has declined in recent years, and it shows no signs of a rebound. Local bodies are similarly strapped and unable to provide the local match for capital improvement grants.

General aviation airports serve all private aircraft, from single-engine propeller planes flown by weekend pilots and those used by flying schools to corporate jets.

Their revenues come from landing fees, rental of hangar space and from the sale of aviation fuel. The public agency operating the airport — usually a city or county commission — is on the hook to cover any operating losses, which is a common reality.

High-flying costs

Airports are expensive and not all the state's general aviation airports operate anywhere close to capacity.

A 2006 state airport system study found that total general aviation operations — takeoffs and landings — at individual public airports ranged from more than 100,000 operations annually to as few as 200. Total operations at all 97 airports were 3.4 million.

Another airport included in the study is the Willoughby Lost Nation Municipal Airport, which had 61,370 operations in 2006. It runs a deficit of more than $200,000 a year for the city of Willoughby, which has been negotiating for the Lake County Port Authority to take over the airport.

Marshall Eichfeld, president of the Ohio Aviation Association, said he hopes the state's airports can stay open because of their role in business attraction and development.

“You never know what can happen in the future,” Mr. Eichfeld said. “Think about the new shale development in the east of the state,” which has boosted traffic at airports in the region as oil industry executives come in and out to inspect their operations.

Because of their federal support, airports cannot simply close. Under the federal Airport Improvement Program, airports that accept federal grants for long-term capital projects, such as runway lengthening, must refund their federal grants if they are closed during the grant period, which can run for five years or longer. n-

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News Headline: KSU unveils 4 proposals for architecture school building Designers present range of concepts at public forum (Steidl) | Email

News Date: 01/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Litt, Steven
News OCR Text: The four concepts unveiled Thursday for a new architecture school building at Kent State University couldn't be more diverse.

One calls for a nearly all-glass structure that emphasizes transparency. Another virtually eliminates windows as a way to save on energy.

Some designs strive to impress with their monumentality. Others appear to hunker into the earth.

"The schemes are really diverse and in some ways some give you more freedom than others," said Douglas Steidl, dean of the architecture program and a member of the five-person jury that will recommend the winning design.

The university is preparing to build a $40 million, 122,000-square-foot building for its College of Architecture and Environmental Design. The structure will be located along a planned extension of the school's main campus pedestrian Esplanade that will reach west of the campus at Lincoln Street toward downtown Kent.

The KSU program is one of four architecture schools in Ohio, along with those at Ohio State University in Columbus, the University of Cincinnati and Miami University.

A capacity crowd showed up Thursday evening at the 900-seat Cartwright Hall on campus to watch two hours of presentations by the four finalists in the running for the KSU assignment. The event followed a full day in which the teams discussed their proposals with the university's five-member jury in closed meetings.

The university will reuse the existing architecture building on campus, which stands next to the site of the May 4, 1970, National Guard shootings that resulted in four deaths.

In its new location, the architecture school will act as a bridge between the city and the campus. The university and the city have collaborated on a $106 million campus-edge development that includes offices, retail, shopping and dining, plus a hotel and apartments.

KSU President Lester Lefton said after the event Thursday that he was delighted by the competing designs and pleased that all four teams understood the nature of the assignment as a link between town and gown. He wants to start construction soon.

Michael Bruder, director of design and construction at KSU, said that the jury, on which he serves, will choose a winner in the competition by February. The university originally started with 37 design teams.

Steidl said that picking the winner will involve "feedback on how they [the designs] affect our program. I was excited because there are some different options.

"Several have similar ideas but are totally different in terms of how they presented themselves."

The four teams and proposals are as follows:

Bialosky + Partners Architects, with offices in Cleveland and New York, in association with Architecture Research Office of New York, proposed a building with a skin of light-brown precast concrete panels rising from a one-story base of tan brick. The building emphasized a sculptural look and featured vertical windows.

Architect Stephen Cassell of ARO said the building would qualify for a platinum rating – the highest available – under the LEED system of the U.S. Green Building Council. (LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.) But he ran out of time Thursday before he could explain the details.

Weiss/Manfredi Lead Designer + Richard L. Bowen & Associates Architect of Record proposed a glassy structure called "Design Loft." The project emphasized flexible interior spaces organized around a skeletal structural system and interior ramps and staircases that knitted the interior together.

The Collaborative Inc. of Toledo, with the Miller Hull Partnership of Seattle, proposed a design in which architecture studios for students would be installed in a series of north-south rectangular "tubes" set atop an east-west rectangular base that would parallel the KSU campus Esplanade.

The studios would be connected to one another with interior pathways that would invite students to take a shortcut through the building during cold weather – and simultaneously check out the architecture program.

Cleveland-based Westlake Reed Leskosky, the only local firm to enter the competition without a high-powered design partner from outside the region, proposed a building with elegantly detailed facades and powerful geometric shapes that echoed the firm's recent Bertram and Judith Kohl Building at Oberlin College. The design aimed to make use of natural ventilation and daylight to save on energy costs.

Steidl said the issues likely to prove decisive in the selection process would include environmental sustainability and energy savings, the image of the architecture building and the degree of openness in the design studios and how that might affect acoustics within the building.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW A landmark of the future for Kent and Kent State (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: DISTINCTIVE DESIGN APPROPRIATE FOR NEW ARCHITECTURE FACILITY

The new building housing
Kent State University's College
of Architecture and Environmental
Design will be an important addition
to the campus and, given its proximity
to downtown Kent, a community landmark
as well.

The $40 million facility
will be an important
symbol of Kent
State as it enters its
second century, and as
such, its design takes
on added interest to the campus community.
Because of this, the four finalists
in the competition to design the architecture
building presented their proposals
during a public gathering Thursday at the
University Auditorium in Cartwright Hall.

The designs that were unveiled all are
distinctive, with a 21st Century look that
will set them apart from any other structure
on the Kent State campus, or in the
city of Kent for that matter. That's as it
should be; the Kent campus reflects a
variety of architectural styles from every
decade of its existence — some more
successful than others — and this latest
addition to the campus will be no exception.
A structure housing the College of
Archicteture should be a showcase for
cutting-edge design.

The new facility will be located between
South Willow and South Lincoln streets
on the Esplanade, the walkway being constructed
by KSU that will link the campus
and downtown Kent. That will put it
closer to the central city than any campus
building. As President Lester Lefton
noted, the location “makes a strong statement
about the inextricable link between
our campus and the city we've called
home for more than a century.”

The four proposals, while differing in appearance,
adhere to guidelines of the design
competition that stressed the landmark
aspect of the site and the need for
energy efficiency. Two have a “green roof”
element, utilizing living vegetation as
an energy conservation element. All are
multi-story, which will make the facility
an imposing addition to the campus and
downtown area.

A crowd of about 800 turned out for the
“unveiling” at Cartwright Hall, which is
an indication of interest in the new facility
and welcome sign of engagement. University
officials are to be commended for
drawing the community into the selection
process.

The winning design will be announced
in February. Based on the proposals
shared Thursday, whichever one emerges
as the winner will be an impressive addition
to the Kent State campus and to
Kent.

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News Headline: Listening for a Design Solution; Kent State's New Architecture College and Downtown | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One of the interesting things about being an architect is discussing the design of buildings with non-architects.

After learning about the competition to design the new College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) building for Kent State University, I have been informally polling community members about what they think about the design of buildings both in the downtown and on campus, and how they would conceive of a new building along the Esplanade that will soon connect the two.

In these conversations, the majority of the people wonder why it is that architects are so bent on “pushing the envelope,” both figuratively and literally. “Must every building be an exercise in designing a sculpture in space?” one of them offered. When I ask people about the design of the recent developments in downtown, there is a widespread affinity for what most of us trained in architecture hold at least a little disdain for, if not outright hostility; the mimicking of historic building forms and details.

One of the other phenomenon I encounter in talking with lay people about architecture is the influence of the convenient parking space in our thinking about urban design. The creation of pedestrian-friendly streets with buildings up to the front lot line is seen by many as out of date — even as this street pattern is the very pattern of the city in which traditional urban architecture forms were conceived. An important question for the design of the CAED building is, in what way is the Esplandade a street in terms of the way it embraces the bypassers and connects users to visitors?

Historic downtowns have tall street level spaces with 60 percent or more glazing, a second floor of offices and upper levels of apartments and/or public spaces that serve social and service groups. The density and complexity of these street patterns adds to the social dynamic of the street, with the people and places given preference to the storage of motor vehicles. With the vehicles banished from the Esplandade, in what way is it like the historic pattern of the streetscape and in what ways is it different?

What we have done in Downtown Kent is, at least in part, a sensitive construction of the historic street pattern. The details of the design of the buildings is in no small measure secondary to the basic elements of the streetscape and the way the buildings greet the street. Will this building be more focused on itself than the street?

In our day and age, what is interesting is that most of us live in space as citizens of the auto-nomous, atomic age, with the pieces of our lives as electrons circling our homes, yet we conceive of our home places and buildings in very traditional ways. This contradiction is intriguing and frustrating for those of us working to create sustainable communities, and it may offer insight as to the best way to build streets in the future.

The investment of the City and Community in our downtown is now being rapidly joined by the expansion of campus to the verge that is S.R. 59 (Haymaker Parkway). After decades of work to get the university to focus to the west rather than to sprawl to the east, some say that we are now sorry for what we prayed for, for not only has the university answered our prayers but it has remade the “Campus Link” neighborhood in its own image. Gone are dozens of houses and hundreds of residents, but they will be replaced by thousands learning, living, working and visiting in the new CAED building and the enlarged downtown. The work by the university to bring its Hotel and Conference Center across the verge is a remarkable investment in our common future, and it promises to contribute to the rapid conversion of our downtown from a quiet and uninspiring crossroads into a regional destination and national class college town.

The completion of the Esplanade, with the construction of a new village green in the form of a great lawn, offers a rare opportunity to repair a tear in the urban fabric wrought by a poorly designed redirection of a state highway. Good urban design has the opportunity to mitigate, at least to some degree, poor transportation planning. To make the Esplanade inviting and enlivened the University has included the old idea of the sculpture mile, placing interesting pieces of Art along its path. The new CAED building, placed on the south side of the Esplanade between South Lincoln and South Willow streets, will not only be a destination for students, but it is envisioned as a community center serving the campus and the city as a whole. Like the sled riding hill on front campus, it promises, in conjunction with the great lawn, to be the physical heart of our city, complementing Main and Water streets, the Commons, and the Student Center plaza as a pearl on a string of great places where we can recreate, relax and run into old and new friends.

