Report Overview:
Total Clips (10)
Alumni; Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Hotel and Conference Center; Office of the President; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Art, School of (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Computer Science; Students (1)
Enrollment (1)
Geology (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Office of the President (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
'Project Runway' vet's latest project features fancy fabrics, patterns 02/06/2013 News & Observer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Suede aims to change that. He recently unveiled his new line of SUEDEsays prom and special occasion fabrics and styles at two shows at his alma mater, Kent State University in Ohio. "People can expect colorful, wearable, modern clothing for the young lady who wants to express herself outside of...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Hotel and Conference Center; Office of the President; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
A Partnership Seeks to Transform Kent State and Kent (Lefton) 02/06/2013 New York Times - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...and spending patterns. The project will also shift the entertainment and business center a few blocks south from the city's aging core and closer to Kent State University. The development is specifically intended to open a new economic era in Kent by helping to recruit and retain young professionals,...


Art, School of (1)
Entertainment briefs 02/06/2013 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

KSU gallery seeks entries for Cup Show The Kent State University School of Art Downtown Gallery is seeking entries for the 12th Annual National Juried Cup Show and will accept submissions through...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
KSU's College of Public Health creates new practice office, research center (Slenkovich, Hoornbeek, Alemagno) 02/06/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's College of Public Health has established a new Office of Public Health Practice and a Center for Public Policy and Health,...


Computer Science; Students (1)
(VIDEO) Privacy Concerns Facebook & Simple Wash 02/06/2013 WSYR-TV Text Attachment Email

To view video, please click on link: http://www.9wsyr.com/mediacenter/local.aspx?videoid=3928964


Enrollment (1)
School Notes (Lefton, Garcia) 02/06/2013 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State tallies 40,559 students for spring term With the release of its official 15th day census data, Kent State University has set a...


Geology (1)
Fossil reef yields oldest spider crabs ever discovered 02/06/2013 NBCNews.com (Formerly MSNBC) - Englewood Cliffs Bureau Text Attachment Email

Remains of 8 new species of crustaceans found, including one that lived 100 million years ago The remains of eight new species of crustaceans, including...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Kent State Tuscarawas to present Jim Brickman Feb. 9 02/05/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas will present and evening with Jim Brickman at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 9 at Kent State's Performing Arts Center, 330 University...


KSU Museum (1)
Midwest events 02/05/2013 Chicago Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

Ohio Through Oct. 6: Fandemonium, Kent. The Kent State University Museum hosts this exhibit of fans that span three centuries. Examples range from ornate hand-painted designs from the 18th century...


Office of the President (1)
Kent State president shows his photography in Hudson (Lefton) 02/06/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Hudson Fine Art & Framing Co. enjoyed a lively turnout of buyers and on-lookers Feb. 1 curious to see an exhibit of the photography works of Kent State President Lester Lefton, which were available for sale. All the proceeds went to support scholarships for international students at Kent...


News Headline: 'Project Runway' vet's latest project features fancy fabrics, patterns | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: News & Observer - Online
Contact Name: CAROL BILICZKY
News OCR Text: It might not feel like prom time, but former Project Runway contestant Suede aims to change that.

He recently unveiled his new line of SUEDEsays prom and special occasion fabrics and styles at two shows at his alma mater, Kent State University in Ohio.

"People can expect colorful, wearable, modern clothing for the young lady who wants to express herself outside of the mundane styles in department stores," he said of the line.

Stephen "Suede" Baum turned his appearance on Project Runway in 2008 and on Project Runway All Stars in 2012 into something of a fashion empire.

Now 42 and living in Barryville, N.Y., he has an exclusive licensing deal with Simplicity Patterns and distributes his fabrics at Hobby Lobby and Jo-Ann Fabrics and Craft Stores.

He might best be remembered on the Project Runway shows for his purple mohawk, for referring to himself in the third person and for his nickname, earned at KSU when he picked a swatch of the fabric out of a barrel.

His ascent into fashion might be especially surprising considering he spent about eight years in an Amish school as a child even though his family was not Amish.

"My parents wanted me and my brother to see the world through different eyes," which meant boarding with an Amish family in Charm, Ohio, he said. "I cherish those memories of growing up without electricity and taking care of animals."

