Report Overview:
Total Clips (51)
Academics; Office of the Provost (1)
Alumni (3)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Office of the University Architect; Renovation at KSU (2)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Renovation at KSU (1)
Athletics (6)
Biological Sciences (1)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Geology (2)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Office of the Provost (3)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Continuing and Distance Education (2)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Geology (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Stark; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Political Science (1)
Psychology (3)
Students (11)
Town-Gown (3)
University Press (1)
Upward Bound (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Academics; Office of the Provost (1)
CSU finds that extra help to struggling freshmen works: editorial 01/28/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Now that Ohio's public college and university presidents have agreed to make completion rates a factor in state funding, success in the first year of college...


Alumni (3)
Zygote Press co-founder Liz Maugans making an impression on Cleveland art scene 01/27/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...like a good story and it is important to dig out the details about the characters as well as the storyteller. Where did you get your art degree? Kent State University for my BFA and then headed to Cranbrook Academy of Art for my Masters. Would you say that motherhood is a major theme in...

ALONG THE WAY: Remembering Joe Gorman 01/28/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Cleveland industrial titan Joe Gorman, who died a week ago today, spent a few of his formative years in Kent after his father, Burton Gorman, was hired...

Devo - Artist Snapshot: Biography 01/26/2013 Tad Show - WEZN-FM Text Attachment Email

...of new wave's most innovative and (for a time) successful bands, Devo was also perhaps one of its most misunderstood. Formed in Akron, OH, in 1972 by Kent State art students Jerry Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh, Devo took its name from their concept of "de-evolution" -- the idea that instead of evolving,...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
AU lecture series continues with talk about shrinking cities 01/25/2013 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

ASHLAND — Ashland University will continue its Environmental Lectures Series, “The Ecology of Urban Living,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday with a presentation by Terry...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Office of the University Architect; Renovation at KSU (2)
Weiss/Manfredi concept is the best of four options for KSU's new architecture school building 01/28/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

It's hard to make a great building. Architecture is a complicated business and there are as many ways to mess up as there are players in the game of putting...

ALONG THE WAY: A future landmark for Kent 01/28/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The panel that will select a finalist from the four architectural plans unveiled at Cartwright Hall a week ago Thursday, faces a daunting assignment, I...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Renovation at KSU (1)
EDITORIAL: Architecture School Finalists: Ho Hum 01/25/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...considering the dynamic scale of downtown and campus projects, the gateway new architecture school ought to be at least as visually exciting as, ta-da, the Kent State University power plant. Or Akron Art museum.  Or The Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland.  Or even the dynamic new  Case Western...


Athletics (6)
Morrow leaves legacy that transcends golf honors 01/28/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The retirement announcement of Kent State women's varsity golf coach Mike Morrow caught everyone by surprise. Morrow has been synonymous with Kent State...

Crosby named KSU deputy athletic director (Nielsen, Crosby) 01/28/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Devin Crosby named deputy athletic director at Kent State Devin Crosby was announced on Saturday by Kent State athletic director Joel Nielsen as the...

KSU Sports Report: Golden Flashes gymnasts perform well in home opener 01/28/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

GYMNASTICS The Kent State gymnastics team scored 194.675 points to win its 2013 home opener, defeating Western Michigan (194.125) and George Washington...

Kent State's Dustin Kilgore sets school career record with 47th pin 01/28/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

MT. PLEASANT, Mich. -- Senior Dustin Kilgore broke a Kent State record with his 47th career pin in the Golden Flashes' 27-8 loss to Central Michigan Sunday...

WATCH: Kent State Baseball Named Collegiate Athlete of the Year 01/28/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

After a trip to the College World Series, the Golden Flashes baseball team beat out the football team for the honor at the 2012 Greater Cleveland Sports...

Kent State selling bowl throwback helmets for $1,000 each 01/28/2013 CBSSports.com Text Attachment Email

Thanks to the example of former Golden Flash Josh Cribbs, we know Kent State alums and fans can be intensely loyal. They would have to be, considering...


Biological Sciences (1)
Shale Waste Too Much For Ohio (Lutz) 01/25/2013 WFMJ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...in this region does require that we have a very clear plan for managing the growing wastewater volumes that are being generated," says Brian Lutz, a Kent State University professor who led the analysis. YSU Geology Professor Jeffrey Dick says the average well will produce from 3 to 6 barrels...


College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Geology (2)
Kent State Panel Discussion Will Explore Puerto Rico Statehood (Ortiz) 01/25/2013 El Sol de Cleveland - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences, and the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion are sponsoring a panel discussion titled...

KENT STATE PANEL DISCUSSION TO EXPLORE PUERTO RICO STATEHOOD, JAN. 31 (Ortiz) 01/25/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Jan.25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's College of Arts and Sciences, and the Division of Diversity,...


College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Office of the Provost (3)
Kent State reaches deal giving students research access to Cuyahoga Valley National Park (Diacon, Blank) 01/28/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — Kent State University has reached an agreement with the National Park Service which will allow collaborative projects and joint research in...

PARTNERSHIP FORMED 01/25/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Kent State University has signed a five-year memorandum of understanding with the National Park Service that should lead to enhanced collaboration...

Kent State University signs agreement with National Park Service (Diacon, Blank) 01/26/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University signs agreement withSFlbNational Park Service Record-Courier Staff Report Published: January 26, 2013 4:00AM Kent State...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
National Teacher Of The Year 01/28/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...Mieliwocki, who was recognized by President Barack Obama as the 2012 National Teacher of the Year, will present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished Lecture at Kent State University on Tuesday, Jan. 29, at 4:30 p.m. in the Kent Student Center Kiva. This lecture is free and open to the public. Mieliwocki teaches...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
KENT STATE'S COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH ESTABLISHES A NEW PRACTICE OFFICE AND RESEARCH CENTER (Slenkovich, Hoornbeek, Alemagno) 01/25/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Jan.25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's College of Public Health has established a new Office of...


Continuing and Distance Education (2)
UA WANTS TO EXPAND ONLINE LEARNING: (Kelly) 01/25/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...EXTEND SCHOOL'S REACH IN NATIONWIDE TREND THAT PROENZA HOPES TO GET UNDER WAY QUICKLY ON CAMPUS Someday you might be able to get a degree from the University of Akron without setting a foot on its well-manicured campus. Or paying UA a single dollar in tuition. UA officials are looking at ways...

University of Akron looking to expand online offerings (Kelly) 01/25/2013 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

Someday you might be able to get a degree from the University of Akron without setting a foot on its well-manicured campus. Or paying UA a single dollar in tuition. UA officials are looking at ways...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
KSU speaker: King would press 'war on poverty' 01/25/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Carlos Muñoz Jr., told faculty, students and visitors at Kent State University Thursday that Martin Luther King Jr., if he were alive today, would press President Barack Obama for less action in wars abroad...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Browns likely to stay conservative with any uniform changes in future (Quevedo, Stanforth) 01/28/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Owner Jimmy Haslam recently informed the NFL that the Browns are exploring possible changes to their iconic uniforms. It is a league procedure to make...


Geology (1)
Report: Fracking waste up 570% 01/26/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Columbus A new report by researchers at Kent State and Duke universities shows that fracking waste generated in Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia has increased by 570 percent since 2004....


KSU at Stark (1)
Oil and Gas Education Session on Basic Contracts Held at Kent State University at Stark 01/25/2013 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

The Canton Small Business Development Center* and Kent State University at Stark, with the attorneys at Roetzel & Andress, will present the third event in the four-part Oil and Gas Education Series....


KSU at Stark; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Area entertainment events beginning Jan. 25 01/25/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...from middle and high school students in Stark, Summit, Portage, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties are on view through Wednesday in three locations at Kent State University at Stark. Seen here is "Gumball Machine" by Sheldyn Nicholson of Hoover High School. The 59th Annual Northeast Central Ohio...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Obamacare and small businesses: How will it impact the workforce? 01/26/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...happen to you personally when you wake up in 2014?” That was the question Scott Pipes posed to nearly 100 small-business owners who were seated in the Kent State at Tuscarawas Founders Hall Auditorium on Friday. Pipes' audience was there to learn more about the impact of the Patient Protection...

Elvis Lives 01/25/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Performing Arts schedule this April NEW PHILADELPHIA The national hit Elvis Lives will be performed at 7:30 p.m. April 5 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. "I'm excited to have the national tour of Elvis Lives coming our way and pleased they know our extraordinary...


Political Science (1)
Students for Concealed Carry targets UA campus for growth (Banks) 01/28/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Matthew Mansell looks forward to the day when he can take not only his books and notebooks but also his gun to his University of Akron classes. Mansell,...


Psychology (3)
Research looks at most-effective study strategies (Dunlosky) 01/26/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...strategies — such as highlighting and rereading — do not show much promise for improving student learning, according to a new report authored in part by two Kent State University researchers. Kent State's John Dunlosky, professor of psychology, and Katherine Rawson, associate professor of psychology,...

Best (and Worst) Ways to Study for a Test (Dunlosky) 01/25/2013 Yahoo! Health Text Attachment Email

...Public Interest, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The authors—a team of distinguished researchers led by John Dunlosky, PhD, of Kent State University—weighed the evidence for 10 simple learning strategies. Here's what they found. These techniques are highly effective for...

Popular study strategies called ineffective -- report 01/25/2013 Answer Sheet, The Text Attachment Email

...students. Published in the January issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest,  the report was written by John Dunlosky and Katherine A. Rawson of Kent State University, Elizabeth J. Marsh of Duke University, Mitchell J. Nathan of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Daniel T. Willingham...


Students (11)
Second opinion gives Portage County cancer patient new lease on life 01/27/2013 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...would have along life ahead of her," Megan's mother, Crystal, explained. Megan started chemotherapy treatment last March while attending classes at Kent State's main campus. Classes and chemotherapy made for long days and many side effects. "I would get these massive headaches where I felt...

App of the Week: FaceWash 01/27/2013 ABC News - Online Text Attachment Email

What does it do?  When three computer science majors from Kent State University drove out to the University of Pennsylvania together for a hackathon last weekend, they dreamed up an idea for an app that would...

Clean up Your Facebook Profile With FaceWash 01/28/2013 Mashable Text Attachment Email

We've all been there. Your grandmother just joined Facebook, your boss sent you a friend request or you're applying for that dream job. Suddenly, you're...

Mining Your Facebook Profile for Dirt 01/25/2013 Yahoo! Canada Text Attachment Email

...by the University of Pennsylvania last weekend. Facewash's developers – Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur, and David Steinberg, all computer science majors at Kent State University in Ohio – discussed the idea for the app on the drive to the competition. They saw the need for such a tool, particularly for...

Grandparents learn to text to keep in touch with grandchildren 01/28/2013 Green Bay Press-Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

...communicate. Moore is a busy guy. Though technically a student at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, he is taking 18 hours of post-secondary classes at Kent State University and participating in an internship in the psychology department. With those things and other activities, he’s not the easiest...

Grandparents learn texting as way to communicate with grandkids 01/26/2013 Athens Banner-Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...communicate. Moore is a busy guy. Though technically a student at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, he is taking 18 hours of post-secondary classes at Kent State University and participating in an internship in the psychology department. With those things and other activities, he's not the easiest...

The app that 'cleans up' your Facebook profile instantly 01/28/2013 Yahoo! UK and Ireland Text Attachment Email

...be highly useful for party-loving students facing job interviews. Yahoo! News - The app, 'Facewash', was designed by three students at the American Kent State University, and can scan and hide embarrassing posts in seconds. A new Facebook app promises to help users 'clean up' their profile,...

TECH NOW: A way to 'wash' your Facebook 01/27/2013 Los Angeles Times Text Email

Got a Facebook profile with vulgarities or embarrassing pages you shouldn't have liked? Now there's a way to clean them up. A trio of Kent State University undergrads have put together the "Facewash" app that'll search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that...

Facewash - New App Created 01/25/2013 NBC 5 Chicago News at 5 PM - WMAQ-TV Text Email

Think of facebook as your face on the internet. Now there is an app to help you wash it. Kent state university researchers created facewash, the new app searches through your facebook profile looking for items you may not want your boss...

Kent State Proves Not Everyone At PennApps Were Creeps 01/28/2013 Under the Button.com Text Attachment Email

We all try to keep our Facebooks as PC as possible, but everyone lets a tagged photo or liked link fall through the cracks every now and then. Lucky for...

Now remove vulgar embarrassing pages from Facebook with Facewash 01/25/2013 Albuquerque Express Text Attachment Email

Now, a new application has been created that can help users clean vulgar or embarrassing pages from their Facebook profile. A group of Kent State University students have put together the 'Facewash' app that will search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that...


Town-Gown (3)
NEW ELECTRONIC SIGN TURNS HEADS IN KENT: 01/25/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

$92,000 MESSAGE BOARD DELIVERING INFORMATION ABOUT CITY, UNIVERSITY A colorful electronic message board the city and Kent State University had talked about installing for years finally lit up this month. The ground-level sign - 80 inches by 168 inches - greets...

Parking 'Pay Stations' Coming to Downtown Kent 01/28/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...per street similar to a system in place in Charlotte, NC. Pay stations allow drivers to pay with credit cards or cash (Kent is considering accepting Kent State University's FLASHCard). Drivers would identify their parking space at the station — spaces will be numbered or identified at the curb...

New electronic sign in downtown Kent promotes city and KSU messages 01/25/2013 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

A colorful electronic message board the city and Kent State University had talked about installing for years finally lit up this month. The ground-level sign -- 80 inches by 168 inches -- greets...


University Press (1)
What's new on the bookshelf from and about East Tennesseans 01/26/2013 Knoxville News-Sentinel - Online, The Text Attachment Email

For local authors in East Tennessee, reading and writing have added up to a good number of recently published books. "Pacific Time On Target" (Kent State University Press) by Christopher S. Donner and edited by Knoxville attorney Jack H. McCall, Jr. is the gritty, combat memoir of a WWII...


Upward Bound (1)
Skeels Center honors legacy of Dr. King 01/26/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Ravenna are, in front row from left, Louise Ottrix, welcomer; and Bonnie Richardson, guest speaker; and in back row, Lauren Sagaria, volunteer from the Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown; Robert Martin, soloist; and Gabrielle Harris, volunteer from Ravenna High School Leadership. ...


News Headline: CSU finds that extra help to struggling freshmen works: editorial | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Now that Ohio's public college and university presidents have agreed to make completion rates a factor in state funding, success in the first year of college -- when discouraged students are most at risk of dropping out -- is even more important.

That's the back story to Cleveland State University's effort starting this fall to get more freshmen across the first-year finish line by offering intensive advising for students in remedial math and writing classes and even email alerts to absentee students.

The result: Freshmen earned an average of 12.6 credits in the fall semester, up from 10.91 last year. Some minority freshmen got higher grades.

Such intensive efforts are costly. In some cases, colleges should channel weaker students toward community colleges or expand efforts to work more closely with school districts such as Cleveland's -- as CSU already is doing -- to improve college readiness.

However, CSU's latest "helicopter-college" approach, also tried by the University of Akron and Kent State University, may be well worth the effort for students who are a little wobbly in only one or two academic subjects.

CSU's latest efforts also suggest the decision to tie state funding more closely to college completion is already yielding benefits in Ohio.

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News Headline: Zygote Press co-founder Liz Maugans making an impression on Cleveland art scene | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Michael Heaton
News OCR Text: Liz Maugans, 45, is the co-founder and executive director of Zygote Press a non-profit fine arts print making studio and gallery. Zygote won Cleveland Arts Prize this year. Maugans also won a creative workforce scholarship from the Community Partnership on Arts and Culture (CPAC). She currently has a show at Arts Collinwood called "Half Empty" and on Feb. 15 she will have another show called "Desperate Signs" at the 1point 618 Gallery.

You're winning prizes, you have two shows going. Everybody is singing your praises as an organizational leader at Zygote. How do you explain the big year you're having?

I figure it is from all the outstanding talent Zygote attracts-all those artists who bounce off one another with a collective spirit that oozes from Zygote's collaborative print shop experience. Or maybe, it's my pick-up line, "Why don't you come and see my etchings". Not sure which one.It has been wonderful to not only have Team Zygote recognized by our region with the Cleveland Arts Prize, but it has been so humbling and validating to receive one of the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture's Creative Workforce Fellowships for my own work. Mind-boggling.It is a game changer.

Is it tough juggling all these projects?