As someone who has long been engaged in the public process in Kent, I appreciate the gesture made by the competition committee to engage the public in the design of this most public building. As an Alumni of the CAED and a 30 year practitioner I appreciate the complexity of the project and the divergent interests and constraints that a real world project entails. While it isn't clear how much influence the general public will have on the selection of the winning firm and the execution of the design, I do hope that this opportunity is fully exploited. What better way to demonstrate the vision for the building as a place to engage the public than to show students and citizens alike that architects can listen as well as speak and draw, and set aside their hubris in favor of creating a harmonic design solution.

It was fun to listen to the briefs by the four design teams to see both how they went about learning about the place and people, studied the site and conceived a solution to the building requirements. Each of the teams clearly expended a large degree of time, money and energy on their concepts, and the designers varied in how they presented them to us.

While I sat watching the presentations, I tried to put myself in the shoes of the “average joe” in our town:

How would most people, who have an affinity for traditional forms of buildings and straightforward arrangements of materials, react to what I knew, from the websites of the architects, would be exercises in the elaboration of the building program and envelope?
Would there be any use of materials, proportions, scales, and design elements that had any relation to the two historic centers (front campus and downtown) which they would connect?
Would there be any sense in which this building would related to, remember, or refer to the historic neighborhood that has been replaced by a new space?
How will the building hold up over time? Will it remain stately and regal like the historic front campus or be seen as a brutal, trendy and insensitive design like White and Bowman Halls and several other building built in the 1960s and 1970s? Will it be worth restoring in 50, 80 or 100 years time?
Will the architects be able to translate their discussions with people in campus and the town into spaces that work on the many scales of access, use and interpretation?
Will the building seem wasteful and extravagant or hard to maintain?
Will it have learned the lessons of some of the past mistakes of campus buildings, such as the Art building, with its interconnected open spaces and inappropriate use of glazing — such that it fails to perform acoustically, makes learning difficult, and fails to adequately secure classrooms from theft?
Will the architect spend too much time defying gravity and not enough connecting the building to people and to the earth?
Will the people who have to use the building day to day appreciate the extravagance of form that leads to shortcomings in function?
Will the custodians shake their heads when they discover that the emperor has no clothes and they have to maintain a building that is half the building of the big piles up on the hill?

I would hope that the community and committee will ask these and other hard questions and not be distracted by design for design's sake. Each of the teams has solid design solutions that differ in slight and significant ways, that function differently and collaborate with the neighborhood and Esplanade in different ways.

I am pleased by the process and thankful for the promise that a new building will bring to a newly conceived center for our community. I wish the selection jury and the architects well and hope that you will conceive a facility that will help inspire the genius of Kent.

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News Headline: Proposals Unveiled for Kent State's new Architecture College | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: ArchDaily.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Yesterday, the shortlisted teams for Kent State University's new, $40 million College of Architecture and Environmental Design pitched their designs to the Kent community. From “simple and functional to splendidly provocative”, these proposals offer a range of innovative solutions that will satisfy Kent's mission to create a modern campus that provides an outstanding academic experience and enriches the greater community of Kent, Ohio.

The four finalists, which were selected from 37 international teams, were challenged to design a 122,000 square foot, sustainable exemplar that unites Kent State's architecture program under one roof, while inspiring interdisciplinary collaboration within flexible learning spaces along the University's new esplanade.

Get a sneak peak of each proposal after the break.

Bialosky + Partners Architects (New York and Cleveland) in association with Architecture Research Office of New York

WEISS/MANFREDI (Lead Designer) of New York in association with Richard L. Bowen + Associates (Architect of Record) of Cleveland

The Collaborative Inc. of Toledo, Ohio, in association with the Miller Hull Partnership of Seattle

Westlake Reed Leskosky with offices in Cleveland and four other cities

Which design do you like best? Help Kent State decide by taking this poll! Also, University officials are asking the public to offer feedback on the four proposals via email at caedcomments@kent.edu.

A five-person jury will announce the winning firm in February.

The Jury:

Vivian Loftness, professor at Carnegie Mellon University
Brad Lynch, Brinistool+Lynch Architecture Design
Joan M. Soranno, vice president FAIA
Douglas Steidl, dean of Kent State's architecture school
Michael Bruder, director of design and construction in Kent State's architecture office

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News Headline: Kent painter to be honored by Ohio Arts Council | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent resident and painter Joseph O'Sickey, born in 1918, has devoted his lifetime to painting. This year he will mark two more milestones: "Unifying Art, Life and Love," a major life retrospective at the Canton Museum of Art and the Individual Award in the Ohio Arts Council's Governor's Awards for the Arts in May.

Cleveland-born O'Sickey has been an active member of the Ohio artistic community for more than seven decades, as both an artist and a teacher.

"I wanted a more exciting visual life," he said. "My father said to us when we were kids, 'Do anything you want to do in life, but be good at it and do it now,' and he encouraged us. He didn't care what we did, but he said, 'You have to practice, you have to do it now.'"

And not long after, O'Sickey began to draw. At 4 years old, he began sketching the barnyard birds his grandmother hatched. As he grew up, his subjects shifted to the Akron racetracks, sights in Burma, where he was stationed in the Army, and whatever inspired him at the moment, he said.

O'Sickey's teaching career began in 1946 at Ohio State University and lasted until his 1984 retirement from Kent State University.

He also worked as a faculty member of the Cleveland Institute of Art and Akron Institute, and took on jobs outside of education, including fashion painting, architectural rendering and perfume advertising, he said.

And even though he's retired from education, O'Sickey continues to instill a passion for art in young students through the creation of a sketchbook program in Portage County schools, which has in turn led some parents to rediscover drawing as well.

"A lot of people told me they were very interested in drawing in school but they'd stopped," he said. "There's only two requirements for sketching: Use the whole page and choose one thing, then relate everything to that one thing."

He added that his teaching methods never allowed for criticism.

"I believe in helping people, so I don't have critiques. I don't like them," O'Sickey said.

O'Sickey has had more than 50 solo exhibitions throughout his life, and shared a few with Algesa O'Sickey, his wife of 60 years, before her death in 2006.

The "Unifying Art, Life and Love," retrospective at the Canton Museum of Art runs from May 11 to July 29, and is supported by grants from the Institute for Museum and Library Services and the Ohio Humanities Council. A documentary to be released through PBS will coincide with the exhibit as well.

O'Sickey will also receive his Individual Award during the Governor's Awards for the Arts in Ohio on May 15 -- Arts Day -- to commemorate a life's dedication.

"I'm very happy to get it, because it comes from a lot of people who voted for that," O'Sickey said. "One thing I'm very grateful for in my life is all of the encouragement I got from different people and different artists. I can't thank them all and they were wonderful and generous."

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News Headline: Flashes speeding up athletic donations (Nielsen, Geis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's success in baseball, football sparks $60 million fundraising drive

Kent State University's trip last summer to the College World Series and its first football bowl berth in 40 years did more over the last year than boost morale of the Golden Flashes faithful.

It also infused the athletic department's coffers with a hefty chunk of change — something upon which the university intends to build with the launch this spring of a $60 million fundraising campaign to support scholarships and the athletic program's capital needs.

“We have a lot of alums,” said Joel Nielsen, the university's director of athletics. “We have the prospect base, and we've coupled that with success on the field and in classroom and now have a heck of a product to go out and sell to people when we ask them to help us.”

Mr. Nielsen's fundraising prowess was one reason he was tapped for the head athletics official role in March 2010 after serving seven years at the University of South Dakota, where he helped steer fundraising efforts to finance its transition to a Division I school. In the two fiscal years that encompass the bulk of Mr. Nielsen's tenure at Kent State, the athletic program has brought in $14.5 million in cash and pledges from donors.

Matt Geis, Kent State's executive director of athletic advancement, said those are good numbers considering athletics in total brought in about $25 million in cash and pledges over the last six fiscal years. Also, since the baseball team's first appearance last June in the College World Series, the baseball program brought in about $1 million in cash and pledges.

“That's a good indication of the impact of the success we're having on fundraising numbers,” said Mr. Geis, also the university's associate athletic director.

Building a winner

Kent State president Lester Lefton charged Mr. Nielsen early in his tenure with turning around the floundering football program, which until Darrell Hazell took the reins as coach in 2011 had gone 28-53 over the previous seven seasons under former coach Doug Martin.

Despite a solid basketball program, which claims five Mid-American Conference titles and even made it to the Elite Eight of the NCAA tournament in 2002, Kent State longed for a winning football program. A solid football program can help drive a university's overall enrollment, bring donors to the door and pull in revenue from concessions and ticket sales.

To get the football program up to snuff, Mr. Nielsen and his team raised $3 million over the last two-and-a-half years. The effort led to the hiring of better personnel such as Mr. Hazell, a former assistant coach at Ohio State University. In the previous 10 years, Mr. Geis said the program had brought in less than $1.5 million total.

“It was a hard sell to get that $3 million and get donors to trust in what we're saying and for them to believe in the model we put together for football to be successful,” Mr. Geis said. “Now our pitch to alums is to help us keep it there. Don't help us get there but help us stay there now.”

After a rookie season record of 5-7, Mr. Hazell led the Golden Flashes over the last year to an overall 11-2 record, a MAC East championship and an appearance — a loss — in the GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala. Mr. Hazell announced in December he would leave Kent State for the head coaching job at Purdue University, and Kent State subsequently tapped Paul Haynes — a graduate of the university and former defensive coordinator at the University of Arkansas — for the top job.

“That was a huge factor in the success we've seen in two years,” Mr. Nielsen said about Mr. Hazell's hire. “You win with people. That's my bottom-line assessment. We understand we need facilities and other components to run a successful program, but you've got to get the right people in place first.”

Riding the momentum

While the Golden Flashes will try to keep the momentum of the football program headed in the right direction under Mr. Haynes' watch, the development staff for the athletics department hopes the fundraising dollars will continue to pour in. While football is only a piece of athletics as a whole at Kent State, its success has translated to other areas, particularly in the fundraising arena.

“It becomes an easier pitch all around,” Mr. Geis said. “When I'm talking to a field hockey or women's soccer alum, I don't have that hurdle to get over. They all want to see football win. They want to see football be successful.”

Mr. Geis said about $36 million of the $60 million campaign slated to launch May 3 will be earmarked for construction and renovation projects, with the rest going toward scholarships. Among the construction work the university is planning is a $4.5 million addition to its field house near Dix Stadium, which will house new locker rooms for the field hockey, women's soccer, track and field and softball programs.

Kent State also is plotting a $10 million construction and renovation effort for its Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center. The project would include new space for the gymnastics program, new suites in the heart of the arena, a new mezzanine level and a complete overhaul of the lower bowl area.

“We're competitive, and we like to keep those expectation levels high,” Mr. Nielsen said. “In our business of being in sports, we're all kind of wired that way. We don't run away from expectations.”