His skills at sewing surfaced early when he made his own Amish clothing - simple white shirts and black pants with suspenders.

Later he went to Normandy High School in Parma, Ohio. He had grand visions of moving to Los Angeles or New York to act after graduation, but his dad, an engineer, and his mom, a physicist, wanted him to stay closer to home.

So he enrolled in fashion design at Kent State and found it was the right, er, fit.

He graduated in 1993, and with degree in hand, interned with Geoffrey Beene and has been a creative director for the Lee Juniors and Lee Girls brands of jeans.

His career really took off in 2008 when he was selected as one of 16 designers for Project Runway, a reality show that pits clothing designers against each other. The show has since moved from the Bravo channel to Lifetime.

It was Suede's third tryout for the show, attempted because he had a dream of host Tim Gunn telling him he had won the top award. Fortunately, he wasn't working at the time, so he had available the six weeks contestants needed to compete.

"I was thrilled and scared at the same time," Suede said. He thought the show would provide him with a seamstress to stitch his designs.

Wrong.

Then there was the pressure that came with being sequestered and the pressure of living cheek by jowl with other contestants in a super-hyped atmosphere.

Contestants could make only one call a week - in front of a producer, as they were filmed, with the minutes taken from their precious sewing time. Of course, they could not reveal what was happening on the show, and to level the playing field, were not allowed to ask a telephone contact how to make sleeves or smocking or whatever.

It was common to work 16- to 18-hour days.

"You were completely shut off from the outside world," Suede said. "No TVs, no newspapers, no magazines."

He was buoyed when guest judge and actress Natalie Portman raved about his short, red-and-cream party dress, 300 copies of which went on to sell out in 24 hours at Bluefly.com. But he was eliminated in the challenge of creating a menswear design for a fellow contestant for not being creative enough.

So the invitation to be a contestant on the Project Runway All Stars spinoff four years later gave him pause. He had the lines of patterns and fabrics in the pipeline and wanted publicity to help fuel their launch, so he agreed to go on the show.

"I was shaking in my boots," he said. "This time, I knew what I was getting into."

He was eliminated in the Up Your Aerosol episode when his green-and-black party dress, created with spray paint and 7 yards of fabric, failed to impress the judges. "Too creative," he remembers being criticized.

All that's behind him now. His SUEDEsays line of materials has grown to include quilting materials for Hobby Lobby; his Simplicity sewing patterns have expanded from women to men, plus-size and children; and Hobby Lobby and Jo-Ann's stock his fabrics. More plans are in the works, he said.

ONLINE

For more information on Suede and his latest projects, check out: www.suedesays.com

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News Headline: A Partnership Seeks to Transform Kent State and Kent (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: New York Times - Online, The
Contact Name: Schneider, Keith
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — Though it is home to the second largest campus in Ohio's state university system by enrollment, this small Cuyahoga River city spent much of the last four decades neglecting, if not deliberately retreating from, its history as a college town and its place in the annals of the Vietnam War era.

But a $110 million mixed-use development that is under construction at the city's center is remedying that.

The project — a melding of more than 500,000 square feet of office, retail, residential and public spaces — is unfolding across a four-block, four-acre section of downtown. City and university leaders said the development, the largest downtown construction project in Kent's 208-year history, will outfit the city with new destinations that suit contemporary lifestyles and spending patterns.

The project will also shift the entertainment and business center a few blocks south from the city's aging core and closer to Kent State University.

The development is specifically intended to open a new economic era in Kent by helping to recruit and retain young professionals, as well as Kent State students, faculty and staff members.

But city and university leaders said in interviews that the tight collaboration among the city, the university and private developers is also helping heal the psychic wounds from a previous era that has hindered Kent's development.

On May 4, 1970, four students were shot and killed by Ohio National Guardsmen during a demonstration against the Vietnam War. Nine other students were wounded. The cultural and geographic gulf that opened that day widened in 1975 with the completion of Haymaker Parkway, a five-lane downtown bypass that literally cut off the campus from Kent's center.

Two men, Dave Ruller, Kent's city manager, and Lester A. Lefton, president of Kent State University — outsiders when they arrived here within a year of each other in 2005 and 2006 — are credited with galvanizing the community to redevelop downtown and draw the city and the university closer.

