Report Overview:
Total Clips (25)
Alumni (6)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Office of the University Architect; Renovation at KSU (1)
Athletics; Institutional Advancement (1)
Biogeochemistry (5)
Communication Studies (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
Hotel and Conference Center; Students; Town-Gown (1)
International and Intercultural Education (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program; Psychology (2)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Town-Gown (1)
University Communications and Marketing (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (6)
Free live comedy 01/24/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...received justice on the Judge Alex show, will headline the show. And just when you think your splintered mind can't suffer from any more vulgarity, Kent State University alumni and host Anthony Savatt comes in and tells another satirical joke. It's the kind of entertainment you have to see to...

Need to clean up your Facebook profile? Get a 'Facewash' 01/23/2013 L.A. Times Technology Blog Text Attachment Email

...Facewash ) Got a Facebook profile with vulgarities or embarrassing pages you shouldn't have liked? Now there's a way to clean them up. A trio of Kent State University undergrads have put together the "Facewash" app that'll search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that...

FaceWash Cleans Up Dirty Facebook History 01/23/2013 PC Magazine Text Attachment Email

...highlighting specific terms and providing a direct link to the post, where users can delete or privatize the message. FaceWash is the brainchild of Kent State grads Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur, and David Steinberg, who frame it as a service for college students with something to hide, but no time...

Need to clean up your Facebook profile? Get a 'Facewash' 01/24/2013 Burbank Leader - Online Text Attachment Email

Got a Facebook profile with vulgarities or embarrassing pages you shouldn't have liked? Now there's a way to clean them up. A trio of Kent State University undergrads have put together the "Facewash" app that'll search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that...

Students Create Facewash app 01/24/2013 KDFW-TV Text Email

Thank goodness some students at kent state university in ohio created the genius idea called face wash. It searches your facebook page looked for things you may want to hide or delete....

Cleanse Your Facebook With ‘Facewash’ 01/24/2013 EFYTimes.com Text Attachment Email

...Are there things on your Facebook page that you feel should not have been there? Well, here is your chance to clean it up! Three undergraduates at the Kent State University have created a "Facewash" app that will help users delete or hide content that they don’t want on their page. It could vary...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Office of the University Architect; Renovation at KSU (1)
Finalists Reveal Designs for Kent State University Architecture College 01/24/2013 Blouin News Text Attachment Email

Last week, four design teams presented their visions for Kent State University's new College of Architecture and Environmental Design to a packed audience...


Athletics; Institutional Advancement (1)
Kent State is selling their bowl game helmets for $1,000 01/24/2013 SB Nation Text Attachment Email

Call this a bit of free advertising, but even despite the novelty and perks, to me it's a pretty steep price for a part of Kent State history. Yes, the...


Biogeochemistry (5)
PA. DRILLING WASTES MAY OVERWHELM OHIO (Lutz) 01/23/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...not be sufficient for the Pennsylvania waste, plus wastes from Ohio's developing Utica shale, said Brian Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State University, who led the analysis while he was a postdoctoral research associate at Duke University. The volume of Marcellus wastewater...

AUDIO: WKSU News: Fracking factfinders issue another report (Lutz) 01/23/2013 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...says some of that information is on its way. Click here to listen: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/34463 Collaborative efforts Researchers from Kent State and Duke Universities have been working together analyzing reports from Marcellus Shale drilling sites throughout Pennsylvania-some with...

'Fracking' wastewater at center of study (Lutz) 01/23/2013 Big News Network Text Attachment Email

...the eastern United States is so vast it threatens to produce more wastewater than disposal efforts can handle, an analysis by researchers at Duke and Kent State universities found. In hydraulic fracturing, large volumes of water, sand and chemicals are injected deep underground into gas wells...

Fracking Fracking generates less wastewater per unit of gas, but more overall (Lutz) 01/23/2013 Homeland Security Newswire Text Attachment Email

...that the wastewater it produces threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater disposal capacity, according to new analysis by researchers at Duke and Kent State universities. A Duke University release reports that hydraulically fractured natural gas wells in the Marcellus shale region of Pennsylvania...

Ohio study warns of Pennsylvania wastewater 01/23/2013 Delusional Duck Blog Text Attachment Email

...not be sufficient for the Pennsylvania waste, plus wastes from Ohio's developing Utica Shale, said Brian Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State University, who led the analysis while he was a postdoctoral research associate at Duke University.


Communication Studies (1)
Google, Facebook May See Tougher Data Use Rules in Europe (Child) 01/23/2013 Channel Insider Text Attachment Email

...that people should have a say over how their information is being used," Jeffrey Child, an associate professor in the School of Communication Studies at Kent State University, told eWEEK. A similar backlash hasn't yet happened in the United States, said Child, but it could be imminent depending...


Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
Are you an apple or a pear? 01/23/2013 News-Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...shape. Jamie Geretz, gift shop manager and auxiliary liaison at Firelands Regional Medical Center, and Alyssa Ammanniti, fashion merchandising student at Kent State University, will offer tips on how to dress for your shape. This entertaining program will be held at the Sandusky Yacht Club, 529 E....


Hotel and Conference Center; Students; Town-Gown (1)
ALONG THE WAY 01/24/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent's downtown redevelopment is rounding third and plowing through the home stretch in 2013. The Fairmount Properties project anchored by Ametek, Inc....


International and Intercultural Education (1)
National Teacher of the Year to present lecture at KSU 01/24/2013 www.ohio.commldohio Text Attachment Email

KENT: The 2012 National Teacher of the Year Rebecca Mieliwocki will present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished Lecture at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 29 at the Kent State University Student Center Kiva, 1075 Risman Drive. Mieliwocki is a seventh-grade English teacher at Luther Burbank Middle School in...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Arts Beat: Prokofiev's 'Cinderella' coming to PAC Tuesday 01/23/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The State Ballet Theatre of Russia will perform Sergei Prokofiev's Cinderella at the Kent State University Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center next Tuesday, Jan. 29, at 7:30 p.m. Wow! I never thought that this could happen in my own...

Women's Success Series to feature Kathy L. Pietro Feb. 1 01/23/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

NEW PHILADELPHIA - Kent State University's Women's Success Series will feature Kathy L. Pietro from 8:15 to 11:30 a.m. on Feb. 1 at Kent State University Tuscarawas,...


Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program; Psychology (2)
Grandparents learn to text to keep in touch with grandchildren 01/23/2013 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...communicate. Moore is a busy guy. Though technically a student at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, he is taking 18 hours of post-secondary classes at Kent State University and participating in an internship in the psychology department. With those things and other activities, he's not the easiest...

Grandparents learn to text to keep in touch with grandchildren 01/24/2013 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...communicate. Moore is a busy guy. Though technically a student at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, he is taking 18 hours of post-secondary classes at Kent State University and participating in an internship in the psychology department. With those things and other activities, he's not the easiest...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Leanna Landsmann: Harvest words with kids to produce bountiful vocabulary (Rasinski) 01/24/2013 Tennessean - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...their use. “Learning anything, including new words, involves connecting new information with what you already know,” says Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a Kent State University professor of literacy education. “There’s a fun way to learn new words. I call it ‘word-harvesting.’ ” Word-harvesting highlights...


Town-Gown (1)
Senator Sherrod Brown visits downtown Kent 01/24/2013 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

...community leaders, said using federal funding for projects like the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's new downtown parking deck and the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, was more effective at creating jobs than cutting taxes for individuals in the upper tax brackets....


University Communications and Marketing (2)
University: Reported Cocaine Bust at Kent State Airport Old News 01/24/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

A news outlet re-reported Wednesday the finding of 200,000 kilos of cocaine at the airport. Did you hear there was a massive drug bust at the Kent State...

Beacon First: Bob Dyer: Big KSU bust eventually shows its age 01/24/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Talk about deja vu! Five years ago, police and federal agents seized 30 kilos of cocaine flown into Kent State University Airport from Los Angeles....


News Headline: Free live comedy | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The weekend ends on a Sunday for most of us, but for those still looking to party check out Northeast Ohio's longest running, weekly, independently produced comedy show every Monday at the Stone Tavern at 110 E. Main St.

Over two years and 104 Monday's, downtown Kent has showcased some of the best comics in Northeastern Ohio, as well as visitors from Pittsburg, New York and San Francisco.

Performing this week: Hilarities regular Micheal Ivy; Akron native and regular at the Funny Stop in Cuyahoga Falls, Tone Tone; coming all the way from Western Pennsylvania is Kyle Karmelita and recent transplant from Chicago's celebrated comedy scene, Gabrielle Henri.

Northeastern Ohio native Shawn Boyd, who now tours the country and received justice on the Judge Alex show, will headline the show.

And just when you think your splintered mind can't suffer from any more vulgarity, Kent State University alumni and host Anthony Savatt comes in and tells another satirical joke. It's the kind of entertainment you have to see to believe.

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News Headline: Need to clean up your Facebook profile? Get a 'Facewash' | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: L.A. Times Technology Blog
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Facewash is an app for Facebook that helps you easily clean up your profile. ( Facewash )

Got a Facebook profile with vulgarities or embarrassing pages you shouldn't have liked? Now there's a way to clean them up.

A trio of Kent State University undergrads have put together the "Facewash" app that'll search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that the user may want to hide or delete. That could include status updates, photo captions, and comments users left or received as well as pages and links that were liked.

"We realized that there's a lot of content that perhaps someone might not want a future employer to see," Daniel Gur, 22, said Wednesday.

QUIZ: How much do you know about Facebook?

Gur created the app over the weekend with two friends and fellow computer science majors from his school -- Camden Fullmer, 21, and David Steinberg, 24. The three students built Facewash in less than two days while at a hackathon at the University of Pennsylvania .

To use Facewash, users first need to go to its website, Facewa.sh , click "Get Started" and log into their Facebook account if they aren't logged in already.

The user will be prompted to click "Go to App" and then give the app permission to access the user's contents.

Search for a term and the app starts looking through all of the user's profile content. If Facewash finds a match, it'll show it to the user and link the posts so the user can easily delete a status or remove a picture.

It's still in beta phase so users may encountered minor glitches.

Since launching Sunday, Facewash has received more than 20,000 unique visitors, Gur said.

The three students said they hope to keep expanding Facewash and keep adding features to it. Next up, Gur said the team wants to make Facewash capable of looking for content in other languages so more people can use it.

As for how they came up with the name, Gur said it just fit so perfectly.

"This is your face on the Internet, and you might need to wash it," he said.

Copyright 2013, Los Angeles Times

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News Headline: FaceWash Cleans Up Dirty Facebook History | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: PC Magazine
Contact Name: Stephanie Mlot
News OCR Text: Most Facebook users have embarrassing comments or status updates hidden in the depths of their social network profile — long forgotten but not gone. So why not tidy up a little with the new FaceWash Web app?

The service, which is geared primarily toward recent college graduates, aims to delete your seedy Facebook history before you enter the professional world.

A few simple clicks of the mouse will wash your social network's mouth out with soap via FaceWash's precompiled list of "dirty" words (sex, drugs, cursing), or a personalized word list into which users have full range over what terms they'd like to eliminate.

The app will search through comments posted on your wall or remarks left on photos you've been tagged in, as well as photos you've posted, links and pictures you've liked, status updates, and pages of which you are a "fan."

Results are returned in conceptual chunks, highlighting specific terms and providing a direct link to the post, where users can delete or privatize the message.

FaceWash is the brainchild of Kent State grads Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur, and David Steinberg, who frame it as a service for college students with something to hide, but no time to hide it themselves.

"You spent the last four years being a college kid. And that's wonderful. But a lot can happen in four years, and Facebook never forgets," the website description said. "Wash away all those dirty little jokes and beer talk, those late night snapshots, those forgotten 'likes.' Keep track of all the dirt and grime that attaches to your social self."

When I put the FaceWash app to the test, it almost immediately returned results (right) from my own status updates, pages I am a fan of, and my photos — all with innocuous words either taken out of context or not rising above the level of "butt."

Meanwhile, comments posted on my wall and links and photos I've liked came up clean.

While the service is simple, fast, and probably a good idea for 20-somethings looking for a job, it doesn't cover all the bases. FaceWash's biggest drawback lies in its text-only searches; those photos of you playing beer pong and throwing back shots sophomore year will still be available to anyone looking hard enough.