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News Headline: Patent Application Titled "Devices and Methods for Detecting Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms" Under Review | Email

News Date: 01/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Biotech Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 JAN 21 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Business Week -- According to news reporting originating from Washington, D.C., by NewsRx journalists, a patent application by the inventors Mao, Hanbin (Kent, OH); Koirala, Deepak P. (Kent, OH), filed on May 31, 2012, was cleared for further review on January 10, 2013.

The assignee for this patent application, patent serial number 485201, is Kent State University.

Reporters obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "SNP is a common genetic variation in human genome with an average occurrence of .about.1/1000 base pairs. SNP detection is crucial for biological and clinical aspects since it is associated with diseases, anthropometric characteristics, phenotypic variations and gene functions. Recent strides towards personalized medicines necessitate high resolution genetic markers to track disease genes, which further amplifies the importance of SNP detection.

"Most SNP detecting methods use amplification steps such as PCR to achieve highly sensitive detection. However, efficiency of PCR is dependent on the target sequence. Recently, Mirkin and co-workers, see Taton, T. A.; Mirkin, C. A.: Letsinger, R. L. Science 2000, 289, 1757-1760; and Nam, J.-M.; Stoeva, S. I.: Mirkin, C. A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 5932-5933 developed alternative nano-particles based amplifications and attained femto molar detection limits. Methods incorporating amplification steps require, laborious and time consuming multi-step protocols, which may expose a sample to uncontrollable human and environmental factors. Approaches that employ less amplification steps, such as molecular beacon, see Tyagi, S.: Kramer, F. R. Nat Biotech 1996, 14, 303-308; and Tan, W.; Wang, K.; Drake, T. J. Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. 2004, 8, 547-553, can reportedly reduce these disadvantages. Yet, fluorescence based detection often suffers from indigenous background that deteriorates detection limit.

"Various attempts to combine laser tweezers with a lab on a chip system are known, for example Gross, P. et al. in methods in Enzymology; Academic press: 2010; Vol. 475, p 427-453; and Enger, J. et al. Lab on a Chip 2004, 4, 196-200. However there is still a need for a device and method that utilize this system to demonstrate bio-sensing at a single molecule level.

"In view of the above, a problem of the invention is discovering how to avoid or reduce sophisticated amplification steps while at the same time providing desirable detection limits and selectivity in reasonable detection time. The method disclosed herein presents a first example of the force based stochastic sensing of SNP at a single molecule level."

In addition to obtaining background information on this patent application, NewsRx editors also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent: "In view of the above, it is an object of the present invention to provide devices and methods which utilize a force based sensing of SNP at a single-molecule level. The single; molecule nature of the SNP-probe allows for stochastic sensing that presents high sensitivity and selectivity.

"Yet another object of the invention is to provide a device that utilizes a mechanical signal to sense SNP that is subject to little environmental interference while providing high signal to noise ratio.

"Still another object is to provide a device and method that utilizes two stages, for example on-off, mechanical signals of a single DNA template that recognizes SNP that are recorded by a laser tweezers device in a microfluidic platform.

"A further object is to provide a device including a SNP-probe comprising a hairpin that recognizes a SNP sequence, with the probe selectively placed inside a microfluidic device, wherein the laser tweezers is utilized to provide force based SNP sensing.

"An additional object of the invention is to provide a method for sensing with a laser tweezers a wild type DNA sequence or a SNP sequence by allowing binding of the same with the SNP-probe in a microfluidic platform. In a further step wild type sequence or SNP sequence is determined by measuring the force required to eject the bound target during the extension of the target bound SNP-probe.

"Accordingly, in one aspect of the present invention, a device for detecting a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is disclosed comprising a SNP-probe including a hairpin that recognizes a target DNA comprising one or more of a wild type and SNP sequences; a microfluidic device; and a laser tweezers device operatively connected to the microfluidic device for force based stochastic sensing of the one or more of the wild type and the SNP sequences.

"In another aspect of the present invention, a method for detecting a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is disclosed comprising the steps of obtaining a SNP detection device including a microfluidic device operatively connected to a laser tweezers device; connecting a SNP-probe containing a hairpin that recognizes a SNP sequence to the SNP detection device; and measuring a force exerted by the SNP-probe in the SNP detection device in the presence of a target sample and determining whether the SNP sequence is present in the target sample."

For more information, see this patent application: Mao, Hanbin; Koirala, Deepak P. Devices and Methods for Detecting Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. U.S. Patent Serial Number 485201, filed May 31, 2012, and posted January 10, 2013. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=2886&p=58&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20130103.PD.&OS=PD/20130103&RS=PD/20130103

Keywords for this news article include: Kent State University.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2013 Biotech Business Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Gay Community Endowment Fund awards $26,900 to local programs | Email

News Date: 01/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jan. 20--The Gay Community Endowment Fund of Akron Community Foundation awarded grants totaling $26,900 to nine greater Akron nonprofit organizations at its fourth-quarter meeting of 2012.

Several grants were awarded to programs that increase awareness about domestic violence and bullying in the LGBT community. Other will provide outreach to LGBT individuals and their families.

The recipients:

--Akron Parents Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, $1,000 to purchase educational materials.

--Battered Women's Shelter, $1,500 for a community outreach program that educates teens and adults about same-sex domestic violence.

--Domestic Violence Project Inc., $1,500 to provide emergency shelter for victims of same-sex domestic violence.

--Fair Housing Contact Service Inc., $4,000 to study housing discrimination against LGBT individuals in Akron.

--Friends of 91.3, $2,400 to broadcast anti-bullying messages on KIDJAM! radio in Akron Public Schools.

--Fusion Magazine, $3,000 for a marketing campaign that will expand the reach of Kent State University publication.

--Jewish Family Service of Akron Ohio, $5,000 for counseling and support groups for LGBT senior citizens.

--Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Union, $5,000 to send University of Akron students to the 2013 National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Creating Change Conference.

--Weathervane Community Playhouse Inc., $3,500 for the production of Next Fall, a contemporary comedy about the issues that arise in the long-term relationships of gay men.

Founded in 2001, the Gay Community Endowment Fund is a permanent philanthropic endowment of Akron Community Foundation. Contributions of any amount are welcome and support future grant-making. Checks may be sent to: the Gay Community Endowment Fund of Akron Community Foundation, 345 W. Cedar St., Akron, OH 44307-2407.

For more information, call 330-376-8522 or visit www.gaycommunityfund.org.

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News Headline: Teacher of Year will speak at KSU | Email

News Date: 01/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HAPPENING

California teacher Rebecca Mieliwocki, who was recognized by President Barack Obama in 2012 as National Teacher of the Year, will speak at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29, at Kent State University's Student Center Kiva. Mieliwocki, who teaches seventh-grade English classes, has taught for 14 years. Her lecture is free. For more lecture information, contact Linda Robertson at lfrobert@kent.edu or call 330-672-0563.

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News Headline: Local news briefs - Jan. 21 | Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Lecture plans

KENT: The 2012 National Teacher of the Year Rebecca Mieliwocki will present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished Lecture at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 29 at the Kent State University Student Center Kiva, 1075 Risman Drive.

Mieliwocki is a seventh-grade English teacher at Luther Burbank Middle School in Burbank, Calif. She is known for her unconventional teaching methods that inspire and motivate students, often using a Socratic method of questioning to stimulate students' critical thinking.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

For more information about the lecture, contact Linda Robertson, at lfrobert@kent.edu or call 330-672-0563.

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News Headline: Tallmadge City Schools' relatively flu free | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name: Holly Schoenstein
News OCR Text: Flu prevalent in Summit County, throughout state, according to health officials

Tallmadge -- Officials in the Tallmadge City School District say the flu and other contagious diseases going around this time of year haven't been any more of a problem this season than in previous seasons.

Staff at the schools are taking routine measures to try to prevent the spread of germs, including disinfecting classrooms, work surfaces, doorknobs and other areas throughout the buildings daily.

"As always, I'm knocking on wood because I know we're not out of the woods yet for the cold and flu season. We haven't been hit thus far," said Superintendent Jeff Ferguson.

"We are always reminding students and staff to cover mouths when coughing, wash hands frequently and other common practices for the prevention of spreading germs," he said.

Ferguson said student and staff absences at all of the buildings in the district have been because of "a mixed bag of what we usually see in January" and aren't attributable to any one illness.

One of the preventative measures the district has taken is offering free flu shots to its staff through its health insurance company.

Flu affects the county, state

Margo Erme, medical director at the Summit County Health Department, said Jan. 14 the flu is prevalent in the county.

"We started seeing influenza activity at the end of November, and it's continuing to go up. We do not believe it's peaked yet," she said.

Erme said measures of influenza infections garnered from hospital and emergency room admissions all show increases. Schools, which were out of session over the holidays, have only been back in session for a couple of weeks.

"It doesn't surprise me they're not seeing activity," she said. "That could change one or two weeks from now."

Erme said the current vaccine is designed to protect against three strains of flu and noted another strain may make its appearance before the season ends some time in May.

"It's quite possible we may see another peak in February or March," she said.

The Ohio Department of Health reported Jan. 11 that one Ohio child died from "flu-related illness," and a handful of adult deaths have been linked to the flu, the Associated Press reports.

It's not calling the flu outbreak "an epidemic," according to Tessie Pollock, a department spokesperson.

"It's an early start to the flu season," she said.

Ohio is among 47 states with widespread flu outbreaks, and health officials blame the flu for at least 20 child deaths nationally, the AP reported.

Flu-associated hospitalizations are running at much higher rates than the last two seasons. The state reports there have been 1,922 since October in Ohio, compared with 86 a year ago and 175 the previous season.

Some hospitals have begun limiting visitors and handing out surgical masks to try to slow the spread, and health officials are urging people to stay home if they are sick and to keep ill children out of day cares and schools.

The Ohio Health Department advises people to get flu shots, noting there are sufficient supplies of the vaccine available around the state. While flu shots aren't a guarantee against catching the flu, Pollock said the vaccine seems to be a good match for current strains.

"Building health habits into your routine will also go a long way in preventing the flu," she said.

Pollock suggests regular hand washing with either soap and water, or using hand sanitizers, and staying home if you're sick.

"It's something that's more easily said than done, but it really does help curb the spread of illness," she said.

Dunbar learns how

to deal with germs

Some of the district's youngest students, those at Dunbar Primary School, learn about how to prevent the spread of germs through lessons in the curriculum that focus on proper hand washing, coughing into an elbow instead of a hand and using hand sanitizer after blowing a nose.

"Our young students benefit greatly from these informal-type lessons," Dunbar Principal Courtney Davis said.

Second-graders also learned about hand washing and hygiene when students from Kent State University's nursing program visited last October.

But children aren't the only ones who can help prevent the spread of germs. Davis offered this reminder for parents:

"One of the most important preventative measures is that parents keep their child home from school if he/she has a fever and/or symptoms such as vomiting. Children must be fever-free for 24 hours, without the use of medicine, before returning to school."