“When I came here seven years ago I was aware of the undercurrent around that event and the strained relationship between the city and the university,” said Dr. Lefton, an experimental psychologist who was raised in Brookline, Mass. He has spent much of his career teaching in the South, and has played a central role in fostering and managing the downtown development.

When he took the reins of the university, Dr. Lefton said, he became just as interested in the economy and the condition of the city.

“Why isn't there a hotel here? Where is the conference center? We need to develop a much stronger economy,” he said. “We have 28,000 students and 3,000 faculty members here that spend money. We need to generate some new business in this community.”

Mr. Ruller, who was raised in Rochester and spent much of his career helping to manage small cities in Virginia and Tennessee, said it was not that Kent had forgotten about its downtown.

“At least as far back as the 1980s and about every five years afterward, the city prepared a development plan that proposed much of what we're doing now,” he said. “Preserve the good old buildings. Demolish the bad ones and rebuild. Lester and I realized that it was time to work together and act like the future mattered.”

“It took two guys from someplace else who didn't know any better,” he said.

Not since the early 1980s had Kent, a slow-growing city of nearly 29,000 south of Cleveland, invited new construction downtown. The city had been content to have a slowly evolving mix of sedate shops and family restaurants that attracted a trickle of students and faculty from the university.

The new office, retail, entertainment and residential spaces under construction are seen here as essential ingredients in a civic formula for attracting students and educated professionals, defining spending habits and rebranding Kent as a flourishing 21st-century college town.

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News Headline: Entertainment briefs | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU gallery seeks entries for Cup Show

The Kent State University School of Art Downtown Gallery is seeking entries for the 12th Annual National Juried Cup Show and will accept submissions through Feb. 15. More than $1,000 in prizes will be awarded. The gallery will host the exhibition of all submitted cups March 13 through April 20.

The Downtown Gallery will celebrate the opening of the exhibit with a reception March 14 from 5 to 7 p.m., free and open to the public. The gallery is at 141 E. Main St. in Kent, with free parking available behind the gallery.

To be considered for this juried exhibition, clay must be the work's primary medium. The cup must be no larger than 12 inches in any dimension, and it must not weigh more than ten pounds. Images of the work(s) in JPEG or PDF format must be received by Feb. 15.

Kirk Mangus, professor of art and head of ceramics at Kent State University, will serve as the exhibition's juror.

The competition is open to all artists residing in the United States. Each artist may submit no more than two cups. There is a $20 entry fee per artist, which must be submitted with the entry form.

Entrants will be notified of juror's decision on March 1, and the gallery must receive all pieces by March 9. The artist is responsible for shipping to the Downtown Gallery.

The Downtown Gallery is open Wednesday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, visit galleries.kent.edu or call 330-676-1549. Download the submission form at dept.kent.edu/art/galleries/documents/12thannualcupshowbrochure.pdf.

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News Headline: KSU's College of Public Health creates new practice office, research center (Slenkovich, Hoornbeek, Alemagno) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's
College of Public Health has
established a new Office of
Public Health Practice and
a Center for Public Policy
and Health, two externally
focused college units that
offer services to health departments,
hospital systems,
government agencies and
non-governmental organizations.

These two new units will
provide links between KSU
and community partners
to enable research and assistance
to improve public
health and to foster workforce
development and student
experiential learning.

The Office of Public Health
Practice at KSU will provide
workforce development programs
for public health professionals
to meet continuing
education requirements.

For example, an online review
course for the Ohio registered
sanitarian exam has
been developed and is presently
in the testing phase.

In addition, the Office
of Public Health Practice
will recruit organizations to
provide student experiential
learning opportunities,
such as field experiences, internships
and practicums.

Kenneth Slenkovich,
KSU's College of Public
Health assistant dean, operations
and community relations,
heads the new office,
and Willie H. Oglesby,
Ph.D., assistant professor of
health policy and management
at KSU, is the assistant
director.

“Practitioners have provided
strong feedback to us that
they need relevant, accessible
and cost-effective courses
to stay current in their
jobs and to meet the continuing
education requirements
of their licenses and
accreditations,” Slenkovich
explained.

“We look forward to providing
this assistance and to
working with our community
partners.”