I'd be fibbing if I said it wasn't tricky-but somehow, honestly, it is a good-tough. We are so lucky to be in a town with public sector CAC, strong supportive foundations like Cleveland and GUND and lots of strong, resilient galleries, exhibition venues and community centers that are really starting to work together like a well oiled-machine. The variety of projects I am involved in are an extension of my art making and feed into my interests in how creative possibilities can open up and engage communities. Zygote's latest project is called the TRADES Project. We have been working with the AFL-CIO to try and create some wonderful connections between labor/unions and arts and culture. Zygote recruited seven union members a teacher, plumber, postal carrier, librarian, sheet metal worker, teamster and a President form the UAW local 1005. They are working with our artists at Zygote for 5 months to create prints together which will be exhibited at Zygote in July. I think this is going to be a great start in connecting the working class to the arts again-the committee at North Shore Federation, with the leadership of Harriet Applegate, has been super supportive of making these connections.

How old were you when you decided you were an artist?

I was five. I clearly remember doing a drawing at some friends of my family and I was one of those kids whose tongue would mimic the same gesture that my hand made as I was drawing. Someone took a photograph during that moment, tongue hanging out, and when I saw it, it just sat right with me. I thought, There is something to this art thing.

Where is your next show?

The next show, Desperate Signs, is at 1point618 Gallery, which is Robert Maschke's gallery in the Gordon Square Arts District. It opens on February 15th and I am thrilled to be working with the director, D.J. Hellerman and am honored to show in such a prestigious gallery.

When did you begin incorporating humor into your work?

When I was back in graduate school -postmodernism was at its peak. I found the work of Jeff Koons, John Baldessari, Christopher Wool, Richard Prince, Bruce Nauman, Sophie Calle, Cindy Sherman, and that whole crew to be inventive, refreshing and just plain hilarious. They were all provocateurs. I liked how their humor could be comedy-relief, entertainment, honest confessions, but with a whiff of tragedy. I like a good story and it is important to dig out the details about the characters as well as the storyteller.

Where did you get your art degree?

Kent State University for my BFA and then headed to Cranbrook Academy of Art for my Masters.

Would you say that motherhood is a major theme in your work?

My work comes from all my direct experiences. I think of the work as familiar, but flawed, like an old sweater that is all pilled up. It is accessible, but in its dysfunction, it is weirdly likeable. One of my favorite quotes is from filmmaker Miranda July, who wrote, "All I ever really want to know is how other people are making it through life."Certain unfiltered stories are relatable and I like to find and reveal those mutual connections, many are about motherhood. In the upcoming Desperate Signs Exhibition, I try to inhabit a few of these female characters who have had to make some major concessions in their life. My intention was to present their personal protests edged with a little satire.

How did the CAN Journal come about?

Many critical regional arts magazines died like; ANGLE, Dialogue, New Art Examiner, and The Free Times, and with them, so did the coverage. The economy was creeping into a dark place and I just felt the anxiety looming at how we were going to prevail at Zygote. So in my nervousness, we organized a great group of 28 organizations from the outer ring suburbs and city-wide galleries, to the community centers and nonprofits. We started to meet and figure out how we could survive this sea change together. I had two talents printing at Zygote at the time, Michael Gill, CAN editor, and JoAnn Dickey, CAN designer and with the amazing support of Wally Lanci from Consolidated Graphics, CAN's archangel, CAN was born. I applaud these organizational leaders who helped fill a void for a centralized visual arts community. Now we have this journal 10,000 distributed that can be found at any Heinen's store, county library or participating CAN organization in your area.

Is it safe to say you are optimistic about the Cleveland art scene?

I am very optimistic. I do think we, as artists, need to be better advocates for our sector and need to be at the table when economic development, city-wide projects and place-making discussions come up. Jean Brandt said it best, "We have been doing this way before Richard Florida came along." Artists need stronger voices to preach not only the qualitative benefits arts and culture provide, but the quantitative hard numbers we generate in our region and state.

Are you living proof that a wife and mom can be a full time artist too?

Sure, I hope my kids see that their mom loves what she does, followed her bliss, worked cooperatively and made a contribution to her community.

Do you ever get inspiration for you art while doing housework?

Funny you should mention that, I have an ironing board in the next show. I garbage picked it in Bay Village from someone's lawn. They have great trash in Bay. I also have a basement studio and sometimes I do laundry and then work a bit in the studio.

What do you see on the local art scene which makes you excited?

The new Print Room, community darkroom in the Art Craft Building, Gadi Zamir's Negative Space Gallery, BUCK BUCK gallery in Ohio City and of course, The Transformer Station with the fabulous pinhole photos of Vaugn Wascovich-Bridging Cleveland. Amazing.

Which artist has influenced you the most?

I am going local on this question. I have enormous admiration for Laurence Channing who consistently creates exquisite work and does it with immense grace. I think he has the best hand around. His prints are delicious and I am completely in awe of his observational acuity. I am also a huge fan of his wife, Susan Channing who was the Executive Director at SPACES for over 25+ years. I look to her as a role model for what she did at SPACES, as a person who really paved the way for making the art scene come alive in Cleveland. Michael Loderstedt continues to be one of the hardest working artists in the region and he has been so significant to helping us shape our history at Zygote Press. I admire him and his innovative work in print, photography and installation. He is always full of surprises in his work.

Do you have a favorite art movie?

"Harold and Maude." Hands down. More recent film, I just saw Beast of the Southern Wild and loved it.

How do you encourage your three kids, (ages 13, 11 and 5) to be creative?

I am the silliest one in my house. My husband plays a good straight man. I suppose I encourage my kids to not feel they need to be so "normal". I want them to distinguish themselves with their own style and opinions. All the kids have some creative drift. The two big ones both want to pursue some kind of art field, and the little guy wants to be a cop.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Remembering Joe Gorman | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cleveland industrial titan Joe Gorman, who died a week ago today, spent a few of his formative years in Kent after his father, Burton Gorman, was hired by Kent State University to head up what was in the 1950s known as the Department of Education (now the College of Education).

A talented basketball player, Joe played forward for the Theodore Roosevelt High School Rough Riders for a year when they had some of those great teams coached by Harold Andreas. Obtaining his bachelor's degree at KSU, he then received his law degree from Yale and returned to the Cleveland area, eventually becoming general counsel for TRW and then its president.

The last time I saw Joe in Kent, he was semi-retired and a venture capitalist. In that context, he was helping open Kent's Five Guys, Burgers and Fries. Joe had acquired the franchise rights for that premier hamburger operation for a number of communities in Northeastern Ohio and Western Pennsylvania. An optimist, Joe quipped, when I asked him, that Five Guys, Burgers and Fries might turn out to be one of the best investments he'd ever made.

My lifelong buddy, Bob Griffin, who now lives in Hawaii, emailed me that Joe, who was four or five years older than we were, gave Bob in his early teens his first real job: Parking cars at Lot Owners Beach at Twin Lakes when Joe was its head lifeguard.

Joe was dating a very attractive young lady at the time and the guys working at Lot Owners Beach looked forward to her daily visits, Bob wrote.

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News Headline: Devo - Artist Snapshot: Biography | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tad Show - WEZN-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One of new wave's most innovative and (for a time) successful bands, Devo was also perhaps one of its most misunderstood. Formed in Akron, OH, in 1972 by Kent State art students Jerry Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh, Devo took its name from their concept of "de-evolution" -- the idea that instead of evolving, mankind has actually regressed, as evidenced by the dysfunction and herd mentality of American society. Their music echoed this view of society as rigid, repressive, and mechanical, with appropriate touches -- jerky, robotic rhythms; an obsession with technology and electronics (the group was among the first non-prog rock bands to make the synthesizer a core element); often atonal melodies and chord progressions -- all of which were filtered through the perspectives of geeky misfits. Devo became a cult sensation, helped in part by their concurrent emphasis on highly stylized visuals, and briefly broke through to the mainstream with the smash single "Whip It," whose accompanying video was made a staple by the fledgling MTV network. Sometimes resembling a less forbidding version of the Residents, Devo's simple, basic electronic pop sound proved very influential, but it was also somewhat limited, and as other bands began expanding on the group's ideas, Devo seemed unable to keep pace. After a series of largely uninteresting albums, the band called it quits early in the '90s, and Casale and Mothersbaugh concentrated on other projects.

Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh both attended art school at Kent State University at the outset of the '70s. With friend Bob Lewis, who joined an early version of Devo and later became their manager, the theory of de-evolution was developed with the aid of a book entitled {-The Beginning Was the End: Knowledge Can Be Eaten}, which held that mankind had evolved from mutant, brain-eating apes. The trio adapted the theory to fit their view of American society as a rigid, dichotomized instrument of repression which ensured that its members behaved like clones, marching through life with mechanical, assembly-line precision and no tolerance for ambiguity. The whole concept was treated as an elaborate joke until Casale witnessed the infamous National Guard killings of student protesters at the university; suddenly there seemed to be a legitimate point to be made. The first incarnation of Devo was formed in earnest in 1972, with Casale (bass), Mark Mothersbaugh (vocals), and Mark's brothers Bob (lead guitar) and Jim, who played homemade electronic drums. Jerry's brother Bob joined as an additional guitarist, and Jim left the band to be replaced by Alan Myers. The group honed its sound and approach for several years (a period chronicled on Rykodisc's Hardcore compilations of home recordings), releasing a few singles on its own {%Booji Boy} label and inventing more bizarre concepts: Mothersbaugh dressed in a baby-faced mask as {%Booji Boy} (pronounced "boogie boy"), a symbol of infantile regression; there were recurring images of the potato as a lowly vegetable without individuality; the band's costumes presented them as identical clones with processed hair; and all sorts of sonic experiments were performed on records, using real and homemade synthesizers as well as toys, space heaters, toasters, and other objects. Devo's big break came with its score for the short film The Truth About De-Evolution, which won a prize at the 1976 Ann Arbor Film Festival; when the film was seen by David Bowie and Iggy Pop, they were impressed enough to secure the group a contract with Warner Bros.

Recorded under the auspices of pioneering producer Brian Eno, Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! was seen as a call to arms by some and became an underground hit. Others found Devo's sound, imagery, and material threatening; {-Rolling Stone}, for example, called the group fascists. But such criticism missed the point: Devo dramatized conformity, emotional repression, and dehumanization in order to attack them, not to pay tribute to them.

While 1979's Duty Now for the Future was another strong effort, the band broke through to the mainstream with 1980's Freedom of Choice, which contained the gold-selling single "Whip It" and represented a peak in their sometimes erratic songwriting. The video for "Whip It" became an MTV smash, juxtaposing the band's low-budget futuristic look against a down-home farm setting and hints of S&M. However, Devo's commercial success proved to be short-lived. 1981's New Traditionalists was darker and more serious, not what the public wanted from a band widely perceived as a novelty act, and Devo somehow seemed to be running out of new ideas. Problems plagued the band as well: Bob Lewis successfully sued for theft of intellectual property after a tape of Mothersbaugh was found acknowledging Lewis' role in creating de-evolution philosophy, and the sessions for 1982's Oh, No! It's Devo were marred by an ill-considered attempt to use poetry written by would-be Ronald Reagan assassin John Hinckley, Jr. as lyrical material.

As the '80s wore on, Devo found itself relegated to cult status and critical indifference, not at all helped by the lower quality of albums like 1984's Shout and 1988's Total Devo. With the band's shift toward electronic drums, Alan Myers departed in 1986, to be replaced by ex-Sparks and Gleaming Spires drummer David Kendrick. Devo recorded another album of new material, Smooth Noodle Maps, in 1990, after which its members began to concentrate on other projects. Mark Mothersbaugh moved into composing for commercials and soundtracks, writing theme music for MTV's Liquid Television, Nickelodeon's Rugrats, Pee-Wee's Playhouse, and the Jonathan Winters sitcom Davis Rules. He also played keyboards with the Rolling Stones, programmed synthesizers for Sheena Easton, and sang backup with Debbie Harry. Buoyed by this success, Mothersbaugh opened a profitable production company called Mutato Muzika, which employed his fellow Devo bandmates. Jerry Casale, meanwhile, who directed most of the band's videos, directed video clips for the Foo Fighters' "I'll Stick Around" and Soundgarden's "Blow Up the Outside World." No reunions were expected, but as Devo's legend grew and other bands acknowledged their influence (Nirvana covered "Turnaround," while "Girl U Want" has been recorded by Soundgarden, Superchunk, and even Robert Palmer), their minimalistic electro-pop was finally given new exposure on six dates of the 1996 Lollapalooza tour, to enthusiastic fan response.

The following year, Devo released a CD-ROM game ({*The Adventures of the Smart Patrol}) and accompanying music soundtrack, in addition to playing selected dates on the Lollapalooza tour. 2000 saw the release of a pair of double-disc Devo anthologies: the first was the half-hits/half-rarities Pioneers Who Got Scalped: The Anthology (on Rhino), while the second was the limited-edition mail-order release Recombo DNA (on Rhino's Handmade label), the latter of which was comprised solely of previously unreleased demos. In 2001, the Mothersbaugh and Casale brothers reunited under the name the Wipeouters for a one-off surf release, P'Twaaang!!!Casale would introduce his Jihad Jerry & the Evildoers solo project with the 2006 album Mine Is Not a Holy War. It was that same year that the band teamed with Disney for Dev2.0, a band/project/album that involved a set of pre-teens re-recording classic Devo tracks, although some lyrics were adjusted to be more family friendly. Devo got back to releasing their own material in 2007 with the downloadable single "Watch Us Work It," but a new, promised album failed to materialize. In 2008 they returned to Akron for a rare show and in support of Barack Obamas presidential campaign with all proceeds going towards the Summit County Democratic Party. After deluxe 2009 reissues of Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! and Freedom of Choice sent the band back on the road to play said albums live in their entirety, work resumed on a new album. By the end of the year, it was announced that the band had once again signed with Warner for an album originally titled "Fresh." An internet campaign where fans got to choose the full-length's 12 tracks inspired the 2010 effort, Something for Everybody.

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News Headline: AU lecture series continues with talk about shrinking cities | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ASHLAND — Ashland University will continue its Environmental Lectures Series, “The Ecology of Urban Living,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday with a presentation by Terry Schwarz, director of Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, in the Hawkins-Conard Student Center Auditorium.

In a talk called “Urban Obsolescence and the Adaptive Values of Cities,” Schwarz will discuss how persistent, large-scale population decline challenges such cities as Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo, St. Louis and Pittsburgh.

Schwarz suggests that the growing inventories of vacant land in shrinking cities be used as a laboratory for understanding and restoring urban ecosystems.

“Vacant properties offer opportunities to increase biodiversity, sequester carbon, restore rivers and lakes, eradicate hunger and improve public health in urban settings,” she said. “Rapidly growing cities inevitably damage natural systems — declining cities can repair them. By integrating ecological processes into the built environment, shrinking cities can create a new template for future development that is sustainable, equitable and economically self-sufficient.”

Schwarz works on neighborhood and campus planning, commercial and residential design guidelines, storm water management and green infrastructure strategies. She teaches at the KSU College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

In 2009, Schwarz received the Cleveland Arts Prize for Design.

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News Headline: Weiss/Manfredi concept is the best of four options for KSU's new architecture school building | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: It's hard to make a great building. Architecture is a complicated business and there are as many ways to mess up as there are players in the game of putting together a big project.

Kent State University has tried hard to ensure success with its $40 million project to build a dramatic and highly visible new home for its College of Architecture and Environmental Design, one of Ohio's four architecture schools. It has given the project a terrific site and held an international selection process with a design competition at the final stage end to pick the architects.

Unfortunately, whether out of caution or bureaucratic complexity or institutional inertia, KSU has ended up with four design proposals that collectively have failed to create the excitement and buzz such an important project deserves.

The concepts under consideration, unveiled in a public forum at KSU on Jan. 17 in the final stage of a multi-phase selection process, portray architecture as a profession in a state of confusion, if not crisis, over its future.

Should architects create iconic, instantly recognizable structures capable of putting a city or a university on the map? Should they make the planet a greener, more sustainable and socially equitable place to live, even if it means sacrificing aesthetics? Or should they simply package space competently and with minimal fuss, at a fixed price?

The proposals for the 122,000-square-foot building answer those questions in muddled ways, sometimes sacrificing one goal for another. Yet there is at least one good choice.

The concept from the team led by the highly regarded firm of Weiss/Manfredi of New York - the best of the four under consideration - emphasizes glassy forms as a metaphor of transparency, a compelling image for a profession that needs to reconnect with the public and reassert why it matters in the 21st century.

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The KSU CAED concept from Bialosky + Partners & ARO.