District's plan to deal with an outbreak

If the flu or other contagious disease causes a drastic increase in illnesses, the school district has a plan.

Ferguson said the Summit County Health Department tracks the number of absences for every public school district in the county. If Tallmadge Schools has a concern there's an outbreak of an illness, he said certain measures, such as having a cleaning company do a more rigorous scouring of the buildings, can be taken.

Substitutes will fill in for ill teachers, and students who miss school generally have the same number of days they missed to make up their work. Extenuating circumstances because of extended illnesses can be discussed with teachers, Ferguson said.

"Online has helped us, where a lot of teachers have the work available online so once a child is feeling better maybe they can get some of it," Ferguson said. Not all coursework is available online, he said.

Ill students also have the option of calling the school to have their missed work collected for them so they can pick it up.

Nordonia Hills News Leader Editor Eric Marotta and the AP contributed to this report.

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News Headline: Martin Luther King Day events in Northeast Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Many local organizations will stage public events to mark the 84th birthday of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The official holiday for the civil rights leader is Monday and most government offices will be closed. Below are the events being held in Greater Cleveland.

TODAY

Northeast Ohio. National Day of Service. 'To volunteer locally and find a location near you go to http://action.2013pic.org/National-Day-of-Service.

SUNDAY

8 a.m.: Trinity Cathedral, 2230 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, the Rev. Carl Walter Wright, an Episcopal priest and retired U.S. Air Force chaplain, will be the guest preacher for all morning services. Mostly Jazz Mass will be performing and representatives from the local chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen Inc. will be guests at the Dean's Forum. For more information call 216-774-0479.

3 p.m.: Cuyahoga Community College Metro Campus, 2900 Community College Ave., Cleveland, 36th annual celebration featuring musician, composer and music producer Avery Sharpe. The event will also include the presentation of the 2013 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship Fund recipients and a performance by the Cleveland Philharmonic Orchestra. To reserve tickets for this free event and for more information call 216-987-4805 or go to https://forms.tri-c.edu/MLKReservation.

3 p.m.: Lake Shore Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 28010 Lake Shore Blvd., Euclid. Tribute in celebration of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Open to the public. For more information call 216-289-2226.

3:30 p.m.: Hope Lutheran Church, 2222 North Taylor Road, Cleveland Heights. Commemoration featuring Bishop Elizabeth Eaton of the Northeastern Ohio Synod, ELCA. Worship, readings and more. Free. Reception to follow. Call 216-371-5252.

5 p.m.: Finney Chapel, Oberlin College, 90 N. Professor St., Oberlin. The college and community will celebrate the legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in a free public event, which will feature a panel of local speakers sharing their personal stories about the civil rights era in Oberlin.

MONDAY

7:30 a.m.: The Marriott Hotel at Key Center, 127 Public Square, Cleveland. Thirteenth Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Breakfast Celebration. Keynote speaker James-Michael Johnson, linebacker for the Cleveland Browns. 2013 Class of MLK Holiday Scholars. For ticket information call 216-229-0306 no later than noon Sunday.

9 a.m.: Laurel School, One Lyman Circle, Shaker Heights, "A Day of Celebration, Reflection and Service in Memory of Dr. Martin Luther King." Breakfast, special exhibits, service projects and more. Free, open to public, but registration required at www.LaurelSchool.org/MLKsignup. For more information contact Holly Fidler at 216-455-0120 or email at hfidler@LaurelSchool.org.

9 a.m.: East View United Church of Christ, 15615 Chagrin Blvd., Shaker Heights. Keynote speaker, social worker and education advocate Deborah Y. Willis will discuss "What is the Value of Homework to Your Education?" Breakfast and Essay Awards Program. For more information call 216-921-7673.

10 a.m.: Karamu House, 2355 East 89th Street, Cleveland. "Passage to Promise: From Emancipation to Presidency," with a community televised viewing of the inauguration of President Obama. There will be a number of activities including a film screening, family crafting workshops and performances. For more information call Vivian Wilson at 216-795-7070, ext. 215.

10 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Great Lakes Science Center, 601 Erieside Ave., Cleveland. Free admission. Regular OMNIMAX rates still apply. For more information call 216-694-2000.

11 a.m. to 5 p.m.: Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage, 2929 Richmond Road, Beachwood, Free admission, musical presentation and the award-winning play, "A Conversation After a Funeral." For more information call 216-593-0575 or go to maltzmuseum.org.

11 a.m.: The Cleveland Museum of Art, 11150 East Blvd., Cleveland. Several family-friendly activities including the opening of the new interactive gallery, Gallery One. Free, open to the public. For more information call 216-421-7350.

11 a.m.: University of Akron's Student Union Ballroom. Martin Luther King Jr. Activities Fair for students from K-12. Activities encourage nonviolence and civic responsibility. Will also include a number of other activities including dancing, coloring and crafts. For more information call 330-972-7008 or email afw3@uakron.edu.

Noon to 5 p.m.: Cleveland Metroparks Chalet Toboggan Chutes, Mill Stream Run Reservation, 16200 Valley Parkway, Strongsville. Special holiday hours. For more information call 440-572-9990 or go to clevelandmetroparks.com.

1 p.m.: Cleveland Public Library Martin Luther King Jr. Branch, 1962 Stokes Blvd., Cleveland, keynote speaker Rev. Dr. Todd C. Davidson, senior pastor of Antioch Baptist Church, at 28th annual Commemorative Celebration. Event will also feature a broadcast of President Barack Obama's inauguration. Seating begins at 11:30 a.m., full program begins 1 p.m. followed by a reception. Free, open to the public. For more information call 216-623-7018.

2 p.m.: Lakewood Main Library,15425 Detroit Ave., Lakewood. School-age children will celebrate the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. through stories, songs and crafts. For more information call 216-226-8275 ext. 140.

2:30 p.m.: Montefiore, One David N. Myers Parkway, Beachwood. Rev. Hilton O. Smith, President of the NAACP Cleveland Branch, will be the keynote speaker at a tribute. Free, open to the public. For more information call 216-910-2522.

7 p.m.: Mt. Zion Oakwood Village, One Mt. Zion Circle, Oakwood. "Remembering the Dream of King." For more information call 440-232-2645.

TUESDAY

All day: Hiram College, Welcome Center,11715 Garfield Road, Hiram. Students, faculty, staff and administration will participate in symbolic silent sit-ins. Participants who sign up can help keep the seats filled for 30 minutes throughout Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday to symbolize the diversity of the college. People are welcome to view a documentary, complete a questionnaire, sign a social justice pledge or do homework. For more information call 330-569-5954.

Noon: Hiram College, Kennedy Center Ballroom, 11715 Garfield Road. A convocation and panel discussion on the state of race relations in America in the 21st Century. Moderated by Doug Brattebo, assistant professor of political science at Hiram College. For more information call 330-569-5954.

THURSDAY

2 p.m.: Kent State University, Kent Student Center Ballroom, 1075 Risman Drive, Kent. Keynote speaker Dr. Carlos Mu2/3oz Jr., activist and professor emeritus of ethnic studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Free, open to the public. For more information go to www.kent.edu/diversity/mlk-resources.cfm.

FRIDAY

12:30 p.m.: Case Western Reserve University, Amasa Stone Chapel, 10900 Euclid Ave. Lawyer Lanier Guinier, the first black woman to become a tenured professor at Harvard Law School, will speak. Free, open to the public. For more information go to www.cwru.edu/events/mlk/.

4 p.m.: Hiram College,11715 Garfield Road, Hiram. Candlelight vigil to conclude Martin Luther King Jr. celebration. For more information, call 330-569-5954.

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News Headline: Kent State MLK Celebration is Jan. 24 (Brown) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 theme is "Empowering the Individual, Strengthening the Community"

Kent State University's 11th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration, themed “Empowering the Individual, Strengthening the Community,” will take place on Thursday, Jan. 24, at 2 p.m. in the Kent Student Center Ballroom. The event is free and open to the public.

Inspirational speaker and Professor Emeritus of Ethnic Studies Carlos Muñoz Jr., Ph.D., at UC Berkeley is the keynote speaker at the event.

“Our celebration at Kent State gives us the opportunity to reflect on the ideals of a great man whose struggle for civil rights and inclusion has led to many great things for our citizens and country,” said Alfreda Brown, Ed.D., vice president for Kent State's Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. “This year, I am delighted to have Dr. Carlos Muñoz Jr. as our keynote speaker. Dr. Muñoz has been at the forefront of civil rights issues for many decades, and we all can learn a lot from his experiences. I invite all members and friends of our diverse and inclusive Kent State community to join us in this year's celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.”

In his 37-year academic career, Muñoz gained international prominence as a political scientist, historian, journalist and public intellectual. He was born in the “segundo barrio” in El Paso, Texas, and raised in the barrios of East Los Angeles, Calif. Muñoz authored several pioneering works on the Mexican-American political experience and on African-American and Latino political coalitions, including his award-winning “Youth, Identity, Power: The Chicano Movement.” He is an acknowledged expert on the issues of ethnic and racial politics, multiculturalism and diversity, immigration, civil and human rights and affirmative action.

Muñoz has appeared on PBS, NBC, CNN, ABC, CBS and the Spanish-speaking networks Univision and Telemundo, and he is a syndicated columnist with the Progressive Media Project. His newspaper columns are distributed nationally by the Knight-Ridder newswire service and have appeared online on Latino.com and on the BBC World Service.

As a scholar-activist, Muñoz has been a central figure in the struggles for civil and human rights, social and economic justice, and peace in the United States and abroad. He played a prominent leadership role as a founder of the Chicano Civil Rights Movement. He co-founded the Institute for Multiracial Justice in San Francisco and the Latinos Unidos, a grassroots community organization in Berkeley, Calif. Today, Muñoz is active in the Immigrant Rights Movement, and he is currently working on several new books, including “Diversity and the Challenge for a Multiracial Democracy in America.”

Pre-celebratory events marking Martin Luther King Jr. Day at Kent State begin on Jan. 15 with a “Black and Brown Discussion,” featuring Kent State President's Ambassador José Feliciano at the Kent Student Center Kiva at 7 p.m. On Jan. 16, there will be a Support and Mentoring Fair at the Kent Student Center Ballroom Balcony from 1-3 p.m., and a campus conversation, “The Power of Words,” at Studio A in Twin Towers at 6 p.m. Other events include a Game of Life Simulation on Jan. 23 from 5-7 p.m. at Room 310B in the Kent Student Center.

For more information about Kent State's 11th annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebratory events, visit www.kent.edu/diversity/mlk-resources.cfm.

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News Headline: Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Tell us what this holiday means to you and how you will celebrate?