KSU's Center for Public
Policy and Health, which
provides research and technical
assistance to government
agencies, nonprofit organizations
and community
partners, is headed by John
Hoornbeek, Ph.D., associate
professor of health policy
and management at KSU,
and is staffed by Joshua Filla,
a KSU outreach program officer,
as well as a cadre of affiliated
faculty and experts.

The center has already received
more than $450,000 in
contract and grant support,
with assignments including
evaluating the effects of consolidation
on 12 recent Ohio
health department mergers;
assisting health departments
in Portage County
in identifying and pursuing
cross-jurisdictional service
sharing arrangements; and
working on a comprehensive
community health needs assessment,
related to the 2011
Affordable Care Act, for the
three Akron-area hospital
systems.

“The new center builds on
the foundation of KSU's former
Center for Public Administration
and Public Policy,
which provided services
and research relating to public
policy and administration
in a range of policy areas for
more than 30 years,” Hoornbeek
said.

“The new center will assist
external organizations that
influence public health in improving
their effectiveness
and efficiency, while providing
opportunities for faculty,
staff and graduate students
to apply their skills and abilities
to real-world issues and
problems,” Hoornbeek explained.

“The center will also work
closely with the new Office
of Public Health Practice to
enable effective research, assistance
and continuing education
for a range of external
audiences,” said Sonia Alemagno,
KSU's dean of the College
of Public Health. “KSU
is positioned as a leader in
these areas.”

For more information
about KSU's College of Public
Health, visit www.kent.
edu/publichealth.

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News Headline: (VIDEO) Privacy Concerns Facebook & Simple Wash | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: WSYR-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: To view video, please click on link:
http://www.9wsyr.com/mediacenter/local.aspx?videoid=3928964

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News Headline: School Notes (Lefton, Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State tallies 40,559 students for spring term

With the release of its official 15th day census data, Kent State University has set a new record high for spring enrollment, which is up 161 students, or 0.4 percent, for Kent State's eight-campus system.

Kent State reports 40,559 students for the spring 2013 semester, compared to 40,398 for spring semester 2012, which was the previous high. Unduplicated headcount at the Kent campus is 26,461, and the unduplicated headcount for the regional campuses is 14,098.

"Student success is our top priority at Kent State University, and it shows in our record spring enrollment," said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton. "Kent State is clearly a first-choice university where students receive a world-class education, and we are committed to seeing each of them reach the finish line to graduation."

"I am very pleased to see spring enrollment grow slightly on the Kent campus," said T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management.

"A combination of continued efforts with international recruitment and efforts to retain students currently enrolled are making a positive difference. It is no surprise that some regional campuses are experiencing enrollment decreases due to an improving economy and the growth of shale industry jobs in Northeast Ohio."

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News Headline: Fossil reef yields oldest spider crabs ever discovered | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: NBCNews.com (Formerly MSNBC) - Englewood Cliffs Bureau
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Remains of 8 new species of crustaceans found, including one that lived 100 million years ago

The remains of eight new species of crustaceans, including the oldest known spider crabs that lived 100 million years ago, have been uncovered in a fossil reef in northern Spain, scientists report.

The fossils were found in the abandoned Koskobilo quarry alongside other species of decapod crustaceans (a group that includes crabs, shrimp and lobsters ). The two oldest-known spider crabs, named Cretamaja granulata and Koskobilius postangustus, are much older than the previous record holder, said study author Adiël Klompmaker, a postdoctoral researcher at the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida.

"The previous oldest one was from France and is some millions of years younger," Klompmaker told LiveScience, referring to the spider crabs. "So this discovery in Spain in quite impressive and pushes back the origin of spider crabs as known from fossils."

C. granulatawas about 0.6 inches (15 millimeters) long and showed distinctive features to suggest it was a spider crab, including two diverging spines coming out of its rostrum (the extended portion of the carapace, or shell, in front of the eyes) and a somewhat pear-shaped carapace. The fossil spider crab also sported spines on its sides at the front of the body. [ See Photos of the Ancient Spider Crabs ]

The reef where they were found seems to have vanished shortly after these creatures lived. "Something must have happened in the environment that caused reefs in the area to vanish, and with it, probably many of the decapods that were living in these reefs," Klompmaker said. "Not many decapods are known from the time after the reefs disappeared in the area," added Klompmaker, who details the findings in a forthcoming issue of the journal Cretaceous Research.

With a team of researchers from the United States, the Netherlands and Spain, Klompmaker collected fossils in the Koskobilo quarry in 2008, 2009 and 2010.

"We went there in 2008, and in the first two hours found two new species," Klompmaker said in a statement. "That's quite amazing — it just doesn't happen every day."

With the new findings, some 36 decapod species are known to have existed at the abandoned quarry, making it one of the most diverse localities for decapods during the Cretaceous period (145 million to 66 million years ago), Klompmaker said.

The researchers also found there were more diverse ancient decapods living within the reefs — where they fed, mated and sought shelter — than in other parts of the ocean.

"One of the main results of this research is that decapod crustaceans are really abundant in reefs in the Cretaceous," Klompmaker wrote in an email. "The presence of corals seemed to promote decapod biodiversity as early as 100 million years ago and may have served as nurseries for speciation."

Last year, Klompmaker reported finding fossils of tiny lobsters huddled together in the seashell of an extinct mollusk known as an ammonoid. The "embracing" lobsters, found in a rock quarry in southern Germany, suggested these fearsome-looking crustaceans were sociable as long ago as 180 million years, when the little crustaceans lived.

"This is the oldest example of gregarious behavior for lobsters in the fossil record — and not just lobsters but the entire group of decapods, which includes lobsters, crabs and shrimp," Klompmaker, who was at Kent State University, said at the time. "What this tells us is that this type of behavior of grouping together may have been very beneficial early on in the evolution of these crustaceans."

Klompmaker was also part of a team that discovered a new hermit crab at the same quarry, naming it after Michael Jackson (Mesoparapylocheles michaeljacksoni), as it was found around the time the singer died.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to present Jim Brickman Feb. 9 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas will present and evening with Jim Brickman at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 9 at Kent State's Performing Arts Center, 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia.

With more than seven million records sold, Jim Brickman's romantic piano sound has made him the best-selling solo piano artist of our time. Brickman's best-known compositions include the chart-toppers “Valentine,” “The Gift,” “Love of My Life,” “Simple Things” and “Peace.”

Ticket prices range from $39 to $59. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 330-308-6400 or visit www.tusc.kent.edu.

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News Headline: Midwest events | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Chicago Tribune - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio

Through Oct. 6: Fandemonium, Kent. The Kent State University Museum hosts this exhibit of fans that span three centuries. Examples range from ornate hand-painted designs from the 18th century to art deco pieces from the 20th century. Fee varies 330-672-3450, tinyurl.com/bh782n7 . Miles from Chicago: 370

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News Headline: Kent State president shows his photography in Hudson (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hudson Fine Art & Framing Co. enjoyed a lively turnout of buyers and on-lookers Feb. 1 curious to see an exhibit of the photography works of Kent State President Lester Lefton, which were available for sale. All the proceeds went to support scholarships for international students at Kent State University.

A proponent of meticulous post-processing of images, as opposed to capturing a moment in time as practiced by street photographers, Lefton utilizes the tools available in digital photography to enhance colors, but not objects. Post processing may be controversial among adherents of capturing a moment in time, but, Lefton's program notes explain the end product of his work reflects his artistic sensibility and the way he views the world.

"There is much written and much debated about the role of photography in society, the role of post-processing, and the purity of photography as an art form... My feeling is everybody should keep calm and shoot more. Let's populate the world with more art, however, you define it. It will make for a better world," Lefton states.

The Feb. 1 collection consisted of 29 such photographs. The subjects photographed were all from countries he has visited and include scenes from Russia, Italy, Greece, Spain, Germany, Norway, Lithuania, Turkey, Germany, Cuba and Canada.

Subjects ranged from those of a beggar in St. Petersburgh, a Florentine street scene, a the Jewish Museum in Berlin, to a view of Trinidad, which is a world heritage site in central Cuba.

A print of the Notre Dame Basilica in old Montreal was up for a silent auction. Prices ranged from $49.99 to $485.99. Those who visited the exhibit dined on an assortment of finger foods and a variety of wines.

Sponsoring the event were Gary Brahler and Kathyrn Dix Brahler.

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