Bialosky + Partners & ARO The other three concepts are less promising. The proposal from Bialosky + Partners Architects of Cleveland with Architecture Research Office of New York virtually eschews transparency and nearly eliminates windows in a quest to cut energy costs.

A design from Westlake Reed Leskosky of Cleveland aims for monumentality, as if architecture as a profession needs to beat on its chest to get attention. The fourth concept, from the Collaborative Inc. of Toledo with the Miller Hull Partnership of Seattle, calls for a highly rational building made of standardized parts that looked like widgets proceeding down an assembly line.

Given those possibilities, there's a 75 percent chance that KSU could make a choice it will regret. Of course, it's still early in the game, and success is still possible. After it chooses a design team in February, the university could refine the winning proposal. Something new could emerge if the university allows such a process of discovery.

Whatever happens, the stakes are high. The architecture school has been housed for decades in Taylor Hall, the Brutalist concrete and glass structure that served as the backdrop for the May 4, 1970 National Guard shootings of anti-war protestors. Taylor will be renovated for another academic department.

KSU's planners and President Lester Lefton, will put the new architecture school on a highly prominent new site along an extension of the KSU pedestrian Esplanade off South Lincoln Street at the new western gateway to the 27,700-student campus. The spot also sits at the eastern edge of a $100 million development underway in downtown Kent with a hotel, housing, a garage, restaurants and apartments. It's a dream location.

In its new setting, the architecture building could revamp the image of KSU as a sprawling, suburban-style, automobile-oriented campus that filled up with dozens of dull, utilitarian structures since the end of World War II.

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The proposal from The Collaborative & Miller Hull Partnership.

The Collaborative, Toledo + Miller Hull of Seattle Beyond that, the new building will be viewed as a competitive response to rival universities that built two new architecture school buildings in recent years.

One is Peter Eisenman's controversial Aronoff Center at the University of Cincinnati, a composition of jagged, intersecting forms built in 1996, which has had to undergo extensive repairs.

The other is the cool and eccentric Knowlton Hall at Ohio State University, built in 2004. Designed by Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects of Atlanta it's a boxy structure with an oddball skin of marble shingles and a main entrance shadowed by a foreboding, heavy-looking overhang.

Sensing the importance of the moment and the chance to do something really great, the KSU administration organized a global search. The original 37 contenders included global superstars such as Zaha Hadid and Farshid Moussavi, both of London; Eric Owen Moss and Thom Mayne, both of Los Angeles; and the firm of Smith-Miller + Hawkinson of New York.

These and other candidates raised the potential for a clash of exciting ideas. That's not the result, however.

KSU winnowed most of the big names over concerns about whether the stars could meet a tight construction budget. In the end, it's not clear that the most stimulating teams made the cut for the final four, who were asked in December to submit the competing concepts now on the table.

Given the existing choices, the design offered by Weiss/Manfredi, in collaboration with Richard L. Bowen & Associates of Cleveland, clearly looks best.

Called “Design Loft,” it calls for a row of three glassy, rectangular forms clustered in a row that steps higher and higher in a crescendo along the Esplanade as the outdoor pathway descends gently from South Lincoln Street toward downtown Kent.

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The Westlake Reed Leskosky proposal for KSU.

Westlake Reed Leskosky Confident and simple, “Design Loft“ has the greatest potential to provide KSU with something flexible, iconic and sustainable. The architects claim that the project will qualify for a Silver rating under the National Green Building Council's widely followed LEED program, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.

Weiss/Manfredi earned a national reputation for its 2007 Olympic Sculpture Park for the Seattle Art Museum, which features zigzag pathways, green platforms and staircases that leap over highways and railroads to connect the city's downtown to Puget Sound.

The concept for KSU exhibits a similar zeal for urban connections. It emphasizes transparency as a way to link the profession of architecture to the world it's meant to serve. A flexible internal layout would provide lots of wide-open space, creating a sense of community inside the building.

In contrast, the concept from Bialosky and Architecture Research Office easily ranks as the most unappealing.

The team declared it would win a Platinum LEED rting – the highest available – but proposed a hard, mean-looking structure with a buff brown corrugated skin and vertical slit windows that recalled the worst aspects of 1960s Brutalist architecture, now wildly unpopular. Why go back to that?

The proposal from The Collaborative Inc. and Miller Hull Partnership of Seattle, calls for a building with a long, low, one-story base filled with elements including an auditorium and library.

Atop the base, the architects would set four, giant rectangular “tubes“ at right angles, framed in steel trusses, containing design studios on two floors inside of each enclosure.

The design grew out of a logical and methodical process, but it brings to mind an assembly line grinding out identical widgets, not the happiest image for an architecture school. Who wants to study architecture in a “tube?“

Westlake Reed Leskosky of Cleveland was the only Ohio firm that entered the competition without a lead designer from outside the region, and is certainly capable of handling such big and important a project without help.

The firm offered an energetic proposal designed by principal Jonathan Kurtz, 35, an important designer on the rise and a KSU grad with a bachelor's degree in architecture and a master's degree from Harvard's prestigious Graduate School of Design.

If anything, though, the concept looked like a ponderous and attempt to enlarge the chunky, precisely fitted geometric shapes of Kurtz's outstanding new Bertram and Judith Kohl Building, the newest part Oberlin College's music conservatory.

With its heavy, cantilevered overhang at its main entrance, the Kurtz design also bore an unfortunate resemblance to the Knowlton building at OSU.

Of the available options, and on the basis of the consecutive 20-minute presentations made by the firms during the public forum at KSU, Weiss/Manfredi's “Design Loft” design is the one that deserves to get built.

The building could make a powerful statement, especially at night when all those glassy rectangles are lit up and architecture students are up late and working, that KSU is a place where architecture can resolve the challenges it faces as a profession and find a way forward in the 21st century.

For KSU, and for the public image of architecture as a profession in Ohio, that would qualify as a worthy success.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: A future landmark for Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The panel that will select a finalist from the four architectural plans unveiled at Cartwright Hall a week ago Thursday, faces a daunting assignment, I think, because all four appear to meet the specifications KSU set, including energy efficiency and a building that will stand the test of time as a landmark that helps bridge the campus with Kent's downtown.

The new building will be located on the Esplanade, the land bridge linking the campus and the downtown. Models of the four designs are on display at the KSU Library for the public to see.

Hundreds of students and faculty, with a generous portion of townies sprinkled in, turned out for the unveiling event, which did KSU proud.

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News Headline: EDITORIAL: Architecture School Finalists: Ho Hum | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: I suppose there is a part of me that thinks, considering the dynamic scale of downtown and campus projects, the gateway new architecture school ought to be at least as visually exciting as, ta-da, the Kent State University power plant.

Or Akron Art museum.  Or The Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland.  Or even the dynamic new  Case Western University off campus housing development.

But looking at the four semi-finalists in Patch, I took a deep breath and went looking for a cup of coffee here in my hip little loft.  And took another deep breath. Chatting about this in email later, someone suggested, well,if you feel that way, blog it.  And I do blog about architecture: energy efficient small scale housing in Japan, with special attention to Yoshiharu Matsumura, the work of Lars Spuybroek in Holland, who addresses the radically opposed positions of high tech and sculpted, biomimetic design for a sustainable future ... I mean, I have my moments.  Don't get me started on Makoto  Sei Watanabe's  evolutionary Tokyo Lidabashi Station. You will hate seeing an adult get so passionate about a subway station.

So, I am attaching some photos of other  regional projects from here in Northeast Ohio and throwning in a couple of others to illustrate what I am thinking when I say: the scope of the semi-finalists projects, as they were presented in Patch, was competent, of course, just what you would want for the new high school or something: sturdy with some nice touches.  Not signature work, not statements, not proposals that seemed to inject life into the idea this is a gateway bridging campus not to just downtown, but symbolically to the world, the stance and posture of the 21st century set down on a formerly troublesome little campus neighborhood.

And it was easy to imagine the politics of it all: relationships, internships, graduate placements, friendships and alumni blessings, whatever,  all the whatevers from the companion world where things get wired up and presented to public view. But there is a penalty for this — a "product" roll out that pales in comparison to the power plant.

http://kent.patch.com/blog_posts/architecture-school-finalists-ho-hum/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1359150291

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News Headline: Morrow leaves legacy that transcends golf honors | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The retirement announcement of Kent State women's varsity golf coach Mike Morrow caught everyone by surprise. Morrow has been synonymous with Kent State and the greater Portage County area his entire life and has received numerous accolades and awards already well-documented on the Kent State sports website and in the Record-Courier.

Certificates, plaques and trophies do not begin to cover Morrow's contribution to golf -- both locally and nationally.

My golfing children grew up at the Kent State University golf course.

All three, still a part of the golfing community, started working at Kent State while in middle school, washing carts and putting them away in exchange for the opportunity to hone their golfing skills on the course.

Hundreds of youth golfers in Portage County can say the same thing.

While many youths had nothing to do at night, young would-be golfers spent long afternoons and evenings at Kent State, forging friendships and learning much more about work and responsibility than just how to wash a golf cart.

Starters and rangers became part of the family. Whether it be the one who became like a grandpa or another who became affectionately known as Papa.

Every time I stepped into the clubhouse, someone was asking about our children because they cared.

Our children became friends with adults spanning the generations.

Our children, now adults, didn't go far away to college, but they had the opportunity to play great country clubs and golf courses. It didn't matter. When they came home, their first stop was always the Kent State golf course to see Mike Morrow and their extended golfing family.

The Kent State University golf course was a family affair as Mike, his wife and daughters, a constant presence, opened their arms to welcome everyone.

The Matt Mishler Junior Amateur made its home for the past four years at Kent State University Golf Course. Much of the success of the Junior Amateur can be attributed to Mike Morrow and his love of golf. He was not just the host PGA professional at the course, the young golfers and parents all knew he loved the kids.

Often on the course to help junior golfers understand the complicated rules, Morrow made every junior golfer feel special. He was patient, kind and always the teacher, once even taking a group of 10 year olds back on the course to recreate a hole so they could remember the score.

His Golden Flashes are the only women's team to ever hold ownership of the Mid-American Conference women's championship. While the Kent State women's golf team played a remarkably tough schedule prior to the MAC championships, Morrow always cited the improvement of the other teams in the MAC and was a gracious coach -- right before his women's team would often have the other eight teams clobbered by the end of the second day.

His focus was always to advance the sport -- wanting the women's coaches inside the MAC to improve the game, add an additional 18 holes to the 36-hole tournament to create a competitive test for everyone and enhance fair rules to speed up play that helped all of the collegiate women golfers.

My son once said when someone on his team was wishing another player a double-bogey, "Stop it. You want everyone to play their best and then you beat them."

That is the ultimate in sportsmanship and it is Mike Morrow. At the MAC Tournament, Morrow would seek out the golfers scoring the best rounds to congratulate them. Seeing him in action at the tournaments, it was obvious the coaches across the conference looked up to him and valued his opinion and coaching abilities.

I wish Mike and his family all the best in his retirement. I hope he will still be involved in the golfing community. If he isn't, it is a loss for all of us.

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News Headline: Crosby named KSU deputy athletic director (Nielsen, Crosby) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Devin Crosby named deputy athletic director at Kent State

Devin Crosby was announced on Saturday by Kent State athletic director Joel Nielsen as the university's new deputy athletic director.

Crosby had worked at Towson since July of 2011. At Kent State, he will be involved with the athletic department's day-to-day operations, while also serving as a sports supervisor for football, along with men's and women's basketball.

"We're excited about adding someone with Devin's experience and background to our senior management team," Nielsen said. "I know he'll bring a wealth of knowledge from his past positions at the Division I level, plus he's currently serving in a very similar position at Towson University.

"With other recent additions to our staff, adding Devin completes our senior management team and puts us in a position to build upon the level of success we have come to expect at Kent State."

As the first person to serve in the role of deputy athletics director at Towson, Crosby assisted with strategic planning and the overall management of the department while leading efforts to build strong relationships with alumni and donors. He also directly supervised the Tigers' football and baseball programs.

"I am grateful to serve Kent State University, learn from Joel Nielsen and help sustain KSU's MAC and national success," said Crosby. "Our competitive gains will increase the University's dynamic impact throughout Northeast Ohio, the state and the region."

Crosby has more than 14 years of administrative experience at six different Division I programs including Northeastern, Virginia, Saint Louis, Houston and Holy Cross.

A native of Monaca, Pa., which is near Pittsburgh, Crosby earned his B.A. degree in communication studies from Slippery Rock University in 1997. He was an all-conference selection in track and field for the Rock. Crosby earned a master's of education in physical education and sport management from East Stroudsburg University.

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News Headline: KSU Sports Report: Golden Flashes gymnasts perform well in home opener | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GYMNASTICS

The Kent State gymnastics team scored 194.675 points to win its 2013 home opener, defeating Western Michigan (194.125) and George Washington (193.875) Friday in a tri-meet at the M.A.C. Center.

The Golden Flashes won all four events. Sophomore Chelsea Drogger took the vault for Kent State with a personal-best score of 9.850.

Senior Rachel Guida was the winner in uneven bars, scoring a 9.900, while senior teammate Lindsay Runyan placed second (9.875).

Junior Marie Case took the balance beam for Kent State, earning a 9.800, and also won floor exercise with a 9.925 while claiming the all-around with a total score of 39.200.

The Flashes will return to action next Sunday at Bowling Green.

BASEBALL

Kent State's baseball team was honored as Collegiate Athlete of the Year last Thursday at the Greater Cleveland Sports Awards after reaching the College World Series in 2012.

Flashes coach Scott Stricklin was on hand to receive the award that was presented by Ohio State head football coach Urban Meyer.

Stricklin was joined by Jimmy Rider, David Lyon, Nick Hamilton and David Starn, all key members of the 2012 KSU team that are now playing professional baseball.

Kent State earned a school-record 47 wins, captured the Gary Regional, then defeated host Oregon in the Super Regional to advance to the College World Series.

The Flashes baseball team beat out the KSU football program and the University of Akron men's soccer program, which had won the award the previous three years.

INDOOR TRACK & FIELD

The Golden Flashes took top honors in 17 events on the day in a tri-meet with host Illinois State and SIU-Edwardsville on Saturday at the Horton Field House in Normal, Ill. The women captured nine events while the men came out on top in eight events.

On the women's side, the Flashes took the top three places in the long jump. Freshman Dior Delophont took first place with a mark of 19-10.75, while sophomore Ann Marie Duffus -- the reigning MAC Field Athlete of the Week -- cleared 19-10.25 to finish runner-up and Roseanne Erickson finished third (18-9).

Senior Keri Dantley won the triple jump with a mark of 40-0, and senior Domenica Rossi won the pole vault by clearing 12-0.5.

On the track, the Flashes took 1-2 in both the 60-meter dash and 60-meter hurdles. Junior Katie Reiser won the 60 meters (7.64), followed by Chanitta Westbrooks. Duffus remained unbeaten in the 60-meter hurdles, clocking an 8.56 for first place, followed closely by freshman Kailyn Arcury (8.64).

Junior Shanequa Williams took first place in both the 200 meters (24.41) and the 400 meters (55.36), and senior Melinda Sawnor captured the 800-meter run in 2:13.02.

On the men's side, sophomore Matthias Tayala won the weight throw with a toss of 64-1.75. Led by senior Kenneth Agee, the Flashes took the top three spots in the high jump. Agee won the event by clearing 6-7.5. Freshman Cody Jones also cleared the height but needed one more attempt to do so, while sophomore Tyler Jones (Stow) finished third (6-4.).

Senior Mitchell Seawood won the 60-meter hurdles (8.22), while redshirt junior Nate Scales won the 60-meter dash in 6.88. Junior Laron Brown earned a victory in the 400 meters (50.46) to give the Flashes three titles in sprints.

Junior Marteze Roper clocked 1:53.29 to win the 800 meters, and redshirt senior Michael Heller (Stow) won the 1-mile run in 4:16.56 for a pair of distance victories.

Kent State will compete at the Akron Invitational next weekend.

FOOTBALL

While it was reported in an article that appeared in last Saturday's Record-Courier that funding had been secured to replace the artificial turf on the football field inside the Kent State's Fieldhouse with Fieldturf, that is actually not true. Officials are still trying to accumulate funding for the new surface.

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News Headline: Kent State's Dustin Kilgore sets school career record with 47th pin | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MT. PLEASANT, Mich. -- Senior Dustin Kilgore broke a Kent State record with his 47th career pin in the Golden Flashes' 27-8 loss to Central Michigan Sunday at McGuirk Arena. The Chippewas were difficult to score on throughout most of the day, winning 1-0 decisions at 125 and 184, a 2-0 decision at heavyweight and a 3-2 decision at 165.

