Report Overview:
Total Clips (37)
Athletics (4)
Biological Sciences (4)
Biological Sciences; College of Arts and Sciences (AS); College of Nursing (CON); Office of the Provost (1)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Office of the Provost (1)
Continuing and Distance Education (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU at Stark (3)
KSU Ice Arena; Theatre and Dance (1)
Office of the Provost (2)
Psychology; Research (1)
Students (16)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (4)
KSU baseball team honored with Cleveland sports stars (Stricklin) 01/25/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

By Marla Ridenour Beacon Journal sports columnist Published: January 24, 2013 - 11:19 PM (PHOTO) Kent State University's head baseball coach Scott...

Kent State women's golf coach Mike Morrow stuns players, announces his retirement (Morrow, Page, Nielsen) 01/25/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

By Allen Moff | Staff Writer Published: January 25, 2013 4:00AM The one and only coach in the history of Kent State's national power women's golf program...

No looking back for Stricklin, Kent State baseball (Stricklin) 01/25/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

By Allen Moff | Staff writer Published: January 25, 2013 4:00AM Scott Stricklin is ready to slap the covers shut on last year's storybook season. ...

Greater Cleveland Sports Awards attendees most optimistic about Browns 01/25/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

By Dennis Manoloff, The Plain Dealer on January 24, 2013 at 11:45 PM, updated January 25, 2013 at 7:02 AM CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Fans of Cleveland professional...


Biological Sciences (4)
New analysis of fracking wastewater yields surprising results (Lutz) 01/24/2013 WaterWorld - Online Text Attachment Email

...that the wastewater it produces threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater disposal capacity, according to new analysis by researchers at Duke and Kent State universities. Hydraulically fractured natural gas wells in the Marcellus shale region of Pennsylvania produce only about 35 percent...

21 News 6 P.M. (Lutz) 01/24/2013 21 News at 6 PM - WFMJ-TV Text Email

...and gas industry develops more and more wells, the new study says the volume of briny waste could overwhelm the regions wastewater disposal capacity. Kent State University Professor Brian Lutz led the analysis. SUPER ON GRAPHIC 00:01:48:19 FUTURE EXPANSION OF SHALE GAS DEVELOPMENT IN THIS REGION...

WFMJ Today (Lutz) 01/25/2013 WFMJ Today - WFMJ-TV Text Email

...and gas industry develops more and more wells, the new study says the volume of briny waste could overwhelm the regions wastewater disposal capacity. Kent State University Professor Brian Lutz led the analysis. SUPER ON GRAPHIC 00:01:48:19 FUTURE EXPANSION OF SHALE GAS DEVELOPMENT IN THIS REGION...

Research Yields Surprise: Does Fracking Help to Save Water? (Lutz) 01/24/2013 PROCESS Worldwide - Online Text Attachment Email

Shale Gas 01/24/2013 | Editor: Dominik Stephan A new research by the Duke and Kent State universities provides surprising results: Although hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") consumes less water than conventional gas wells, the...


Biological Sciences; College of Arts and Sciences (AS); College of Nursing (CON); Office of the Provost (1)
Kent State, Cuyahoga Valley National Park to Work Together (Diacon, Blank, Dzurec) 01/25/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Collaboration to allow for research projects and educational programs development Kent State University has signed a memorandum of understanding with the National Park Service, providing for enhanced collaboration in the Cuyahoga...


College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Office of the Provost (1)
Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects 01/24/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects Beacon Journal staff report Published: January 24, 2013 - 02:38 PM Kent State,...


Continuing and Distance Education (1)
University of Akron looking to expand online offerings (Kelly) 01/25/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

By Carol Biliczky Beacon Journal staff writer Published: January 24, 2013 - 10:51 PM Someday you might be able to get a degree from the University...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
KSU speaker: King would press 'war on poverty' 01/25/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

By Thomas Gallick | Staff Writer Published: January 25, 2013 4:00AM Carlos Muñoz Jr., told faculty, students and visitors at Kent State University Thursday...


KSU at Geauga (1)
Geauga County Maple Leaf 01/24/2013 ??Geauga County Maple Leaf Text Attachment Email

...Collection at KSU Geauga: Funding Resources and Assistance at the next Geauga Economic Leadership (GEL) breakfast Feb. 1 at 8 a.m. at the Burton campus of Kent State University, 14111 Claridon Troy Road. Holmes is the regional training coordinator for the Foundation Center - Cleveland and Dr. Hricko...


KSU at Stark (3)
GET OUT!: Celebrating creativity at Kent State Stark 01/25/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

CantonRep.com staff report Posted Jan 24, 2013 @ 06:00 AM JACKSON TWP. — More than 3,000 pieces of artwork from middle and high school students in...

Kent State University at Stark Theatre Presents This Season's Musical, 'I Love You Because' 01/24/2013 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Posted by North Canton Patch Contributor Kent State University at Stark is proud to present this season's musical production, I Love You Because, with music by Joshua Salzman and the book...

Gallery 6000 at Kent State University at Stark Opens 'Printed Matters' Exhibit 01/24/2013 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Posted by North Canton Patch Contributor Credit North Canton Patch Contributor http://northcanton.patch.com/announcements/gallery-6000-at-kent-state-university-at-stark-opens-printed-matters-exhibit/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1359051155 Kent State University at Stark...


KSU Ice Arena; Theatre and Dance (1)
Grab & Go Kids Planner: Ice Skating, Grease and Butterflies 01/24/2013 Stow Patch Text Attachment Email

...opportunity to see the kind of work the students of Ohio Virtual Academy are doing. Pricing: Free. • ICE SKATING Where/When: The Ice Arena at Kent State University, Stockdale Safety Building, Kent, is open to the public today 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. to midnight; Friday 11 a.m. to...


Office of the Provost (2)
BRIEF: Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects 01/24/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Jan. 24--Kent State University has signed a five-year memorandum of understanding with the National Park Service that should lead to enhanced collaboration...

BRIEF: Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects 01/24/2013 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

BRIEF: Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects Jan 24, 2013 (The Akron Beacon Journal - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX)...


Psychology; Research (1)
Observer Xpress (eNewsletter) 01/24/2013 EurekAlert! Text Attachment Email

...Harris Cooper, Duke University. Watch>> Twitter Q&A : What Works While Studying Look out for the next Q&A on February 7 & 8 with John Dunlosky, Kent State University, coauthor of the PSPI report Improving Students' Learning With Effective Learning Techniques. Dunlosky researches techniques...


Students (16)
Mining Your Facebook Profile for Dirt 01/25/2013 Yahoo! Finance Text Attachment Email

...by the University of Pennsylvania last weekend. Facewash's developers – Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur, and David Steinberg, all computer science majors at Kent State University in Ohio – discussed the idea for the app on the drive to the competition. They saw the need for such a tool, particularly for...

New app touted as way to clean up Facebook profiles 01/24/2013 Orlando Sentinel - Online Text Attachment Email

...January 23, 2013 Got a Facebook profile with vulgarities or embarrassing pages you shouldn't have liked? Now there's a way to clean them up. A trio of Kent State University undergrads have put together the "Facewash" app that'll search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that...

Want to clean up your Facebook profile? Get 'Facewash' 01/25/2013 www.rediff.com Text Attachment Email

...developed a new app that can help Facebook users clean up vulgar or embarrassing pages from their profile. The ‘Facewash' app developed by researchers from Kent State University will search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that the user may want to hide or delete. That could...

Got a dirty Facebook page? Clean it up 01/24/2013 Salon.com Text Attachment Email

...wall? Let enough time pass, and it's more than Facebook's interface that can seem a little blue. But don't worry, there's an app for that. A trio of Kent State University undergrads created “Facewash“ to search through your Facebook activity and root out unsavory stuff on your timeline, from  drunken...

Need to clean up your Facebook profile? Get a FaceWash 01/25/2013 The Age Text Attachment Email

Got a Facebook profile with vulgarities or embarrassing pages you shouldn't have liked? Now there's a way to clean them up. A trio of Kent State University undergrads have put together the FaceWash web app that'll search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that...

'Facewash' to remove vulgar pages from Facebook! 01/25/2013 Deccan Chronicle Text Attachment Email

Washington: Now, a new application has been created that can help users clean vulgar or embarrassing pages from their Facebook profile. A group of Kent State University students have put together the 'Facewash' app that will search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that...

Questionable Facebook Presence? Clean It Up With This App 01/24/2013 Big Think Text Attachment Email

What's the Latest Development? This week, Kent State University students Daniel Gur, Camden Fullmer, and David Steinberg launched a beta version of FaceWash, a Web-based app that searches...

Now, remove 'vulgar, embarrassing pages' from Facebook with 'Facewash'! 01/25/2013 Big News Network Text Attachment Email

Now, a new application has been created that can help users clean vulgar or embarrassing pages from their Facebook profile. A group of Kent State University students have put together the 'Facewash' app that will search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that...

5 Eyewitness News at 4:30 01/24/2013 5 Eyewitness News at 4:30 PM - KSTP-TV Text Email

...be especially beneficial for soon-to-be college grads about to enter the work force after all, the "la times" reports that the app was created by three kent state university students. >>> That's your latest look at business. Live at the new york stock exchange, I'm deborah kostrin. Bloomberg news....

FaceWash helps clean up your Facebook profile 01/25/2013 ThinkDigit.com Text Attachment Email

Here's one for all you perverts that swarm Facebook. Researchers from Kent State University have developed an app for Facebook that will help you clean up the potentially embarrassing “stuff” off your Facebook Profile....

Dirty Facebook? Clean it up with Facewash. 01/24/2013 Minnesota Daily - Online Text Attachment Email

...the (sort of) occasional curse word popping up on their Facebook profiles. Wanting to help college students salvage their online reputations, three Kent State University undergraduates created a way for them to clean their virtual “faces.” The service, Facewash, searches through the users Facebook...

Facewash Clears Embarrassing Content from your Timeline 01/24/2013 American Banking News Text Attachment Email

A developing app from undergraduate students at Kent State University can search your Facebook profile for embarrassing or compromising content, and gives you an option to clean up your public appearance....

Embarrassing Facebook history? New FaceWash app cleans your page 01/24/2013 KSAZ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur and David Steinberg agree. Motivated by the need to have an employer friendly Facebook page, in a Skype interview, the trio from Kent State University say they created FaceWash over the weekend. "We made it at a hackathon, a programming competition, at the University of Pennsylvania,"...

BLOG: 'Facewash' App Quickly Cleans Up Your Facebook Profile 01/25/2013 Computerworld Singapore - Online Text Attachment Email

...potentially embarrassing or unprofessional activity, there's a new Facebook app that makes doing so a whole lot easier: Facewash. Facewash, developed by Kent State University undergrads Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur and David Steinberg, combs your Facebook profile for instances of both preselected "dirty"...

BLOG: 'Facewash' App Quickly Cleans Up Your Facebook Profile 01/25/2013 MIS Asia Text Attachment Email

...potentially embarrassing or unprofessional activity, there's a new Facebook app that makes doing so a whole lot easier: Facewash. Facewash, developed by Kent State University undergrads Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur and David Steinberg, combs your Facebook profile for instances of both preselected "dirty"...

News @ 10:30 01/24/2013 Chicagoland News at 10 PM - ChicagoLand TV (CLTV) Text Email

...embarrasing things on your facebook profile, there's a new way to clean it up. It's called 'face wash'. The facewash app was created by three students at kent state university. The web app skims your facebook profile for things you may want to delete or hide on your page. That includes status updates,...


Town-Gown (1)
New electronic sign in downtown Kent promotes city and KSU messages 01/25/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

By Paula Schleis Beacon Journal staff writer Published: January 24, 2013 - 09:59 PM KENT: A colorful electronic message board the city and Kent State...


News Headline: KSU baseball team honored with Cleveland sports stars (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Marla Ridenour
Beacon Journal sports columnist
Published: January 24, 2013 - 11:19 PM

(PHOTO) Kent State University's head baseball coach Scott Stricklin aknowledges his players that have signed with Major League teams after the team was awarded the Collegiate Athlete of the Year award Thursday during the Greater Cleveland Sports Award banquet. (John Kuntz / The Plain Dealer)
-----
CLEVELAND: Cheri Stricklin was so oblivious to the stars her husband kept pointing out at Thursday night's Greater Cleveland Sports Awards that she said he should have brought a friend instead.