For some, the national holiday honoring the prominent civil rights activist is a time to give back and serve the community, be it through removing graffiti or picking up litter in a local park.

For others, it's an opportunity to educate themselves aboutKing and his life's work. And for others, it's a time to just kick back and enjoy the prolonged weekend.

Here are some MLK events in Kent:

Kent State University's annual celebration is Thursday, Jan. 24, at 2 p.m. in the Kent Student Center Ballroom.

Add your MLK event to Kent Patch's events calendar.

So, tell us—What does Martin Luther King Jr. Day mean to you? What are you doing to commemorate King's legacy?

The Holiday's History

Martin Luther King Jr. Day, now a U.S. holiday, took 15 years to create.

Legislation was first proposed by Congressman John Conyers (D-Michigan) four days after King was assassinated in 1968.

The bill was stalled, but Conyers, along with Rep. Shirley Chisholm (D-New York), pushed for the holiday every legislative session until it was finally passed in 1983, following civil rights marches in Washington.

Then-president Ronald Reagan signed it into law. Yet it was not until 2000 that every U.S. state celebrated Martin Luther King Jr. Day by its name. Before then, states like Utah referred to the holiday more broadly as Human Rights Day.

Now, the Corporation for National and Community Service has declared it an official U.S. Day of Service.

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News Headline: Study shows Akron Marathon adds $6 million to economy (Rohlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Akron Marathon added about $6 million to Akron's economy in 2012, creating the equivalent of 60 full-time jobs.

That's up $2 million from two years ago, according to an economic impact study conducted by the Kent State University's Department of Economics.

The event drew 15,000 runners, bringing a boon to local hotels, gas stations, restaurants and bars, the study said.

"Year after year, the Akron Marathon continues to have a positive economic impact on the city," said Assistant Professor Shawn Rohlin, who led the study. "This event brings thousands of people to Akron to experience the city and spend money. There are few events that can make that claim."

Also significant in 2012: It was the first time that nonlocal racers outnumbered the locals, with 51 percent of registered participants coming from outside Summit and Portage counties.

Last year's special 10th anniversary celebration may have been responsible for some of that draw, officials said. Still, 90 percent of the runners came from within a two-hour radius of Akron.

A second study on the 2012 Akron Marathon also touted the benefits of the race for its health impact.

The analysis, conducted by Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron, reported 75 percent of those who said the race motivated them to improve their health reported improvement in at least one of six possible areas, including weight loss.

Participants lost an average of 3.3 pounds each, and those who said they lost weight also reported a "significant decline" in their overall levels of stress.

The report also found that 91 percent of runners who were motivated to improve their health reported they would run another marathon event in order to stay fit.

During training for the marathon, all runners combined logged between 3.6 and 4.6 million miles.

That means between 409 and 516 million calories were burned - or up to 34,400 calories per person, the report concluded.

Both reports affirmed the marathon's goal, Akron Marathon Executive Director Anne Bitong said.

"It's very gratifying to see through these reports that the [race] has had such a significant impact on both the economy and the overall health and weight loss of our participants," she said.

The single-day event features four races - a full marathon, half marathon, five-person team relay and a one-mile kids fun run.

This year's event is scheduled for Sept. 28. Registration is available at akronmarathon.org. Registration rates increase March 1.

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News Headline: Universities facing drop in future enrollees (Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The heady days of surging enrollment might be over for now at Ohio's colleges and universities.

The number of high school graduates are on a decade-long-plus decline, and already some institutions are beginning to feel the pinch.

Enrollment at Ohio's public colleges and universities fell almost 6 percent last fall, and figures at independent, not-for-profit colleges were down for the first time in 25 years.

“This is a long-term structural issue for us,” said Tom Chema, president of the private Hiram College in Portage County. “You're going to see mergers, acquisitions, institutions that will choose to be in a different market.”

While college enrollment nationwide is expected to grow overall in the next decade, a handful of states, including Ohio, will see declines, thanks to shrinking populations.

The jury is out on how big the decline will be, though, with competing organizations providing vastly different figures.

According to a new report from the U.S. Department of Education, the number of public high school graduates in Ohio will drop more than 18 percent between the peak of 2008-09 and 2021-22 — from 122,200 to 99,990.

Meanwhile, the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education projects a softer decline in Ohio, to 111,600 high school graduates, or 9 percent less, by 2021-22.

Those students are crucial to higher education, as they have been the main fuel to fill seats in classrooms and beds in residence halls.

“The decline is clearly going to have an impact,” said C. Todd Jones, president of the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Ohio, which promotes private, not-for-profit institutions. “The question is, ‘How severe will that decline be?' ”

Decline has started

Many tax-supported universities felt that rumbling last fall. Ohio's 61 public colleges and universities saw enrollment fall 6 percent, or 31,000 students. At the University of Akron, enrollment fell 3 percent after six consecutive years of growth.

Provost Mike Sherman said UA foresaw the downturn and has plans in gear to stem future losses.

Those plans include everything from working with area schools to improve the number of college-ready students who he hopes will turn to UA to a new internship program beginning this spring for 250 undergraduates.

The latter should feed into the university's master plan, Vision 2020, which aims to find jobs for 80 percent of graduates within six months of graduation, Sherman said.

“Yes, we're going to have to be competitive and do some things differently,” he said. “We're going to be part of the solution to offset the population trend.”

Colleges say they will do everything from poaching students from other states to revving up outreach to military veterans and offering more lucrative scholarships.

The private College of Wooster has amped up its outreach to high school counselors in Ohio and in southwestern states like Arizona, meeting all its enrollment goals despite the downturn, dean of students Jennifer Winge said.

But for colleges that compete predominantly in state, competition is keen. More than 100 public and private, two- and four-year colleges in the Buckeye State are competing for the same students in the same high schools.

Messages more targeted

And the declining high school student population might not have the expected effect of holding down costs, said Rebecca Watts, associate vice chancellor for the Ohio Board of Regents, which coordinates tax-supported higher education statewide.

“Students may say, ‘I don't want to share a bedroom and I want at least two bathrooms for four people,' ” Watts said, which could require institutions to improve facilities or build new ones. “Students can make their needs very clear. Sometimes it drives costs up.”

Colleges and universities will be forced to recruit with more targeted messages. Faculty in music and agriculture traditionally have recruited for top students one-on-one, and other disciplines might be forced to follow suit to bring in the best students.

Recruitment “will take a lot of work,” said T. David Garcia, associate vice president for enrollment services at Kent State.

The university, the state's second largest after Ohio State, is working to attract better students who will stay all four years of an undergraduate program, not marginal students who drop out and have to be replaced. Like its sister institutions, KSU also wants more out-of-state, graduate, veteran and international students to buttress the downturn in the high school population.

That could help moderate another challenge: the burgeoning shale gas industry in eastern Ohio, which is home to KSU's regional campuses and to some of the university's biggest enrollment hikes in recent years. Good jobs can divert students from college.

While the main campus in Kent grew last fall, six of KSU's seven regional campuses lost enrollment after sometimes dizzying increases recently.

“We're not looking to grow significantly,” Garcia said. “If at the end of the day we're flat with our enrollment, that's a good thing.”

Small schools may struggle

Still, Kent State, UA and other big universities might not face the same threats as smaller, independent colleges, where even a 5 percent decrease in students can be a major blow.

While the U.S. Department of Education said that public college enrollment nationwide rose 36 between 1996 and 2010, private enrollment spiked 81 percent during the same period. In short, smaller, private colleges have more to lose in an enrollment downturn.

At Hiram College, which with 1,400 students is the smallest in the Akron area, “We're going to have to run even harder to sustain ourselves,” Chema, the president, said.

He foresees that somewhere around 10 percent of all colleges — public and private — won't be around in a decade, or at least won't exist in their current form. They will go out of business or merge or be acquired by others.

That means it will make it harder for students to find the right college for them.

“There will be fewer students chasing a smaller number of institutions,” he said.

Still, he is optimistic that Hiram's overall enrollment will grow to 2,200 in a decade with more distance learners, degree-completion programs with community colleges and adult learners returning to college to get an education or complete a degree. But he expects Hiram to have about the same number of residential students that it has today — 1,200.

Jim Tressel, UA's vice president of strategic engagement, talks up college-going to everyone he meets. While he used to steer students on the football field at Ohio State, he's now trying to steer them into the classroom at UA.

“It's going to come down to who does it best,” he said.

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News Headline: Colleges bracing for declining enrollment (Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: POPULATION SHIFT IN OHIO BLAMED FOR IT

AKRON — Universities in
Ohio are changing how they
recruit students and rethinking
their approaches amid
predictions that the number
of public high school graduates
in the state will continue
to drop over the next decade.

Ohio's public colleges and
universities posted an enrollment
drop of 6 percent last
fall, and numbers at independent,
nonprofit colleges
were down for the first time
in 25 years.

The biggest concern is
over population shifts that
will leave Ohio with fewer
high school graduates.

The U.S. Department of
Education estimates that
the number of public high
school graduates in Ohio will
by about 18 percent between
2008 and 2021. The Western
Interstate Commission on
Higher Education predicts
the drop will be 9 percent.

Colleges and universities
will be forced to recruit student
with more targeted
messages, The Akron Beacon
Journal reported.

Kent State University
wants to bring in better students
who will stay all four
years instead of marginal
students who drop out and
have to be replaced. It also is
looking to more out-of-state,
graduate, veteran and international
students.

“We're not looking to grow
significantly,” said T. David
Garcia, associate vice president
for enrollment services
at KSU. “If at the end of the
day we're flat with our enrollment,
that's a good thing.”

KSU's enrollment has
steadily increased in recent
years.

The University of Akron
is working with northeast
Ohio high schools to improve
the number of collegeready
students. The school
also is planning a new internship
program beginning
this spring for 250 undergraduates.

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News Headline: Home and garden happenings -- week of Jan. 19 | Email

News Date: 01/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Breckenridge, Mary Beth
News OCR Text: Jan. 18--HGTV's David Bromstad will make appearances today during the NARI Remodel Ohio Home Improvement Show at Cleveland's I-X Center.

Bromstad, winner of HGTV's first Design Star competition and host of the shows Color Splash, Color Splash: Miami and The White Room Challenge, will be onstage at noon, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. He will sign autographs at the Sherwin-Williams booth after each appearance.

Other highlights of the home improvement show are a home designed for all ages, designer rooms, a pool and spa show and a custom doghouse auction.

The show is open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. today and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at the I-X Center, off state Route 237 next to Cleveland Hopkins Airport.

Admission is $14. Children younger than 16 are admitted free. Parking is $8.

Information and a discount coupon are at www.remodelohio.org.

Seedlings, rain barrels

Tree seedlings, flower seeds and rain barrels are again being offered for sale by the Summit Soil and Water Conservation District.