Of course, you could always just tighten up those privacy controls, but you never know which "friend of a friend" might see your updates or snapshots; just ask Randi Zuckerberg.

For more from Stephanie, follow her on Twitter @smlotPCMag.

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News Headline: Need to clean up your Facebook profile? Get a 'Facewash' | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Burbank Leader - Online
Contact Name: Los Angeles Times
News OCR Text: Got a Facebook profile with vulgarities or embarrassing pages you shouldn't have liked? Now there's a way to clean them up.

A trio of Kent State University undergrads have put together the "Facewash" app that'll search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that the user may want to hide or delete. That could include status updates, photo captions, and comments users left or received as well as pages and links that were liked.

"We realized that there's a lot of content that perhaps someone might not want a future employer to see," Daniel Gur, 22, said Wednesday.

Sal Rodriguez

Gur created the app over the weekend with two friends and fellow computer science majors from his school -- Camden Fullmer, 21, and David Steinberg, 24. The three students built Facewash in less than two days while at a hackathon at the University of Pennsylvania.

To use Facewash, users first need to go to its website, Facewa.sh, click "Get Started" and log into their Facebook account if they aren't logged in already.

The user will be prompted to click "Go to App" and then give the app permission to access the user's contents.

Search for a term and the app starts looking through all of the user's profile content. If Facewash finds a match, it'll show it to the user and link the posts so the user can easily delete a status or remove a picture.

It's still in beta phase so users may encountered minor glitches.

Since launching Sunday, Facewash has received more than 20,000 unique visitors, Gur said.

The three students said they hope to keep expanding Facewash and keep adding features to it. Next up, Gur said the team wants to make Facewash capable of looking for content in other languages so more people can use it.

As for how they came up with the name, Gur said it just fit so perfectly.

"This is your face on the Internet, and you might need to wash it," he said.

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News Headline: Students Create Facewash app | Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: KDFW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Thank goodness some students at kent state university in ohio created the genius idea called face wash. It searches your facebook page looked for things you may want to hide or delete. Especially from the boss. Can you like single out only my boss can't see this stupid thing I did this weekend.

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News Headline: Cleanse Your Facebook With ‘Facewash’ | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: EFYTimes.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Facewash app was created in less than two days, during a hackathon at the University of Pennsylvania.

Thursday, January 24, 2013: Are there things on your Facebook page that you feel should not have been there? Well, here is your chance to clean it up! Three undergraduates at the Kent State University have created a "Facewash" app that will help users delete or hide content that they don’t want on their page. It could vary from a status update, photo captions to the comments that they left or received or the pages that they liked.

One of the core creators, Daniel Gue said, "We realised that there's a lot of content that perhaps someone might not want a future employer to see.” He along with two of his friends, Camden Fullmer and David Steinberg created Facewash in less than two days, during a hackathon at the University of Pennsylvania.

To start using the app, users have to go to Facewa.sh website and click "Get Started”. Simultaneously they have to log into their Facebook account, if they are not already online. Shortly, the app will prompt the user to "Go to App" and ask for app permission to access the user's contents. According to a LA Times report, “Search for a term and the app starts looking through all of the user's profile content. If Facewash finds a match, it'll show it to the user and link the posts so the user can easily delete a status or remove a picture.”

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News Headline: Finalists Reveal Designs for Kent State University Architecture College | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Blouin News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Last week, four design teams presented their visions for Kent State University's new College of Architecture and Environmental Design to a packed audience in a filled-to-capacity 900-seat auditorium. With a strict 20-minute time limit, each team communicated their ideas for the $40-million new landmark, well aware that their presentations would play an important role in the final decision-making process.
As The Plain Dealer reports, Cleveland- and New York-based Bialosky + Partners Architects, in association with Architecture Research Office of New York, emphasized the potential LEED platinum rating of their massive brick-and-concrete building, whereas New York firm Weiss/Manfredi and Cleveland-based Richard L. Bowen + Associates went in an entirely different direction with a stepped crystal palace of sorts called “Design Loft” that boasts flexible interior spaces with interweaving ramps and stairways.

Westlake Reed Leskosky from Cleveland was another firm that highlighted the energy efficiency of their proposal, which was noted to be a key factor in the selection process. Meanwhile, The Collaborative Inc. from Toledo and Seattle's Miller Hull Partnership introduced the concept of studios set within north-south axis rectangular “tubes” with interior pathways that invite all students to use the building as a sheltered passageway to campus in cold weather.

The proposals reflect some of the specific issues that the teams were instructed to consider, including environmental sustainability, openness of the design studios, and the image of the building. A five-person jury is expected to select the winning design by February. See renderings of all four proposals here.

http://blogs.artinfo.com/objectlessons/2013/01/23/finalists-reveal-designs-for-kent-state-university-architecture-college/

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News Headline: Kent State is selling their bowl game helmets for $1,000 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: SB Nation
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Call this a bit of free advertising, but even despite the novelty and perks, to me it's a pretty steep price for a part of Kent State history. Yes, the GoDaddy.com Bowl was their first bowl game in 40 years, and to commemorate the occasion they broke out their old "weird eye and block K" helmets. They certainly got our attention.
Well, now they have all these helmets and heck if they know what they're going to do with them. So KSU is selling them off for $1,000, which includes the helmet autographed by Darrell Hazell and a brick with your name it outside of Dix Stadium. All the money goes to the "football enhancement fund," so it's basically a donation to the program. It seems like a lot of money, but Cincinnati sold their special Belk Bowl helmets for the same price.
Personally this seems like an incredibly high price for either helmet, but if it's worth that to you, then you'll spend the dough.

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News Headline: PA. DRILLING WASTES MAY OVERWHELM OHIO (Lutz) | Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Downing, Bob
News OCR Text: STATE'S INJECTION WELLS MIGHT NOT BE ENOUGH FOR MARCELLUS, UTICA SHALE WASTEWATER, STUDY SAYS

The volume of drilling wastes from Pennsylvania's Marcellus shale is growing and threatening to overwhelm existing waste-handling infrastructure in Ohio and other states, according to a study released Tuesday.