“I said, ‘That's Hanford Dixon,' and she had no idea who that was,” Kent State baseball coach Scott Stricklin said, referring to the former Browns cornerback.

Fortunately, Stricklin had four more knowledgeable members of his 2012 College World Series team at his side to help him accept the collegiate athlete of the year award from Ohio State coach Urban Meyer during the annual gala at the Renaissance Hotel.

With Stricklin was pitcher David Starn (a Walsh Jesuit product), designated hitter Nick Hamilton (Avon Lake), shortstop Jimmy Rider (Venetia, Pa.) and catcher David Lyon (Emporium, Pa.).

“We've got two Pittsburgh guys here. I'm glad they didn't wear their black and gold up on stage,” Stricklin said.

The Golden Flashes' baseball team was selected over the KSU football team, which went to its first bowl game in 40 years, and the University of Akron soccer team, which reached the NCAA round of 16.

Other big names in attendance were Browns owner Jimmy Haslam and coach Rob Chud­zinski, Cavs coach Bryon Scott, General Manager Chris Grant and newly named all-star Kyrie Irving, and legendary boxing promoter Don King.

“It's a great honor,” Stricklin said of the Golden Flashes' award. “I was excited when I got the call that we'd be a part of this. It's really neat to be around these people who mean so much to Northeast Ohio.

“The coolest thing for me is that everybody knows what we did and they didn't say, ‘What did they do?' They really took this story and ran with it and people responded. I think it's because we had so many kids from here. We were Northeast Ohio and we represented college baseball like it's never been represented.”

Other winners

Irving was named professional athlete of the year over teammate Anderson Varejao and Browns kicker Phil Dawson.

Tianna (Madison) Bartoletta, an Elyria native who finished fourth in the 100-meter dash at the London Olympics, was selected the top amateur athlete. She was picked over Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy product Justin Harry Lester, a Greco-Roman wrestler who also competed in the London Games, and Westlake's Margot Shumway of the USA rowing team.

Mentor quarterback Mitch Trubisky was chosen the high school athlete of the year over Kirtland running back Damon Washington and Mentor guard Justin Fritts, Ohio's Mr. Basketball in 2012.

Former Browns left tackle Doug Dieken received the Lifetime Achievement Award. Chris Wilk of the American Collegiate Hockey Association, also an adjunct professor of sports administration at KSU, took home the Sports Development Gold Medalist Award.

The sports moment of the year was the Mentor-St. Edward high school football playoff game.

What about Modell?

Former Browns owner Art Modell is one of 15 finalists for the Pro Football Hall of Fame's Class of 2013 and ex-Browns running back Eric Metcalf believes Modell should be selected.

“If you talk about what he did for the NFL, to me it's a no-brainer,” said Metcalf, who helped Haslam present Dieken his award. “Granted, he took the Browns to Baltimore, but I'd be willing to bet if you asked a Browns fan if he still owned the team in Cleveland right now would you think he would be in the hall of fame, everybody would say yes.”

Asked how he feels about the Browns' new regime, Metcalf said, “I think we're going to see some changes that people are looking forward to and we're going to be past the point of all the turnover with the new coaches and new players. We'll get to the place everybody in Cleveland wants to be.”

Metcalf lives in Seattle and coaches track and field for a track club, some elite athletes, the University of Washington. He is also a consultant for Nike track and field.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State women's golf coach Mike Morrow stuns players, announces his retirement (Morrow, Page, Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Allen Moff | Staff Writer Published: January 25, 2013 4:00AM

The one and only coach in the history of Kent State's national power women's golf program has decided to call it a career.

Mike Morrow, a Stow native and former All-American golfer for the Golden Flashes, announced his retirement on Thursday after leading Kent State to a Mid-American Conference championship in every season of its 14-year existence. He will also be retiring after 22 years as general manager of the Kent State University Golf Course.

Morrow may be the only coach in sports history to retire with a perfect record, as far as league championships are concerned.

“We always attempted to recruit to be in the top 20 in the country, and winning the conference titles and all the other things we accomplished just came along with that philosophy,” said Morrow. “We always thought if things fell right we would have a chance to win an NCAA championship. We tried to recruit that way and not just think about winning the conference, and that played a big part in our success.”

Morrow became the program's first head coach in 1997. Since then, he has been a 10-time MAC Coach of the Year, a two-time Central Region Coach of the Year and a Golfweek National Coach of the Year in 2001, when the Flashes finished a program-best 15th at the NCAA Championships in just their third year of existence. He has also coached 13 MAC players of the year and 59 All-MAC honorees, including 39 All-MAC First Team selections, and led KSU to the NCAA Championships four times.

The timing of his decision, just weeks before the Flashes are set to begin the spring portion of the 2012-13 campaign, admittedly caught people by surprise — especially his players.

“I think shock would probably be the word,” said Morrow, when asked to describe how his golfers reacted to the news. “(The meeting) was relatively short.”

Why did Morrow choose to step down in mid-season?

“There's never a great time for something like this. Before the spring started would be better than any,” said Morrow. “But basically I think it's in the best interests of the university and the team, and myself.”

Kent State Director of Golf Herb Page knew Morrow's retirement was a possibility.

“It came up fairly suddenly, but I think it's been discussed off and on,” said Page. “I know Mike Morrow and (KSU Director of Athletics) Joel Nielsen talked about this, and Mike is retiring. That's what happened. It's the beginning of a new era, but certainly the end of a phenomenal one with what he's done, his record here. He's an icon. You can't replace Mike Morrow. He never lost.”

Page, along with Associate Head Coach for men's and women's golf Rob Wakeling and women's assistant coach Maddi Swaney, will assume leadership of the program until a new head coach is named. Page said a national search for a new coach would begin immediately, but he did not know if a replacement would be named before the end of the current season.

“We haven't had time to really sit down and talk about what we're going to do yet moving forward,” said Page.

“But I can guarantee you that our women will be taken care of and treated like they were with Mike Morrow, first-class.”

Morrow became the first All-American golfer in Golden Flashes history in 1973. He earned All-MAC honors for three consecutive seasons from 1973-75, and was a 1987 inductee into the Varsity ‘K' Hall of Fame.

“We thank Mike for his many years of service to Kent State University,” said Nielsen. “His 14 consecutive conference championships will be difficult to match by any coach in any sport. I also want to thank Mike's family, his wife Denise and his three daughters, Kelly, Jamie and Mandi, for everything the Morrow family has meant to Kent State.”

Morrow was known as a great teacher of the game of golf well before the Kent State women's golf program ever existed, and he cemented that reputation over the past 15 years.

“The majority of our players are developed,” he said. “We probably only had four or five what you would call blue-chip players, who you knew were the real deal when they came out of high school and junior golf. The rest were just really quality people who did the work themselves. They turned themselves into good players.”

Morrow is more proud of the accomplishments his players have accrued off the golf course.

“We're now 29 straight semesters where the team GPA is 3.0 or higher,” said Morrow. “Just about everyone who has stuck with the program for four years has graduated. Not only was this a pretty darn good program, but you're talking about some class girls, just unbelievable ambassadors for Kent State University. I'm more proud of the quality people that we graduated and what they're going to do with their lives than anything else.”

Morrow said he has not made any concrete plans of how he's going to spend his newfound free time.

“Doing both jobs was time-consuming,” he said. “Of course my family was awesome; they pretty much lived at the golf course with me. So obviously I'll enjoy some family time, and probably take some time to refect a little bit. I don't have anything set that I want to do. I'm open for opportunities and challenges, but I don't have anything set.”

Morrow would not rule out an eventual return to coaching.

“I love coaching, I love teaching, and I think I've been decent at it,” he said. “I just don't know how much I'm gonna miss it. Right now I'm not actively looking to get back into coaching, but you never say never.”

Return to Top



News Headline: No looking back for Stricklin, Kent State baseball (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Allen Moff | Staff writer Published: January 25, 2013 4:00AM

Scott Stricklin is ready to slap the covers shut on last year's storybook season.

As tempting as it may be to continue rehashing his Kent State baseball team's Cinderella run to the 2012 College World Series, the Golden Flashes' eighth-year mentor knows that's not going to help his team achieve success in 2013.

"We certainly have a lot to look back on and be proud of, and we have a lot of kids back that were part of that team, but the biggest thing for us is trying to turn the page," said Stricklin, whose Flashes will conduct their first official practice of 2013 Saturday morning at the KSU Fieldhouse. "We always talk about when things go wrong we can't hit the rewind button and change it. Well, everything went right for us last year, but we still can't hit the rewind button. We still have to look forward.

"That's a challenge any time you have a championship team, you have to turn the page and try to get moving in the right direction to win another championship. So that's what we're focused on right now."

The Flashes have the majority of players returning from last year's squad, which earned a school-record 47 wins while capturing the Gary Regional and defeating Oregon in the Super Regional to advance to the College World Series for the first time in school history. They knocked off top-ranked Florida and wound up finishing fifth in Omaha.

However, Kent State will have to replace No. 1 starter David Starn, All-American shortstop Jimmy Rider and standout catcher David Lyon.

Filling Lyon's shoes is a chief concern heading into the preseason according to Strickland.

"I think the biggest thing we need to do is find out who our starting catcher's going to be," he said.

"We've got three candidates right now. Jason Bagoly is a senior, while Tommy Monot and Jason Revesz are both sophomores. That's the position we need to shore up the most. Losing David Lyon is certainly a big loss, but we feel like we've got some talented kids here that are gonna try to fill his shoes."

Stricklin has two other particular areas of emphasis heading into preseason practices.

"Second is shoring up our starting rotation," he said.

Junior right-hander Tyler Skulina, who went 11-3 with a 3.77 earned-run average as KSU's No. 3 starter a year ago, returns to anchor the rotation.

"It looks like Tyler Skulina will be our No. 1 starter," said Stricklin. "At No. 2 it looks like (junior) Taylor Williams, our junior college transfer, and at No. 3 right now is Casey Wilson. But those spots can still be won and lost."

Wilson, a senior right-hander, pitched out of the bullpen last year, and led the team with seven saves. The Flashes have tremendous depth in their bullpen, making Wilson's move into the starting rotation possible.

"The final thing is whose gonna anchor the back end of our bullpen," said Stricklin. "That's probably the area that we have the most depth in. Our bullpen is very experienced. We have a lot of guys back from last year's team and a couple more guys that stepped up and had really good (fall seasons) for us. I don't know if we're gonna have a (regular) closer; we may have three or four guys that all can do it, and we may mix and match those guys."

Stricklin, who signed a six-year contract extension worth $300,000 annually last September, knows his Flashes will need to few breaks in order to approach last year's success. But the tools to make magic happen once again in 2013 are certainly in place.

"We've got a lot of talent on this team, a lot of experience. We feel good, we feel confident," said Stricklin. "We've got a really tough early schedule. We have to play our first 17 games on the road, and that's always a challenge, especially when you play good teams. We'll learn a lot about ourselves in those first 17 games."

The Flashes open the season on Feb. 15 with games against Virginia Tech and UNC-Wilmington in North Carolina.

LIGHTS, ACTION

Lights are currently being installed for the first time at Olga A. Mural Field at Schoonover Stadium.

"The concrete sleeves that go 25-feet deep into the ground are being placed as we speak," Stricklin said on Tuesday. "They're going to wait to put the actual light poles in until early March, but our first home game is March 20 and they are supposed to be up and operational by then."

The first home game of the season, a non-league battle with Pittsburgh, is scheduled to start at 4 p.m.

"We may use the lights that day a little bit at the end, but we're gonna wait until we get a little further into April before we start scheduling some night games," said Stricklin.

MARCONI RETURNS TO KENT

Alex Marconi, a former star catcher for the Golden Flashes, has joined the KSU coaching staff after spending the past two seasons as head coach at Ball State. He will coach Kent State's infielders.

Marconi was a four-year letterwinner at Kent State, earning First Team All-MAC and All-Region honors in 1999 and 2000.

Return to Top



News Headline: Greater Cleveland Sports Awards attendees most optimistic about Browns | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Dennis Manoloff, The Plain Dealer
on January 24, 2013 at 11:45 PM, updated January 25, 2013 at 7:02 AM

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Fans of Cleveland professional sports are a different breed. They have no choice, what with their three major teams -- Browns, Indians, Cavaliers -- having failed to win a title since 1964.