Various seedling packets are available at prices ranging from $10 to $26. Annual and perennial seed mixes and bird and butterfly seed mixes are also available.

Rain barrels are $80 each and come with a spigot, overflow hose and sight gauge. A linking barrel for additional water storage can be purchased for $50 and comes with a hose to attach to the main barrel.

The barrels are 55-gallon blue plastic drums with removable lids.

Details and an order form are at www.summitswcd.org (click on "2013 Tree Seedling Sale").

Trees must be ordered by March 29, or March 22 for bulk deciduous trees. They must be picked up between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. April 12 at the district office, 2525 State Road, Cuyahoga Falls.

Barrels ordered by March 29 will be available for pickup April 12. For orders placed after March 29, barrels will be available for pickup about two weeks after the order is placed.

For more information, call 330-929-2871, ext. 16.

Horticulture grants

Grants for horticulture-related projects, programs or events are available from the Master Gardeners of Summit County.

Grants of up to $1,000 are available to qualifying nonprofit, educational and public organizations in Summit County. Projects must have an educational element to be considered.

Information and an application packet are at http://summitmastergardeners.org (click on "Grants" under the "Resources" tab).

Application deadline is Feb. 23.

For additional information, send email to mgscgrants@gmail.com.

Events, programs

--Recycled Bird Feeders, 1-3 p.m. today, Cleveland Botanical Garden, 11030 East Blvd. Families will use recycled materials to make bird feeders. Free with garden admission ($9.50; children ages 3-12, $4; members and younger children, free). 216-721-1600 or www.cbgarden.org.

--Knitting and Crocheting Circle meeting, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. today and Jan. 26, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Granger Township, Medina County. Call for supply list. 330-278-4271 or 330-239-2674.

--Gardeners of Greater Akron meeting, Monday evening, St. George Fellowship Centre, 3204 Ridgewood Road, Copley Township. Social hour starts at 5:30, dinner at 6:30. Program: Hydroponic Gardening. Cost: $13. Reservations: 330-336-6269. Information: 330-673-3553 or www.ohiogardeners.org.

--Knitting and Crocheting Circle meeting, 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road. Registration: 330-273-4150.

--Warm Up Akron meetings, 3:30 and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Mogadore Branch Library, 144 S. Cleveland Ave. Members knit and crochet rectangles that are used to make afghans for needy people in the Akron area, and they'll teach others the skills. 330-699-3252 or http://warmupakron.webs.com.

--So You Want to Start a Community Garden?, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday, Akron-Summit County Public Library, 60 S. High St., Akron. Learn about basics and resources available. Presented by Summit Food Policy Coalition's Neighborfood program, Let's Grow Akron, Akron Community Foundation and Summit County Master Gardeners. Free. Information: sv0614@gmail.com.

--Yarncrafters meetings, 1-3 and 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway. Knitting and crocheting group. www.mcdl.info or 330-725-0588.

--Needlework Circle meeting, 6 p.m. Thursdays, Seville Library, North Center Street. 330-769-2852.

--Home furnishings floor sample sale, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 26, Ohio Design Centre, 23533 Mercantile Road, Beachwood (off Chagrin Boulevard, west of Interstate 271). Six showrooms open. $5 admission, which benefits Cleveland Furniture Bank. 216-831-1245 or www.ohiodesigncentre.com.

--Sustainability Symposium 2013, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 26, Cleveland Botanical Garden, 11030 East Blvd. Theme: adjusting to climate change and unpredictable weather patterns in Northeast Ohio. Keynote speaker: Scott Sheridan, Kent State University climatology professor. $50 for members, $60 for others. Registration: 216-721-1600, ext. 100, or www.cbgarden.org.

--Annuals and Tropical Plants for Summer Color in Your Landscape and Containers, 10-11:30 a.m. Jan. 26, Graf Growers Garden Center, 1015 White Pond Drive, Copley Township. Speaker: Brian Jorg of Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden. $12. Registration: 330-836-2727, or use the mail-in registration form at www.grafgrowers.com.

--Garden Club of Kent President's Banquet, 6:30 p.m. Jan. 28, NEOMED Conference and Event Center, 4209 State Route 44, Rootstown Township. Program: awards and remembrances of members. $20; cash bar. Reservations: 330-673-1686.

Submit notices of classes, programs and events two weeks in advance to mbrecken@thebeaconjournal.com or Home and Garden News, Features Department, Akron Beacon Journal, P.O. Box 640, Akron, OH 44309-0640. Please include name and phone number. All events must be open to the public.

Mary Beth Breckenridge can be reached at 330-996-3756 or mbrecken@thebeaconjournal.com. You can also become a fan on Facebook at http://tinyurl.com/mbbreck, follow her on Twitter @MBBreckenridge and read her blog at www.ohio.com/blogs/mary-beth.

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News Headline: Senator Sherrod Brown visits downtown Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name: Thomas Gallick
News OCR Text: U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown made the case that federal spending could lead to job growth and spur private development during a visit to downtown Kent Jan. 16, pointing to the city's $110 million downtown redevelopment project as an example.

The senator, in town to tour redevelopment efforts and meet with local business and community leaders, said using federal funding for projects like the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's new downtown parking deck and the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, was more effective at creating jobs than cutting taxes for individuals in the upper tax brackets.

"You don't grow an economy by tax cuts for the rich trickling down," Brown said. "You grow an economy by focusing on the middle class and growing it out from there. That's what both parties in Congress said two weeks ago, and I think that's pretty established that's the direction we should go in. And part of that, I think, is more stimulus to put people to work, which then will mean fewer tax dollars going out the door."

Brown said that, unlike some of his colleagues, he was unashamed of supporting earmarks for his home state.

He said the $20 million Department of Transportation grant for the PARTA parking deck, which was part of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009, and $4 million in New Market Tax Credit funding for the hotel were used to create jobs and strengthen the local economy. Both projects are expected to open this spring.

Brown said he is a strong supporter of the New Market Tax Credit Program, which allocates $3.5 billion in tax credits for real estate and business developments in low-income communities each year. The program, created in 2000, was extended through 2013 by the Congress' deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff.

"The New Markets Tax Credit is something we know works," he said. "I would think people in both parties understand that and it would likely be continued, but you never know."

Brown called his tour of downtown Kent, "pretty exciting," noting that he tries to visit the area when he can with his wife, Connie Schultz, a KSU graduate and Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper columnist.

"I've been in Kent lots of times over the last 30 years and seen the problems and seen it coming back," Brown said. "This is a great picture for Kent."

Brown fired off questions to KSU and PARTA officials as he toured the neighboring hotel and parking deck sites at the corner of DePeyster and Erie streets, asking about how many workers were employed at the sites, when the projects would be completed and whether union labor was being used. Earlier in his visit, he asked employees at electro-mechanical manufacturer Ametek's new downtown Kent offices about their employment numbers and whether they should be working more closely with KSU to train potential employees.

He shook hands with workers at the downtown Kent construction sites and chatted with local business owners, including Gwen Rosenberg, who handed the senator a bag of popcorn, which he sampled, from her Acorn Alley popcorn shop, Popped!.

KSU President Lester Lefton and Kent City Manager Dave Ruller thanked Brown for his support and gave him a brief history of the collaboration between city, university and business leaders on the downtown Kent redevelopment project at Ametek's downtown Kent offices.

"We sort of all got together, held hands, prayed, lept and did it," Lefton said of the project. "What's gone on is about $110 million of public-private partnership."

Although Brown touted the federal spending role in reviving downtown Kent, he added that the project could not have worked unless it was "driven by attracting private capital and job creation."

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1126 or tgallick@recordpub.com

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News Headline: Senator Sherrod Brown visits downtown Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name: Thomas Gallick
News OCR Text: U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown made the case that federal spending could lead to job growth and spur private development during a visit to downtown Kent Jan. 16, pointing to the city's $110 million downtown redevelopment project as an example.

The senator, in town to tour redevelopment efforts and meet with local business and community leaders, said using federal funding for projects like the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's new downtown parking deck and the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, was more effective at creating jobs than cutting taxes for individuals in the upper tax brackets.

"You don't grow an economy by tax cuts for the rich trickling down," Brown said. "You grow an economy by focusing on the middle class and growing it out from there. That's what both parties in Congress said two weeks ago, and I think that's pretty established that's the direction we should go in. And part of that, I think, is more stimulus to put people to work, which then will mean fewer tax dollars going out the door."

Brown said that, unlike some of his colleagues, he was unashamed of supporting earmarks for his home state.

He said the $20 million Department of Transportation grant for the PARTA parking deck, which was part of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009, and $4 million in New Market Tax Credit funding for the hotel were used to create jobs and strengthen the local economy. Both projects are expected to open this spring.

Brown said he is a strong supporter of the New Market Tax Credit Program, which allocates $3.5 billion in tax credits for real estate and business developments in low-income communities each year. The program, created in 2000, was extended through 2013 by the Congress' deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff.

"The New Markets Tax Credit is something we know works," he said. "I would think people in both parties understand that and it would likely be continued, but you never know."

Brown called his tour of downtown Kent, "pretty exciting," noting that he tries to visit the area when he can with his wife, Connie Schultz, a KSU graduate and Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper columnist.

"I've been in Kent lots of times over the last 30 years and seen the problems and seen it coming back," Brown said. "This is a great picture for Kent."

Brown fired off questions to KSU and PARTA officials as he toured the neighboring hotel and parking deck sites at the corner of DePeyster and Erie streets, asking about how many workers were employed at the sites, when the projects would be completed and whether union labor was being used. Earlier in his visit, he asked employees at electro-mechanical manufacturer Ametek's new downtown Kent offices about their employment numbers and whether they should be working more closely with KSU to train potential employees.

KSU President Lester Lefton and Kent City Manager Dave Ruller thanked Brown for his support and gave him a brief history of the collaboration between city, university and business leaders on the downtown Kent redevelopment project at Ametek's downtown Kent offices.

"We sort of all got together, held hands, prayed, lept and did it," Lefton said of the project. "What's gone on is about $110 million of public-private partnership."

Although Brown touted the federal spending role in reviving downtown Kent, he added that the project could not have worked unless it was "driven by attracting private capital and job creation."

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1126 or tgallick@recordpub.com

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News Headline: Senator Sherrod Brown visits downtown Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name: Thomas Gallick
News OCR Text: U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown made the case that federal spending could lead to job growth and spur private development during a visit to downtown Kent Jan. 16, pointing to the city's $110 million downtown redevelopment project as an example.

The senator, in town to tour redevelopment efforts and meet with local business and community leaders, said using federal funding for projects like the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's new downtown parking deck and the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, was more effective at creating jobs than cutting taxes for individuals in the upper tax brackets.