"There were a lot of really close matches so it was not as bad as the final score may look," Head Coach Jim Andrassy said. "Central's style is not very exciting, but they're very good at what they do. And they're especially tough to beat at their place."

Kilgore improved to 30-0 on the year with his Division I leading 15th pin of the year just 1:43 into the first period. Each of his last eight opponents in dual meets have not made it past the second period.

Kilgore ran his winning streak to 49 and his dual meet winning streak to 59.

The Golden Flashes got a victory at 174. Redshirt freshman Sam Wheeler knocked off No. 23 Craig Kelliher 5-2 behind takedowns in the first and second periods.

"Sam did a really good job of getting that first period takedown," Andrassy said. "As soon as you score that first takedown against them, it forces them to come out get you. And that's more of our style.

"If we're able to wrestle our style at the MAC Tournament, I think a lot of these matches could have different outcomes."

Seniors Casey Newburg, Stevie Mitcheff and Keith Witt did not allow takedowns, but all dropped close bout against Top 10 opponents.

Mitcheff and Newburg each allowed third period escapes in 1-0 losses, while Witt allowed an escape and riding time.

Redshirt freshman Tyler Buckwalter made his dual meet debut, dropping a 3-2 decision to Mike Ottinger.

A second period takedown made the difference at 165.

Sophomore 165-pounder Caleb Marsh and redshirt freshman 149-pounder Nick Carr (Fayette, Pa.) each sat out with injuries, but are expected to return to the starting lineup soon.

The Golden Flashes return to Mid-American Conference action Friday, visiting Eastern Michigan, before heading to Buffalo on Sunday, Feb. 3.

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News Headline: WATCH: Kent State Baseball Named Collegiate Athlete of the Year | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: After a trip to the College World Series, the Golden Flashes baseball team beat out the football team for the honor at the 2012 Greater Cleveland Sports Awards.

After such an amazing season that ended in the College World Series, it is no surprise that the Kent State baseball team is still gaining recognition.

The Golden Flashes won the Collegiate Athlete of the Year Award Thursday night at the 2012 Greater Cleveland Sports Awards.

The baseball team beat out both the Akron Zips soccer team and Kent State's football team.

Coach Scott Stricklin received the award along with four of his players, including David Lyon, Jimmy Rider, David Starn and Nick Hamilton. All four were drafted by Major League Baseball teams.

The Flashes dominated the Mid American Conference last season winning both the regular season and MAC Tournament Championships. The team blew through the Gary Regionals and then won the Eugene Super Regional to advance to the College World Series.

There they beat the top-ranked Florida Gators in an elimination game but were later knocked out by South Carolina, the defending champions.

The team's 47 wins was the most in program history.

The football team made its first bowl game in 40 years this past season after finishing 11-2, losing to Northern Illinois in the MAC Championship Game.

In the GoDaddy.com Bowl the Flashes fell to Arkansas State, 17-13.

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News Headline: Kent State selling bowl throwback helmets for $1,000 each | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: CBSSports.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Thanks to the example of former Golden Flash Josh Cribbs, we know Kent State alums and fans can be intensely loyal. They would have to be, considering 2012 marked the first FBS bowl berth in the program's history. But are they so loyal they're willing to pony up $1,000 for the helmets worn in that bowl?

Kent State hopes so, because that's the current "gift to the football enhancement fund" requested in exchange for one of the helmets worn at the GoDaddy.com Bowl, plus a "personalized brick at the main West Gate entrance of Dix Stadium."

Remember, though, these aren't just any helmets; they are the eyes-in-front, block-K-on-the-back throwbacks to the Flashes' 1972 Tangerine Bowl berth, which you may remember from them being, well, the weirdest-looking college football lids this side of Maryland's state flag experiments:

But the $1,000 doesn't just get Flashes fans one of the most (ahem) unique helmets in recent college football history and their own brick at the Flashes' stadium -- the helmet also comes autographed by the coach who got them to the bowl game, Darrell Hazell. How much of a bonus that is might depend on how said Flash fan feels about Hazell having left the program for Purdue after the season, of course.

To be fair, unlike many of his job-hopping coaching brethren, Hazell stuck around to coach the Flashes in the bowl game, and this was a historic moment for the long-suffering program (17-13 loss to Arkansas State and all), and those are some interesting helmets, and it's not like this is the kind of memorabilia Kent State is going to produce every season, and they're not even the only college football program offering their one-off bowl helmet for this exact same price.

Still, though ... a thousand bucks?

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News Headline: Shale Waste Too Much For Ohio (Lutz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - The amassing volume of brine wastewater created by the oil and gas industry drilling wells for natural gas production could soon overwhelm Ohio's wastewater disposal capacity, researchers say.

A study shows Ohio's 180 injection wells used nearly 14-million barrels of water in 2012, up from 12.8 million barrels in 2011.

"The future expansion of shale gas development in this region does require that we have a very clear plan for managing the growing wastewater volumes that are being generated," says Brian Lutz, a Kent State University professor who led the analysis.

YSU Geology Professor Jeffrey Dick says the average well will produce from 3 to 6 barrels of brine wastewater per day. Each barrel holds 42 gallons of waste water.

"If you take that and multiply it by the thousands of these wells, the rate of brine production doesn't decline," Dick says. "It holds steady."

Both professors say the cost of transporting so much water by truck is also making possible alternatives such as water pipelines and processing plants more attractive.

"You take that brine water and treat it in a centralized off site facility - basically a distillation plant - and then use that recycled water for fracturing," Dick says.

A spokesperson for ShaleComm says the industry is doing considerable work and research to recycle processed water for use at multiple drill sites as well as finding alternatives to water based fracturing.

Although he believes research on better recycling options is advancing rapidly, Lutz is unclear how much of the total waste water volume they're going to ultimately be able to recycle.

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News Headline: Kent State Panel Discussion Will Explore Puerto Rico Statehood (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: El Sol de Cleveland - Online
Contact Name: Kent State PR
News OCR Text: Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences, and the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion are sponsoring a panel discussion titled “Puerto Rico: The 51st Star On the U.S. Flag?” on Jan. 31 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Kent Student Center Kiva. The event is free and open to the public. A dessert and coffee reception will follow the discussion in the Multicultural Center, Room 206 of the Kent Student Center, which is directly above the Kiva.

Supported by the Hispanic Alliance Inc., Kent State Admissions, and the Spanish and Latino Student Association (SALSA), the discussion will provide participants with the opportunity to explore the complex issue from diverse angles. The history of Puerto Rico’s connection as a U.S. territory and the arguments for independence, status quo and statehood are all aspects influencing the issue to be discussed by the panel.

“This forum will present a discussion focusing on the historic statehood vote by Puerto Rico in the fall 2012 election,” said Joseph Ortiz, Ph.D., geology professor and provost faculty associate for Kent State’s Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, who will serve on the discussion panel.

Other panel members include Jose E. Lopez, adjunct professor and executive director for the Institute of Puerto Rican Arts and Culture at the University of Illinois at Chicago; Juan Molina Crespo, executive director, Hispanic Alliance Inc. in Cleveland; Amoaba Gooden, Ph.D., chair of Kent State’s Department of Pan-African Studies; David Kaplan, Ph.D., professor in Kent State’s Department of Geography; and Elizabeth Pryor-Smith, Ph.D., history professor at Kent State. The panel will be moderated by José C. Feliciano, a Cleveland-area trial lawyer who also serves as Kent State’s 2012-2013 President’s Ambassador.

For more information about Kent State’s College of Arts and Sciences, visit www.kent.edu/cas.

For more information about Kent State’s Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, visit www.kent.edu/diversity.

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News Headline: KENT STATE PANEL DISCUSSION TO EXPLORE PUERTO RICO STATEHOOD, JAN. 31 (Ortiz) | Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Jan.25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's College of Arts and Sciences, and the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion are sponsoring a panel discussion titled "Puerto Rico: The 51st Star On the U.S.Flag?" on Jan.31 from 6 p.m.to 7:30 p.m.in the Kent Student Center Kiva.The event is free and open to the public.A dessert and coffee reception will follow the discussion in the Multicultural Center, Room 206 of the Kent Student Center, which is directly above the Kiva.

Supported by the Hispanic Alliance Inc., Kent State Admissions, and the Spanish and Latino Student Association (SALSA), the discussion will provide participants with the opportunity to explore the complex issue from diverse angles.The history of Puerto Rico's connection as a U.S.territory and the arguments for independence, status quo and statehood are all aspects influencing the issue to be discussed by the panel.

"This forum will present a discussion focusing on the historic statehood vote by Puerto Rico in the fall 2012 election," said Joseph Ortiz, Ph.D., geology professor and provost faculty associate for Kent State's Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, who will serve on the discussion panel.

Other panel members include Jose E.Lopez, adjunct professor and executive director for the Institute of Puerto Rican Arts and Culture at the University of Illinois at Chicago; Juan Molina Crespo, executive director, Hispanic Alliance Inc.in Cleveland; Amoaba Gooden, Ph.D., chair of Kent State's Department of Pan-African Studies; David Kaplan, Ph.D., professor in Kent State's Department of Geography; and Elizabeth Pryor-Smith, Ph.D., history professor at Kent State.The panel will be moderated by Jose C.Feliciano, a Cleveland-area trial lawyer who also serves as Kent State's 2012-2013 President's Ambassador.

For more information about Kent State's College of Arts and Sciences, visit www.kent.edu/cas.

For more information about Kent State's Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, visit www.kent.edu/diversity.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kent State reaches deal giving students research access to Cuyahoga Valley National Park (Diacon, Blank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — Kent State University has reached an agreement with the National Park Service which will allow collaborative projects and joint research in Cuyahoga Valley National Park.

The research will focus primarily on geology, biology, hydrology and educational programs, said Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost.

The collaboration, which was finalized last month, is called "The River We Share" because the Cuyahoga River flows through both the Cuyahoga Valley National Park and through Kent.

"The collaboration between the park and the university will provide students and the park research and technical services through hands-on education and service-learning opportunities," said Stan Austin, superintendent of Cuyahoga Valley National Park.""

The five-year pact allows both parties to revisit and revise the agreement at the end of that period.

"This particular national park is unique, as it encompasses urban environments to fairly pristine areas -- plus it's heavily used because of the large population surrounding it," said James Blank, interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor and chair of the Department of Biological Sciences at Kent State.

The new agreement will mean expanded internship opportunities for Kent State students.

"We have a number of programs across different departments where students want to look for careers related to the environment, everything from working for the park service or the EPA to environmental consulting," Blank said. "The explosion of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in Ohio is just one example of an industry that is fueling the demand for trained workers in environmental fields. This agreement will yield enormous benefits for our students."

"I can see this relationship growing in ways we don't even realize yet," Blank added. "National parks are precious resources, and the ones we have are important to understand and study."

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News Headline: PARTNERSHIP FORMED | Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has signed a five-year memorandum of understanding with the National Park Service that should lead to enhanced collaboration in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park.

The agreement, signed last month and announced Thursday, calls for collaborative projects and joint research focused on geology, biology, hydrology and educational programs.

The theme of the collaboration is "The River We Share" because the Cuyahoga River flows through both the park and through the city of Kent.

The new agreement also will lead to expanded internship opportunities for Kent State students, the university said.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Kent State University signs agreement with National Park Service (Diacon, Blank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University signs agreement withSFlbNational Park Service

Record-Courier Staff Report Published: January 26, 2013 4:00AM

Kent State University has signed a memorandum of understanding with the National Park Service, providing for enhanced collaboration in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park.

The agreement, signed last month, calls for collaborative projects and joint research primarily focused on geology, biology, hydrology and educational programs, according to Todd Diacon, KSU senior vice president for academic affairs and provost.

"There have been informal discussions between scientists at the park and Kent State faculty for a long time, but over the past two years, we really started to strengthen the relationship and deepen the ties to the park," Diacon said.

The collaboration theme is "The River We Share," because the Cuyahoga River flows through both the Cuyahoga Valley National Park and through Kent, creating a physical connection between both areas.

"The collaboration between the park and the university will provide students and the park research and technical services through hands-on education and service-learning opportunities. This association has the potential to develop future land stewards while enriching the experience for park visitors," said Stan Austin, superintendent of Cuyahoga Valley National Park.

The five-year pact allows both parties to revisit and revise the agreement at the end of that period.

"This particular national park is unique, as it encompasses urban environments to fairly pristine areas -- plus it's heavily used because of the large population surrounding it," said James Blank, interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor and chair of the department of biological sciences at KSU.

"Our faculty is energized and interested in addressing the complex issues regarding sustainability and the use of our precious resources," Blank said.

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News Headline: National Teacher Of The Year | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Rebecca Mieliwocki
News OCR Text: Rebecca Mieliwocki will speak Jan. 29

Rebecca Mieliwocki, who was recognized by President Barack Obama as the 2012 National Teacher of the Year, will present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished Lecture at Kent State University on Tuesday, Jan. 29, at 4:30 p.m. in the Kent Student Center Kiva. This lecture is free and open to the public. Mieliwocki teaches 7th grade English classes at Luther Burbank Middle School in Burbank, Calif. Mieliwocki, who has taught for 14 years, is known for inspiring and motivating students, often using the Socratic method of questioning to stimulate students' critical thinking and create dynamic lessons. She hosts family nights, sends out weekly memos to parents and maintains a Facebook page for her class. Mieliwocki explained that when she was 18 years old, the last thing she wanted to be was a teacher. As the daughter of two public school teachers, she rebelled by studying to become a lawyer. She eventually went on to try a few different careers – in publishing, floral design and event planning – before becoming a teacher.

The National Teacher of the Year Program, sponsored by Target, is a project of the Council of Chief State School Officers in partnership with the ING Foundation, the University of Phoenix and People to People Ambassador Programs.

For more information about the lecture, contact Linda Robertson, director of the Center for International and Intercultural Education in the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State, at lfrobert@kent.edu or call 330-672-0563.

For more information about Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services, visit www.kent.edu/ehhs.

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News Headline: KENT STATE'S COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH ESTABLISHES A NEW PRACTICE OFFICE AND RESEARCH CENTER (Slenkovich, Hoornbeek, Alemagno) | Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Jan.25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's College of Public Health has established a new Office of Public Health Practice and a Center for Public Policy and Health, two externally focused college units that offer services to health departments, hospital systems, government agencies and non-governmental organizations.These two new units will provide links between Kent State and community partners to enable research and assistance to improve public health and to foster workforce development and student experiential learning.

The Office of Public Health Practice at Kent State will provide workforce development programs for public health professionals to meet continuing education requirements.For example, an online review course for the Ohio registered sanitarian exam has been developed and is presently in the testing phase.In addition, the Office of Public Health Practice will recruit organizations to provide student experiential learning opportunities, such as field experiences, internships and practicums.Kenneth Slenkovich, Kent State's College of Public Health assistant dean, operations and community relations, heads the new office, and Willie H.Oglesby, Ph.D., assistant professor of health policy and management at Kent State, is the assistant director.

"Practitioners have provided strong feedback to us that they need relevant, accessible and cost-effective courses to stay current in their jobs and to meet the continuing education requirements of their licenses and accreditations," Slenkovich explained."We look forward to providing this assistance and to working with our community partners to identify internship and other field experience opportunities for our students at all levels."

Kent State's Center for Public Policy and Health, which provides research and technical assistance to government agencies, nonprofit organizations and community partners, is headed by John Hoornbeek, Ph.D., associate professor of health policy and management at Kent State, and is staffed by Joshua Filla, a Kent State outreach program officer, as well as a cadre of affiliated faculty and experts.The center has already received more than $450,000 in contract and grant support, with assignments including evaluating the effects of consolidation on 12 recent Ohio health department mergers; assisting health departments in Portage County in identifying and pursuing cross-jurisdictional service sharing arrangements; and working on a comprehensive community health needs assessment, related to the 2011 Affordable Care Act, for the three Akron-area hospital systems.

"The new center builds on the foundation of Kent State's former Center for Public Administration and Public Policy, which provided services and research relating to public policy and administration in a range of policy areas for more than 30 years," Hoornbeek said."We have maintained affiliations with clients and contributors to that center, even as we focus our efforts more intensively on public and environmental health issues through this new center."

Late last year, the university's College of Public Health signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the College of Arts and Sciences to transfer the center and continue collaborative efforts across the two colleges.

"The new center will assist external organizations that influence public health in improving their effectiveness and efficiency, while providing opportunities for faculty, staff and graduate students to apply their skills and abilities to real-world issues and problems," Hoornbeek explained.

"The center will also work closely with the new Office of Public Health Practice to enable effective research, assistance and continuing education for a range of external audiences," said Sonia Alemagno, Kent State's dean of the College of Public Health."Kent State is positioned as a leader in these areas."

For more information about Kent State's College of Public Health, visit www.kent.edu/publichealth.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: UA WANTS TO EXPAND ONLINE LEARNING: (Kelly) | Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: FREE CLASSES TO EXTEND SCHOOL'S REACH IN NATIONWIDE TREND THAT PROENZA HOPES TO GET UNDER WAY QUICKLY ON CAMPUS

Someday you might be able to get a degree from the University of Akron without setting a foot on its well-manicured campus. Or paying UA a single dollar in tuition.

UA officials are looking at ways to extend the school's reach by embracing massive, open online courses - or MOOCs, in the shorthand of the educational revolution.

University President Luis Proenza wants to make the campus a source of online learning, and as quickly as possible.

"This is the first time I've seen a real sense of urgency among university leaders who recognize the opportunities in digital learning," he told the campus by email earlier this month, referring to a professional association meeting he attended last fall.

While online courses have been around at UA and other universities for decades, MOOCs are different. Unlike traditional online classes, MOOCs don't cost anything, offer credit, limit enrollment or require students to complete prerequisites.

That means thousands of students can sample prepackaged online courses in everything from solid-state chemistry to game theory to equine nutrition.

While most of today's courses are offered by elite institutions like Harvard, Stanford, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Berklee College of Music, that is rapidly changing. More and more university officials are showing interest in entering the exploding fray.

"It's more than just a fad," said Gerry McKiernan, an Iowa State librarian whose self-described "obsession" with MOOCs led him to launch a blog called Alt-Ed in April. "Very quickly the phenomenon has exploded. It is a moving target. I think it certainly will affect higher education."

While just 2.6 percent of colleges and universities nationwide offer MOOCs, another 9.4 percent are planning to do so, according to a report by the Babson Survey Research Group. About 6.7 million students took online courses in 2012, with innovations cropping up seemingly every day.

San Jose State University announced this week that it will experiment with offering credit for MOOCs through the for-profit provider Udacity. Another for-profit provider, Coursera, announced last week that students can earn "verified certificates" via software that tracks their typing style. That identifies the student doing the work and gives them something to prove that it was indeed them who passed the course. Coursera offers more than 200 courses from 33 universities.

Ohio State became the first Ohio university to launch MOOCs, with four classes on Coursera this month.

More than 30,000 students - some from as far away as Lithuania, India and Norway - have enrolled in the introductory calculus course offered by lecturer Jim Fowler.

His 15-week course is made up of videos plus an online textbook and exercises with cues to help the stumbling student. Fowler offers weekly online office hours and encourages students to work with others online.

The course "is about doing calculus problems in fellowship with one another," he says enthusiastically on the introductory lecture.

No formality here: He wears a casual brown sweater, signs his missives to students "Jim" and exudes his love for higher math. His goal, he said, is to make math more accessible to more people.
REACHING STUDENTS

That is also how Proenza sees it. MOOCs can "improve educational productivity, allowing us to reach more learners at lower cost," the UA president said in his campus email.

In a paper he presented to the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities, he suggests capitalizing on the promise of MOOCs by "unbundling teaching and learning, assessment and location."

He says that universities should develop the ability to credential students with course credits - and even degrees - when they prove they have the knowledge, regardless of where they received the knowledge or even took a college course at all.

He wants UA to make available "as many of the world's resources (about MOOCs) as possible to anyone who might need them."

Already the university has a web page dedicated to MOOCs.

"The result would be an entirely new business model for higher education," he said in his paper. Tomorrow's university would offer wider access to "over 50 million Americans who have only partially completed their baccalaureate degree."

He presented his ideas to 23 members of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities at the Association of Public Land-Grant Universities national meeting in Denver in November. Both organizations agreed to form faculty work teams to address the issues.

Part of their conclusion to date: It's better to have innovations driven by universities than by third-party vendors.
CLASS FALL OFF HUGE

Yet how that will take shape remains to be seen.

Fowler, the OSU lecturer, said he would be ecstatic if even a couple thousand students finished his calculus course. That's because the falloff is huge in MOOCs.

Students don't pay anything for the course and there's no penalty for dropping out, so many do. Some do not learn well online; some do not have a sustaining interest in the subject.

"We're in a transition period," said Harvey Sterns, a UA gerontology professor who is immediate past chairman of the university's Faculty Senate. "How this translates into practice on our campus is a major exercise for faculty. It's very difficult to judge."

At Kent State, the university is concentrating on conventional online courses for credit for enrolled students, said Valerie Kelly, director of online learning.

"MOOCs may add some value, but they're not our focus," she said.

"It's probably going to be another 30 years before we see this sorting itself out," Proenza said.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: University of Akron looking to expand online offerings (Kelly) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Someday you might be able to get a degree from the University of Akron without setting a foot on its well-manicured campus. Or paying UA a single dollar in tuition.

UA officials are looking at ways to extend the school's reach by embracing massive, open online courses -- or MOOCs, in the shorthand of the educational revolution.

University President Luis Proenza wants to make the campus a source of online learning, and as quickly as possible.

"This is the first time I've seen a real sense of urgency among university leaders who recognize the opportunities in digital learning," he told the campus by email earlier this month, referring to a professional association meeting he attended last fall.

While online courses have been around at UA and other universities for decades, MOOCs are different. Unlike traditional online classes, MOOCs don't cost anything, offer credit, limit enrollment or require students to complete prerequisites.

That means thousands of students can sample prepackaged online courses in everything from solid-state chemistry to game theory to equine nutrition.

While most of today's courses are offered by elite institutions like Harvard, Stanford, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Berklee College of Music, that is rapidly changing. More and more university officials are showing interest in entering the exploding fray.

"It's more than just a fad," said Gerry McKiernan, an Iowa State librarian whose self-described "obsession" with MOOCs led him to launch a blog called Alt-Ed in April. "Very quickly the phenomenon has exploded. It is a moving target. I think it certainly will affect higher education."

While just 2.6 percent of colleges and universities nationwide offer MOOCs, another 9.4 percent are planning to do so, according to a report by the Babson Survey Research Group. About 6.7 million students took online courses in 2012, with innovations cropping up seemingly every day.

San Jose State University announced this week that it will experiment with offering credit for MOOCs through the for-profit provider Udacity. Another for-profit provider, Coursera, announced last week that students can earn "verified certificates" via software that tracks their typing style. That identifies the student doing the work and gives them something to prove that it was indeed them who passed the course. Coursera offers more than 200 courses from 33 universities.

Ohio State became the first Ohio university to launch MOOCs, with four classes on Coursera this month.

More than 30,000 students -- some from as far away as Lithuania, India and Norway -- have enrolled in the introductory calculus course offered by lecturer Jim Fowler.

His 15-week course is made up of videos plus an online textbook and exercises with cues to help the stumbling student. Fowler offers weekly online office hours and encourages students to work with others online.

The course "is about doing calculus problems in fellowship with one another," he says enthusiastically on the introductory lecture.

No formality here: He wears a casual brown sweater, signs his missives to students "Jim" and exudes his love for higher math. His goal, he said, is to make math more accessible to more people.

Reaching students

That is also how Proenza sees it. MOOCs can "improve educational productivity, allowing us to reach more learners at lower cost," the UA president said in his campus email.

In a paper he presented to the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities, he suggests capitalizing on the promise of MOOCs by "unbundling teaching and learning, assessment and location."

He says that universities should develop the ability to credential students with course credits -- and even degrees -- when they prove they have the knowledge, regardless of where they received the knowledge or even took a college course at all.

He wants UA to make available "as many of the world's resources (about MOOCs) as possible to anyone who might need them."

Already the university has a web page dedicated to MOOCs.

"The result would be an entirely new business model for higher education," he said in his paper. Tomorrow's university would offer wider access to "over 50 million Americans who have only partially completed their baccalaureate degree."

He presented his ideas to 23 members of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities at the Association of Public Land-Grant Universities national meeting in Denver in November. Both organizations agreed to form faculty work teams to address the issues.

Part of their conclusion to date: It's better to have innovations driven by universities than by third-party vendors.

Class falloff huge

Yet how that will take shape remains to be seen.

Fowler, the OSU lecturer, said he would be ecstatic if even a couple thousand students finished his calculus course. That's because the falloff is huge in MOOCs.

Students don't pay anything for the course and there's no penalty for dropping out, so many do. Some do not learn well online; some do not have a sustaining interest in the subject.

"We're in a transition period," said Harvey Sterns, a UA gerontology professor who is immediate past chairman of the university's Faculty Senate. "How this translates into practice on our campus is a major exercise for faculty. It's very difficult to judge."

At Kent State, the university is concentrating on conventional online courses for credit for enrolled students, said Valerie Kelly, director of online learning.

"MOOCs may add some value, but they're not our focus," she said.

"It's probably going to be another 30 years before we see this sorting itself out," Proenza said.

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News Headline: KSU speaker: King would press 'war on poverty' | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Carlos Muñoz Jr., told faculty, students and visitors at Kent State University Thursday that Martin Luther King Jr., if he were alive today, would press President Barack Obama for less action in wars abroad and more action on "the war on poverty" in the United States.

Muñoz, professor emeritus at University of California, Berekley and founding chair of the first Chicano studies department in the United States of America, was the keynote speaker KSU's 11th Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration in the Kent Student Center Ballroom.

A Vietnam War veteran and social activist, Muñoz said he was disappointed Obama did not act more quickly to end the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"We have lost enough of our young men and women of all colors in wars we had no business being involved in," he said. Muñoz said King, a practitioner of non-violent resistance, would have celebrated the election of the nation's first black president, but would have questioned many of the foreign policy actions of Obama's first term. Muñoz said King was known for "speaking truth to power."

King also protested for economic and social justice, leading Muñoz to suggest the civil rights leader would also be unhappy with some of Obama's domestic policy decisions as well.

"We must let (Obama) know ... We expect him to save the poor and working class like he saved Wall Street in his first term," Muñoz said.

He said social activists should also be pressing for amnesty for undocumented workers and the end of private, for-profit prisons. Muñoz referred to the nation's current prison system as "the new slavery" due to the outsized percentage of prison populations made up by black and latino inmates.

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1126 or tgallick@recordpub.com

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News Headline: Browns likely to stay conservative with any uniform changes in future (Quevedo, Stanforth) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Owner Jimmy Haslam recently informed the NFL that the Browns are exploring possible changes to their iconic uniforms. It is a league procedure to make the notification, and part of that means the earliest a change can occur is 2014.

Paul Lukas, who writes a column for ESPN.com on uniform designs called Uni Watch and is the foremost follower of uniform changes, said much of the feedback he has received from Browns fans has been resistant to a change.

As Lukas said, much of that derives from the team keeping its colors and history in Cleveland after the late Art Modell moved the team to Baltimore after the 1995 season.

“Let's remember, in terms of conservatism and sticking with what one has, this is a team that pretends it is another franchise,” Lukas said. “This team, and the league, has created this fiction, this fantasy, that this team is still the old team that moved away. That's the fairy tale that gets told. When they assume that role, they're stuck with that uniform.”

There's also a reason the change won't be taking place during the 2013 season, as some might have expected. Brian McCarthy, vice president of corporate communications for the NFL, said a lot of care goes into the design process. In a sense, the goal is to get it right rather than get it right now.

“[Those making the new design] will analyze it from a number of different perspectives,” McCarthy said. “They'll look at it from the perspective of the fans and how it looks from every seat in the stadium, they'll show what it looks like on TV and do TV testing. ... It's a lengthy process. That's where the time lapse is.”

There are things the Browns can do to retain tradition while ushering in a new look. Lukas suggests a more prominent role for Brownie the Elf on the new uniforms (the helmet would have been the best placement for this, but the Elf could be placed on the shoulder or hip) or a change in stripes or pant color. One of the biggest requests he receives from Browns fans, he said, is the return of the orange pants, made famous in large part thanks to Brian Sipe and the Kardiac Kids.

Another option is using a less traditional font with the jersey numbers, much like what the Pittsburgh Steelers did in the late '90s.

“I would say the block numbers are very Cleveland. I can tell you when the Steelers went away from the block numbers and switched to the rounded italic fonts in the late '90s, I still get emails from Steelers' fans,” Lukas said. “They would say, ‘This isn't what the Steelers are about, it [the font] is too slick.' ”

Vince Quevedo is an associate professor of fashion design at Kent State University, which was recently ranked as the No. 3 fashion school in the country by Fashionista.com. Quevedo said the most important thing the Browns can do when redesigning their uniforms is to keep a firm grasp on their identity.

“It can't be so drastic of a change that no one will know who they are,” Quevedo said. “This is a very competitive field where there is a lot of body contact. The uniform has to appear menacing and strong.”

Superstition can also play a large part in a team's uniform design.

“For example, the University of Nebraska had a very winning team in the '80s, and they had this one helmet that they used. Well, in subsequent years they changed it. And then their luck changed. They soon went back to that winning helmet,” Quevedo said. “A lot of teams want to go back to what they were wearing when they were at their best. Sometimes that hinders the design. If they don't want to change the helmet, then I would imagine they wouldn't make such a big change in the uniforms either.”

Simplifying design

Nancy Stanforth, associate professor of fashion merchandising at Kent State University, believes that change is about increments.

“Dramatic differences can alienate those who are committed fans,” Stanforth said. “Fresh and tradition must be blended. Much of what we see today in traditional looks that have been updated to contemporary standards is simplicity, cleaner lines and clearer graphics. Logos seem to become more graphic and simpler with each update.”

When it comes to revealing the change to fans, Stanforth knows that there are always going to be people who don't want change.

“Uniform changes generally are not a make-or-break for fans. They love the players and the team and that will continue,” Stanforth said. “What it does do is generate discussion, which whether positive or negative, is good. Marketers always prefer positive, but negative comments demonstrate passion and commitment. They [the Browns] need to emphasize that the uniforms are fan-driven.”

Stanforth doesn't believe that new is necessarily better either.

“New is about being somewhat tired of what is current and looking for a bit of excitement in the new.”

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News Headline: Report: Fracking waste up 570% | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Columbus

A new report by researchers at Kent State and Duke universities shows that fracking waste generated in Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia has increased by 570 percent since 2004.

The study warns of a marked increase in waste in the coming years, as well. In 2011, 12.8 million barrels of wastewater were dumped underground in Ohio at disposal sites known as injection wells, according to the report.

The report found that more than half that waste comes from drilling sites in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, where drilling in the Marcellus Shale formation has been more extensive.

Fracking uses water, chemicals and sand to fracture shale rock formations so that oil and gas deposits can be released deep below the earth during the drilling process. At issue in recent years has been what to do with leftover wastewater, also known as brine water, after the process is completed.

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News Headline: Oil and Gas Education Session on Basic Contracts Held at Kent State University at Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Canton Small Business Development Center* and Kent State University at Stark, with the attorneys at Roetzel & Andress, will present the third event in the four-part Oil and Gas Education Series.

The public presentations are designed to provide education to members of the community. Presented by knowledgeable attorneys at Roetzel & Andress, each event will provide a factual forum, with an opportunity for attendees to ask questions regarding the subject matter.

Each event in the series will take place from 6:30 – 8 p.m. in Kent State Stark's Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township. Register online for $10 per person or $15 per couple atwww.cantonsbdc.org.

Basic Contracts Used in Oil and Gas Management

This program examines oil and gas leases, pooling and utilization agreements, division orders, operating agreements and other contractual agreements used in the exploration, production and marketing of oil and gas.

Presenter:

Michael R. Traven

Michael Traven is a Roetzel & Andress associate and member of the firm's Oil and Gas Industry Team. His practice focuses on commercial and business related transactions and litigation. He has extensive experience with oil- and gas-related litigation, as well as real estate and construction litigation and adversary bankruptcy matters. Mr. Traven was selected as an “Ohio Super Lawyers - Rising Star” by Ohio Super Lawyers magazine (2011-13).

The final event in the series, Understanding the Process, will take place on Thursday, March 28. This program will cover stages of the process, from clearing to production, and answers the following questions, such as: What is seismic? What equipment is used? How long does it take to drill a well? What will you see and hear? How deep does the well go? How is it constructed? What about the pipelines? What can be expected from an access road? How are drill cuttings disposed? When and why is water needed and how is it disposed? and What is an injection well?