Fans in other cities have moaned and groaned about their teams' misfortunes, but they really have no idea. Cleveland pro teams don't simply fail to win titles, they fail to get within striking distance. Since the first Super Bowl was played in January 1967, the Browns have been to none, the Cavaliers have been to one NBA Finals (2007) and the Indians have been to two World Series (1995, 1997).

The past several years have been especially painful.

Since LeBron James made "The Decision" in summer 2010, the Cavaliers are a combined 51-140, the Browns 14-34 and the Indians 217-269 (including the full 2010 season). LBJ's 2009-2010 Cavs are the most recent Cleveland team with a record of .500 or better.

How much longer will Cleveland fans be forced to wait? Which of the teams has the best chance to touch off the wildest of wild celebrations before the others?

A straw poll of luminaries and fans at the Greater Cleveland Sports Awards on Thursday night leaned heavily toward the Browns, by a 2-to-1 margin, to win the Super Bowl before the other teams reach their respective championship series.

Jimmy Haslam, who took over for Randy Lerner as owner this past season, is the main reason the Browns got so much love. Those interviewed are convinced Haslam is an owner who cares, who will make things happen in a hurry, who will not stand for losing.

Backstage at the GCSA, Haslam made it a point to praise Browns fans. He could have been talking about the likes of Beverly Svenson of Maple Heights.

"I think the Browns are going to do it soon," Svenson said. "They've made a lot of changes, and they seem to be good ones. Ultimately, the players are going to have to get it done, but I think they have the support of management now, whereas they didn't have it as much before."

Legendary St. Ignatius football coach Chuck Kyle, as expected, thinks the Browns will need the least amount of time to get the ring. But Kyle doesn't see it happening overnight, even with the positive vibes created by Haslam.

"It's going to be a while for all three of the teams, because they're all still rebuilding," Kyle said. "I like the Browns because of the leadership at the top and a young, talented roster. They've got cap room, and their division is getting old. It's tougher for the Indians, who are in the small-to-mid-market situation and have the tight windows before the good players sign elsewhere. The Cavs are young and have Kyrie Irving, but they keep getting injured."

Kyle said he was thrilled to learn that new Browns coach Rob Chudzinski, a rookie at that job, assigned play-calling duties to offensive coordinator Norv Turner.

"Rob could call the plays because he's been a good offensive coordinator, but he recognized, 'Hey, I'm a head coach -- I've got enough to worry about,' " Kyle said.

Northeast Ohio resident Dominique Moceanu and her husband, Dr. Michael Canales, see the Cavaliers getting to the mountain first. Moceanu is a former Olympic gymnast.

Moceanu and Canales think Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert and General Manager Chris Grant are rebuilding the right way and not going for the quick fix. Moceanu and Canales said Irving is a star around whom to build, but they were not willing to mentally commit to Irving joining forces with a certain member of the Miami Heat in summer 2014.

"We'll talk about LeBron as we get closer," Moceanu said. "Right now, I'm just enjoying watching the Cavs get better."

Among other bigwigs at the annual GCSA banquet were boxing promoter Don King, Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer, Browns CEO Joe Banner, Chudzinski, members of the Indians' front office, Cavaliers coach Byron Scott, Grant, Irving and former Brown Eric Metcalf.

King drew a crowd wherever he went in the Renaissance Hotel. Irving had just learned he was named to the Eastern Conference All-Star Team, so he was swarmed.

Awards handed out at the GCSA included: pro athlete of the year -- Kyrie Irving, guard, Cavaliers; college athlete of the year -- Kent State baseball team; amateur athlete of the year -- Tianna (Madison) Bartoletta, track and field, Elyria; high school athlete of the year -- Mitch Trubisky, quarterback, Mentor; lifetime achievement -- Doug Dieken, former offensive tackle, Browns; best moment -- St. Ignatius vs. Mentor, playoff football; and courage award -- Molly Miller, soccer, Toledo Notre Dame Academy.

Miller received a protracted standing ovation from the packed ballroom. Miller has battled cancer.

Return to Top



News Headline: New analysis of fracking wastewater yields surprising results (Lutz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: WaterWorld - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: DURHAM, NC, Jan. 22, 2013 -- Hydraulically-fractured natural gas wells are producing less wastewater per unit of gas recovered than conventional wells would. But the scale of fracking operations in the Marcellus shale region is so vast that the wastewater it produces threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater disposal capacity, according to new analysis by researchers at Duke and Kent State universities.

Hydraulically fractured natural gas wells in the Marcellus shale region of Pennsylvania produce only about 35 percent as much wastewater per unit of gas recovered as conventional wells, according to the analysis, which appears in the journal Water Resources Research.

"We found that on average, shale gas wells produced about 10 times the amount of wastewater as conventional wells, but they also produced about 30 times more natural gas," said Brian Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State, who led the analysis while he was a postdoctoral research associate at Duke. "That surprised us, given the popular perception that hydraulic fracturing creates disproportionate amounts of wastewater."

However, the study shows the total amount of wastewater from natural gas production in the region has increased by about 570 percent since 2004 as a result of increased shale gas production there.

"It's a double-edged sword," Lutz said. "On one hand, shale gas production generates less wastewater per unit. On the other hand, because of the massive size of the Marcellus resource, the overall volume of water that now has to be transported and treated is immense. It threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater-disposal infrastructure capacity."

"This is the reality of increasing domestic natural gas production," said Martin Doyle, professor of river science at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment. "There are significant tradeoffs and environmental impacts whether you rely on conventional gas or shale gas."

The researchers analyzed gas production and wastewater generation for 2,189 gas wells in Pennsylvania, using publicly available data reported by industry to the state's Department of Environmental Protection, in compliance with state law.

In hydraulic fracturing, large volumes of water, sand and chemicals are injected deep underground into gas wells at high pressure to crack open shale rock and extract its embedded natural gas. As the pace of shale gas production grows, so too have concerns about groundwater contamination and what to do with all the wastewater.

Another surprise that emerged, Doyle said, was that well operators classified only about a third of the wastewater from Marcellus wells as flowback from hydraulic fracturing; most of it was classified as brine.

"A lot of attention, to date, has focused on chemicals in the flowback that comes out of a well following hydraulic fracturing," he said. "However, the amount of brine produced -- which contains high levels of salts and other natural pollutants from shale rock -- has received less attention even though it is no less important."

Brine can be generated by wells over much longer periods of time than flowback, he noted, and studies have shown that some of the pollutants in brine can be as difficult to treat as many of the chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

"We need to come up with technological and logistical solutions to address these concerns, including better ways to recycle and treat the waste on site or move it to places where it can be safely disposed," Doyle said. "Both of these are in fact developing rapidly."

"Opponents have targeted hydraulic fracturing as posing heightened risks, but many of the same environmental challenges presented by shale gas production would exist if we were expanding conventional gas production," Lutz added. "We have to accept the reality that any effort to substantially boost domestic energy production will present environmental costs."

The Marcellus shale formation stretches from New York to Virginia and accounts for about 10 percent of all natural gas produced in the United States today. Much of the current production is in Pennsylvania. Prior to technological advances in horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing that made the shale gas accessible, the region accounted for only about 2 percent of the nation's output.

Return to Top



News Headline: 21 News 6 P.M. (Lutz) | Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: 21 News at 6 PM - WFMJ-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: can meet the qualifications to be a combat soldier-- both genders are now eligible for the chance. Youngstown State University Veterans Affairs office student employee, Antwan Davis, says many women are ready,were trained along side him ... as he served 5 years overseas in Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan. 08:50:20:26-08:50:32:29 "WE HAVE FEMALES THAT ARE IN UNITS, EVERY UNIT HAS A MISSION AND YOUR MISSION MIGHT BE TO DRIVE TRUCKS, IF YOU DRIVE A TRUCK AND YOUR VEHICLE IS HIT BY AN I-E-D, I MEAN THE IED DOESN'T DETERMINE THE GENDER." More than 200-thousand elite commando positions will be created for women with this measure. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta says women now play an integral part of the military's ability to succeed. And if ask you them ... 09:03:15:17-09:03:29:24 "I THINK THE FEMALES WHO ARE GOING TO ENTER THE MILITARY, BE PART OF THESE INFANTRY POSITIONS OR COMBAT POSITIONS, YOU KNOW THEY'RE GONNA, THEY'RE NOT GOING TO GO THERE AND THINK IT'S JUST ANY OTHER JOB, THEY'RE G GNG TO KNOW THEY HAVE PERFORM WELL AND PERFORM EQUAL TO THEIR COUNTERPARTS." For the women who aim high ... Their steps toward advancement could come one mission at a time. With more local news ... I'm Lindsay McCoy. Two valley congresesen from opposite sides of the political aisle, are joining forces to give the Shale boom a boost. Democrat Tim Ryan and Republican Bill Johnson, are calling on the White House to open America's gas reserves, to the global market. The representatives say that selling natural gas overseas, would increase demand and create jobs. As the shale industry grows, so does the volume of wastewater. A newly published study suggests that Ohio may not have the capacity to handle the drilling wastes. 21 News reporter Glenn Stevens takes a closer look at the problem and how it's being addressed. As the oil and gas industry develops more and more wells, the new study says the volume of briny waste could overwhelm the regions wastewater disposal capacity. Kent State University Professor Brian Lutz led the analysis. SUPER ON GRAPHIC 00:01:48:19 FUTURE EXPANSION OF SHALE GAS DEVELOPMENT IN THIS REGION DOES REQUIRE THAT WE HAVE A VERY CLEAR PLAN FOR MANAGING THE GROWING WASTEWATER VOLUMES THAT ARE BEING GENERATED The study shows that Ohio is projecting that it's 180 injection wells handled nearly 14-million babaels of water in 2012, up from 12.8 million barrels in 2011..with each barrel holding 42 gallons of waste water. YSU Geology Professor Jeffrey Dick says the average well will produce from 3 to 6 barrels of briny waste per day. 00:01:24:14 IF YOU TAKE THAT AND MULTIPLY IT BY THE THOUSANDS OF THESE WELLS THE RATE OF BRINE PRODUCTION DOESN'T DECLINE IT HOLDS STEADY Both of the Professors says the cost of transporting so much water by truck is also making possible alternatives such as water pipelines s d processing plants more attractive. 00:02:44:12 TAKE THAT BRINE WATER AND TREAT IT IN A CENTRALIZED OFF SITE FACILITY BASICALLY A DISTILLATION PLANT A spokesperson for ShaleComm says the industry is doing considerable work and research to recycle processed water for use at multiple drill sites, as well as finding alternatives to water based fracturing. Professor Lutz believes that rapid advancements are being make on greater recycling options. SUPER ON GRAPHIC 00:07:37:11 BUT IT REMAINS UNCLEARJUST HOW MUCH OF THE TOTAL WASTE WATER VOLUME THEY'RE GOING TO ULTIMATELY BE ABLE TO RECYLE With more local news, I'm GS. Next on 21 news at six.. The price of potholes.. Some drivers think fixing the roads is worth every penny. But the Mahoning county engineer, is looking at ways to cut costs. . Plus.. Will your insurance pay if your car or truck is damaged while driving during a winter emergency? We'll have the answer. A fire alarm brings the evacuation of a downtown high rise.