Ohio's 179 injection wells for disposing of briny waste might not be sufficient for the Pennsylvania waste, plus wastes from Ohio's developing Utica shale, said Brian Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State University, who led the analysis while he was a postdoctoral research associate at Duke University.

The volume of Marcellus wastewater has grown 570 percent from 2004 to 2011 due to increased shale gas production in Pennsylvania, Lutz said.

"The overall volume of water that now has to be transported and treated is immense," he said. "It threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater-disposal infrastructure capacity."

The wastes in play include flow-back water, produced immediately after hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, plus brine, or production water, generated after the fracking is done and the well goes into production. Such wastes generally are similar with a few key differences.

The liquid wastes can contain significant amounts of salts and total dissolved solids; low-level radiation and toxic heavy metals picked up from underground rocks; oils and grease; leftover toxic chemicals used in fracking; and certain volatile organic compounds, including benzene.

Pennsylvania has about 6,400 Marcellus shale wells that have been drilled and another 3,500 that have been permitted. In comparison, Ohio has about 500 wells permitted in the Utica shale, of which 200 have been drilled.

Lutz said Pennsylvania generated about 20 million barrels (each holding 42 gallons) of wastewater in 2011. About 7 million barrels were shipped to Ohio injection wells.

Ohio is projecting that its injection wells handled nearly 14 million barrels in 2012, up from 12.8 million barrels in 2011. (Final figures have not been compiled). More than half of that volume came from Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

Pennsylvania has five permitted and operating injection wells. Some of the state's wastewater is recycled; some goes to special plants for treatment.

Ohio cannot ban such wastes because they are interstate commerce protected under the U.S. Constitution. It is unknown exactly how much injection capacity the state can handle.

"This is the reality of increasing domestic natural gas production," said Martin Doyle, a professor of river science at Duke. "There are significant trade-offs and environmental impacts whether you rely on conventional gas or shale gas."

Lutz reported that Marcellus shale horizontal wells that have been fracked are producing less wastewater per unit of gas than conventional wells would produce.

Fracked natural gas wells in the Marcellus shale produce only about 35 percent as much wastewater per unit of gas recovered as conventional wells, according to the analysis that appears in the journal Water Resources Research.

"We found that on average, shale gas wells produced about 10 times the amount of wastewater as conventional wells, but they also produced about 30 times more natural gas," said Lutz, who only recently came to Kent State. "That surprised us, given the popular perception that hydraulic fracturing creates disproportionate amounts of wastewater."

There have been proposals to ship the brine waste via barge down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to injection wells on the Gulf Coast, he said.

The researchers at Kent State and Duke analyzed gas production and wastewater generation for 2,189 gas wells in Pennsylvania, using data reported by the industry to the state's Department of Environmental Protection.

Doyle said the researchers were surprised that drillers classified most of the wastewater as brine, not fracking flow-back water.

"A lot of attention, to date, has focused on chemicals in the flow-back that comes out of a well following hydraulic fracturing," he said. "However, the amount of brine produced - which contains high levels of salts and other natural pollutants from shale rock - has received less attention, even though it is no less important."

Studies have shown that brine can be as difficult to treat as many of the chemicals used in fracking fluids, he said.

What's needed are better ways to recycle and to treat wastewater, two options that are being developed, Doyle said.

Many of the challenges facing shale development also would occur if conventional vertical-only drilling were expanding, Lutz said.

"We have to accept the reality that any effort to substantially boost domestic energy production will present environmental costs," he said.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: AUDIO: WKSU News: Fracking factfinders issue another report (Lutz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Crew on deck at on a drilling rig in Carroll County

"We need more facts, more scientific study:" that's what is heard in nearly every local town hall meeting and forum on fracking-the controversial drilling technology sweeping eastern Ohio with the shale gas boom. WKSU's Tim Rudell says some of that information is on its way.

Click here to listen: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/34463

Collaborative efforts

Researchers from Kent State and Duke Universities have been working together analyzing reports from Marcellus Shale drilling sites throughout Pennsylvania-some with conventional wells, some that were "fracked." The latest paper is on waste water.

Facts and belief

Brian Lutz, now associate professor of biochemistry at Kent, worked on it He says they found good news and bad for both advocates and opponents of fracking. It turns out to be far more efficient in terms of waste water than conventional drilling. "On a per-unit energy basis shale wells are producing only one third the amount of waste water when we compare them to conventional wells."

But, because fracked wells are more effective, a lot more are drilled; making the total volume of waste water greater-even if it is less per cubit yard of gas. And what does all this mean for the ongoing debate over fracking? [Lutz]"This is simply the information. These are tradeoffs that both the industry and environmental advocates are going to have to tangle with so that they can make informed decisions."

Fact based

Lutz says he and his colleagues are committed to continuing to provide facts for what he sees as a critical public decision making process

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News Headline: 'Fracking' wastewater at center of study (Lutz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Big News Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: DURHAM, N.C. -- Fracking makes less wastewater per unit of gas obtained than conventional wells but can overwhelm some regions' wastewater disposal capacity, researchers say.

The scale of hydraulic fracturing operations in the Marcellus shale region of the eastern United States is so vast it threatens to produce more wastewater than disposal efforts can handle, an analysis by researchers at Duke and Kent State universities found.

In hydraulic fracturing, large volumes of water, sand and chemicals are injected deep underground into gas wells at high pressure to crack open shale rock and extract embedded natural gas.

Hydraulically fractured natural gas wells in Pennsylvania produce only about 35 percent as much wastewater per unit of gas recovered as conventional wells, the researchers said, but the total amount of wastewater from natural gas production in the region has increased by about 570 percent since 2004 as a result of increased fracking production.

"It's a double-edged sword," Kent State biogeochemist Brian Lutz said. "On one hand, shale gas production generates less wastewater per unit. On the other hand, because of the massive size of the Marcellus resource, the overall volume of water that now has to be transported and treated is immense.

"It threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater-disposal infrastructure capacity," said Lutz, who made the analysis while a postdoctoral research associate at Duke.

The researchers analyzed gas production and wastewater generation for 2,189 gas wells in Pennsylvania.

"This is the reality of increasing domestic natural gas production," Martin Doyle, Duke professor of river science said. "There are significant tradeoffs and environmental impacts whether you rely on conventional gas or shale gas."

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News Headline: Fracking Fracking generates less wastewater per unit of gas, but more overall (Lutz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Homeland Security Newswire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hydraulically fractured natural gas wells are producing less wastewater per unit of gas recovered than conventional wells would. The scale of fracking operations in the Marcellus shale region – which stretches from New York to Virginia and accounts for about 10 percent of all natural gas produced in the United States today — is so vast, however, that the wastewater it produces threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater disposal capacity.

Hydraulically fractured natural gas wells are producing less wastewater per unit of gas recovered than conventional wells would. The scale of fracking operations in the Marcellus shale region, however, is so vast that the wastewater it produces threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater disposal capacity, according to new analysis by researchers at Duke and Kent State universities.

A Duke University release reports that hydraulically fractured natural gas wells in the Marcellus shale region of Pennsylvania produce only about 35 percent as much wastewater per unit of gas recovered as conventional wells, according to the analysis, which appears in the journal Water Resources Research.

“We found that on average, shale gas wells produced about 10 times the amount of wastewater as conventional wells, but they also produced about 30 times more natural gas,” said Brian Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State, who led the analysis while he was a postdoctoral research associate at Duke.

“That surprised us, given the popular perception that hydraulic fracturing creates disproportionate amounts of wastewater.”

The study shows, however, that the total amount of wastewater from natural gas production in the region has increased by about 570 percent since 2004 as a result of increased shale gas production there.

“It's a double-edged sword,” Lutz said. “On one hand, shale gas production generates less wastewater per unit. On the other hand, because of the massive size of the Marcellus resource, the overall volume of water that now has to be transported and treated is immense. It threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater-disposal infrastructure capacity.”

“This is the reality of increasing domestic natural gas production,” said Martin Doyle, professor of river science at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment. “There are significant tradeoffs and environmental impacts whether you rely on conventional gas or shale gas.”

The researchers analyzed gas production and wastewater generation for 2,189 gas wells in Pennsylvania, using publicly available data reported by industry to the state's Department of Environmental Protection, in compliance with state law.

In hydraulic fracturing, large volumes of water, sand and chemicals are injected deep underground into gas wells at high pressure to crack open shale rock and extract its embedded natural gas. As the pace of shale gas production grows, so too have concerns about groundwater contamination and what to do with all the wastewater.

Another surprise that emerged, Doyle said, was that well operators classified only about a third of the wastewater from Marcellus wells as flowback from hydraulic fracturing; most of it was classified as brine.

“A lot of attention, to date, has focused on chemicals in the flowback that comes out of a well following hydraulic fracturing,” he said. “However, the amount of brine produced — which contains high levels of salts and other natural pollutants from shale rock — has received less attention even though it is no less important.”

Brine can be generated by wells over much longer periods of time than flowback, he noted, and studies have shown that some of the pollutants in brine can be as difficult to treat as many of the chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

“We need to come up with technological and logistical solutions to address these concerns, including better ways to recycle and treat the waste on site or move it to places where it can be safely disposed,” Doyle said. “Both of these are in fact developing rapidly.”

“Opponents have targeted hydraulic fracturing as posing heightened risks, but many of the same environmental challenges presented by shale gas production would exist if we were expanding conventional gas production,” Lutz added. “We have to accept the reality that any effort to substantially boost domestic energy production will present environmental costs.”

The Marcellus shale formation stretches from New York to Virginia and accounts for about 10 percent of all natural gas produced in the United States today. Much of the current production is in Pennsylvania. Prior to technological advances in horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing that made the shale gas accessible, the region accounted for only about 2 percent of the nation's output.

The release notes that Lutz and Doyle conducted their analysis with no external funding.

— Read more in Brian D. Lutz et al., “Generation, transport, and disposal of wastewater associated with Marcellus Shale gas development,” Water Resources Research (11 January 2013) (DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20096)

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News Headline: Ohio study warns of Pennsylvania wastewater | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Delusional Duck Blog
Contact Name: Sam1mail@aol.com
News OCR Text: The volume of drilling wastes from Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale is growing and threatening to overwhelm existing waste-handling infrastructure in Ohio and other states, according to a study released Tuesday. Ohio's 179 injection wells for disposing of briny waste might not be sufficient for the Pennsylvania waste, plus wastes from Ohio's developing Utica Shale, said Brian Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State University, who led the analysis while he was a postdoctoral research associate at Duke University.

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News Headline: Google, Facebook May See Tougher Data Use Rules in Europe (Child) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Channel Insider
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Companies like Google and Facebook, which collect and reuse data from customers, could face new EU restrictions, according to a report.

Internet giants like Google and Facebook may find more limits on what they can do with the personal information they collect from their customers if the European Union tightens regulations, according to a story from Reuters.

The leaders of several EU nations are continuing their push for stricter controls, and proposed rules would give users more control over personal data that is collected by companies through Web searches, use of online shopping sites and other interactions online, the story reported. The rules would then limit the sale of such data to advertisers and others, "especially when people are unaware their data is being used in such a way," Reuters reported.

"Users must be informed about what happens with their data," Jan Philipp Albrecht, a German member of the European Parliament, told Reuters. "And they must be able to consciously agree to data processing-or reject it."

Albrecht is proposing a new law to help consumers maintain direct control over what kinds of information that companies can collect from them and sell to others, the story reported. Similar efforts have been in the works in the EU for the last couple years.

At the same time, companies such as Facebook and Google, which collect and sell such data, have been fighting the restrictions in the EU, according to Reuters.

For consumers, such rules would likely be welcome, but Internet companies say they are concerned that it might harm their operations.

Though the discussion in the EU presently only pertains to Europe, experts in the United States say that what eventually happens in Europe regarding privacy could certainly impact consumers in this country as well.

"With what's happening in Europe now, I think that this is growing recognition that what people do online is still private information and that people should have a say over how their information is being used," Jeffrey Child, an associate professor in the School of Communication Studies at Kent State University, told eWEEK.

A similar backlash hasn't yet happened in the United States, said Child, but it could be imminent depending on what happens in Europe.