"You don't grow an economy by tax cuts for the rich trickling down," Brown said. "You grow an economy by focusing on the middle class and growing it out from there. That's what both parties in Congress said two weeks ago, and I think that's pretty established that's the direction we should go in. And part of that, I think, is more stimulus to put people to work, which then will mean fewer tax dollars going out the door."

Brown said that, unlike some of his colleagues, he was unashamed of supporting earmarks for his home state.

He said the $20 million Department of Transportation grant for the PARTA parking deck, which was part of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009, and $4 million in New Market Tax Credit funding for the hotel were used to create jobs and strengthen the local economy. Both projects are expected to open this spring.

Brown said he is a strong supporter of the New Market Tax Credit Program, which allocates $3.5 billion in tax credits for real estate and business developments in low-income communities each year. The program, created in 2000, was extended through 2013 by the Congress' deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff.

"The New Markets Tax Credit is something we know works," he said. "I would think people in both parties understand that and it would likely be continued, but you never know."

Brown called his tour of downtown Kent, "pretty exciting," noting that he tries to visit the area when he can with his wife, Connie Schultz, a KSU graduate and Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper columnist.

"I've been in Kent lots of times over the last 30 years and seen the problems and seen it coming back," Brown said. "This is a great picture for Kent."

Brown fired off questions to KSU and PARTA officials as he toured the neighboring hotel and parking deck sites at the corner of DePeyster and Erie streets, asking about how many workers were employed at the sites, when the projects would be completed and whether union labor was being used. Earlier in his visit, he asked employees at electro-mechanical manufacturer Ametek's new downtown Kent offices about their employment numbers and whether they should be working more closely with KSU to train potential employees.

He shook hands with workers at the downtown Kent construction sites and chatted with local business owners, including Gwen Rosenberg, who handed the senator a bag of popcorn, which he sampled, from her Acorn Alley popcorn shop, Popped!.

KSU President Lester Lefton and Kent City Manager Dave Ruller thanked Brown for his support and gave him a brief history of the collaboration between city, university and business leaders on the downtown Kent redevelopment project at Ametek's downtown Kent offices.

"We sort of all got together, held hands, prayed, lept and did it," Lefton said of the project. "What's gone on is about $110 million of public-private partnership."

Although Brown touted the federal spending role in reviving downtown Kent, he added that the project could not have worked unless it was "driven by attracting private capital and job creation."

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1126

or tgallick@recordpub.com

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News Headline: Geauga Hunger Task Force to hold Incredible Edible art show in February | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Joan Rusek
News OCR Text: CHARDON - Several organizations are seeking participants in their Feb. 12-16 "Incredible Edible" sculpture show to be on display in the Commons at Kent State Geauga.

The United Way Services of Geauga County, Kent State Geauga and the Geauga Hunger Task Force is holding the event to collect food and raise awareness about hunger in Geauga County.

Participants must supply and use approximately 300 items in the creation of their sculpture. In addition to non-perishable food items, paper products, personal hygiene and cleaning supplies may be incorporated into the design.

Any group or individual may participate in this event, including clubs, businesses, civic organizations, schools and non-profit organizations.

Depending upon the size and design, sculptures will be constructed on the floor. Tables are available upon request at the time of registration. All other materials must be furnished by the participants. The theme is "Board Games."

The opening will be held on February 12. Groups may set up Feb. 9 or Feb. 11.

On Thursday, February 14 at 12:00 noon, The sculptures will be judged Feb. 14 with winners announced at 1 p.m. On Feb. 16 the sculptures will be dismantled and items will be donated to the Geauga County Hunger Task Force.

Register with Joann Randall, United Way Services of Geauga County, jrandall@uws.org.

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News Headline: ART EXHIBIT TO BEGIN | Email

News Date: 01/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The annual Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Awards and Exhibit will be Wednesday through Jan. 30 in the Kent State University at Stark State Campus Center, Fine Arts Building, and the Main Art Gallery.

The exhibit will feature more than 3,000 pieces of artwork from middle and high school students, representing schools in Stark, Summit, Portage, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties.

The galleries will be open for viewing from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays.

The regional awards ceremony and reception will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday in the University Center at Kent State Stark.

Gold Key winners, American Vision nominees and Portfolio finalists will be forwarded into the national level to participate in the Alliance for Young Artists and Writers' National Student Art Exhibition of The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards in New York City in June.

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News Headline: Workshop for nonprofits offered | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Small Business Development Center, Tuscarawas County Chamber of Commerce, Tuscarawas County Community Foundation, Stark Community Foundation and Canton Regional Chapter of SCORE are offering a workshop for area nonprofits, both startups and existing organizations from 2 to 4 p.m. Feb. 15 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas Science and Advanced Technology Center Room 113/107. There is no charge for the event.

The purpose is to help nonprofits improve operations and build long-term success.

Contact Deanna Spencer to register for this class at 330-308-7522 or dmspence@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Hudson Library offers "MBA-Lite" Mini Series: Renew Your Business | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Hudson Library & Historical Society's Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship Research will again be offering a mini-series of more advanced (Level II) programs for the small business community. This" MBA Lite" four-part series will have one workshop in January and three in February.

"MBA-Lite: Renew Your Business" will feature presenters from area businesses and universities. The leadoff session Jan. 28 will be "Driving Change in Stable Organizations" with Dr. Susan C. Hanlon, Assistant Dean, College of Business Administration at The University of Akron; "Financing for a Small Business" will be offered Feb. 11, with PNC's Business Banking Officer Jon Novak; "Value added IP: Why Intellectual Property Adds Value to Small Business" will be Feb. 13 with Howard Wernow and John Gugliotta, registered patent attorneys. The final session Feb. 25, is "Entrepreneurial Marketing: How to Market the "New" with Denise Easterling, CPA, Entrepreneur Faculty Advisor for Collegiate Entrepreneur's Organization for Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation at Kent State University.

Registrants will be asked to attend each session in the mini-series in order to earn a certificate after completion. The programs will begin at 6:30 p.m. and last for 75 minutes of teaching time, followed by a question and answer period.

The Entrepreneurship Series is made possible with a grant from the Burton D. Morgan Foundation. Programs are free, but do require registration. All interested entrepreneurs are invited to register for these workshops by calling 330-653-6658 ext. 1010, or register online at hudsonlibrary.org.

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News Headline: The Best and Worst Learning Techniques | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Michigan Chronicle - Online
Contact Name: Annie Murphy Paul
News OCR Text: Details Category: Urban Ed Published on Monday, 21 January 2013 09:00 Written by Annie Murphy Paul, Time

In a world as fast-changing and full of information as our own, every one of us — from schoolchildren to college students to working adults — needs to know how to learn well. Yet evidence suggests that most of us don't use the learning techniques that science has proved most effective. Worse, research finds that learning strategies we do commonly employ, like rereading and highlighting, are among the least effective.

The scientific literature evaluating these techniques stretches back decades and across thousands of articles. It's far too extensive and complex for the average parent, teacher or employer to sift through. Fortunately, a team of five leading psychologists have now done the job for us. In a comprehensive report released on Jan. 9 by the Association for Psychological Science, the authors, led by Kent State University professor John Dunlosky, closely examine 10 learning tactics and rate each from high to low utility on the basis of the evidence they've amassed. Here is a quick guide to the report's conclusions:

The Worst

Highlighting and underlining led the authors' list of ineffective learning strategies. Although they are common practices, studies show they offer no benefit beyond simply reading the text. Some research even indicates that highlighting can get in the way of learning; because it draws attention to individual facts, it may hamper the process of making connections and drawing inferences. Nearly as bad is the practice of rereading, a common exercise that is much less effective than some of the better techniques you can use. Lastly, summarizing, or writing down the main points contained in a text, can be helpful for those who are skilled at it, but again, there are far better ways to spend your study time. Highlighting, underlining, rereading and summarizing were all rated by the authors as being of “low utility.”

The Best

In contrast to familiar practices like highlighting and rereading, the learning strategies with the most evidence to support them aren't well known outside the psych lab. Take distributed practice, for example. This tactic involves spreading out your study sessions, rather than engaging in one marathon. Cramming information at the last minute may allow you to get through that test or meeting, but the material will quickly disappear from memory. It's much more effective to dip into the material at intervals over time. And the longer you want to remember the information, whether it's two weeks or two years, the longer the intervals should be.

The second learning strategy that is highly recommended by the report's authors is practice testing. Yes, more tests — but these are not for a grade. Research shows that the mere act of calling information to mind strengthens that knowledge and aids in future retrieval. While practice testing is not a common strategy — despite the robust evidence supporting it — there is one familiar approach that captures its benefits: using flash cards. And now flash cards can be presented in digital form, via apps like Quizlet, StudyBlue and FlashCardMachine. Both spaced-out learning, or distributed practice, and practice tests were rated as having “high utility” by the authors.

The Rest

The remainder of the techniques evaluated by Dunlosky and his colleagues fell into the middle ground — not useless, but not especially effective either. These include mental imagery, or coming up with pictures that help you remember text (which is time-consuming and only works with text that lends itself to images); elaborative interrogation, or asking yourself “why” as you read (which is kind of annoying, like having a 4-year-old tugging at your sleeve); self-explanation, or forcing yourself to explain the text in detail instead of passively reading it over (its effectiveness depends on how complete and accurate your explanations are); interleaved practice, or mixing up different types of problems (there is not much evidence to show that this is helpful, outside of learning motor tasks); and lastly the keyword mnemonic, or associating new vocabulary words, usually in a foreign language, with an English word that sounds similar — so, for example, learning the French word for key, la clef, by imagining a key on top of a cliff (which is a lot of work to remember a single word).

All these techniques were rated of “moderate” to “low” utility by Dunlosky et al because either there isn't enough evidence yet to be able to recommend them or they're just not a very good use of your time. Much better, say the authors, to spread out your learning, ditch your highlighter and get busy with your flash cards.

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News Headline: Relationship Between Children, Dogs Topic of Kent State Study (Kerns) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Families needed for psychology department research project

How children relate to their pet dogs is the topic of a study by researchers in Kent State University's Department of Psychology.

Professor Kathy Kerns is leading the study, in which researchers are trying to determine how a child's relationship to their pet dog relates to their connections with other people and how they adjust as they grow.

Kerns said the study is part of a grant from the National Institute of Health to examine how pet relationships fit in with other kinds of relationships children have.

"So do they provide support?" she said. "Are they particularly important for kids who may be having difficulties in their human relationships? The studies that are out there have sort of looked at pet relationships in isolation, so we don't really get a picture of how it fits into the whole development of the child."

Kerns said they selected dogs for the study purposefully rather than cats, reptiles or other house pets.

"A lot of the work on pets and kids just asks about pets, and it's really not clear what kids are talking about,” she said. "We selected dogs purposefully because people so often say ‘You're dog loves you no matter what.' (There is) this idea that dogs might be a particular pet that would be the kind to provide validation and support."

To participate, families must have one household dog as a pet with a child either in fourth or fifth grade. Interested families can call 330-672-2139 or send an email to akoehn@kent.edu for more information about participating.

The actual information gathered comes from one visit to the family's home to fill out a questionnaire and observe some interaction between the child and dog.

The researchers at Kent State plan to gather data on 100 families. So far, 40 families have taken part.

Kerns, like her two collaborators, has a family dog — a black lab. She suspects they will learn through the study that children with strong relationships with their pet dogs cope with stress better and are more social.

"We also expect to find the kids who say they are close to their dogs reporting things like feeling less lonely, less anxious," she said.

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News Headline: PLANNED TRANSITION OF KENT STATE'S VAN CAMPEN HALL CREATES SWING SPACE FOR 'FOUNDATIONS OF EXCELLENCE' INITIATIVE (Church) | Email

News Date: 01/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Jan.18 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's Department of Residence Services will turn control of Van Campen Hall back to the Division of Business and Finance in May 2013.Residence Services has been using the building as a residence hall for the past three years, on loan from the Division of Business and Finance.The planned transition of the three-story building will take 56 beds offline from Residence Services' available stock.

The building will be used for much-needed swing space, providing transitional offices for displaced employees for the "Foundations of Excellence: Building the Future" initiative.During the next four years, Kent State will be transforming its campus with new buildings and revitalized classroom, laboratory, studio, performance, living and studying spaces.Van Campen Hall will provide temporary office spaces for employees whose buildings are being renovated or constructed.

Students who are currently living in Van Campen Hall will have priority registration for the contract renewal process for Fall 2013 university housing.The hall director and other members of Residence Services met with residents to let them know of the hall's transition and explain how they will receive priority registration.Van Campen Hall residents also were given an information handout and were encouraged to contact their hall director should they have any questions.

"We feel comfortable with our demographics and our ability to house everyone who chooses to live on campus or is required to live on campus," said Jill Church, Kent State's interim director of Residence Services."This is a planned transition.Van Campen is located on the periphery of campus, and generally, our students have preferred living closer to the center of campus."

Van Campen Hall is located on the edge of campus at 625 Loop Road in Kent.The building was added to the university in 1967 as part of Small Group One, which also included Harbourt Hall and Heer Hall.

For more information about Kent State's Department of Residence Services, visit www.kent.edu/housing.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

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News Headline: College Students Seek Sugar Daddies on Dating Website | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University in Kent, OH was number 11 on SeekingArrangement.com's list of "Fastest Growing Sugar Baby Schools."

An online dating service that matches college students with “sugar daddies” says female students at Kent State University in Kent, OH are among the most active on its site.

SeekingArrangement.com released a list of the "Fastest Growing Sugar Baby Schools,” ranking colleges where it says the most women are signing up for the site.

Kent State was listed number 11 on the list, according to a press release.

Members sign up for this dating site as either a sugar daddy, sugar momma or sugar baby. Sugar babies are described on the website as “students, actresses, models or girls & guys next door. You know you deserve to date someone who will pamper you, empower you, and help you mentally, emotionally and financially.”

Angela Jacob Bermudo, a publicist for SeekingArrangement.com, said the average sugar baby is 22 years old and attends school. "She is looking for a mutually beneficial relationship," she said in a phone conversation with Patch.

The majority of students who use the site are females in search of wealthy older men to help them pay off loans and tuition bills, The Huffington Post reported in July 2011.

The average student sugar baby “receives approximately $3,000 a month in allowances and gifts from her Sugar Daddy, enough to cover tuition and living expenses at most schools," The Huffington Post reported.

The CEO of the company says the relationships between sugar daddies and sugar babies are not a form of prostitution. “There is chemistry involved in these relationships,” Brandon Wade told The Wall Street Journal in August 2011. “It's not a one-time exchange of money for sex … After a relationship forms, sex becomes part of the relationship.”

One User's Experience

Stephanie, 21, of Brooklyn, NY, used SeekingArrangement.com briefly before deciding it wasn't for her. “If you're the kind of girl who just wants to be taken care of, then that's what this site has going for you,” she told Patch.

Stephanie, a student at FIT who did not want to reveal her last name, said she did meet one man she was interested in on the site. They exchanged numbers and had a “texting relationship” for a couple months.

“It felt like we didn't really meet on SeekingArrangement. I think we both steered away from the website because we didn't have the same opinions and views as most of the people on there,” she said.

Her advice for curious users: be realistic going in. “Sugar babies are there to seek someone's money and travel with them for free. The guys probably just want to find young, beautiful women to either be arm candy at events or just have sex with.”

Other Ranked Colleges

SeekingArrangement.com launched in 2005 and reportedly has 2 million members. The Las Vegas-based company says 128 new members from Kent State joined the site in 2012.

SeekingArrangement.com used the following data to create its list of fastest growing sugar baby schools. Below are the schools identified by the site, as well as the number of female students who signed up for the site in 2012, followed by the school's ranking on a similar list released for 2011.

Georgia State University – 292 (#11 in 2011)
New York University – 285 (#1 in 2011)
Temple University – 268 (#5 in 2011)
University of Central Florida – 221 (#14 in 2011)
University of South Florida – 212 (#7 in 2011)
Arizona State University – 204 (#8 in 2011)
Florida International University - 187
University of Georgia – 148 (#2 in 2011)
Indiana University – 123 (#17 in 2011)
Texas State - 131
Kent State University – 128 (#15 in 2011)
Penn State – 121 (#13 in 2011)
University of North Texas - 112
Florida State University - 111
Tulane University – 109 (#4 in 2011)
Michigan State University – 108 (#9 in 2011)
Ohio University - 103
Columbia University - 100
University of Alabama - 96
UCLA - 91

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News Headline: Kent landmark 'saved,' but still not on new site | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent landmark 'saved,' but still not on new site

Almost a year after a group of history buffs rediscovered the Kent Wells Sherman House, the future of the 170-year-old home with ties to Kent's founding family still remains hazy due to an ongoing legal fight.

Still, a group of preservationists who founded Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc. for the purpose of moving the 1850s Greek Revival-style structure in order to save it from demolition feel confident the house will be in its new home at 247 N. Water St. by spring.

Last year, Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc. purchased the vacant North Water Street property, which had been used by neighboring Standing Rock Cultural Arts as a garden and performance space for 20 years with permission from the previous owner, in order to relocate the house.

A group called "Save the Standing Rock Garden," created to stop the house's relocation to Water Street, is currently challenging a magistrate's earlier ruling that the city of Kent did not violate state law and its own guidelines when its Architectural Review Board and Planning Commission approved plans to move the house. The group filed its original appeal of the boards' decision in October, and is continuing the challenge despite having its preliminary injunctions against the city and the preservation group denied by a magistrate.

Roger Thurman, vice chairman of Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc., said he believes the initial court battle has proven his group and the city of Kent did nothing wrong during the process of finding a new location for the home, which originally was the home of Frances Kent Wells, the daughter of Zenas Kent.

"We basically prevailed in court," Thurman said. "The substance that has been presented in court has been very strongly in our favor."

The group has already moved the house once, with Kent State University's assistance, to a temporary home on KSU property at the dead end of College Avenue, where it sits today. The house was move there from Erie Street, its location since the 1920s, which has since been vacated by the city to make room for an extension of KSU's Esplanade walkway.

The two-story Greek Revival-style structure, which dates to the 1850s, originally was located on South Water Street and was moved from that site in the 1920s because of commercial development. It is among a handful of surviving 19th Century structures with direct ties to the Kent family.

Thurman said the group is waiting both on the court case to end, and for the city of Kent to issue a foundation permit for the house's proposed location on Water Street. He said the leadership of the group has not decided on whether they will go ahead with the process of moving the house if the permit is issued before the court case ends.

"Save the Standing Rock Garden" previously had a temporary restraining order against Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc., which prevented them from altering the Water Street site, but that order was rescinded after Magistrate Kent Graham ruled that the "Garden" group had no legal ownership claim on the land.

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News Headline: Book talk: Wildlife officer's memoir; Ohio's lost places | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Undercover wildlife officer gives account of preying on poachers

Over the course of 18 years, R.T. Stewart hunted deer, raccoon, turkey and other wildlife out of season, bringing in game over the legal limit, using prohibited weapons and wearing boots made of the skins of endangered species. He wasn't a criminal - he explains it all in his memoir Poachers Were My Prey: Eighteen Years as an Undercover Wildlife Officer.

Beginning in the early 1990s, Stewart's assignments would find him living in vans and unheated, roach-infested trailers for as long as a year and a half without breaking cover, developing conflicted feelings about befriending several of the men he was investigating. Some grew to trust him so fully that they allowed him to videotape their illegal activities, even hamming it up for the camera. He was involved in two landmark cases.

Stewart tells of different operations targeting suspects like the one he and a partner dubbed "The Hunter from Hell," who didn't know that the agents' van was fitted with surveillance equipment, recording their incriminating actions.

Some were exceedingly brutal; others were peculiar, like the Cleveland Chinese-restaurant suppliers who wanted Stewart and his partner to provide them with snapping turtles and a black bear.

Stewart's story is "as told to" outdoor writer W.H. "Chip" Gross, who's published wildlife and fishing guides - a good thing, because, as Stewart's former supervisor remarks in the foreword, Stewart isn't "particularly gifted at putting words on paper." He tells a great story, though.

Poachers Were My Prey (216 pages, softcover) costs $19.95 from Kent State University Press.

Randy McNutt celebrates what remains

In his previous books, like Ghosts: Ohio's Haunted Landscapes, Lost Arts, and Forgotten Places, Randy McNutt has searched the back roads of Ohio for ghost towns, places that aren't there anymore. In his new book, Finding Utopia: Another Journey into Lost Ohio, McNutt's goal is to "celebrate what remains," to find remnants of the heartland before they disappear.

One of McNutt's most fascinating finds is the story of Magnetic Springs, a village northwest of Columbus. A council member tells McNutt that the village, with a population just over 300, can't even afford to pay counsel for advice on dissolving its incorporation, let alone to repair the failing sewers. But a century ago, Magnetic Springs was one of the most prosperous resorts in the country, with hordes of well-heeled tourists who came to bathe in the mineral-rich spring water and stay in the fine hotels, now all gone.

The author finds more detail than most when telling the popular tale of Rogue's Hollow and Cry Baby Bridge and, in a final chapter, shares his research on the peculiar names of some communities that may exist only in memory, like Polkadotte and Democracy. Brimstone Corners, the intersection of state Routes 21 and 93 in Canal Fulton, "was a meeting place for farmers, canal deck hands, and miners."

Finding Utopia (258 pages, softcover) costs $21.95 from Black Squirrel Books, an imprint of Kent State University Press.

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