Return to Top



News Headline: WFMJ Today (Lutz) | Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ Today - WFMJ-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Good Morning to Ya! It's Friday January 25. This is WFMJ Today. Coming up... They say a picture is worth a thousand words...and this one surely inspires many. Coming up, Jennifer Brindisi brings us a love story that knows no boundaries and tugs at the heart strings of all. And how would you like to work out...without doing the work? That dream could become a reality...with Goga! But just what is Goga? On the go-ga this morning is Lauren LIVE at a new mexican restaurant in Boardman...hey Lauren! Thanks Lauren. AD LIB TOSS TOSS BACK TO MIKE AD LIB TOSS TOSS BACK TO MIKE A proposed senior independent living facility in Poland, is raising concerns within the community. The board of zoning appeals is considering whether or not to allow more square footage and a higher building, than what's allowed for the property on Route 224, next to the post office. It would be for people 55 and older, who make around 30,000 or less a year. 32 0 0WE MAY THINK THAT WE ARE BECOMING A DENSE AND INTENSE BUILT CENTER OF A COMMUNITY BUT I'M NOT SURE THE RESIDENTS OF TEH VILLAGE.....ARE SEEING THEMSELVES IN THE DENSITY THAT IS 26 UNITS AN ACRE. 32:30 Other concerns include increased traffic and how long the facility would be designated for senior living. Other concerns include increased traffic and how long the facility would be designated for senior living. We have an update on that long strike at Phillips Metals Manufacturing in Niles. Company CEO George Kubat came here from Omaha and met with local steel workers union leaders and congressman Tim Ryan to try to end the walkout. Ryan said both sides offered creative solutions but failed to reach an agreement. They DID agree to meet again in the very near future. 50 workers went on strike against Phillips last September in a contract dispute. Two valley congressmen from opposite sides of the political aisle, are joining forces to give the Shale boom a boost. Democrat Tim Ryan and Republican Bill Johnson, are cacaling on the White House to open America's gas reserves, to the global market. The representatives say that selling natural gas overseas, would increase demand and create jobs. As the shale industry grows, so does the volume of wastewater. A newly published study suggests that Ohio may not have the capacity to handle the drilling wastes. 21 News reporter Glenn Stevens takes a closer look at the problem and how it's being addressed. As the oil and gas industry develops more and more wells, the new study says the volume of briny waste could overwhelm the regions wastewater disposal capacity. Kent State University Professor Brian Lutz led the analysis. SUPER ON GRAPHIC 00:01:48:19 FUTURE EXPANSION OF SHALE GAS DEVELOPMENT IN THIS REGION DOES REQUIRE THAT WE HAVE A VERY CLEAR PLAN FOR MANAGING THE GROWING WASTEWATER VOLUMES THAT ARE BEING GENERATED The study shows that Ohio is projecting that it's 180 injection wells handled nearly 14-million barrels of water in 2012, up from 12.8 million barrels in 2011..with each barrel holding 42 gallons of waste water. YSU Geology Professor Jeffrey Dick says the average well will produce from 3 to 6 barrels of briny waste per day. 00:01:24:14 IF YOU TAKE THAT AND MULTIPLY IT BY THE THOUSANDS OF THESE WELLS THE RATE OF BRINE PRODUCTION DOESN'T DECLINE IT HOLDS STEADY Both of the Professors says the cost of transporting so much water by truck is also making possible alternatives such as water pipelines and processing plants more attractive. 00:02:44:12 TAKE THAT BRINE WATER AND TREAT IT IN A CENTRALIZED OFF SITE FACILITY BASICALLY A DISTILLATION PLANT A spokesperson for ShaleComm says the industry is doing considerable work and research to recycle processed water for use at multiple drill sites, as well as finding alternatives to water based fracturing. Professor Lutz believes that rapid advancements are being make on greater ryc tmo lal new I G --Mg iidin a m.sowpoho unEnin Pri Gnntisa Tmbl isdyavg shy oding "cd tc..A rm had rds tiloerastingeprsan LEO Wie cane, m . p Mahoning County is considering

Return to Top



News Headline: Research Yields Surprise: Does Fracking Help to Save Water? (Lutz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: PROCESS Worldwide - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Shale Gas

01/24/2013 | Editor: Dominik Stephan

A new research by the Duke and Kent State universities provides surprising results: Although hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") consumes less water than conventional gas wells, the waste water can still overstress local disposal and cleaning systems...

The advent of shale gas has shaken the global economy: While Europe and Asia groan under the burden of high energy prices, America eyes for total independence from oil and gas imports. While the geopolitical consequences of this development remain unclear, the economic potential is game–changing: The US could well face a decade of reindustrialisation, analysts expect.

Despite these potentials, critics blame shale gas production to pose a serious thread to ecosystems and ground water. As the nonporous shales have to be fractured with a mixture of water and highly aggressive chemicals ("cracking"), shale gas is indeed no green choirboy. In terms of water consumption, it could nevertheless be better than its reputation, a new study shows.

Shale Gas Produces Less Wastewater than Conventional LNG

Hydraulically fractured natural gas wells are producing less wastewater per unit of gas recovered than conventional wells would. Nevertheless, the enormous scale of the shale gas revolution poses serious challenges for water and waste water management systems: The scale of fracking operations in the Marcellus shale region (in the North American Appalachian Basin) is so vast that the wastewater it produces threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater disposal capacity, according to new analysis by researchers at Duke and Kent State universities.

Plus 30 % Gas Per Well – Shale Gas Efficiency Beats Water consumption

Hydraulically fractured natural gas wells in the Marcellus shale region of Pennsylvania produce only about 35 percent as much wastewater per unit of gas recovered as conventional wells, according to the analysis, which appears in the journal Water Resources Research. "We found that on average, shale gas wells produced about 10 times the amount of wastewater as conventional wells, but they also produced about 30 times more natural gas," said Brian Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State, who led the analysis while he was a postdoctoral research associate at Duke. "That surprised us, given the popular perception that hydraulic fracturing creates disproportionate amounts of wastewater."

Yet, the gas boom in the region stresses the water network, which has become a bit long in the tooth, insiders believe... More on page 2!

Additional Information

Process Technology Reduces Water Consumption for Shale Gas

Page 1: Research Yields Surprise: Does Fracking Help to Save Water?

Page 2: Significant Tradeoffs and Environmental Impacts – Shale Gas Raises Concerns of Groundwater Pollution

Page 3: A New Challenge: Brine Water From Shale Gas Production – Technological and Logistical Solutions Needed

Page 4: The Marcellus Formation – America's Gas Eldorado to come?

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State, Cuyahoga Valley National Park to Work Together (Diacon, Blank, Dzurec) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Collaboration to allow for research projects and educational programs development

Kent State University has signed a memorandum of understanding with the National Park Service, providing for enhanced collaboration in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost (left) and Stan Austin, superintendent of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, signed the five-year agreement in December 2012. Kent State University

http://kent.patch.com/articles/kent-state-cuyahoga-valley-national-park-to-work-together/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1359090201

Kent State University has signed a memorandum of understanding with the National Park Service, providing for enhanced collaboration in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park.

The agreement, signed last month, calls for collaborative projects and joint research primarily focused on geology, biology, hydrology and educational programs, according to Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost.

“There have been informal discussions between scientists at the park and Kent State faculty for a long time, but over the past two years, we really started to strengthen the relationship and deepen the ties to the park,” Diacon said.

The theme of the collaboration is “The River We Share,” aptly named because the Cuyahoga River flows through both the Cuyahoga Valley National Park and through Kent, creating a physical connection between both areas.

“We are pleased to join Kent State University in announcing this partnership,” said Stan Austin, superintendent of Cuyahoga Valley National Park. “The collaboration between the park and the university will provide students and the park research and technical services through hands-on education and service-learning opportunities. This association has the potential to develop future land stewards while enriching the experience for park visitors.”

The five-year pact allows both parties to revisit and revise the agreement at the end of that period.

“This particular national park is unique, as it encompasses urban environments to fairly pristine areas - plus it's heavily used because of the large population surrounding it,” said James Blank, interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor and chair of the Department of Biological Sciences at Kent State.

“At Kent State, we have real interest in urban ecology and hydrology, that is, what's going on with water as it moves throughout these environments,” Blank said. “Our faculty is energized and interested in addressing the complex issues regarding sustainability and the use of our precious resources.”

The new agreement will mean expanded internship opportunities for Kent State students.

“We have a number of programs across different departments where students want to look for careers related to the environment, everything from working for the park service or the EPA to environmental consulting,” Blank said. “The explosion of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in Ohio is just one example of an industry that is fueling the demand for trained workers in environmental fields. This agreement will yield enormous benefits for our students.”

Past collaborations between Kent State and the CVNP have involved the university's Department of Biology, the Wick Poetry Center and the School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences.

Last year, Kent State's Wick Poetry Center, in collaboration with the Conservancy for the CVNP and the National Park Service, hosted two workshops for the university's College of Nursing. Forty-five faculty and staff members attended the writing and nature retreat at the CVNP's Environmental Education Center, participating in poetry and creative writing workshops, as well as hiking and bird watching.

“The experience was rejuvenating,” said Laura Dzurec, dean of Kent State's College of Nursing. “The poetry really opened doors for us, allowing for intergenerational communication and building camaraderie in the college.”

Future programs will be centered on enhanced joint research opportunities, learning opportunities for faculty, staff and students from both organizations, and potential employment experiences for Kent State students and faculty.

“I can see this relationship growing in ways we don't even realize yet,” Blank added. “National parks are precious resources, and the ones we have are important to understand and study.”

For more information about the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, visit www.nps.gov/cuva.

For more information about Kent State's College of Arts and Sciences, visit www.kent.edu/cas.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects

Beacon Journal staff report

Published: January 24, 2013 - 02:38 PM

Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects January 24,2013 07:38 PM GMT

Beacon Journal Publishing Co.

Kent State University has signed a five-year memorandum of understanding with the National Park Service that should lead to enhanced collaboration in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park.

The agreement, signed last month and announced Thursday, calls for collaborative projects and joint research focused on geology, biology, hydrology and educational programs.

The theme of the collaboration is "The River We Share" because the Cuyahoga River flows through both the park and through the city of Kent.

The new agreement will lead to expanded internship opportunities for Kent State students, the university said.

Click here to read or leave a comment on this story.

Return to Top



News Headline: University of Akron looking to expand online offerings (Kelly) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Carol Biliczky
Beacon Journal staff writer
Published: January 24, 2013 - 10:51 PM

Someday you might be able to get a degree from the University of Akron without setting a foot on its well-manicured campus. Or paying UA a single dollar in tuition.

UA officials are looking at ways to extend the school's reach by embracing massive, open online courses — or MOOCs, in the shorthand of the educational revolution.

University President Luis Proenza wants to make the campus a source of online learning, and as quickly as possible.

“This is the first time I've seen a real sense of urgency among university leaders who recognize the opportunities in digital learning,” he told the campus by email earlier this month, referring to a professional association meeting he attended last fall.

While online courses have been around at UA and other universities for decades, MOOCs are different. Unlike traditional online classes, MOOCs don't cost anything, offer credit, limit enrollment or require students to complete prerequisites.

That means thousands of students can sample prepackaged online courses in everything from solid-state chemistry to game theory to equine nutrition.

While most of today's courses are offered by elite institutions like Harvard, Stanford, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Berklee College of Music, that is rapidly changing. More and more university officials are showing interest in entering the exploding fray.

“It's more than just a fad,” said Gerry McKiernan, an Iowa State librarian whose self-described “obsession” with MOOCs led him to launch a blog called Alt-Ed in April. “Very quickly the phenomenon has exploded. It is a moving target. I think it certainly will affect higher education.”

While just 2.6 percent of colleges and universities nationwide offer MOOCs, another 9.4 percent are planning to do so, according to a report by the Babson Survey Research Group. About 6.7 million students took online courses in 2012, with innovations cropping up seemingly every day.

San Jose State University announced this week that it will experiment with offering credit for MOOCs through the for-profit provider Udacity. Another for-profit provider, Coursera, announced last week that students can earn “verified certificates” via software that tracks their typing style. That identifies the student doing the work and gives them something to prove that it was indeed them who passed the course. Coursera offers more than 200 courses from 33 universities.

Ohio State became the first Ohio university to launch MOOCs, with four classes on Coursera this month.

More than 30,000 students — some from as far away as Lithuania, India and Norway — have enrolled in the introductory calculus course offered by lecturer Jim Fowler.

His 15-week course is made up of videos plus an online textbook and exercises with cues to help the stumbling student. Fowler offers weekly online office hours and encourages students to work with others online.

The course “is about doing calculus problems in fellowship with one another,” he says enthusiastically on the introductory lecture.

No formality here: He wears a casual brown sweater, signs his missives to students “Jim” and exudes his love for higher math. His goal, he said, is to make math more accessible to more people.

Reaching students

That is also how Proenza sees it. MOOCs can “improve educational productivity, allowing us to reach more learners at lower cost,” the UA president said in his campus email.

In a paper he presented to the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities, he suggests capitalizing on the promise of MOOCs by “unbundling teaching and learning, assessment and location.”