"One thing we know about privacy is that it definitely is a cultural variable," he said. "Different places do have different norms and practices that are important. In the U.S., the dot-com revolution happened in the Silicon Valley, and it advanced interaction on the Web," meaning that Americans could be more open to and accustomed to wider online use patterns and consequences, he said.

"Other places may have different expectations," said Child. "But I think this is a growing trend, that people are becoming more informed about how companies are using their personal information."

The problem is worse when companies use people's private preference data, collected through Websites and other services, without asking them, said Child.

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News Headline: Are you an apple or a pear? | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SANDUSKY — Join Firelands Regional Medical Center on Feb. 7 to find out how your body shape can affect your health with the program, “Are you an apple or a pear?”

Tina Ammanniti, director of Cardiac and Pulmonary Services at Firelands Regional Medical Center, will discuss cardiac health and how it relates to body shape. Jamie Geretz, gift shop manager and auxiliary liaison at Firelands Regional Medical Center, and Alyssa Ammanniti, fashion merchandising student at Kent State University, will offer tips on how to dress for your shape.

This entertaining program will be held at the Sandusky Yacht Club, 529 E. Water St. from 5:30 to 7 pm. Cost for the evening is $18 per person and includes barbeque chicken breast, mixed salad greens, baked potato, green beans almondine and sherbert du jour.

To register, call 419-557-7410 by Feb. 1.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent's downtown redevelopment is rounding third and plowing through the home stretch in 2013.

The Fairmount Properties project anchored by Ametek, Inc. and Davey Resource Group is near full capacity with the final storefronts nearly ready for their tenants, and Ron Burbick's Acorn Alley II has become a shopping hub for Kent residents and beyond.

By the end of 2013, the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's Kent Central Gateway parking deck, the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center and Acorn Corner (the old Kent Hotel) will be operating in full force, and a third Fairmount Properties project, simply titled "Building C" at this stage, will be nearing completion.

"Building C" will house the restaurant Bricco, expected to open by the end of the year, in addition to 32 apartments that will be ready for residency in the spring of 2014.

All this development hasn't gone unnoticed outside of Kent. State Rep. Kathleen Clyde recently presented the city with a commendation from the Ohio House of Representatives on Kent's boom.

Politicians are noting how multiple entities have united and leveraged federal stimulus money from the PARTA project to create a new downtown.

U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan and both of Ohio's U.S. senators, Rob Portman and Sherrod Brown, have all taken time for personal tours of the downtown projects.

MapleBrook at Golden Pond

A new senior living center, Maplebrook at Golden Pond, is currently under construction in Kent near S.R. 261 and expected to be finished by December 2013.

I anticipated that this project would gain the interest of low-income seniors in the area after many were displaced following eviction from Silver Oaks in 2011. Joseph McCabe, the project's manager, confirmed that summer of Silver Oaks headlines was one of the reasons NRP Group took an interest in developing a new Kent project.

I did not anticipate, however, the high volume of calls I'd receive from senior citizens wishing to live in Maplebrook at Golden Pond.

If you're interested in living in this new senior facility, Four Seasons at Kent, also owned by NRP Group, is taking inquiries. Give them a ring at 330-346-0063.

'Sugar Babies' at Kent State

According to SeekingArrangement.com, "the world's largest Sugar Daddy website," women students at KSU are increasingly looking for alternative ways to bypass high tuition costs.

The site lists KSU as the 11th fastest growing "Sugar Baby School," which is determined by the number of new signups the website received in 2012.

SeekingArrangement.com links people willing to dish out cash (an average of $3,000 a month) with coeds who are willing to date for it. Young college men can seek out Sugar Mommies as well.

All in all, 128 KSU students signed up for the online service last year.

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News Headline: National Teacher of the Year to present lecture at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: www.ohio.commldohio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: The 2012 National Teacher of the Year Rebecca Mieliwocki will present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished Lecture at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 29 at the Kent State University Student Center Kiva, 1075 Risman Drive.

Mieliwocki is a seventh-grade English teacher at Luther Burbank Middle School in Burbank, Calif. She is known for her unconventional teaching methods that inspire and motivate students, often using a Socratic method of questioning to stimulate students' critical thinking.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

For more information about the lecture, contact Linda Robertson, at lfrobert@kent.edu or call 330-672-0563.

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News Headline: Arts Beat: Prokofiev's 'Cinderella' coming to PAC Tuesday | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Jeannine Kennedy
News OCR Text: The State Ballet Theatre of Russia will perform Sergei Prokofiev's Cinderella at the Kent State University Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center next Tuesday, Jan. 29, at 7:30 p.m. Wow! I never thought that this could happen in my own back yard. Way back, when I was much younger, spending my summers traipsing around the world, I saw the Bolshoi Ballet perform Sleeping Beauty in Moscow and then a few years later The Kirov Ballet perform Swan Lake in Florence, Italy. This was pre-1989 and Russia was still Communistic, so it was a little tougher to see fabulous performances that generated from artists living behind the Iron Curtain…(and they were fabulous…even if the Russian audience did all clap in unison!) But I never dreamed that one day, in the not too distant future, I could see them in Tuscarawas County. Cool!

Prokofiev composed Cinderella between 1940 and 1944 and it premiered at the Bolshoi Theatre on Nov. 21, 1945. The ballet is notable for its jubilant music, lush scenery and comic double-roles of the stepsisters (sometimes played by men) and depicted more like “mad” stepsisters than “bad” stepsisters.

The State Ballet Theatre Company is the touring name of the more formally named Voronezh State Theatre of Opera and Ballet. Voronezh is a large city in the south central part of Russia close to the Ukraine and was founded in 1585 by Tsar Feodor I as a fortress that would protect the Russian state from raids of hostile Tartars. Settlements in that region date back to the Stone Age!

Ticket information is available at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac

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News Headline: Women's Success Series to feature Kathy L. Pietro Feb. 1 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA -

Kent State University's Women's Success Series will feature Kathy L. Pietro from 8:15 to 11:30 a.m. on Feb. 1 at Kent State University Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia.

The Women's Success Series is a powerful speaker series and book discussion designed for all women to think differently about success, themselves and how they live, work and play in Tuscarawas County.