For more information on the Oil and Gas Education Series, visit www.cantonsbdc.org or call 330-244-3290.

Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least two weeks in advance. Contact the Small Business Development Center at Kent State Stark at 330-244-3290 orinfo@cantonsbdc.org. Call 330-244-3239 for TDD only.

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News Headline: Area entertainment events beginning Jan. 25 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: STUDENT ART SHOWCASE

More than 3,000 pieces of artwork from middle and high school students in Stark, Summit, Portage, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties are on view through Wednesday in three locations at Kent State University at Stark. Seen here is "Gumball Machine" by Sheldyn Nicholson of Hoover High School. The 59th Annual Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Exhibit may be viewed from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, and 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday; in the Campus Center, Fine Arts Building and Main Hall Art Gallery.


STORYBOOK BALLET

The State Ballet Theatre of Russia will present a fully staged production of "Cinderella" at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. Tickets, $37 to $54, are on sale at www.tusc.kent.edu and 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Obamacare and small businesses: How will it impact the workforce? | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: “What will happen to you personally when you wake up in 2014?”

That was the question Scott Pipes posed to nearly 100 small-business owners who were seated in the Kent State at Tuscarawas Founders Hall Auditorium on Friday.

Pipes' audience was there to learn more about the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — often called Obamacare — would have on small businesses once the individual mandate requiring all Americans to have insurance goes into effect Jan. 1, 2014.

While the Affordable Care Act passed in 2010, much of it won't be enacted until next year, leaving a lot of people confused about how they will be affected socially and economically.

Speaking at the Small Business Development Center forum, Pipes, as well as Mark Fearon of Rea & Associates, shared a lot of information regarding the rules, costs and issues business owners and their employees will face in the coming years.

“This will change the labor market more than anything else we have seen in our lifetime,” Pipes said.

For starters, businesses that have more than 50 employees must offer insurance. That number includes anyone who works 30 hours or more, and also may comprise of part-time and seasonal workers, Pipes said.

While there are some exceptions, Pipes suggested that employers hire a team of advisers, accountants and an attorney to assist them on the laws in place.

The next issue is the type of insurance that must be offered and the cost to employers and employees. The mandate stipulates at least a  60/40 split for coverage. However, the employee doesn't have to pay more than 9.5 percent of household income for self-only coverage, Pipes said. That amount is determined by the number in the top box of a W-2 form.

COMES DOWN TO COVERAGE

If the coverage exceeds that amount, or if the employer chooses not to offer health insurance or only a watered-down version of basic insurance, the employee can buy a state insurance plan. The plans are offered through an  Internet-driven market, where individuals will have to supply their age, location, employer, smoking status, salary, but not any pre-existing conditions, he explained.

If business owners meet the minimum requirements, employees can't participate in the plan. Conversely, owners will be fined if their employees need state insurance plans. Things aren't necessarily smooth for employees, Pipes cautioned.

“The exchange is far from free,” he said.

As an example he pointed to the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit that specializes in health reform. Based on the Kaiser Subsidy Calculator, a family of four making $65,000 a year would pay $6,250 out-of-pocket expenses after receiving the government subsidy tax credit. A single 45-year-old adult making $45,000 a year would pay $4,167 out of pocket after the tax credit.

Everything is based on the person's income, Pipes said. “The word affordability means ‘How much can you afford?' ” he said. “It has nothing to do with overall costs.”

What's best for the employee depends on the individual and the insurance offered, Pipes said. Some employees may benefit more from employer-owned insurance even though the out-of-pocket expense exceeds 9.5 percent. Conversely, some may find better access if they had the opportunity to purchase their own insurance.

Pipes also explained the theory behind the Affordable Care Act, which is, if the masses cover health insurance, those on the poverty line and those who had pre-existing conditions would get coverage, and save the government money in the long run.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates the reform will reduce the deficit by $124 billion over 10 years. However, Pipes is still skeptical, questioning how many will purchase the insurance and use it according to the mandate.

Another issue for many owners is morality, Pipes said. He said some people don't want to pay because of their values, such as the birth control mandate that required all employers to cover contraception, sterilization and abortifacients. The problem, Pipes said, is employers still would have to pay fines, which will fund the same system.

Pipes said the next step is for business owners to meet with their consultants and consider their options of whether to avoid plans and pay penalties, strictly conform or a hybrid of the two options.

PENALTIES AND INCENTIVES

Pipes said the penalty for not offering coverage is $2,000 annually times the number of employees minus 30. The penalty for not offering affordable coverage is $3,000 annually for each full-time employee receiving the subsidy, up to a maximum of $2,000 times the number of full-time employees minus 30.

If the employer has 25 or fewer employees and the average wage is up to $50,000, he or she may be eligible for a tax credit. Employers with more than 200 employees are automatically required to enroll with insurance.

OBAMACARE HITS HOME

As a small-business adviser, Jeanne Keenan was glad to see Pipes and Fearon tackle a lot of the topics small-business owners will need to address within the next year.

“My clients haven't mentioned it to me yet,” she said. “Are they even aware it's affecting them?”

Some of them are aware of some of the changes they will face, but continue to be left with more questions than answers.

For instance, Bryan Schrock has 66 employees, most of whom are Amish or Mennonite, which might bring up religious exemptions. However, Schrock, who owns Schrocks of Walnut Creek, a kitchen cabinet manufacturing company, still would have to enroll in an insurance program to prove he offered a plan to his workers.

That's only one of his concerns.

“My No. 1 concern would be the moral aspect,” Schrock said.

Shrock takes issue with the ACA mandate that employers provide birth control, sterilizations and abortifacients, free to workers, in August 2012.

“It's probably the first time we as Christians are being required to get out of the gray area and make some tough decisions,” he said. “It's an infringement on our religious freedoms.”

Schrock said he's working with various labor advisers and attorneys to come up with a plan. “Our plan right now is go under 50,” he said. “But then the concern is the personal mandate.”

The personal mandate is Kevin Neidig's chief interest. While his business, Medi-Wise Longterm Care Pharmacy in Newcomerstown, employs fewer than 50 people, he's still concerned.

“Everybody out there is affected by this,” said Neidig.

“Most of my concerns have to do with the impact on individuals in the workforce that have no idea how it's going to hurt their pocketbook.”

“What will happen to you personally when you wake up in 2014?”

That was the question Scott Pipes posed to nearly 100 small-business owners who were seated in the Kent State at Tuscarawas Founders Hall Auditorium on Friday.

Pipes' audience was there to learn more about the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — often called Obamacare — would have on small businesses once the individual mandate requiring all Americans to have insurance goes into effect Jan. 1, 2014.

While the Affordable Care Act passed in 2010, much of it won't be enacted until next year, leaving a lot of people confused about how they will be affected socially and economically.

Speaking at the Small Business Development Center forum, Pipes, as well as Mark Fearon of Rea & Associates, shared a lot of information regarding the rules, costs and issues business owners and their employees will face in the coming years.

“This will change the labor market more than anything else we have seen in our lifetime,” Pipes said.

For starters, businesses that have more than 50 employees must offer insurance. That number includes anyone who works 30 hours or more, and also may comprise of part-time and seasonal workers, Pipes said.

While there are some exceptions, Pipes suggested that employers hire a team of advisers, accountants and an attorney to assist them on the laws in place.

The next issue is the type of insurance that must be offered and the cost to employers and employees. The mandate stipulates at least a  60/40 split for coverage. However, the employee doesn't have to pay more than 9.5 percent of household income for self-only coverage, Pipes said. That amount is determined by the number in the top box of a W-2 form.

COMES DOWN TO COVERAGE

If the coverage exceeds that amount, or if the employer chooses not to offer health insurance or only a watered-down version of basic insurance, the employee can buy a state insurance plan. The plans are offered through an  Internet-driven market, where individuals will have to supply their age, location, employer, smoking status, salary, but not any pre-existing conditions, he explained.

If business owners meet the minimum requirements, employees can't participate in the plan. Conversely, owners will be fined if their employees need state insurance plans. Things aren't necessarily smooth for employees, Pipes cautioned.

“The exchange is far from free,” he said.

As an example he pointed to the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit that specializes in health reform. Based on the Kaiser Subsidy Calculator, a family of four making $65,000 a year would pay $6,250 out-of-pocket expenses after receiving the government subsidy tax credit. A single 45-year-old adult making $45,000 a year would pay $4,167 out of pocket after the tax credit.

Everything is based on the person's income, Pipes said. “The word affordability means ‘How much can you afford?' ” he said. “It has nothing to do with overall costs.”

What's best for the employee depends on the individual and the insurance offered, Pipes said. Some employees may benefit more from employer-owned insurance even though the out-of-pocket expense exceeds 9.5 percent. Conversely, some may find better access if they had the opportunity to purchase their own insurance.

Pipes also explained the theory behind the Affordable Care Act, which is, if the masses cover health insurance, those on the poverty line and those who had pre-existing conditions would get coverage, and save the government money in the long run.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates the reform will reduce the deficit by $124 billion over 10 years. However, Pipes is still skeptical, questioning how many will purchase the insurance and use it according to the mandate.

Another issue for many owners is morality, Pipes said. He said some people don't want to pay because of their values, such as the birth control mandate that required all employers to cover contraception, sterilization and abortifacients. The problem, Pipes said, is employers still would have to pay fines, which will fund the same system.

Pipes said the next step is for business owners to meet with their consultants and consider their options of whether to avoid plans and pay penalties, strictly conform or a hybrid of the two options.

PENALTIES AND INCENTIVES

Pipes said the penalty for not offering coverage is $2,000 annually times the number of employees minus 30. The penalty for not offering affordable coverage is $3,000 annually for each full-time employee receiving the subsidy, up to a maximum of $2,000 times the number of full-time employees minus 30.

If the employer has 25 or fewer employees and the average wage is up to $50,000, he or she may be eligible for a tax credit. Employers with more than 200 employees are automatically required to enroll with insurance.

OBAMACARE HITS HOME

As a small-business adviser, Jeanne Keenan was glad to see Pipes and Fearon tackle a lot of the topics small-business owners will need to address within the next year.

“My clients haven't mentioned it to me yet,” she said. “Are they even aware it's affecting them?”

Some of them are aware of some of the changes they will face, but continue to be left with more questions than answers.

For instance, Bryan Schrock has 66 employees, most of whom are Amish or Mennonite, which might bring up religious exemptions. However, Schrock, who owns Schrocks of Walnut Creek, a kitchen cabinet manufacturing company, still would have to enroll in an insurance program to prove he offered a plan to his workers.

That's only one of his concerns.

“My No. 1 concern would be the moral aspect,” Schrock said.

Shrock takes issue with the ACA mandate that employers provide birth control, sterilizations and abortifacients, free to workers, in August 2012.

“It's probably the first time we as Christians are being required to get out of the gray area and make some tough decisions,” he said. “It's an infringement on our religious freedoms.”

Schrock said he's working with various labor advisers and attorneys to come up with a plan. “Our plan right now is go under 50,” he said. “But then the concern is the personal mandate.”

The personal mandate is Kevin Neidig's chief interest. While his business, Medi-Wise Longterm Care Pharmacy in Newcomerstown, employs fewer than 50 people, he's still concerned.

“Everybody out there is affected by this,” said Neidig.

“Most of my concerns have to do with the impact on individuals in the workforce that have no idea how it's going to hurt their pocketbook.”

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News Headline: Elvis Lives | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Event added to the Performing Arts schedule this April

NEW PHILADELPHIA The national hit Elvis Lives will be performed at 7:30 p.m. April 5 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

"I'm excited to have the national tour of Elvis Lives coming our way and pleased they know our extraordinary venue and wanted to pick us up as a stop on their tour," said Mike Morelli, general manager of the Performing Arts Center. "We've had requests for this show from numerous patrons and it's always great to give our folks what they ask for!"

Tickets for Elvis Lives are $28-$50 and go on sale now. Special pre-sales for Performing Arts Center members and package buyers will take place Jan. 22 and Jan. 24 respectively. Tickets can be purchased at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400. The box office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Elvis Lives, which continues to capture the imaginations and interests of fans of all types including Broadway, concert and Elvis aficionados, is an unforgettable multi-media and live musical journey across Elvis' life. The show features finalists from Elvis Presley Enterprises' (EPE) annual worldwide "Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Contest," each representing Elvis during different stages in his career. The Elvis tribute artists will be joined by a live band, back-up singers and dancers, along with an Ann-Margret tribute artist, as well as iconic imagery made available from the Graceland archives; which includes a new exhibit of life-size images of Elvis' stage-wear, that is on display in every venue.

The high energy show features Ultimate winner Bill Cherry, along with "Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Contest" top finalists Kevin Mills, Leo Days and Ben Klein, as the principle cast for the winter/spring production of Elvis Lives, joined by the professional talent of Lorri Russo as Ann-Margret.

"We are very pleased that Elvis Lives continues to delight audiences all over the nation and that Elvis fans in New Philadelphia will be given the opportunity to see these talented entertainers," said Kevin Kern, director of public relations for EPE. "We hope to see finalists from the "Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Contest" starring in Elvis Lives for years to come."

Barbara Cooley, executive producer for On Stage Touring added, "We are excited to be working with some of the most exceptional tribute artists in the world. These talented performers really capture the spirit of the King of Rock N' Roll while evoking the sensation of being there with Elvis as he journeys through his musical career. Elvis Lives is truly a dynamic and family friendly production."

Free parking is available for all shows at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas, located at 330 University Dr. NE, in New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Students for Concealed Carry targets UA campus for growth (Banks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Matthew Mansell looks forward to the day when he can take not only his books and notebooks but also his gun to his University of Akron classes.

Mansell, a 19-year-old engineering student from southwestern Ohio, aims to launch the seventh Ohio chapter of Students for Concealed Carry and eventually abolish the UA rule forbidding firearms on campus.

It is part of a growing movement of firearms advocates who believe that campuses would be safer if licensed shooters packed heat.

“There's no difference between a college campus and a shopping mall or a state park,” where concealed carry is permitted, said Michael Newbern, a 30-something Ohio State junior who is president of the state organization. “We don't want to change who can carry a firearm or what firearms they can carry — just where they carry them.”

The national Students for Concealed Carry was formed after the Virginia Tech shootings in 2007 with a single goal: to legalize concealed carry for permit holders on college campuses.

Today the group says it has more than 36,000 members in 350-plus chapters nationwide. In Ohio, the list of schools includes Ohio State, Bowling Green, Cincinnati, Dayton and Case Western Reserve universities and Lakeland Community College.

A handful of states allow concealed carry on college campuses, and Newbern points to their track records as evidence of why a similar law would be successful in Ohio.

“None of these campuses has experienced a single incident of gun violence [including threats and suicides], a single gun accident injuring innocent people or a single gun theft as a result,” at the hands of licensees, Newbern said. “We follow all the rules.”

Newbern said two Ohio legislators have approached the state organization about introducing a bill by this summer to permit concealed carry on campuses. He declined to give their names until the legislation jells.

At UA, Mansell's fledgling group already has about 25 interested students. He expects more once word of the organization spreads.

He said the group would work to change the Ohio law and would take part in the national organization's signature event — a weeklong protest in April in which members wear holsters, but no guns, around campus.

But there appears to be no shortage of resistance to changing Ohio's concealed-carry law for college campuses.

“I don't think it's conducive to a proper learning environment,” UA police Chief Paul Callahan said. “It creates a lot more danger for people responding to the scene. Which one is the bad guy and which one is the good guy?”

Nor does there appear to be faculty interest in broadening campus gun laws.

A University of Toledo survey of 791 randomly selected faculty in Ohio and four other states last year found that 97 percent of faculty at Kent State and 14 other state universities felt safe on their campuses and 94 percent didn't want a change to allow concealed carry on campus.

Chris Banks, an associate professor of political science at Kent State, predicted that it would be difficult to change the state law. He said he would be against doing so, partly because of the deaths of four students in 1970 at the hands of trained National Guardsmen.

“I have a hard time that anyone would have a gun anywhere in the public space,” he said.

Newbern, the state president, said he has approached OSU President Gordon Gee about allowing concealed carry on the Columbus campus. But, like the faculty in the survey, Gee “got it wrong.”

Universities “teach us to develop a hypothesis, gather data, test it, but they ignore that and revert back to emotion,” Newbern said. “When you look at stuff rationally and apply logic to the facts, you conclude that conceal carry is a great idea.”

UA spokeswoman Eileen Korey said Mansell has yet to formally register his group on campus.

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News Headline: Research looks at most-effective study strategies (Dunlosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some of the most-popular study strategies — such as highlighting and rereading — do not show much promise for improving student learning, according to a new report authored in part by two Kent State University researchers.

Kent State's John Dunlosky, professor of psychology, and Katherine Rawson, associate professor of psychology, and a team of distinguished psychological scientists review the scientific evidence for 10 learning techniques commonly used by students.

Their findings are published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

“Schools and parents spend a great deal of money on technology and programs to improve student achievement, even though evidence often isn't available to firmly establish that they work,” Dunlosky said. “We wanted to take a comprehensive look at promising strategies now, in order to direct teachers, students and parents to the strategies that are effective yet underused.”

Based on the available evidence, the researchers provide recommendations about the applicability and usefulness of each technique.

While the 10 learning techniques vary widely in effectiveness, two strategies — practice testing and distributed practice — made the grade, receiving the highest overall utility rating.

Most students are probably familiar with practice testing, having used flash cards or answered the questions at the end of a textbook chapter.

Students who prefer last-minute cram sessions, however, may not be as familiar with the idea of distributed practice.

Dunlosky and colleagues report that spreading out your studying over time and quizzing yourself on material before the big test are highly effective learning strategies. Both techniques have been shown to boost students' performance across many kinds of tests, and their effectiveness has been repeatedly demonstrated for students of all ages.

In contrast, five of the techniques received a low utility rating from the researchers.

Notably, these techniques are some of the most-common learning strategies used by students, including summarization, highlighting and underlining and rereading.

“I was shocked that some strategies that students use a lot — such as rereading and highlighting — seem to provide minimal benefits to their learning and performance,” Dunlosky said. “By just replacing rereading with delayed retrieval practice, students would benefit.”

So why don't they? Why aren't students and teachers using the learning strategies that have been shown to be effective and inexpensive?

Dunlosky and colleagues found that the answer may have to do with how teachers are taught.

“These strategies are largely overlooked in the educational psychology textbooks that beginning teachers read, so they don't get a good introduction to them or how to use them while teaching,” Dunlosky explained.

As a result, teachers are less likely to fully exploit some of these easy-to-use and effective techniques.

To help address this gap, the researchers organized their report in distinct modules, so that teachers can quickly decide whether each technique will potentially benefit his or her students and researchers can easily set an agenda on what still needs to be known about the efficacy of these strategies.

“The learning techniques described in this monograph will not be a panacea for improving achievement for all students, and perhaps obviously, they will benefit only students who are motivated and capable of using them,” Dunlosky and colleagues noted. “Nevertheless, when used properly, we suspect that they will produce meaningful gains in performance in the classroom, on achievement tests and on many tasks encountered across the life span.”

The report, “Improving Students' Learning With Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions From Cognitive and Educational Psychology,” is published in the January 2013 issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest and is authored by Dunlosky and Rawson with Elizabeth Marsh of Duke University, Mitchell Nathan of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Daniel Willingham of the University of Virginia.

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News Headline: Best (and Worst) Ways to Study for a Test (Dunlosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! Health
Contact Name: Linda Wasmer Andrews
News OCR Text: Want to ace a school exam or bone up for a work presentation? Forget the highlighter, and make yourself some flashcards instead.

That's the upshot of a recent report in Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The authors—a team of distinguished researchers led by John Dunlosky, PhD, of Kent State University—weighed the evidence for 10 simple learning strategies. Here's what they found.

These techniques are highly effective for learners of all ages and across many types of tests - click here:

http://health.yahoo.net/experts/allinyourmind/best-and-worst-ways-study-test

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News Headline: Popular study strategies called ineffective -- report | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Answer Sheet, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Researchers who evaluated 10 learning techniques believed to improve student achievement found that five of them - including highlighting or underlining, are not very effective.

The report, called "Improving Students' Learning With Effective Learning Techniques," says that one reason that ineffective study habits form is because there is too much research for educators to evaluate to figure out how to advise their students. Published in the January issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest,  the report was written by John Dunlosky and Katherine A. Rawson of Kent State University, Elizabeth J. Marsh of Duke University, Mitchell J. Nathan of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Daniel T. Willingham of the University of Virginia.

The 10 techniques that had been cited as helpful to students in earlier literature and studied by the researchers are:

*elaborative interrogation - uses "why" questions to get students to make connections between new and old material.

*self-explanation - prompting students to provide their own explanations for problems while learning material

*summarization

*highlighting or underlining

*keyword mnemonic - the use of keywords and mnemonics to help remind students of course material

*imagery use for text learning - creating mental images to remind students of material

*rereading

*practice testing - flashcards are one way to practice test

*distributed practice - studying material over a number of relatively short sessions.

*interleaved practice - mixing different kinds of problems or material in one study session

Techniques rated as highly effective for students of different ages and abilities were practice testing and distributed practice. Those cited as having "low utility" were summarization, highlighting, the keyword mnemonic, imagery use for text learning, and rereading. In the middle, rated as having "moderate utility," were techniques including elaborative interrogation, self-explanation, and interleaved practice.

The report says in part:

If simple techniques were available that teachers and students could use to improve student learning and achievement, would you be surprised if teachers were not being told about these techniques and if many students were not using them? What if students were instead adopting ineffective learning techniques that undermined their achievement, or at least did not improve it? Shouldn’t they stop using these techniques and begin usingones that are effective? Psychologists have been developing and evaluating the efficacy of techniques for study and instruction for more than 100 years. Nevertheless, some effective techniques are underutilized—many teachers do not learn about them, and hence many students do not use them, despite evidence suggesting that the techniques could benefit student achievement with little added effort. Also, some learning techniques that are popular and often used by students are relatively ineffective. One potential reason for the disconnect between research on the efficacy of learning techniques and their use in educational practice is that because so many techniques are available, it would be challenging for educators to sift through the relevant research to decide which ones showpromise of efficacy and could feasibly be implemented by students (Pressley, Goodchild, Fleet, Zajchowski, & Evans,1989).

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News Headline: Second opinion gives Portage County cancer patient new lease on life | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Bob Fenner
News OCR Text: DIAMOND, Ohio - The American Cancer Society estimates nearly 10,000 people in the United States will die from melanoma skin cancer this year. But a second doctor's opinion has given a Portage County cancer patient a new lease on life.

While college brings many challenges, 20-year-old Megan Gibbons is facing an even tougher challenge.

"We all just thought it was a blackhead," she said.

Two years ago, Megan noticed a black spot on the right side of her face that got bigger over time. After having the growth removed and a biopsy performed, the family's fears became a reality.

"He had told us, basically, you have about five years to live."

Though shocked and numb from the news, the family would not accept the prognosis as final. They decided to go to the Cleveland Clinic for a second opinion. Their instinct paid off.

"After they looked at the different slides of the mole, they convinced us that this is something that they can treat and that she would have along life ahead of her," Megan's mother, Crystal, explained.

Megan started chemotherapy treatment last March while attending classes at Kent State's main campus. Classes and chemotherapy made for long days and many side effects.

"I would get these massive headaches where I felt like someone was taking my head and just slamming it against concrete," Megan explained.

"Watching her go through chemo, I would have given anything to have me in her place," Megan's dad, Roger, said.

Megan's treatments will be over soon, an experience that has helped her learn more about herself.

"I've actually found strength within myself I never thought I had."

While nursing has always been Megan's passion, the 20-year-old has decided to specialize in pediatric oncology due to her personal experience with cancer.

"I can be that rock for those kids. I've been there, I can relate to them."

This semester, Megan is continuing her studies at Kent State's Stark County campus. She urges anyone who discovers something suspicious on their skin to get it checked immediately.

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News Headline: App of the Week: FaceWash | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: ABC News - Online
Contact Name: Mary Godfrey
News OCR Text: What does it do?  When three computer science majors from Kent State University drove out to the University of Pennsylvania together for a hackathon last weekend, they dreamed up an idea for an app that would clean up unwanted Facebook posts.

“We wanted to give [Facebook] users a choice to control what potential employers might see,” David Steinberg told ABC News. Steinberg is one of the app's developers and acknowledges that many college graduates may be entering the professional world for the first time and will want to make, well, a clean impression.

Over the course of the weekend, Steinberg, alongside collaborators Daniel Gur and Camden Fullmer, programmed an app that searches text on Facebook allowing users to find and delete posts, captions and links from their profiles that could appear unprofessional.

“On Saturday evening, we were ready to throw the project away,” said Fullmer. “But by Sunday, we were excited to see the positive feedback.”

One week and several tweaks and fixes later, the threesome has seen the app's usage grow exponentially. According to Gur, FaceWash had more than 47, 000 unique users as of Friday morning.

To use the app, go to facewa.sh, and then log in to Facebook. Select “Go to App,” and allow FaceWash to access your posts and news feeds. (You can set permissions so that only you can see posts the app makes to your newsfeed). Press “Start” to begin cleaning and the app will search through comments on your timeline and tags on your photos, as well as links you have liked and status updates you have posted. Once the app finds potentially unwanted text, it will provide a link to the post with the questionable word[s] highlighted.

In my case, the app found the words “hard core” in a post from a friend (I can promise you this was benign).

Click on the link to the post, and delete it from there.

For the moment, FaceWash is limited to text searches; if you are looking for embarrassing photos, the app will only find them through comments and descriptions. Steinberg said image and object recognition is something the team is working on, as well as the ability to search in multiple languages.

Is it easy to set up? Yes. Go to facewa.sh, select “Get Started,” and log in to Facebook.

Should I try it? Yes. FaceWash is easy to use and the website provides a quick and thorough overview on how to use it in case you have questions before you get started. However, it is important to know, the app remains in Beta stage, so you can expect some minor glitches here and there. Still, the developers plan to continue to roll out improvements over the coming months. Chances are you or someone you know on your Facebook page posted something somewhere you would rather not have to explain to a hiring manager … so why not freshen up your profile?

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News Headline: Clean up Your Facebook Profile With FaceWash | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Mashable
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: We've all been there. Your grandmother just joined Facebook, your boss sent you a friend request or you're applying for that dream job. Suddenly, you're scrambling to purge your profile of last night's pictures plus everything else you wouldn't want Grams to see.

Painstakingly filtering through your Timeline isn't going to cut it, but FaceWash makes it easier. Three Kent State University undergrads created a web app that cleans your profile of incriminating content to give you a "fresh face."

The app allows users to search the profile with a "dirty word" list, a precompiled set of offensive or distasteful terms. You can also input your own words, and the returned results are displayed in categories such as "links that you have liked" or comments.

When taken to the questionable content, users have the option to either delete or change privacy settings. Check out the video, above, for more.

SEE ALSO: This App Turns Your Facebook Activity Into Beautiful Data

Like most Facebook-compatible web apps, FaceWash asks for access to your basic information, email address, profile info and photos. The free app is ideal for professionals in the making, creators Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur and David Steinberg say on their page.

"You spent the last four years being a college kid. And that's wonderful. But a lot can happen in four years, and Facebook never forgets," the site describes.

The students hope to add more features, reports the Los Angeles Times, giving the app the ability to search in other languages.

Would you use FaceWash to clean up your online identity?

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News Headline: Mining Your Facebook Profile for Dirt | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! Canada
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new app, called Facewash, is the latest tool that aims to save the unsavvy social-network user from himself.

Facewash works by searching the comments posted on your wall, your status updates, comments on photos you're tagged in, photos you posted, links you've ‘liked.” After connecting your Facebook (FB) account, the site scans your profile to find “dirty” words and potentially unsavory photos. Users can also search for specific terms if they think Facewash's list might have missed something.

The app was launched by three college students as an entry in a hackathon hosted by the University of Pennsylvania last weekend. Facewash's developers – Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur, and David Steinberg, all computer science majors at Kent State University in Ohio – discussed the idea for the app on the drive to the competition. They saw the need for such a tool, particularly for college-age young adults like them who use Facebook a lot and probably have “things on there you wouldn't want a future employer to see or your mother to see,” says Steinberg. “Why not help automate the process of finding the undesirable posts and comments you wouldn't want others to find?”

The app won in the Best Hack for Students category by 10gen, a software company (the developers received a $500 prize).

Background check yourself

We all know by now (or should) that employers do a fair bit of online sleuthing to learn more about job candidates and weed out those whose online trails suggest they're less-than-professional.

According to a 2012 survey by CareerBuilder, 37% of companies use social networks to research potential job candidates, and more than 65% of that group uses Facebook as their primary resource. The most common reason hiring managers are looking at social media is to see if candidates present themselves professionally, the survey said.

The usual no-no's may sound obvious for those on the professional track: No drinking, drugs, nudity or profanity. Make sure your Facebook photos are G-rated and don't make derogatory comments about previous employers, bosses or colleagues.

But an increased use of social media doesn't correspond with an increase in web savvy. “Our data suggest that, as people continue to increase their online presence, the number of things we identify that are sexually explicit, potentially racist or displays of illegal activity only grows,” says Max Drucker, CEO and president of Social Intelligence, a company that performs social media background screening and investigations for employers.

And the potential for gaffes increases with Facebook's new graph search feature, announced last week. The company's new tool turns users' shared information into a searchable database, and one reasonable concern – aside from privacy – is that the personal information will be more readily available and accessible to others. And apparently, it makes it easier for users to look dumb.

Dirty words

So what kind of content does Facewash flag? The developers said they wanted Facewash to cover a wide range of categories. Aside from the standard swear words, they included sexual and racist language.

“We took a comprehensive view of what the Internet as a whole considers less than desirable," Steinberg says. "We did extensive research into the types of text that might cause problems for people.”

What about that tagged photo of you at a party double-fisting tequila shots? For now, Facewash will only catch offending images through contextual tags or captions. (In other words, if the caption doesn't say something to the effect of “getting drunk on tequila,” the app won't flag it.) But image and object recognition is the next step for the developers. “Soon the tool will be able to flag that kind of photo without the accompanying text,” Steinberg said. Eventually they want Facewash to be able to pick up on objects like beer bottles or the infamous red cups that college kids do much of their drinking out of.

Since launching the app, Fullmer, Gur and Steinberg have been working on expanding its capabilities and adding new features. They also want to make Facewash available in other markets and languages. “Our particular interest now is to internationalize it, since it's only in English now,” Steinberg says.

Other tools

There are other tools that aim to sanitize online identities that have been around for a while, including online reputation managers, which – for a fee – focus on finding and clearing negative content, posted anywhere online, about individuals or businesses.

Reppler is another service that helps users manage their online profiles; it tries to give a deeper picture of your online profile by analyzing not just your content but also the tone of the language you and your connections use.

Similar to Facewash, SocioClean, which was launched in 2011, targets college students and first-time job seekers. The platform allows users to scan and clean their social networks (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter) for any inappropriate content that might hurt their online reputation, according to Priyanshu Harshavat, the CEO. After the scan, it compiles the data into a document that grades the profiles based on appropriateness. While anyone can use the tool, SocioClean works with colleges that want to offer its students access to the platform. SocioClean currently has a licensing deal with UNC-Chapel Hill, with plans to add nine more universities in the next few months, Harshavat says.

Camden Fullmer, Daniel Gur, and David Steinberg presenting the application at the hackathon

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News Headline: Grandparents learn to text to keep in touch with grandchildren | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Green Bay Press-Gazette - Online
Contact Name: Kim Hone
News OCR Text: AKRON, OHIO — Grandparents may turn up their noses at text messaging as a way to communicate with their tech-savvy grandchildren. They want to hear the kids’ voices, and they can use the phone to talk — not type. But is that realistic in today’s world? And are they at risk of missing out on a relationship with the youngsters they love?

“It’s natural for grandparents to want as much personal interaction with their grandchildren as possible. Many grandparents feel like texting is so impersonal and detached (and) really do get a great deal of happiness from hearing their grandchildren’s voices,” said Amy Goyer, AARP’s home and family expert. “There is nothing wrong with trying to balance phone calls and in-person time with texting or emailing, but as grandchildren grow up, grandparents may have to adjust to their changes and preferences.”

Kids often have hectic lives. And sometimes texting is the best way to keep in touch — whether Granny and Gramps like it or not.

“I’d say they run the risk of losing touch with their grandchildren’s everyday lives if they don’t text,” Goyer added. “That doesn’t mean their whole relationship will fall apart, but they can stay in closer touch if they are willing to text.”

Goyer added that those older than 50 are high adopters of technology, and grandparents are often motivated by their grandchildren to learn how to use new forms of technology — such as texting.

Many grandparents who live miles away from their loved ones have taken to Skype to hear and see their grandkids. With the free software application, a webcam and a high-speed Internet connection, users can talk to and see each other live via the Internet. But many busy teens and 20-somethings say texting is more convenient.

Nancy Lemmon and her 17-year-old grandson, Tyler Moore, aren’t separated by miles. In fact, they live just a few doors from each other in Stow, Ohio. Still, they text regularly to communicate.

Moore is a busy guy. Though technically a student at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, he is taking 18 hours of post-secondary classes at Kent State University and participating in an internship in the psychology department. With those things and other activities, he’s not the easiest guy to get in touch with for a voice conversation.

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News Headline: Grandparents learn texting as way to communicate with grandkids | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Athens Banner-Herald - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AKRON, Ohio — Grandparents may turn up their noses at text messaging as a way to communicate with their tech-savvy grandchildren. They want to hear the kids' voices, and they can use the phone to talk — not type. But is that realistic in today's world? And are they at risk of missing out on a relationship with the youngsters they love?

“It's natural for grandparents to want as much personal interaction with their grandchildren as possible. Many grandparents feel like texting is so impersonal and detached (and) really do get a great deal of happiness from hearing their grandchildren's voices,” said Amy Goyer, AARP's home and family expert. “There is nothing wrong with trying to balance phone calls and in-person time with texting or emailing, but as grandchildren grow up, grandparents may have to adjust to their changes and preferences.”

Kids often have hectic lives. And sometimes texting is the best way to keep in touch — whether Granny and Gramps like it or not.

“I'd say they run the risk of losing touch with their grandchildren's everyday lives if they don't text,” Goyer added. “That doesn't mean their whole relationship will fall apart, but they can stay in closer touch if they are willing to text.”

Goyer added that those older than 50 are high adopters of technology, and grandparents are often motivated by their grandchildren to learn how to use new forms of technology — such as texting.

Many grandparents who live miles away from their loved ones have taken to Skype to hear and see their grandkids. With the free software application, a webcam and a high-speed Internet connection, users can talk to and see each other live via the Internet. But many busy teens and 20-somethings say texting is more convenient.

Nancy Lemmon and her 17-year-old grandson, Tyler Moore, aren't separated by miles. In fact, they live just a few doors from each other in Stow, Ohio. Still, they text regularly to communicate.

Moore is a busy guy. Though technically a student at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, he is taking 18 hours of post-secondary classes at Kent State University and participating in an internship in the psychology department. With those things and other activities, he's not the easiest guy to get in touch with for a voice conversation.

“They do not want to chat on the phone with their grandmother, or anyone else for that matter. They want to communicate short and sweet,” Lemmon explained. “Tyler may respond to me when I ask how he did at Kent this semester. He may let me know he has arrived safely at a destination out of town. He can tell me that he scored the highest grade in his psychology class or he got a 4.0 this semester at school, but the words that warm my heart the most is when he simply texts, ‘I Love You.'”

Sitting in his grandmother's home, Moore acknowledged the two would go longer periods of time without communicating if it weren't for texting.

“People don't talk on the phone that much anymore,” he said.

If grandparents can adjust to thinking of texting as a way to bring them closer to their grandchildren, Goyer thinks they will be more willing to adopt it as a method of communication.

“The reality is that tweens, teens and young adults these days use texting as their most common form of communication and if grandparents … really want to be in touch they'd better learn to text, even if it's just the basics,” Goyer said.

And Lemmon offered: “Keep on texting, grandmas, and stay in touch. We have to learn the technology in order to savor these important relationships.”

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News Headline: The app that 'cleans up' your Facebook profile instantly | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! UK and Ireland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new Facebook app promises to help users 'clean up' their profile, removing incriminating posts - and could be highly useful for party-loving students facing job interviews.

Yahoo! News - The app, 'Facewash', was designed by three students at the American Kent State University, and can scan and hide embarrassing posts in seconds.

A new Facebook app promises to help users 'clean up' their profile, removing incriminating posts - and could be highly useful for party-loving students facing job interviews.

The app, 'Facewash', was designed by three students at the American Kent State University, and can scan and hide embarrassing posts in seconds.

It's free to use within Facebook, and automatically scans Facebook Timelines for items that users might want to hide or delete.

The app scans not only posts but also photo captions, comments and links that have been 'Liked' via Facebook.

By default, it's set to scan for obcene words, but users can scan for other terms that they might wish to hide or delete before others view their profile.

[Related: How to pick the best tablet for you ]

Words pop up highlighted, and users can then decide whether to delete the posts.

Facebook's upcoming 'Graph Search' function has raised further concerns over the site's privacy policies - offering the ability to search other people's Timelines using their 'Likes'.

Online privacy activists the Electronic Frontier Foundation have described Graph Search as 'creepy' and say, "this new search allows strangers to discover information about you that you may not have intended them to find."

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News Headline: TECH NOW: A way to 'wash' your Facebook | Email

News Date: 01/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Los Angeles Times
Contact Name: Brown, Eryn
News OCR Text: Got a Facebook profile with vulgarities or embarrassing pages you shouldn't have liked? Now there's a way to clean them up.

A trio of Kent State University undergrads have put together the "Facewash" app that'll search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that the user may want to hide or delete. That could include status updates, photo captions, and comments users left or received as well as pages and links that were liked.

"We realized that there's a lot of content that perhaps someone might not want a future employer to see," Daniel Gur, 22.

Gur created the app with two friends and fellow computer science majors from his school -- Camden Fullmer, 21, and David Steinberg, 24. The three students built Facewash in less than two days while at a hackathon at the University of Pennsylvania.

To use Facewash, users first need to go to its website, Facewa.sh, click "Get Started" and log into their Facebook account if they aren't logged in already.

The user will be prompted to click "Go to App" and then give the app permission to access the user's contents.

Search for a term and the app starts looking through all of the user's profile content. If Facewash finds a match, it'll show it to the user and link the posts so the user can easily delete a status or remove a picture.

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News Headline: Facewash - New App Created | Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: NBC 5 Chicago News at 5 PM - WMAQ-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Think of facebook as your face on the internet. Now there is an app to help you wash it. Kent state university researchers created facewash, the new app searches through your facebook profile looking for items you may not want your boss or your mom to see. You can delete or remove status updates, comments or pictures. The app is available at facewa.sh. >> A lot of kids writing that down right now.

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News Headline: Kent State Proves Not Everyone At PennApps Were Creeps | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Under the Button.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: We all try to keep our Facebooks as PC as possible, but everyone lets a tagged photo or liked link fall through the cracks every now and then. Lucky for us, while the minds of some participants at last weekend's PennApps were in the gutter, others were more focused on cleaning the gutter out.

Three Kent State students created an app called Facewash, which searches your comments, posts, photos, likes, and tags for anything “you wouldn't want a future employer to see or your mother to see.” Jeff Weiner would totally approve.

The developers won in the Best Hack for Students category and even landed on the homepage of Yahoo!, which basically means they're kind of really famous. One of the guys in the picture is even wearing a Penn hoodie, so we're basically kind of really famous, too, right?

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News Headline: Now remove vulgar embarrassing pages from Facebook with Facewash | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Albuquerque Express
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Now, a new application has been created that can help users clean vulgar or embarrassing pages from their Facebook profile.

A group of Kent State University students have put together the 'Facewash' app that will search through a user's Facebook activity and content for items that the user may want to hide or delete.

That could include status updates, photo captions, and comments users left or received as well as pages and links that were liked, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Daniel Gur, 22, created the app over with two friends and fellow computer science majors from his school, Camden Fullmer, 21, and David Steinberg, 24.

According to the report, to use Facewash, users first need to go to its website, Facewa.sh, click "Get Started" and log into their Facebook account if they aren't logged in already.

The user will be prompted to click "Go to App" and then give the app permission to access the user's contents.

Search for a term and the app starts looking through all of the user's profile content, the report said.

If Facewash finds a match, it'll show it to the user and link the posts so the user can easily delete a status or remove a picture, it added. (ANI)

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News Headline: NEW ELECTRONIC SIGN TURNS HEADS IN KENT: | Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Schleis, Paula
News OCR Text: $92,000 MESSAGE BOARD DELIVERING INFORMATION ABOUT CITY, UNIVERSITY

A colorful electronic message board the city and Kent State University had talked about installing for years finally lit up this month.

The ground-level sign - 80 inches by 168 inches - greets motorists and pedestrians at Haymaker Parkway and Water Street, right at the southwestern tip of downtown's ongoing $100 million makeover.

The cost of the sign, $92,000, was split between the city and KSU and will rotate news about events either party is sponsoring.

Suzanne Robertson, executive assistant to the city manager, has added the sign to her list of duties, accepting city and university requests, searching for announcements they might have missed, and splicing in public safety tips.

"People are very happy with it," she said. "I can tell they are also using it."

She said she's confident that one of the first messages posted, about health department flu shots, helped spur an "amazing turnout."

In his blog, City Manager Dave Ruller said the city played around with graphics, different kinds of messages and various lengths for cycling the messages until it learned the ropes.

"We're looking to keep it simple but also professional, attractive and informative," he said.

Items from KSU will include athletic events, speakers and school-sponsored entertainment.

The city plans to use its time for things like festivals and public meetings.

Robertson said she has tossed in public messages about buckling seat belts, the perils of texting while driving and a plea for homeowners to shovel their sidewalks.

"I try to stay between five and seven messages," she said, including a permanent "Welcome to Kent, Ohio" in the rotation.

"When we started tossing the idea around years ago, message boards were much less common and we thought of ourselves as pioneers back then," Ruller told residents.

The boards are not as uncommon as they used to be, "but that doesn't diminish our enthusiasm for adding what we hope will prove to be a great way of spreading the word of the many athletic, cultural, musical, educational and otherwise fun events that Kent plays host to each week."

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Parking 'Pay Stations' Coming to Downtown Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: City will use pay stations instead of common parking meters to manage on-street parking spaces downtown

A parking pay station like this one will soon manage multiple, paid on-street parking in downtown Kent.

Starting in the fall, drivers will have to pay to park on certain streets in downtown Kent.

Instead of parking meters, the city will use a system of parking pay stations in which a pay station governs multiple parking spaces on a single street.

"We're definitely not using parking meters," Kent City Engineer Jim Bowling said.

Traditional parking meters typically are placed one meter for every on-street parking space, but Kent is planning for pay stations that will manage multiple spaces per street similar to a system in place in Charlotte, NC.

Pay stations allow drivers to pay with credit cards or cash (Kent is considering accepting Kent State University's FLASHCard). Drivers would identify their parking space at the station — spaces will be numbered or identified at the curb — and receive a receipt showing the time paid for at which space. The receipt would not have to be displayed.

Bowling said early plans call for one pay station to be located mid-block on both sides of a street. The pay station would manage all parking spaces on that side of the street within the particular city block.

"There will be free public parking downtown ... at all times," Bowling said. "The purpose of the paid parking on-street ... is to make sure the spaces turn over."

Streets where parking spaces will be managed by the new pay system are: South DePeyster Street, from Haymaker Parkway to Main Street; Erie Street, the full length; Water Street, from Haymaker Parkway to Columbus Street; and Main Street, from DePeyster Street to Franklin Avenue.

The new system may or may not incorporate the parking spaces on the Main Street Bridge, but plans call for the stations to manage 262 of the 1,100 spaces that will be available downtown when the parking garage and new courthouse lot open.

Bowling said city officials and downtown business and property owners are in the process of determining exactly what options they want the new pay stations to have — such as accepting FLASHCards or using solar power. Once those options are set, the city will put the project out to bid and hire a firm to provide and install the new parking pay stations.

The pay station parking project has a $750,000 budget, and that covers the entire process from purchase to installation. City officials estimate as many as two dozen of the parking pay stations will be installed.

The new pay stations could be in place as early as September. Rates are likely to be $0.25 per half hour with a two-hour limit.

Lori Wemhoff, executive director of the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce, said downtown business owners see the goal of the new parking pay stations to manage quick turn-over of the parking spaces directly in front of retail shops.

"This will allow for someone to run into one or more shops, spend their money locally, and then give up that prime spot for the next potential shopper," Wemhoff said. "This way, more convenient parking is made available for the short-time visitor or shopper, versus the space being used by an all-day employee of a store or restaurant."

The parking pay stations will not charge for spaces 24/7. The on-street parking will be free during certain evening and weekend hours. That free time period is not yet set in stone, but stations will likely operate between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

Bowling said adjustments will be made to the new parking system as downtown redevelopment projects finish and data show where and for how long drivers are using the paid system.

The new on-street parking pay stations are not connected to PARTA's Kent Central Gateway transit center, which is expected to open this spring with 300-plus public parking spaces.

"I truly believe when the parking deck is open and operating, the parking situation in downtown Kent will improve tremendously," Wemhoff said. "We just need to make sure that what is being communicated is correct regarding that there will be free parking, and indicating the locations."

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News Headline: New electronic sign in downtown Kent promotes city and KSU messages | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A colorful electronic message board the city and Kent State University had talked about installing for years finally lit up this month.

The ground-level sign -- 80 inches by 168 inches -- greets motorists and pedestrians at Haymaker Parkway and Water Street, right at the southwestern tip of downtown's ongoing $100 million makeover.

The cost of the sign, $92,000, was split between the city and KSU and will rotate news about events either party is sponsoring.

Suzanne Robertson, executive assistant to the city manager, has added the sign to her list of duties, accepting city and university requests, searching for announcements they might have missed, and splicing in public safety tips.

"People are very happy with it," she said. "I can tell they are also using it."

She said she's confident that one of the first messages posted, about health department flu shots, helped spur an "amazing turnout."

In his blog, City Manager Dave Ruller said the city played around with graphics, different kinds of messages and various lengths for cycling the messages until it learned the ropes.

"We're looking to keep it simple but also professional, attractive and informative," he said.

Items from KSU will include athletic events, speakers and school-sponsored entertainment.

The city plans to use its time for things like festivals and public meetings.

Robertson said she has tossed in public messages about buckling seat belts, the perils of texting while driving and a plea for homeowners to shovel their sidewalks.

"I try to stay between five and seven messages," she said, including a permanent "Welcome to Kent, Ohio" in the rotation.

"When we started tossing the idea around years ago, message boards were much less common and we thought of ourselves as pioneers back then," Ruller told residents.

The boards are not as uncommon as they used to be, "but that doesn't diminish our enthusiasm for adding what we hope will prove to be a great way of spreading the word of the many athletic, cultural, musical, educational and otherwise fun events that Kent plays host to each week."

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News Headline: What's new on the bookshelf from and about East Tennesseans | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Knoxville News-Sentinel - Online, The
Contact Name: Ina Hughs
News OCR Text: For local authors in East Tennessee, reading and writing have added up to a good number of recently published books.

"Pacific Time On Target" (Kent State University Press) by Christopher S. Donner and edited by Knoxville attorney Jack H. McCall, Jr. is the gritty, combat memoir of a WWII Marine artillery officer. In his introduction, McCall points out to readers how Donner put himself in harm's way, voluntarily, to serve the cause of freedom: "From the lush, tropical island paradise-turned-killing-fields of the South Pacific to the shell-blasted ridges and villages of Okinawa, Christopher Donner experienced the life of both a Marine heavy artillery officer and, as a forward-observer team leader, a 'grunt' infantryman."

© 2013, Knoxville News Sentinel Co.

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News Headline: Skeels Center honors legacy of Dr. King | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Among those attending the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast at the Skeels-Mathews Community Center in Ravenna are, in front row from left, Louise Ottrix, welcomer; and Bonnie Richardson, guest speaker; and in back row, Lauren Sagaria, volunteer from the Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown; Robert Martin, soloist; and Gabrielle Harris, volunteer from Ravenna High School Leadership.


The annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast was held on Martin Luther King Day at the Skeels-Mathews Community Center in Ravenna.

Artherene Wilmington served as the mistress of ceremonies and opened the proceedings.

Elder James Sanders of the United Church of Jesus Christ in Ravenna offered a prayer.

Following breakfast, the 100 people in attendance sang "Lift Every Voice and Sing," accompanied by Eddie Mae Prisby on the piano.

Louise Ottrix welcomed everyone. Richard Brantley read a poem in honor of the day. Robert Martin sang a solo.

Christi Brown introduced the speaker, Bonnie Richardson, director of Kent State University Upward Bound.

Those assembled sang "We Shall Overcome," again accompanied by Eddie Mae Prisby.

The Rev. Andrew Wright of Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church in Ravenna gave the Benediction.

Sharon Sanders, director of the Skeels Center, expressed gratitude to the volunteers and everyone who helped make the program a success.

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