He says that universities should develop the ability to credential students with course credits — and even degrees — when they prove they have the knowledge, regardless of where they received the knowledge or even took a college course at all.

He wants UA to make available “as many of the world's resources (about MOOCs) as possible to anyone who might need them.”

Already the university has a web page dedicated to MOOCs.

“The result would be an entirely new business model for higher education,” he said in his paper. Tomorrow's university would offer wider access to “over 50 million Americans who have only partially completed their baccalaureate degree.”

He presented his ideas to 23 members of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities at the Association of Public Land-Grant Universities national meeting in Denver in November. Both organizations agreed to form faculty work teams to address the issues.

Part of their conclusion to date: It's better to have innovations driven by universities than by third-party vendors.

Class falloff huge

Yet how that will take shape remains to be seen.

Fowler, the OSU lecturer, said he would be ecstatic if even a couple thousand students finished his calculus course. That's because the falloff is huge in MOOCs.

Students don't pay anything for the course and there's no penalty for dropping out, so many do. Some do not learn well online; some do not have a sustaining interest in the subject.

“We're in a transition period,” said Harvey Sterns, a UA gerontology professor who is immediate past chairman of the university's Faculty Senate. “How this translates into practice on our campus is a major exercise for faculty. It's very difficult to judge.”

At Kent State, the university is concentrating on conventional online courses for credit for enrolled students, said Valerie Kelly, director of online learning.

“MOOCs may add some value, but they're not our focus,” she said.

“It's probably going to be another 30 years before we see this sorting itself out,” Proenza said.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU speaker: King would press 'war on poverty' | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Thomas Gallick | Staff Writer Published: January 25, 2013 4:00AM

Carlos Muñoz Jr., told faculty, students and visitors at Kent State University Thursday that Martin Luther King Jr., if he were alive today, would press President Barack Obama for less action in wars abroad and more action on "the war on poverty" in the United States.

Muñoz, professor emeritus at University of California, Berekley and founding chair of the first Chicano studies department in the United States of America, was the keynote speaker KSU's 11th Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration in the Kent Student Center Ballroom.

A Vietnam War veteran and social activist, Muñoz said he was disappointed Obama did not act more quickly to end the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"We have lost enough of our young men and women of all colors in wars we had no business being involved in," he said. Muñoz said King, a practitioner of non-violent resistance, would have celebrated the election of the nation's first black president, but would have questioned many of the foreign policy actions of Obama's first term. Muñoz said King was known for "speaking truth to power."

King also protested for economic and social justice, leading Muñoz to suggest the civil rights leader would also be unhappy with some of Obama's domestic policy decisions as well.

"We must let (Obama) know ... We expect him to save the poor and working class like he saved Wall Street in his first term," Muñoz said.

He said social activists should also be pressing for amnesty for undocumented workers and the end of private, for-profit prisons. Muñoz referred to the nation's current prison system as "the new slavery" due to the outsized percentage of prison populations made up by black and latino inmates.

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1126 or tgallick@recordpub.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Geauga County Maple Leaf | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: ??Geauga County Maple Leaf
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Schools & Libraries for January 24, 2013

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Middlefield VFW Awards Scholarships To Local Students

Middlefield VFW Post 9678 is proud to announce the winners of the 2012 Voice of Democracy essay contest. Special recognition goes to Eleni Timas from Cardinal High School for scoring the highest points locally and winning second place in VFW District 7. EleniÏ¿½s district win will be acknowledged at the VFWÏ¿½s District 7 awardÏ¿½s dinner where she will receive a $500 scholarship. She won $750 from the Middlefield VFW as the first place winner from Cardinal.

Four students representing two local school districts, Berkshire and Cardinal, were awarded scholarships for their winning presentations. In addition to Timas, Rebecca Wolfe, also from Cardinal High School, received $250 for her second place win. Rosebelle Easthom from the Berkshire School District and a student at Agape Christian School was the first place winner, receiving a $750 scholarship. Laura Lasich, also from Agape Christian Academy, was the second place Berkshire School District winner and received $250.

Since 1947, the Voice of Democracy has been the Veterans of Foreign WarsÏ¿½ (VFWÏ¿½s) premier scholarship program. Each year, more than 50,000 high school students compete for more than $2.3 million in scholarships and incentives. Students compete by writing and recording a broadcast script on an annual patriotic theme. The 2012 theme was Ï¿½Is Our Constitution Still Relevant?Ï¿½

Prizes and scholarships are awarded at the local, district, state and national level. Department (state) winners receive an all-expense paid trip March 2-6 to Washington, D.C., to tour the city, meet the nationÏ¿½s leaders, be honored by the VFW and its ladies auxiliary and receive their portion of $152,000 in national awards, the top scholarship being $30,000.

The Middlefield VFW would like to thank the panel of judges: Sherriff Dan McClelland, Mayor Ben Garlich and Chelsea Gardner and acknowledge all of the students for their participation. Representing the Berkshire School District and students at Agape Christian School are Billy Maschek, Jessica Sole, Tina Elliott, Breanna Rhodes, Laura Lasich, Abbie Maschek, Liam Ferraby, Rosebelle Easthom and from the Cardinal Local School District, Cardinal High School: Elaine Warren, Marie Mahoney, Rebecca Wolff and Eleni Timas.

Book Sale Donations Needed

The annual spring book sale sponsored by the Geauga West Friends of the Library runs March 13-16.

The Friends are currently accepting donations of new or gently used children and adult books, audio books, DVDs, music, puzzles and games for adults and children, collectibles, coffee table books, comic books, and prints. No textbooks or encyclopedias, please.

Donations may be dropped off at the Geauga West Library any time during regular library hours. A receipt for donations is available at the circulation desk.

The Geauga West Library is located at 13455 Chillicothe Road in Chesterland, next to West Geauga High School. For information, call 440-729-4250.

February Events At Burton Public Library

The annual Friends chess tournaments take place every Saturday in February at the Burton Public Library. The grades K-5 tournament is Feb. 2 and the grades 6-8 tournament is Feb. 9. High school students, grades 9-12, will compete Feb. 16 and competition for adults is Feb. 23. Tournaments are free of charge and pre-registration is required.

A Valentine card-making workshop will be Feb. 12 from 2-4 p.m. in the Merritt Room. The program is free and registration is not necessary.

The library will host a book sale Feb. 16 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the book cellar. In addition to books, there will be magazines, movies, puzzles, sheet music and more. All proceeds benefit library programs.

The library will be open regular hours on Presidents Day, Feb. 18. Drop in for a free matinee showing of Ï¿½Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog DaysÏ¿½ at 1 p.m. Bring a pillow or blanket to sit on as well as snacks and drinks. Admission is free and all ages are welcome. No registration required.

Author Sunny Morton will visit the library on Feb. 23 at 11 a.m. A genealogy writer and lecturer, Morton will speak about the process of capturing and recording personal and family histories. Her book, "My Life and Times: A Guided Journal for Collecting Your Stories," will be available for purchase. Registration required.

For information or to register, call 440-834-4466.

Financial Aid Filing Session

The Lake/Geauga Educational Assistance Foundation will hold a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application session at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 30 for high school seniors and their parents at the LEAF Resource Center at 8221 Auburn Road in Concord.

The free session will demonstrate how parents/students should file the FAFSA electronically at home. Parents are encouraged to attend with their students.

Register online at www.leaf-ohio.org or call LEAF at 440-358-8045 to reserve a seat or make an appointment. Reservations are required; capacity is limited.

LEAF is a non-profit college access agency serving students of all ages with the financial aid process.

Academic awards available

The awards committee of the First Congregational Church of Claridon UCC is announcing the availability of awards for the 2013-14 academic year. The purpose of this award is to encourage individuals to further their education either in a traditional college/university, a trade school or an apprentice program.

Applicants will be required to complete an application form. Applications are available through local high schools or the church office located at the corner of Claridon Troy and Mayfield roads, 440-635-1467.

Applications must be received by the awards committee no later than March 31. Completed forms may be returned to the church office or by mail to: Janice Stanek, 15321 Chardon Windsor Road, Huntsburg, OH 44046.

Applications will be reviewed and awards will be made on demonstration of current service to the community, home, school and church; demonstration of need; and work experience, paid or unpaid.

Preference will be given to applicants affiliated with the First Congregational Church of Claridon.

For information, call Mrs. Stanek at 440-321-3188.

GEL Breakfast Feb. 1

David Holmes and Dr. Mary Hricko will present The New Foundation Center Cooperating Collection at KSU Geauga: Funding Resources and Assistance at the next Geauga Economic Leadership (GEL) breakfast Feb. 1 at 8 a.m. at the Burton campus of Kent State University, 14111 Claridon Troy Road.

Holmes is the regional training coordinator for the Foundation Center - Cleveland and Dr. Hricko is director of library services at KSU Geauga and interim assistant dean.

Admission is free. Doughnuts and coffee will be served. Please call Carol at 440-834-3755 to R.S.V.P.

Lakeland Healthcare Curriculum

In response to local healthcare employers who are in need of home health aides and nursing assistants, Lakeland Community College has created two new programs to fill the need. The Ï¿½STNA (State Tested Nursing Assistant) Plus Acute Care SpecialtyÏ¿½ and the Ï¿½STNA Plus Home Health AideÏ¿½ programs were developed with input from over a dozen employers and educational organizations including Lake Health and the Visiting Nurses Association.

Those interested in learning the details on how to get started can visit one of two open houses on Jan. 26 at 11 a.m. or Jan. 29 at 6 p.m. on the main campus, 7700 Clocktower Drive, 44094, room H-103. Classes will begin in the second spring session on March 16.

The programs allow students to earn a paycheck and get experience while they work on their healthcare degree.

For more information, contact Linn Gahr at 440-525-7587.

Return to Top



News Headline: GET OUT!: Celebrating creativity at Kent State Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CantonRep.com staff report
Posted Jan 24, 2013 @ 06:00 AM
JACKSON TWP. —

More than 3,000 pieces of artwork from middle and high school students in Stark, Summit, Portage, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties are on view through Jan. 30 in three locations at Kent State University at Stark.

The 59th Annual Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Exhibit may be viewed from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. today, and Monday through Wednesday; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday in the Campus Center, Fine Arts Building and Main Hall Art Gallery.

The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards are the largest, longest-running and most prestigious recognition programs for creative young people in the United States. Kent State Stark is one of 90 regional partners that sponsor local awards programs.

Some students will receive regional awards for their work, and Gold Key winners, American Vision Nominees and Portfolio Finalists will be forwarded to the national level of the Scholastic Art Awards judging process in New York City.

Seen here are works by some local Gold Key winners.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State University at Stark Theatre Presents This Season's Musical, 'I Love You Because' | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Posted by North Canton Patch Contributor

Kent State University at Stark is proud to present this season's musical production, I Love You Because, with music by Joshua Salzman and the book and lyrics by Ryan Cunningham. The performances will take place on February 15, 16, 22 and 23 at 8 p.m. and on February 17 and 24 at 2:30 p.m. in the Kent State Stark Theatre, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township. American Sign Language interpretation will be provided for the performance on February 24 at 2:30 p.m. Opening night is Scholarship Night with proceeds benefitting students in Kent State Stark theatre and music programs.

In this romantic musical's modern twist on Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, a young, uptight greeting card writer's life is changed when he meets a flighty photographer. Along with their eccentric friends and siblings, they learn to love each other, not in spite of their faults, but because of them. For mature audiences only.

Ticket prices are $14 for adults and $10 for non-Kent State students, children under 17 and senior citizens. All Kent State students are admitted free of charge with current student ID. Tickets may be obtained beginning Monday, Jan. 28. Reserve tickets online at www.stark.kent.edu/theatre or call the Kent State Stark Theatre Box Office at 330-244-3348, Mondays through Fridays from 1 to 5 p.m.