The cost to attend is $10; a continental breakfast will be included. For more information, call 330-339-3391 or visit www.tusc.kent.edu .

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News Headline: Grandparents learn to text to keep in touch with grandchildren | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Sacramento Bee - Online, The
Contact Name: KIM HONE
News OCR Text: AKRON, Ohio -- Grandparents may turn up their noses at text messaging as a way to communicate with their tech-savvy grandchildren. They want to hear the kids' voices, and they can use the phone to talk - not type. But is that realistic in today's world? And are they at risk of missing out on a relationship with the youngsters they love?

"It's natural for grandparents to want as much personal interaction with their grandchildren as possible. Many grandparents feel like texting is so impersonal and detached (and) really do get a great deal of happiness from hearing their grandchildren's voices," said Amy Goyer, AARP's home and family expert. "There is nothing wrong with trying to balance phone calls and in-person time with texting or emailing, but as grandchildren grow up, grandparents may have to adjust to their changes and preferences."

Kids often have hectic lives. And sometimes texting is the best way to keep in touch - whether Granny and Gramps like it or not.

"I'd say they run the risk of losing touch with their grandchildren's everyday lives if they don't text," Goyer added. "That doesn't mean their whole relationship will fall apart, but they can stay in closer touch if they are willing to text."

Goyer added that those older than 50 are high adopters of technology, and grandparents are often motivated by their grandchildren to learn how to use new forms of technology - such as texting.

Many grandparents who live miles away from their loved ones have taken to Skype to hear and see their grandkids. With the free software application, a webcam and a high-speed Internet connection, users can talk to and see each other live via the Internet. But many busy teens and 20-somethings say texting is more convenient.

Nancy Lemmon and her 17-year-old grandson, Tyler Moore, aren't separated by miles. In fact, they live just a few doors from each other in Stow, Ohio. Still, they text regularly to communicate.

Moore is a busy guy. Though technically a student at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, he is taking 18 hours of post-secondary classes at Kent State University and participating in an internship in the psychology department. With those things and other activities, he's not the easiest guy to get in touch with for a voice conversation.

"They do not want to chat on the phone with their grandmother, or anyone else for that matter. They want to communicate short and sweet," Lemmon explained. "Tyler may respond to me when I ask how he did at Kent this semester. He may let me know he has arrived safely at a destination out of town. He can tell me that he scored the highest grade in his psychology class or he got a 4.0 this semester at school, but the words that warm my heart the most is when he simply texts, 'I Love You.'"

Sitting in his grandmother's home, Moore acknowledged the two would go longer periods of time without communicating if it weren't for texting.

"People don't talk on the phone that much anymore," he said.

If grandparents can adjust to thinking of texting as a way to bring them closer to their grandchildren, Goyer thinks they will be more willing to adopt it as a method of communication.

"The reality is that tweens, teens and young adults these days use texting as their most common form of communication and if grandparents ... really want to be in touch they'd better learn to text, even if it's just the basics," Goyer said.

And Lemmon offered: "Keep on texting, grandmas, and stay in touch. We have to learn the technology in order to savor these important relationships."

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News Headline: Grandparents learn to text to keep in touch with grandchildren | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Grandparents may turn up their noses at text messaging as a way to communicate with their tech-savvy grandchildren. They want to hear the kids' voices, and they can use the phone to talk _ not type. But is that realistic in today's world And are they at risk of missing out on a relationship with the youngsters they love "It's natural for grandparents to want as much personal interaction with their grandchildren as possible. Many grandparents feel like texting is so impersonal and detached (and) really do get a great deal of happiness from hearing their grandchildren's voices," said Amy Goyer, AARP's home and family expert. "There is nothing wrong with trying to balance phone calls and in-person time with texting or emailing, but as grandchildren grow up, grandparents may have to adjust to their changes and preferences." Kids often have hectic lives. And sometimes texting is the best way to keep in touch _ whether Granny and Gramps like it or not.

"I'd say they run the risk of losing touch with their grandchildren's everyday lives if they don't text," Goyer added. "That doesn't mean their whole relationship will fall apart, but they can stay in closer touch if they are willing to text." Goyer added that those older than 50 are high adopters of technology, and grandparents are often motivated by their grandchildren to learn how to use new forms of technology _ such as texting.

Many grandparents who live miles away from their loved ones have taken to Skype to hear and see their grandkids. With the free software application, a webcam and a high-speed Internet connection, users can talk to and see each other live via the Internet. But many busy teens and 20-somethings say texting is more convenient.

Nancy Lemmon and her 17-year-old grandson, Tyler Moore, aren't separated by miles. In fact, they live just a few doors from each other in Stow, Ohio. Still, they text regularly to communicate.

Moore is a busy guy. Though technically a student at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, he is taking 18 hours of post-secondary classes at Kent State University and participating in an internship in the psychology department. With those things and other activities, he's not the easiest guy to get in touch with for a voice conversation.

"They do not want to chat on the phone with their grandmother, or anyone else for that matter. They want to communicate short and sweet," Lemmon explained. "Tyler may respond to me when I ask how he did at Kent this semester. He may let me know he has arrived safely at a destination out of town. He can tell me that he scored the highest grade in his psychology class or he got a 4.0 this semester at school, but the words that warm my heart the most is when he simply texts, 'I Love You.'" Sitting in his grandmother's home, Moore acknowledged the two would go longer periods of time without communicating if it weren't for texting.

"People don't talk on the phone that much anymore," he said.

If grandparents can adjust to thinking of texting as a way to bring them closer to their grandchildren, Goyer thinks they will be more willing to adopt it as a method of communication.

"The reality is that tweens, teens and young adults these days use texting as their most common form of communication and if grandparents ... really want to be in touch they'd better learn to text, even if it's just the basics," Goyer said.

And Lemmon offered: "Keep on texting, grandmas, and stay in touch. We have to learn the technology in order to savor these important relationships."

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News Headline: Leanna Landsmann: Harvest words with kids to produce bountiful vocabulary (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tennessean - Online, The
Contact Name: Leanna Landsmann Universal Uclick
News OCR Text: Do you have a question about your child’s education? Email it to Leanna@aplusadvice.com. Landsmann is an education writer who began her career as a teacher. She has visited classes in 49 states to observe best practices and founded Principal for a Day in New York City.

I heard on NPR that kids who develop large vocabularies early on have huge advantages all through school. We read with our first- and second-graders every night. Should we do word lists with them, too?

Keep reading, but nix the lists. It’s important for young learners to build strong vocabularies; research shows that the more word power they have, the better readers and writers they become. But research also suggests that memorizing definitions isn’t very effective because kids forget them when the words are introduced without any context for their use.

“Learning anything, including new words, involves connecting new information with what you already know,” says Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a Kent State University professor of literacy education. “There’s a fun way to learn new words. I call it ‘word-harvesting.’ ”

Word-harvesting highlights the words found in children’s books and magazines as well as poetry and song lyrics and makes them more visible to kids.

“Here’s how it works: Before reading each night, ask your children to listen for interesting words. When you’ve finished a passage, ask if any words intrigue them,” says Rasinski.

For example, say you’re reading William Steig’s “Sylvester and the Magic Pebble” (Aladdin, 1987): “Sylvester Duncan lived with his mother and father at Acorn Road in Oatsdale. One of his hobbies was collecting pebbles of unusual shape and color. On a rainy Saturday during vacation he found a quite extraordinary one. It was flaming red, shiny, and perfectly round, like a marble. As he was studying this remarkable pebble, he began to shiver, probably from excitement, and the rain felt cold on his back. ‘I wish it would stop raining,’ he said. To his great surprise, the rain stopped. It didn’t stop gradually as rains usually do. It ceased!”

“This 95-word excerpt is a treasure trove: pebbles, extraordinary, remarkable, flaming, gradually, shiver, ceased,” says Rasinski. “Harvest these words on a family word wall or in a paper or digital notebook that kids can refer to.”

As you go, elaborate on the meanings of the chosen words and offer synonyms, Rasinski advises.

Many experts think primary-age students should master 3,000 new words each year. When you word-harvest, they add up quickly, notes Rasinski.

“If you harvest 10 words a night, five nights a week, your children will have acquired 2,600 words just in your nightly reading,” he says. “And the family’s had great fun in the process!”

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News Headline: Senator Sherrod Brown visits downtown Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name: Thomas Gallick
News OCR Text: U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown made the case that federal spending could lead to job growth and spur private development during a visit to downtown Kent Jan. 16, pointing to the city's $110 million downtown redevelopment project as an example.

The senator, in town to tour redevelopment efforts and meet with local business and community leaders, said using federal funding for projects like the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's new downtown parking deck and the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, was more effective at creating jobs than cutting taxes for individuals in the upper tax brackets.

"You don't grow an economy by tax cuts for the rich trickling down," Brown said. "You grow an economy by focusing on the middle class and growing it out from there. That's what both parties in Congress said two weeks ago, and I think that's pretty established that's the direction we should go in. And part of that, I think, is more stimulus to put people to work, which then will mean fewer tax dollars going out the door."

Brown said that, unlike some of his colleagues, he was unashamed of supporting earmarks for his home state.

He said the $20 million Department of Transportation grant for the PARTA parking deck, which was part of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009, and $4 million in New Market Tax Credit funding for the hotel were used to create jobs and strengthen the local economy. Both projects are expected to open this spring.

Brown said he is a strong supporter of the New Market Tax Credit Program, which allocates $3.5 billion in tax credits for real estate and business developments in low-income communities each year. The program, created in 2000, was extended through 2013 by the Congress' deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff.

"The New Markets Tax Credit is something we know works," he said. "I would think people in both parties understand that and it would likely be continued, but you never know."

Brown called his tour of downtown Kent, "pretty exciting," noting that he tries to visit the area when he can with his wife, Connie Schultz, a KSU graduate and Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper columnist.

"I've been in Kent lots of times over the last 30 years and seen the problems and seen it coming back," Brown said. "This is a great picture for Kent."

Brown fired off questions to KSU and PARTA officials as he toured the neighboring hotel and parking deck sites at the corner of DePeyster and Erie streets, asking about how many workers were employed at the sites, when the projects would be completed and whether union labor was being used. Earlier in his visit, he asked employees at electro-mechanical manufacturer Ametek's new downtown Kent offices about their employment numbers and whether they should be working more closely with KSU to train potential employees.

He shook hands with workers at the downtown Kent construction sites and chatted with local business owners, including Gwen Rosenberg, who handed the senator a bag of popcorn, which he sampled, from her Acorn Alley popcorn shop, Popped!.

KSU President Lester Lefton and Kent City Manager Dave Ruller thanked Brown for his support and gave him a brief history of the collaboration between city, university and business leaders on the downtown Kent redevelopment project at Ametek's downtown Kent offices.

"We sort of all got together, held hands, prayed, lept and did it," Lefton said of the project. "What's gone on is about $110 million of public-private partnership."

Although Brown touted the federal spending role in reviving downtown Kent, he added that the project could not have worked unless it was "driven by attracting private capital and job creation."

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1126 or tgallick@recordpub.com

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News Headline: University: Reported Cocaine Bust at Kent State Airport Old News | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A news outlet re-reported Wednesday the finding of 200,000 kilos of cocaine at the airport.

Did you hear there was a massive drug bust at the Kent State University Airport some time this past week? That's not completely accurate.

There was a massive drug bust at the airport, where 200,000 kilos of cocaine was seized, but that was in 2008.

According to Kent State's Twitter feed: "Reports of a cocaine arrest at Kent State Airport are a result of a May 2008 story mistakenly reposted by a local news organization. Further investigation indicates that heavy web traffic of 2008 airport arrest story is what made it appear to be a new story. It's old news."

The story has since been taken off Ohio.com's website and the AP Wire has removed it from circulation.

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News Headline: Beacon First: Bob Dyer: Big KSU bust eventually shows its age | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Talk about deja vu!

Five years ago, police and federal agents seized 30 kilos of cocaine flown into Kent State University Airport from Los Angeles.

This week, police and federal agents seized 30 kilos of cocaine flown into Kent State University Airport from Los Angeles.

Stories labeled "Beacon First" are published in the newspaper before appearing in full on Ohio.com.

To read this story in its entirety, get your copy of today's digital Beacon Journal (PDF) here.

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