Directing I Love You Because is Kent State Stark Assistant Professor of Theatre and Theatre Director Brian Newberg. Laurel Seeds is the musical director, Angelo Lemo is the choreographer and Louis Williams is the scenic and lighting designer. Susan Blurton is the costume designer and Ron Jarvis is the sound designer.

http://northcanton.patch.com/announcements/kent-state-university-at-stark-theatre-presents-this-seasons-musical-i-love-you-because/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1359066721

Return to Top



News Headline: Gallery 6000 at Kent State University at Stark Opens 'Printed Matters' Exhibit | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Posted by North Canton Patch Contributor

Credit North Canton Patch Contributor

http://northcanton.patch.com/announcements/gallery-6000-at-kent-state-university-at-stark-opens-printed-matters-exhibit/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1359051155

Kent State University at Stark is proud to host the Gallery 6000 exhibit, entitled Printed Matters. Gallery 6000 is a collaboration between local artists and Kent State Stark, showcasing art of various media throughout the year. The exhibit, which is open to the public, is displayed in The University Center Dining Room, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township.

Printed Matters features the unique visions of four local printmakers: Anna Rather, Nicole Schneider, Lesley Sickle and Emily Sullivan. The exhibit will be on display from February 5 through March 22, 2013. Most of the displayed pieces are for sale. The curator of Gallery 6000, Tom Wachunas, is an artist and adjunct instructor at Kent State Stark.

An opening reception will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 5 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at The University Center. Please RSVP to Rebecca DeHart at 330-244-3518 or rdehart@kent.edu. The reception is free and open to the public. Representatives of the press are encouraged to attend.

Rather's compositions are explosive, semi-abstracted and vibrantly colored, often with an oceanic theme. She calls her prints “an emotional diary realized in imagery.”

Schneider's recent prints explore formal relationships between geometric form, line and color. The imagery evokes tensions and balances between particular states of mind and emotion.

Sickle's layered abstractions juxtapose printed organic and geometric shapes. Her intimate objects of cut, bent and/or folded paper capture the shadows of forms in nature, as well as man-made structures.

The interdisciplinary work of Sullivan's is constructed from a hybrid of screen printing, sculpture and digital photography. Her pieces focus on issues of consumerism, marketing practices and the human propensity for personalizing environments.

For more information on this exhibit or Gallery 6000 at Kent State Stark, contact Rebecca DeHart at 330-244-3518 or rdehart@kent.edu. Kent State Stark features additional art exhibits in the campus galleries located in Main Hall's lower level and the Fine Arts Building. View a schedule of campus exhibits atwww.stark.kent.edu/art.

Return to Top



News Headline: Grab & Go Kids Planner: Ice Skating, Grease and Butterflies | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Patch
Contact Name: Denise Ritter
News OCR Text: Family best bets for the week for Feb. 16, 17 and 18.

Here's a learning fair for e-schoolers, a production of Grease and a moonlit nature hike — pick and choose from this week's array of events.

• LEARNING/SCIENCE FAIR

Where/When:  Celebration Church, 688 Dan St., Akron, today from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Why Go: If you are considering the e-school public-school option, this is a good opportunity to see the kind of work the students of Ohio Virtual Academy are doing.

Pricing: Free.

• ICE SKATING

Where/When: The Ice Arena at Kent State University, Stockdale Safety Building, Kent, is open to the public today 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. to midnight; Friday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.; Saturday 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., 4:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.; and Sunday 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to  7:30 p.m.

Why Go: Friday night is '80s night at the Ice Arena.

Pricing: $6 for general admission, $2 for children under 5 skaing with an adult;  $2.50 skate rental.

• THEATER PRODUCTION: GREASE

Where/When: Kent State University's Stump Theatre, 1325 Theatre Dr., Kent, Friday at 8 p.m.

Why Go: Introduce your kids to the gang at Rydell High: Danny, Sandy, Rizzo and Kenickie.

Pricing: $16

• BUTTERFLIES IN YOUR BACKYARD

Where/When: F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm Visitor's Center,  1828 Smith Rd., Akron, Thursday at 7 p.m.

Why Go: Find out which beautiful butterflies call our area home. And, in preparation of spring, learn what will attract them to your backyard.

Pricing: Free.

• FULL MOON HIKE AND CAMPFIRE

Where/When: F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm Visitor's Center, Friday at 7 p.m.

Why Go: If butterflies don't excite you, maybe the full moon will. Join a metroparks' naturalist for a hike under the full moon and then enjoy a campfire on the Seneca Deck. Marshmallows will be provided for roasting. If you'd like, bring your own food to cook over the fire.

Pricing: Free.

Related Topics: Butterflies, Grease, Kent State University, Nature Hike, Science Fair, and Theater

http://stow.patch.com/articles/grab-go-kids-planner-ice-skating-grease-and-butterflies/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1359066840

Return to Top



News Headline: BRIEF: Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects | Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jan. 24--Kent State University has signed a five-year memorandum of understanding with the National Park Service that should lead to enhanced collaboration in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park.

The agreement, signed last month and announced Thursday, calls for collaborative projects and joint research focused on geology, biology, hydrology and educational programs.

The theme of the collaboration is "The River We Share" because the Cuyahoga River flows through both the park and through the city of Kent.

The new agreement will lead to expanded internship opportunities for Kent State students, the university said.

___

(c)2013 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2013 The Akron Beacon Journal

Return to Top



News Headline: BRIEF: Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BRIEF: Kent State, national park to collaborate on more projects

Jan 24, 2013 (The Akron Beacon Journal - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) --

Kent State University has signed a five-year memorandum of understanding with the National Park Service that should lead to enhanced collaboration in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park.

The agreement, signed last month and announced Thursday, calls for collaborative projects and joint research focused on geology, biology, hydrology and educational programs.

The theme of the collaboration is "The River We Share" because the Cuyahoga River flows through both the park and through the city of Kent.

The new agreement will lead to expanded internship opportunities for Kent State students, the university said.

Copyright (C) 2013, The Akron Beacon Journal

News Provided by

Return to Top



News Headline: Observer Xpress (eNewsletter) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: EurekAlert!
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Drop your highlighters and pick up a set of flashcards! It turns out that some of the most commonly used study strategies don't actually show much promise for improving learning. But you can find out what works, from the latest psychological research.

Some students breeze through school, while others struggle. In the latest issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest researchers evaluate 10 learning techniques that vary widely in effectiveness. Which techniques pass? More>>

Why Facebook Chat is Unforgettable

When it comes to mental recall, people are far more likely to remember the text of idle chitchat on social media than the carefully crafted sentences of books. See how researchers stumbled upon these findings. More>>

________________

________________

Willpower When You Need It Most

All-nighters, group projects, essays...College isn't easy. APS Fellow Roy Baumeister, Florida State University, shares the latest scientific research on how to maximize self-control. More>>

________________

When Helping Kids Study Hurts Them Instead

Homework can be as monumental a task for parents as it is for children. Parents should give advice or help only when asked, says APS Fellow Harris Cooper, Duke University. Watch>>

Twitter Q&A : What Works While Studying

Look out for the next Q&A on February 7 & 8 with John Dunlosky, Kent State University, coauthor of the PSPI report Improving Students' Learning With Effective Learning Techniques. Dunlosky researches techniques to improve the effectiveness of people's self-regulated learning across the life span. Questions should be submitted by 11:59 PM EST through Facebook , on Twitter using #askaps, or via email to askaps@psychologicalscience.org .

Stay tuned for more in 2013 and visit the Twitter Q&A Archive .

A special thanks to Bridgewater College students who helped plan this issue of the Observer Xpress.

Grants and Awards

Psi Chi Research Awards for the APS Convention

Psi Chi , the International Honor Society in Psychology, offers the APS Convention Research Awards for undergraduate and graduate Psi Chi members presenting posters at the APS Annual Convention. Submit to the APS Call for Submissions , and apply online here . Two graduate winners will receive $500 each, and two undergraduate winners will receive $300 each. Deadline: January 31, 2013

APSSC Grants and Awards

The Travel Assistance is intended to assist students attending the APS Annual Convention by defraying the cost of travel.

Current APS student affiliates may only enter one APSSC competition each year (i.e., Student Grant Competition, Student Research Award, or RISE Research Award) and as such are only eligible for one of these three awards each academic year. Travel assistance is excluded from this rule.

Want more? Visit the APSSC Funding Database

Follow APS @psychscience

Return to Top



News Headline: Mining Your Facebook Profile for Dirt | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! Finance
Contact Name: Lisa Scherzer
News OCR Text: A new app, called Facewash, is the latest tool that aims to save the unsavvy social-network user from himself.

Facewash works by searching the comments posted on your wall, your status updates, comments on photos you're tagged in, photos you posted, links you've ‘liked.” After connecting your Facebook (FB) account, the site scans your profile to find “dirty” words and potentially unsavory photos. Users can also search for specific terms if they think Facewash's list might have missed something.

The app was launched by three college students as an entry in a hackathon hosted by the University of Pennsylvania last weekend. Facewash's developers – Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur, and David Steinberg, all computer science majors at Kent State University in Ohio – discussed the idea for the app on the drive to the competition. They saw the need for such a tool, particularly for college-age young adults like them who use Facebook a lot and probably have “things on there you wouldn't want a future employer to see or your mother to see,” says Steinberg. “Why not help automate the process of finding the undesirable posts and comments you wouldn't want others to find?”

The app won in the Best Hack for Students category by 10gen, a software company (the developers received a $500 prize).

Background check yourself

We all know by now (or should) that employers do a fair bit of online sleuthing to learn more about job candidates and weed out those whose online trails suggest they're less-than-professional.

According to a 2012 survey by CareerBuilder, 37% of companies use social networks to research potential job candidates, and more than 65% of that group uses Facebook as their primary resource. The most common reason hiring managers are looking at social media is to see if candidates present themselves professionally, the survey said.

The usual no-no's may sound obvious for those on the professional track: No drinking, drugs, nudity or profanity. Make sure your Facebook photos are G-rated and don't make derogatory comments about previous employers, bosses or colleagues.

But an increased use of social media doesn't correspond with an increase in web savvy. “Our data suggest that, as people continue to increase their online presence, the number of things we identify that are sexually explicit, potentially racist or displays of illegal activity only grows,” says Max Drucker, CEO and president of Social Intelligence, a company that performs social media background screening and investigations for employers.

And the potential for gaffes increases with Facebook's new graph search feature, announced last week. The company's new tool turns users' shared information into a searchable database, and one reasonable concern – aside from privacy – is that the personal information will be more readily available and accessible to others. And apparently, it makes it easier for users to look dumb.

Dirty words

So what kind of content does Facewash flag? The developers said they wanted Facewash to cover a wide range of categories. Aside from the standard swear words, they included sexual and racist language.

“We took a comprehensive view of what the Internet as a whole considers less than desirable," Steinberg says. "We did extensive research into the types of text that might cause problems for people.”

What about that tagged photo of you at a party double-fisting tequila shots? For now, Facewash will only catch offending images through contextual tags or captions. (In other words, if the caption doesn't say something to the effect of “getting drunk on tequila,” the app won't flag it.) But image and object recognition is the next step for the developers. “Soon the tool will be able to flag that kind of photo without the accompanying text,” Steinberg said. Eventually they want Facewash to be able to pick up on objects like beer bottles or the infamous red cups that college kids do much of their drinking out of.

Since launching the app, Fullmer, Gur and Steinberg have been working on expanding its capabilities and adding new features. They also want to make Facewash available in other markets and languages. “Our particular interest now is to internationalize it, since it's only in English now,” Steinberg says.

Other tools

There are other tools that aim to sanitize online identities that have been around for a while, including online reputation managers, which – for a fee – focus on finding and clearing negative content, posted anywhere online, about individuals or businesses.

Reppler is another service that helps users manage their online profiles; it tries to give a deeper picture of your online profile by analyzing not just your content but also the tone of the language you and your connections use.

Similar to Facewash, SocioClean, which was launched in 2011, targets college students and first-time job seekers. The platform allows users to scan and clean their social networks (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter) for any inappropriate content that might hurt their online reputation, according to Priyanshu Harshavat, the CEO. After the scan, it compiles the data into a document that grades the profiles based on appropriateness. While anyone can use the tool, SocioClean works with colleges that want to offer its students access to the platform. SocioClean currently has a licensing deal with UNC-Chapel Hill, with plans to add nine more universities in the next few months, Harshavat says.

Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur, and David Steinberg presenting the application at the hackathon

Return to Top



News Headline: New app touted as way to clean up Facebook profiles | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Orlando Sentinel - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Need to clean up your Facebook profile? Get a 'Facewash'

Facewash is an app for Facebook that helps you easily clean up your profile. ( Facewash )

By Salvador Rodriguez

7:01 p.m. EST , January 23, 2013

Got a Facebook profile with vulgarities or embarrassing pages you shouldn't have liked? Now there's a way to clean them up.

A trio of Kent State University undergrads have put together the "Facewash" app that'll search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that the user may want to hide or delete. That could include status updates, photo captions, and comments users left or received as well as pages and links that were liked.

"We realized that there's a lot of content that perhaps someone might not want a future employer to see," Daniel Gur, 22, said Wednesday.

QUIZ: How much do you know about Facebook?

Gur created the app over the weekend with two friends and fellow computer science majors from his school -- Camden Fullmer, 21, and David Steinberg, 24. The three students built Facewash in less than two days while at a hackathon at the University of Pennsylvania .

To use Facewash, users first need to go to its website, Facewa.sh , click "Get Started" and log into their Facebook account if they aren't logged in already.

The user will be prompted to click "Go to App" and then give the app permission to access the user's contents.

Search for a term and the app starts looking through all of the user's profile content. If Facewash finds a match, it'll show it to the user and link the posts so the user can easily delete a status or remove a picture.

It's still in beta phase so users may encountered minor glitches.

Since launching Sunday, Facewash has received more than 20,000 unique visitors, Gur said.

The three students said they hope to keep expanding Facewash and keep adding features to it. Next up, Gur said the team wants to make Facewash capable of looking for content in other languages so more people can use it.

As for how they came up with the name, Gur said it just fit so perfectly.

"This is your face on the Internet, and you might need to wash it," he said.

ALSO:

Copyright 2013, Los Angeles Times

Return to Top



News Headline: Want to clean up your Facebook profile? Get 'Facewash' | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: www.rediff.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Rediff.com >> Business >> Want to clean up your Facebook profile? Get 'Facewash'

Want to clean up your Facebook profile? Get 'Facewash'

January 25, 2013 15:53 IST

R esearchers have developed a new app that can help Facebook users clean up vulgar or embarrassing pages from their profile.

The ‘Facewash' app developed by researchers from Kent State University will search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that the user may want to hide or delete.

That could include status updates, photo captions, and comments users left or received as well as pages and links that were liked, Los Angeles Times reported.

"We realised that there's a lot of content that perhaps someone might not want a future employer to see," researcher Daniel Gur.

Gur created the Facewash over the weekend along his two friends and fellow computer science majors -- Camden Fullmer, and David Steinberg. The trio built the app in less than two days while at a hackathon at the University of Pennsylvania.

To use Facewash, users first need to go to its website, Facewa.sh , click ‘Get Started' and log into their Facebook account if they aren't logged in already.

The user will be prompted to click "Go to App" and then give the app permission to access the user's contents.

Search for a term and the app starts looking through all of the user's profile content.

If Facewash finds a match, it'll show it to the user and link the posts so the user can easily delete a status or remove a picture.

Facewash is still in beta phase so users may encounter minor glitches for some time.

The recently launched app has already received more than 20,000 unique visitors, Gur said.

The undergrads hope to keep expanding Facewash and keep adding features to it. Gur said the team wants to make Facewash capable of looking for content in other languages so more people can use it.

"This is your face on the Internet, and you might need to wash it," Gur said.

© Copyright 2013 PTI. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PTI content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent.

The above article ran in one additional media outlet.

Return to Top



News Headline: Got a dirty Facebook page? Clean it up | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Salon.com
Contact Name: Katie Mcdonough
News OCR Text: Running for office? Finally friended mom? A new app will help make your social networking persona PG again

Topics: , Internet Culture, life on the internet, Technology News, Life News, News

Embarrassing photos? Dirty things your friends have written on your wall? Let enough time pass, and it's more than Facebook's interface that can seem a little blue.

But don't worry, there's an app for that.

A trio of Kent State University undergrads created “Facewash“ to search through your Facebook activity and root out unsavory stuff on your timeline, from  drunken status updates to crude photo captions and the racy pages and links you've “liked.”

“We realized that there's a lot of content that perhaps someone might not want a future employer to see,” Daniel Gur, one of the app's creators, told the Los Angeles Times.

After accessing the app through their website, Facewash will start searching for naughty search terms on your profile. If it finds a match, it'll alert you and ask permission to delete the image or remove the link.

Then, voilà: Your Facebook profile is employer (or mom) ready.

Gur said the team plans to make Facewash multilingual so that people in other countries (or English speakers with a preference for cussing in French) can use it.

And as for the name? Gur said it just fit so perfectly.

“This is your face on the Internet, and you might need to wash it,” he said.

Katie McDonough is an assistant editor for Salon, focusing on lifestyle. Follow her on Twitter @kmcdonovgh or email her at kmcdonough@salon.com. More Katie Mcdonough.

Return to Top



News Headline: Need to clean up your Facebook profile? Get a FaceWash | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: The Age
Contact Name: Salvador Rodriguez
News OCR Text: Got a Facebook profile with vulgarities or embarrassing pages you shouldn't have liked? Now there's a way to clean them up.

A trio of Kent State University undergrads have put together the FaceWash web app that'll search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that the user may want to hide or delete. That could include status updates, photo captions, and comments users left or received as well as pages and links that were liked.

"We realised that there's a lot of content that perhaps someone might not want a future employer to see," said creator Daniel Gur.

Gur, 22, created the app over the weekend with two friends and fellow computer science majors from his school — Camden Fullmer, 21, and David Steinberg, 24. The three students built FaceWash in less than two days while at a hack-a-thon at the University of Pennsylvania.

To use FaceWash, users first need to go to its website, Facewa.sh, click "Get Started" and log into their Facebook account if they aren't logged in already.

The user will be prompted to click "Go to App" and then give the app permission to access the user's content.

Search for a term and the app starts looking through all of the user's profile content. If FaceWash finds a match, it'll show it to the user and link the posts so the user can easily delete a status or remove a picture.

It's still in beta phase so users may encounter minor glitches.

Since launching on Sunday, FaceWash has received more than 20,000 unique visitors, Gur said. The three students said they hope to keep expanding FaceWash and keep adding features to it. Next up, Gur said the team wants to make FaceWash capable of looking for content in other languages so more people can use it.

As for how they came up with the name, Gur said it just fit so perfectly.

"This is your face on the internet, and you might need to wash it."

The above article ran in six additional media outlets.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Facewash' to remove vulgar pages from Facebook! | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Deccan Chronicle
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Washington: Now, a new application has been created that can help users clean vulgar or embarrassing pages from their Facebook profile.

A group of Kent State University students have put together the 'Facewash' app that will search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that the user may want to hide or delete.

That could include status updates, photo captions, and comments users left or received as well as pages and links that were liked, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Daniel Gur, 22, created the app over with two friends and fellow computer science majors from his school, Camden Fullmer, 21, and David Steinberg, 24.

According to the report, to use Facewash, users first need to go to its website, Facewa.sh, click "Get Started" and log into their Facebook account if they aren't logged in already.

The user will be prompted to click "Go to App" and then give the app permission to access the user's contents.

Search for a term and the app starts looking through all of the user's profile content, the report said.

If Facewash finds a match, it'll show it to the user and link the posts so the user can easily delete a status or remove a picture, it added.

Return to Top



News Headline: Questionable Facebook Presence? Clean It Up With This App | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Big Think
Contact Name: Kecia Lynn
News OCR Text: What's the Latest Development? This week, Kent State University students Daniel Gur, Camden Fullmer, and David Steinberg launched a beta version of FaceWash, a Web-based app that searches through a user's Facebook profile and flags any posts or pages that contain questionable content. That ...

Read More

The above article ran in one additional media outlet.

Return to Top



News Headline: Now, remove 'vulgar, embarrassing pages' from Facebook with 'Facewash'! | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Big News Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Now, a new application has been created that can help users clean vulgar or embarrassing pages from their Facebook profile.

A group of Kent State University students have put together the 'Facewash' app that will search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that the user may want to hide or delete.

That could include status updates, photo captions, and comments users left or received as well as pages and links that were liked, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Daniel Gur, 22, created the app over with two friends and fellow computer science majors from his school, Camden Fullmer, 21, and David Steinberg, 24.

According to the report, to use Facewash, users first need to go to its website, Facewa.sh, click "Get Started" and log into their Facebook account if they aren't logged in already.

The user will be prompted to click "Go to App" and then give the app permission to access the user's contents.

Search for a term and the app starts looking through all of the user's profile content, the report said.

If Facewash finds a match, it'll show it to the user and link the posts so the user can easily delete a status or remove a picture, it added. (ANI)

The above article ran in five additional media outlets.

Return to Top



News Headline: 5 Eyewitness News at 4:30 | Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: 5 Eyewitness News at 4:30 PM - KSTP-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >>> If you are embarrassed of some of the pictures or status updates you've put on facebook or you know someone who is, there's a new app for that. To wash away all of that. Literally away. It's called face wash. The new web app lets you purge or hide mentions of preselected words involving drugs, or sex, or you can choose your own list to purge from. This could be especially beneficial for soon-to-be college grads about to enter the work force after all, the "la times" reports that the app was created by three kent state university students. >>> That's your latest look at business. Live at the new york stock exchange, I'm deborah kostrin. Bloomberg news. Ellen, I guess what they say, once it's on the internet it never goes away, but maybe it does. >> It's a good idea. I'm wonderings what those guys had to hide, too. Thanks, deborah. >>> The city of minneapolis is now recruiting new firefighters and the application response has been overwhelming on day one. We were at fire station seven as applicants were stopping by to get information. At one point the station ran out of applications. At times today there was a line of people waiting to get them. Anyone who wants to drop off their application must do it by january 31st through february 2nd at the northeast armory on broadway avenue. >>> If it's late january, it's time for the st. Paul winter carnival. Coming up we're talking with organizers about some of the fun activities you can enjoy this week. >>> How could all this happen to one person? >> Plus, meant explains how he fell in love with a woman who never existed. You'll hear why he says he was the victim. If you have high blood pressure and get a cold get Coricidin hbp. The number one pharmacist recommended cold brand designed for people with high blood pressure. And the only one I use to relieve my cold symptoms without raising my blood pressure. Coricidin hbp. ááTWIN cities LIVEáá... ááCRASHED ICEáá is the talk of the town...but we catch up with one competitor who lost out last year...and is back again...to try and win it all. And we're making something called ááJUNK BOWLáá salad... To spice up your greens and veggies.

Return to Top



News Headline: FaceWash helps clean up your Facebook profile | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: ThinkDigit.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Here's one for all you perverts that swarm Facebook. Researchers from Kent State University have developed an app for Facebook that will help you clean up the potentially embarrassing “stuff” off your Facebook Profile. Aptly titled “FaceWash,” the app scans through one's profile for any mention of questionable content such as photos, posts, status updates, ‘liked' pages etc. The app was developed by Daniel Gur, Camden Fullmer and David Steinberg w [...]
Read the entire article

Return to Top



News Headline: Dirty Facebook? Clean it up with Facewash. | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Minnesota Daily - Online
Contact Name: Marion Renault
News OCR Text: Former Minnesota GOP Senate staffer Michael Brodkorb was critically injured late Wednesday

Somali president Hassan Sheikh Mohamud spoke to a crowd of 4,000 Minnesota

As the ice begins to melt on the University of Minnesota campus,

“If you wouldn't want your grandmother seeing it, don't put it on Facebook,” goes the adage.

Despite the oft-repeated warning, college students are no stranger to red solo cups, sexual innuendos and the (sort of) occasional curse word popping up on their Facebook profiles.

Wanting to help college students salvage their online reputations, three Kent State University undergraduates created a way for them to clean their virtual “faces.”

The service, Facewash, searches through the users Facebook content and activity and pulls up any unsavory content—including statuses, photo captions, comments and liked pages.

The three computer science majors created the application in less than two days while at University of Pennsylvania's Hackathon, according to the LA Times.

Facewash is geared for college grads looking to vet their profiles in preparation for the leap from parties to the professional world.

"We realized that there's a lot of content that perhaps someone might not want a future employer to see," Daniel Gur, one of the app's developers, said Wednesday.

After users go to Facewa.sh, log into their Facebook and grant the app permission to their profile, it begins to work its magic.

Using its precompiled list of “dirty” words – related to sex, drugs and cursing – it shows its users posts, pictures and comments with the flagged content and offers them links for easy deletion.

The app, which launched Sunday, has already received more than 20,000 unique visitors.

The trio is looking to expand and add features, as well as fix its current minor glitches (the app is still in beta phase).

According to PC Mag, the app's biggest drawback is that the search is text-only; for now it can't flag potentially incriminating pictures.

As for the name, Gur said the metaphor came naturally.

"This is your face on the Internet, and you might need to wash it," he said.

Return to Top



News Headline: Facewash Clears Embarrassing Content from your Timeline | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: American Banking News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A developing app from undergraduate students at Kent State University can search your Facebook profile for embarrassing or compromising content, and gives you an option to clean up your public appearance.

“Facewash Clears Embarrassing Content from your Timeline” is categorized as “science and technology”. This video was licensed from Grab Networks. For additional video content, click the “video” tab at the top of this page.

Return to Top



News Headline: Embarrassing Facebook history? New FaceWash app cleans your page | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: KSAZ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Controversial and compromising pictures and postings flooding your Facebook page? There's an app for that.

FaceWashunderstands you spent the last four years being a college kid. The website says Facebook never forgets the parties, the questionable characters and the posts and pictures to prove it. That's where FaceWash comes in, ready to wash away all the dirty jokes, beer talk, late night snapshots, and questionable "likes," links and updates from your Facebook page.

Jillian Dolciato is like countless college seniors across the country, preparing for life after graduation.

"I want to work within campus recreation," Dolciato says.

And when we showed her the hot new app that boasts it can help students become a professional by removing explicit pics and posts she said, "I feel like a lot of people should get this app, especially seniors."

Buddies Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur and David Steinberg agree. Motivated by the need to have an employer friendly Facebook page, in a Skype interview, the trio from Kent State University say they created FaceWash over the weekend.

"We made it at a hackathon, a programming competition, at the University of Pennsylvania," Steinberg says. "We posted it online and began having people use it and respond to it."

To sign up, users must first go to the app's websiteand click "get started" then log into their Facebook account. Then, click "go to app."

"So we present to the user this list, this result list that has questionable content, potentially undesirable content," Steinberg explains. "We don't delete it for you, we give you the choice."

DePaul University senior Dana Adami is not sold.

"I wouldn't do it," Adami says. "I would just delete my Facebook before I did that."

And James Purpura is skeptical.

"It's kind of cool if there's something you don't want people to see and you don't feel like or have the time to find everything one by one and take it off but then you have to think, is that moral? Automatically deleting everything, is that deceiving people?" Purpura asks.

"The same old adage is true," Social media savvy Chicago Attorney Daliah Saper says. "Be careful what you post on the Internet and always ask yourself is this something you would want an employer or someone else to see."

Photo GalleriesPhoto GalleriesMore>>

Blowing snow and icy conditions on the roads have led to numerous calls of crashes and cars sliding off northwest Indiana roads, state police report Thursday morning.

Blowing snow and icy conditions on the roads have led to numerous calls of crashes and cars sliding off northwest Indiana roads, state police report Thursday morning.

The above article ran in five additional media outlets.

Return to Top



News Headline: BLOG: 'Facewash' App Quickly Cleans Up Your Facebook Profile | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Computerworld Singapore - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kristin Burnham | Jan. 25, 2013

A new Facebook app makes it easier to find and remove unprofessional posts. Here's how it works.

Facebook says I joined the social network on August 23, 2004: That's more than eight years' worth of posts from friends, status updates, photos and links that could bediscoverable, thanks to both Timeline and Facebook's new search capability, Graph Search.

When Timeline launched in December 2011, I took the tedious, painstaking measures to ensure old posts from college were hidden and that my profile was more professional. Timeline makes it easy to browse posts from years ago, something that before could take hours of scrolling.

But if you're one of the many who hasn't perused your old posts one by one and taken the time to hide potentially embarrassing or unprofessional activity, there's a new Facebook app that makes doing so a whole lot easier: Facewash.

Facewash, developed by Kent State University undergrads Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur and David Steinberg, combs your Facebook profile for instances of both preselected "dirty" keywords, which, it says, includes "a precompiled list of words that may be considered offensive or alarming to those viewing your social history," or keywords you input yourself.

The app then scans your profile and returns results of the keywords found in comments posted to your wall, comments on photos you're tagged in, photos you've posted, links you've liked, photos you've liked, status updates you've posted and pages you're a fan of. Clicking the link brings you to that post on Facebook where you can change the privacy setting or remove the post entirely.

Co-creater Fullmer says the app was developed as part of a hackathon held at the University of Pennsylvania.

"Most people need to manually clean their online presence as they present themselves publicly and professionally to future employers," he says. "We wanted to make this easier for people, so we helped automate the process of finding content you may want to clean up."

And while the app was developed with college students in mind, it's usefulness extends to professionals.

"Given the current economic conditions, many experienced professionals have found themselves without a job, and they are having to interview again after years of being in what they thought was a secure position," Fullmer says. "For these people, Facewash helps give them security in an area they may not have previously worried about."

Kristin Burnham covers Consumer Technology, SaaS, Social Networking and Web 2.0 for CIO.com.

Four steps to automate compliance and minimise risks

If you're attempting to cope with the increasing number of compliance requirements with manual, siloed processes, failure is likely. Learn how HP compliance automation solutions enables reporting on the three types of compliance—regulatory, commercial, and organisational.

Reaching across siloes to reduce business risk

This white paper outlines a unified approach across security and operations, articulates why it matters to your enterprise, and provides a foundation for implementing it.

Agile performance testing: Faster time to quality

Learn how HP Performance Center software, HP Diagnostics software, and HP Business Availability Center software can help your team manage performance throughout the application lifecycle.

802.11ac In Depth

This white paper explains the techniques behind 802.11ac. It is intended for those who share our enthusiasm for wireless, to use these insights to become better engineers and users of Wi-Fi technology.

Return to Top



News Headline: BLOG: 'Facewash' App Quickly Cleans Up Your Facebook Profile | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: MIS Asia
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kristin Burnham | Jan. 25, 2013

A new Facebook app makes it easier to find and remove unprofessional posts. Here's how it works.

Facebook says I joined the social network on August 23, 2004: That's more than eight years' worth of posts from friends, status updates, photos and links that could bediscoverable, thanks to both Timeline and Facebook's new search capability, Graph Search.

When Timeline launched in December 2011, I took the tedious, painstaking measures to ensure old posts from college were hidden and that my profile was more professional. Timeline makes it easy to browse posts from years ago, something that before could take hours of scrolling.

But if you're one of the many who hasn't perused your old posts one by one and taken the time to hide potentially embarrassing or unprofessional activity, there's a new Facebook app that makes doing so a whole lot easier: Facewash.

Facewash, developed by Kent State University undergrads Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur and David Steinberg, combs your Facebook profile for instances of both preselected "dirty" keywords, which, it says, includes "a precompiled list of words that may be considered offensive or alarming to those viewing your social history," or keywords you input yourself.

The app then scans your profile and returns results of the keywords found in comments posted to your wall, comments on photos you're tagged in, photos you've posted, links you've liked, photos you've liked, status updates you've posted and pages you're a fan of. Clicking the link brings you to that post on Facebook where you can change the privacy setting or remove the post entirely.

Co-creater Fullmer says the app was developed as part of a hackathon held at the University of Pennsylvania.

"Most people need to manually clean their online presence as they present themselves publicly and professionally to future employers," he says. "We wanted to make this easier for people, so we helped automate the process of finding content you may want to clean up."

And while the app was developed with college students in mind, it's usefulness extends to professionals.

"Given the current economic conditions, many experienced professionals have found themselves without a job, and they are having to interview again after years of being in what they thought was a secure position," Fullmer says. "For these people, Facewash helps give them security in an area they may not have previously worried about."

Kristin Burnham covers Consumer Technology, SaaS, Social Networking and Web 2.0 for CIO.com.

Agile performance testing: Faster time to quality

Learn how HP Performance Center software, HP Diagnostics software, and HP Business Availability Center software can help your team manage performance throughout the application lifecycle.

A closer look at HP LoadRunner software

A technical whitepaper on how HP LoadRunner software, an industry-standard software for performance testing, accurately measures, monitors, and analyses a system's performance and functionality.

Reaching across siloes to reduce business risk

This white paper outlines a unified approach across security and operations, articulates why it matters to your enterprise, and provides a foundation for implementing it.

Return to Top



News Headline: News @ 10:30 | Email

News Date: 01/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Chicagoland News at 10 PM - ChicagoLand TV (CLTV)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: he's admitted to doping and lying and now he's facing a lawsuit over his memoirs. Two men are suing the former cycling champion and his publishers on grounds of fraud and false advertising. They claim armstrong's best selling books were billed as 'non- fiction' but were "filled with lies." the class action complaint is centered around armstrong's books, "it's not about the bike" and "every second counts." armstrong came clean about doping during an interview with oprah. Armstrong admitted he used testosterone, human growth hormone, and blood transfusions, to give him an edge. The family of linebacker junior is suing the n- f-l. The family has filed a wrongful death lawsuit. Helmet maker 'ridell' and others are listed in the suit -- accused of deliberately concealing and ignoring evidence of the risk of brain injuries . Studies showed that seau suffered from a degenerative brain disease. Seau died last may at the age of 43 from a self-inflicted gunshot to the chest. He played 20 seasons in the n-f-l with the chargers, dolphins and patriots. Company is being accused of racism over a star wars model. Austria's turkish community says lego's "jabba's palace" model resembles one of istanbul's most revered mosques. They claim the model is based on sophia mosque in istanbul.. Austria's turkish cultural community is considering taking legal action against the company. Lego denies any link between the palace and the mosque. Subway is now being sued for selling "foot long" sandwiches that are too short. This started when someone posted this picture on facebook. It's a "foot long" sandwich from subway, but it only measures eleven inches. Subway says their bread is baked at individual stores, so that could lead to some inconsistencie s. Well now two men in new jersey are suing because their sandwiches were short... By less than an inch. Their attorney says subway should fix the problem or stop advertising "foot longs." if you've got some embarrasing things on your facebook profile, there's a new way to clean it up. It's called 'face wash'. The facewash app was created by three students at kent state university. The web app skims your facebook profile for things you may want to delete or hide on your page. That includes status updates, dirty jokes, comments, vulgarities and group pages. You'll get the results and pick what you want to get rid of. The service is meant to help out facebook users who want to clear-up any questionable history before getting a job.

Return to Top



News Headline: New electronic sign in downtown Kent promotes city and KSU messages | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Paula Schleis
Beacon Journal staff writer
Published: January 24, 2013 - 09:59 PM

KENT: A colorful electronic message board the city and Kent State University had talked about installing for years finally lit up this month.

The ground-level sign — 80 inches by 168 inches — greets motorists and pedestrians at Haymaker Parkway and Water Street, right at the southwestern tip of downtown's ongoing $100 million makeover.

The cost of the sign, $92,000, was split between the city and KSU and will rotate news about events either party is sponsoring.

Suzanne Robertson, executive assistant to the city manager, has added the sign to her list of duties, accepting city and university requests, searching for announcements they might have missed, and splicing in public safety tips.

“People are very happy with it,” she said. “I can tell they are also using it.”

She said she's confident that one of the first messages posted, about health department flu shots, helped spur an “amazing turnout.”

In his blog, City Manager Dave Ruller said the city played around with graphics, different kinds of messages and various lengths for cycling the messages until it learned the ropes.

“We're looking to keep it simple but also professional, attractive and informative,” he said.

Items from KSU will include athletic events, speakers and school-sponsored entertainment.

The city plans to use its time for things like festivals and public meetings.

Robertson said she has tossed in public messages about buckling seat belts, the perils of texting while driving and a plea for homeowners to shovel their sidewalks.

“I try to stay between five and seven messages,” she said, including a permanent “Welcome to Kent, Ohio” in the rotation.

“When we started tossing the idea around years ago, message boards were much less common and we thought of ourselves as pioneers back then,” Ruller told residents.

The boards are not as uncommon as they used to be, “but that doesn't diminish our enthusiasm for adding what we hope will prove to be a great way of spreading the word of the many athletic, cultural, musical, educational and otherwise fun events that Kent plays host to each week.”

Paula Schleis can be reached at 330-996-3741 or pschleis@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/paulaschleis.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus