Report Overview:
Total Clips (44)
Aeronautics; Athletics; College of Business (COB); Educational Technology, Research Center for (RCET); Music; Recreational Services; Theatre and Dance; Visual Communication Design (VCD) (1)
Athletics (3)
Biogeochemistry (1)
Black United Students (2)
Blossom Music (1)
Budget; Higher Education (2)
College of Business (COB) (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Entrepreneurial and Business Innovation, Center of (1)
Fashion Design (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
Higher Education; Political Science (1)
History (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications; Students (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications; WKSU (1)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Third Frontier (1)
Office of the President; Scholarships (1)
Physics (1)
Political Science (6)
Political Science; Sociology; Students (1)
Political Science; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program; Psychology (1)
Safety (2)
Safety; University Libraries (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Wick Poetry Center (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics; Athletics; College of Business (COB); Educational Technology, Research Center for (RCET); Music; Recreational Services; Theatre and Dance; Visual Communication Design (VCD) (1)
Summer camp guide 2013 02/16/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Students will stay overnight in a Kent State University dormitory. 330-325-6584, or www.neomed.edu/academics/ahec/medcamp . Applications due April 19. Porthouse Theatre Academy - High School Division Academy, School of Theatre & Dance, Kent State University. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., June 24-28 and...


Athletics (3)
Flashes have several strong performances against No. 1 Oklahoma State (Andrassy) 02/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: Kent State wrestling has been building its credibility into a nationally recognized program, and it got a glimpse of what the top dogs look like...

Kent State Sports Report: Kilgore floored by decision to pull wrestling from 2020 Olympic games 02/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Dustin Kilgore was floored when he first caught word that the International Olympic Committee executive board voted to remove wrestling from the list of...

Kent State hosts monumental day for wrestling program (Andrassy) 02/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

While an upset of top-ranked Oklahoma State simply wasn't in the cards, Sunday was still a day Kent State wrestlers and fans won't soon forget. The...


Biogeochemistry (1)
Researcher: Horizontal shale drilling is much less harmful (Lutz) 02/18/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State professor performs study that shows big decline in wastewater produced Kent State University has a new researcher who has brought...


Black United Students (2)
Black History Month events continue at Miles College 02/15/2013 al.com Text Attachment Email

...Study of Negro Life and History. By the late 1960s, Negro History Week evolved into Black History Month, especially on college campuses, including Kent State. President Gerald R. Ford officially recognized Black History Month in 1976. The theme of Black History Month 2013 is "At the Crossroads...

Black History Month 02/15/2013 VIP Jackson Magazine - Online Text Attachment Email

...1976 the federal government had recognized the expansion of Black History week into Black History month, a trend started by the Black Student Union at Kent State University in 1969. From it?s outset, the commemoration was met with praise as well as hostility. In the black community, it created and...


Blossom Music (1)
Joffrey Ballet, PIXAR IN CONCERT and More Set for Cleveland Orchestra's 2013 Blossom Music Festival, 7/3-9/1 02/18/2013 BroadwayWorld.com Text Attachment Email

...Kent/Blossom Music Celebrating its 46th season in 2013, Kent/Blossom Music began under the direction of George Szell when The Cleveland Orchestra and Kent State University launched a partnership in 1968, the year Blossom Music Center opened. Kent/Blossom Music's advanced training program brings...


Budget; Higher Education (2)
Kent State to get Boost in State Share of Instruction Money (Lefton) 02/16/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

2014 projections show university will get increase in state support at 7 of 8 campuses http://kent.patch.com/articles/kent-state-to-get-boost-in-state-share-of-instruction-money/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1360991201 After riding out cuts in state financial...

Kent State's Twinsburg Campus Would Get More Funds In Proposed Budget (Lefton) 02/16/2013 Twinsburg Patch Text Attachment Email

2014 projections show university will get increase in state support at 7 of 8 campuses, including Twinsburg. http://twinsburg.patch.com/articles/kent-state-s-twinsburg-campus-would-get-more-funds-in-proposed-budget/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1360991147 After riding out cuts in...


College of Business (COB) (1)
KSU to host Women in Business conference (Walker, Cook-Euell) 02/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University presents its 3rd annual Spirit of Women in Business Conference on March 6 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Kent Student Center The...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Steubenville case shows universities on heightened alert for problem students (Jarvie, Mansfield) 02/18/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

The social-media frenzy following accusations that a 16-year-old girl was raped by two Steubenville High School football players prompted Kent State University...


Entrepreneurial and Business Innovation, Center of (1)
Final session of "MBA Lite: Renew Your Business" at Hudson Library 02/15/2013 www.ohio.commldohio Text Attachment Email

... Denise Easterling, CPA and Entrepreneur Faculty Advisor for Collegiate Entrepreneur's Organization for Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation at Kent State University, will present “Entrepreneurial Marketing: How to Market the “New” Feb. 25. The series kicked off with “Driving Change in...


Fashion Design (1)
Fashion designer Suede unveils his new SUEDEsays line at KSU 02/17/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

New York-based fashion designer, Season 5 "Project Runway" contestant and Kent State University graduate Suede recently introduced his new SUEDEsays line of fabrics and patterns with a free fashion show in the Rockwell Hall...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Celebrations - Feb. 17 02/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

A Kent State fashion merchandising student received the Ray M. Greenly Scholarship from the National Retail Federation. Senior Brittany Casper of Brunswick...


Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
KSU fashion merchandising major earns scholarship 02/16/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The National Retail Federation selected Kent State University senior fashion merchandising major Brittany Casper to receive its Ray M. Greenly Scholarship that is awarded to the next generation...


Higher Education; Political Science (1)
Speech's timing lets governor sell big ideas (Cassell) 02/18/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...its merits. "He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive...


History (2)
Cspan bus made a special stop at Kent State University 02/15/2013 WEWS-TV Text Email

>> Special bus for history buffs rolled into town today. Cspan bus made a special stop at kent state university. It shows the vast library of historic video clips and the series on first ladies. >> Visitors can watch hundreds of hours of...

Lincoln assassination reaction focus of event 02/16/2013 Chillicothe Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

CHILLICOTHE — Leonne Hudson, a professor of history at Kent State University, will talk about “Supplying the Missing Pages in African-American History” at 11:30 a.m. Feb. 28 in room 206 of Bennett Hall...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
VIDEO: Former Rep. Dennis Kucinich stays in the public eye as Fox News contributor (Hanson, Leach) 02/17/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...society. People are mistrustful of government." Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com TV format favors right After watching their exchange, Kent State University broadcast journalism professor Gary Hanson observed that O'Reilly had a stronger voice and appeared larger on camera than Kucinich,...

Travel Photo Contest judges announced; deadline to enter is Friday 02/16/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Graduate School for the Arts at Bard College and the Cleveland Institute of Art. View her work at nancymcentee.com. • Susan Kirkman Zake, a lecturer in Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, where she teaches classes in new media and is an adviser to the award-winning...


Journalism and Mass Communications; Students (1)
Kent State Students Bring Anti-Bullying Campaign to Portage County 02/15/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Students, parents and teachers at Rootstown Middle School will see a new anti-bullying program next week as a group of five Kent State University students present “Pledge to Prevent: Bullying Stops Here.” The program, created and implemented by the KSU students, encourages...


Journalism and Mass Communications; WKSU (1)
WKSU News: 'White Coats' chronicles the painful transition from student to M.D. (Marino) 02/15/2013 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...At the ceremony, students, for the first time, don the white coat that symbolizes their chosen profession. It's also the starting point for author and Kent State University journalism professor Jacqueline Marino's chronicle of that transformation. Marino looks at the central role doctors hold...


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
2013 North Coast Road Racing Grand Prix: 02/18/2013 Star-Beacon - Online Text Attachment Email

...Sponsored by Achilles Running Shop (Race information and results at www.ashtabuladistancerunners.org ) n March 16 - Shamrock Kick off 2 Mile, 9 a.m., Kent State University-Ashtabula Campus, West 13th St., Ashtabula Director: Warren Dillaway 812-5392 n April 14 - Run from your Taxes 5K Run...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Area entertainment events beginning Feb. 15 02/15/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...that includes songs by Pat Benatar, Bon Jovi, Journey, Styx and REO Speedwagon, will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. Tickets, $45 to $66, may be ordered at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac and 330-308-6400.

Concert will feature Black Squirrel Winds 02/15/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Winds are Kent Larmee (left), Mark DeMio, Amitai Vardi, Diane McCloskey and Danna Sundet. NEW PHILADELPHIA  The Black Squirrel Winds will perform at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at  7 p.m. Feb. 26 in Founders Hall auditorium. Sponsored by the Kent State Tuscarawas Artist/Lecture...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Angela Johnson to be honored at KSU 02/16/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Author Angela Johnson of Kent will be presented the Virginia Hamilton Literary Award in April during Kent State University's annual Virginia Hamilton Conference on Multicultural Literature for Youth. Johnson has written more than 40 picture books,...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Third Frontier (1)
Portman Visit Highlights Northeast Ohio's Liquid Crystal Assets 02/16/2013 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...cutting-edge liquid crystal technologies with representatives from regional companies in the field, as well as officials from the Greater Cleveland Partnership, Kent State University, NorTech and the City of Kent. The Senator is scheduled to be at AlphaMicron at 1950 State Route 59 in Kent from 3:30 to...


Office of the President; Scholarships (1)
Photography exhibit benefits KSU scholarships (Lefton) 02/17/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Hudson Fine Art & Framing Co. recently enjoyed a lively turnout of buyers and onlookers curious to see an exhibit of the photography works of Kent State University President Lester Lefton, which were available for sale. All the proceeds go to support scholarships for international students...


Physics (1)
University of Akron, Kent State University physics professors astonished by meteor in Russia (Gleeson) 02/15/2013 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...the tremendous speed and force of a meteor that injured thousands in Russia and shattered a countless number of windows. But, NewsChannel5 found a University of Akron physics professor, Sergei Lyuksyutov, who lived most of his life in Russia. His reaction to the meteor? "It was quite astonishing,"...


Political Science (6)
Kasich rolling his priorities into spotlight (Cassell) 02/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...its merits. "He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "He's trying to paint himself as a proactive governor coming forward with all those proposals." Kasich's administration recently...

Speech's timing lets Ohio governor sell big ideas (Cassell) 02/17/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...its merits. "He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive...

Speech's timing lets Ohio gov sell ideas (Cassell) 02/17/2013 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...its merits. "He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive...

Speech's timing lets Ohio governor sell big ideas (Cassell) 02/17/2013 Houston Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...its merits. "He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley , a political scientist at the University of Dayton . "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive...

Speech's timing lets Ohio governor sell big ideas (Cassell) 02/18/2013 Marietta Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...its merits. "He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive...

Speech's timing lets Ohio governor sell big ideas (Cassell) 02/17/2013 Palm Beach Post - Online Text Attachment Email

...its merits. "He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive...


Political Science; Sociology; Students (1)
Kent State students take mock trial seriously (Kratcoski) 02/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

For Kent State University's Mock Trial Team, competition is a matter of life and death. Well, not actual death. The nine students on the team wrapped...


Political Science; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
C-SPAN Bus visits Kent State University campus 02/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The C-SPAN Bus made an appearance on Kent State University campus Friday morning, bringing a treasure trove of historical and political information to...


Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program; Psychology (1)
Grandparents learn to text to keep in touch with grandchildren 02/17/2013 Southern Illinoisan - Online Text Attachment Email

...communicate. Moore is a busy guy. Though technically a student at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, he is taking 18 hours of post-secondary classes at Kent State University and participating in an internship in the psychology department. With those things and other activities, he's not the easiest...


Safety (2)
KSU instructor with felony record teaching two police courses (Mansfield) 02/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

A part-time instructor at Kent State is teaching courses in police work — even after pleading guilty to felony charges. Dan Fitzpatrick, 57, of Ravenna, entered pleas last...

Her name is Molly. 02/16/2013 WKYC-TV Text Email

...her at concerts. >> How many people in the crowd have seen molly? >> She is a huge hit on college campuses locally. Including cleveland state, case and kent state. You will find her at club answer especially at raves. All night dance parties. So, what is molly and why should you be concerned. >> Molly...


Safety; University Libraries (1)
Kent State University library closes due to water line break 02/16/2013 www.ohio.commldohio Text Attachment Email

The Library located on the Kent State University's main campus closed Saturday afternoon because of a water line break. The library is expected to be closed for several hours....


Theatre and Dance (1)
Broadway tunes take stage at worship service in Kent (Swoboda, Burke) 02/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...out well-known tunes as well as ones that might have been unfamiliar to attendees. Both Swoboda and Burke work in the School of Theater and Dance at Kent State University, where he is a professor and she is an adjunct instructor. Day by Day from Godspell, was the only song featured that had...


Wick Poetry Center (1)
BOOKS 02/15/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

...the Beachwood branch of the Cuyahoga Country Public Library, 25501 Shaker Blvd., at 7 p.m. Register at cuyahogalibrary.org or call 216-831-6868. Also, Kent State University's Wick Poetry Center resumes its annual reading series with two award-winning poets, Lisa Ampleman and Heather Kirn Lanier....


News Headline: Summer camp guide 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Looking for a summer camp? Here are many of the day and overnight programs offered in the Akron area. In some cases, times and dates are set. In others, plans are still being made. Financial help and scholarships are available for some of the camps. Some offer extended day care. Call for details.

GENERAL RECREATION

SUMMIT COUNTY

University of Akron Band Camp - June 16-21. Commuter students, $250; overnight students, $475. For students entering grades 7-10. Rehearsals, sectionals, technique classes with UA faculty members. 330-972-6919 or e-mail UABands@uakron.edu .

University of Akron Chinese Summer Camps - For students in grades 7-12 to learn Chinese language and culture or are currently in a Chinese language class, July 15-19. Explore Chinese art, food and calligraphy. $100. Call 330-972-2013, email nee@akron.edu .

University of Akron Dance Institute - Classes on campus in seven dance studios. Preprofessional dance program, including ballet, pointe, modern, jazz and tap. Four-week summer intensive, June 17-July 12, for intermediate to advanced students. Two-week session, June 24-July 5, for beginners age 7 and up with optional afternoon arts camp. Storybook dance, pre-ballet and pre-tap for ages 3-7, June 1-29. Adult/teen noncredit evening dance and exercise classes. Registration required. Placement classes for dancers with previous experience are 9:30 a.m. March 2 and 3 p.m. April 21 or by appointment. 330-972-7949 or email danceinstitute@uakron.edu .

University of Akron Camp Digi Lit - College of Education Center for Literacy summer program. Solve and write mysteries using iPods, iPads and computers. Hands-on literacy and problem-solving activities. Mascot eMystery, grades 5-8, June 17-21; Forensic eFiles, grades 2-5, June 24-28. Both camps 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., $200, $175 each for multiple siblings. 330-972-7152 or http://bit.ly/camp-digi-lit .

University of Akron Sport Science Academy Youth Sport Day Camp - Teaching fundamentals of sport for ages 5-12. June 17-21 and/or June 24-28, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at InfoCision Stadium and campus. $175 per week, two weeks $325. $15 discount before May 17. Register online at www.uakron.edu/ssa/ . For information, contact maduve@uakron.edu .

Akron Fossils & Science Center - 2080 S. Cleveland-Massillon Road, Copley Township. Dinosaur Adventure Camps for ages 5-11, Rock Hounds July 8-12 and Fossil Facts and Fiction July 22-26. Morning and afternoon sessions, $90 each, $150 for both. Creation-based curriculum includes facts and theories about dinosaurs, how fossils are formed and how scientists dig for fossils. 330-665-3466 or www.akronfossils.com .

Akron Symphony String Chamber Ensemble Summer Music Experience - Old Trail School, Bath Township. June 17-21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., for string musicians entering grades 8-12. Polish ensemble skills, increase confidence through performance and sight-reading, and study chamber music literature. Akron Symphony Orchestra musicians provide daily coaching. Rehearsals and individual practice. Culminated by afternoon performance featuring all chamber ensembles. Audition recording and letter of recommendation from instructor required. $500, $50 discount before April 1. 330-535-8131, www.akronsymphony.org/string-chamber-camp , or email omatherson@akronsymphony.org .

Akron Urban League Summer Education Enrichment Day Camp - Helen Arnold Community Center, 440 Vernon Odom Blvd., June 10-Aug. 16, Monday-Friday each week, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (extended care hours 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) For ages 5-12, $500 for summer, $250 for each additional sibling. Field trips, daily classes in computers, art, music, dance, drama, physical education and swim program. Breakfast, lunch and snacks. 330-434-3101 or www.akronurbanleague.org .

Akron Zoo Camp - 500 Edgewood Ave., Akron. For ages 2-15, Early June through August. Day camps by age categories. Learn about animals, the environment, conservation programs and what it is like to work at the zoo. New camps about the Mike & Mary Stark Grizzly Ridge exhibit, and five-day morning and afternoon camps. Full-day camp for age 7-12, $150 members, $170 nonmembers. Preschool camps for ages 2-5, accompanied by caregiver. Three-day camp, $65 members, $70 nonmembers. Five-day camps $95 members, $100 nonmembers. Camps for ages 13-15, $115 members, $135 nonmembers. Full-day camps for ages 7-14, $160 members, $180 nonmembers. Each session limited to 15 campers. 330-375-2550 or www.akronzoo.org .

Almost Mom Child Development Center - 258 S. Cleveland-Massillon Road, Copley Township (Montrose area). Grades K-5, June through August. Weekly themes include camping, Olympics and dinosaurs. Three field trips per week include Akron Aeros game, Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens, Akron Zoo, Weathervane Theater, bowling and parks. Cookouts, water slides, sports, crafts and weekly visits from the bookmobile. For rates, call Dominic Musitano at 330-665-4374.

Archbishop Hoban Summer Enrichment Camp - 1 Holy Cross Blvd., Akron. For grades 7-8. Two-week camp includes classes in science, music, technology, graphic and culinary arts as well as recreational activities. 8:30 a.m. to noon, Mondays-Fridays, June 10-21. $175. www.hoban.org or 330-773-6658.

Bioinnovation Academy - Austen Bioinnovation Institute, 47 N. Main St., Akron. Weeklong program for grades 10-12, June 17-21 or July 15-19. Focuses on innovation and biomedicine for those interested in science, technology, engineering, math and medicine. Students work in clinical scenarios to identify patient-centered problems, work in groups to solve those problems and present their solutions. They obtain basic life support certification and learn to design medical devices. $750. Applications due April 30. 330-572-7544 or www.abiakron.org/bioinnovation-academy .

Boy Scouts of America - Camp Manatoc, south of Peninsula. Weekly overnight camp from mid-June to late July, for Scouts ages 10-18. Swimming, canoeing and fishing. $255 per week. Call Great Trail Council, 330-773-0415 or visit www.gtcbsa.org .

Brightside Academy - Two Akron locations: 1100 S. Arlington St. and 1585 Frederick Blvd. An 11- or 12-week program for children who have completed kindergarten through age 12. Curriculum themes are art, architecture and sculpture; animals, gardens and nature; science and technology; culture and diversity; theater, dance and music; and health, fitness and sports. Weekly field trips. 330-785-9740 (Arlington) or 330-835-9560 (Frederick).

Building Blocks Enrichment Program - 110 Goodyear Blvd., Akron. Ages 6-12, June 17-Aug. 2, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday, $40 per week. Academics include math, reading, social studies and science. Also sports, field trips, community service and group activities. Lunch provided. Some scholarships available. 330-375-5065, email hebroughtusout@sbcglobal.net .

Camp Christopher - 1930 N. Hametown Road, Bath Township. Resident camp, ages 7-16, weeklong sessions June 16-Aug. 10, $445 per week. Weekly day camp, ages 5-12, June 10-Aug. 9, $190 per week. Swimming, canoeing, horseback riding, hiking, fishing, archery, rope challenge courses, song time, crafts and games. Lunch/snacks provided. Family Camp, June 8-13, July 2-6 or Aug. 10-15, $295 adult, $225 child. September Song Camp (over age 50), Aug. 18-23, $275; and Discovery Camp for persons with developmental disabilities, $1,050 (financial aid and waiver options available). Some early registration discounts. 330-376-2267, 800-296-2267 or www.campchris.org .

Camp Invention - Weeklong day camps for grades 1-6 in June and August at multiple locations in Summit County. Learn problem solving and teamwork through hands-on activities in science, technology, engineering and math. $220, online cost $215. Locations are: Akron (Our Lady of the Elms Elementary School), June 10-14; New Franklin (Nolley Elementary School), June 18-22; Fairlawn (St. Hilary School), June 24-28; Fairlawn (Fort Island Primary School), June 17-21, Northfield (Nordonia Middle School), June 17-21; and Barberton (Barberton Elementary School West), Aug. 5-16. Call 800-968-4332, or visit www.campinvention.org to register.

Camp Y.E.S.S. (Youth Establishing Success Spiritually) - Mason Community Center, 700 E. Exchange St., Akron. Free sports and interpersonal skills camp for boys and girls ages 12-17, June 11-15, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Applications available at center April 8-May 20 or call 330-238-3091, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

Centenary United Methodist Church Drama Camp - 1310 Superior Ave., Akron. For grades 5-8. July 8-28, 5 to 8 p.m., Mondays-Thursdays. Dress rehearsal July 26, performances evening of July 27 and at 3 p.m. July 28. Instruction in team building, social skills and theater arts including stage direction, elocution, song, choreography and line memorization. $35. Scholarships available with proof of need. 330-376-9648.

Childtime's Summer Camp - Childtime Learning Centers. Children ages 5-11. Program details to be determined. Costs vary by location and participation. Locations: 1189 Tallmadge Road, Cuyahoga Falls, 330-928-6699; 555 White Pond Drive, Akron, 330-864-4499; 186 Portage Trail, Cuyahoga Falls, 330-928-2530; 2691 21st St., Cuyahoga Falls; 3475 Embassy Parkway, Fairlawn, 330-666-4226; 2145 Eastwood Ave., Akron. 330-784-2582; 2645 Manchester Road, Akron, 3101 Graham Road, Stow, 330-673-2050; and 2546 Leland Ave., Akron, 330-784-3399.

Community Christian Camp - 3260 Cormany Road, Coventry Township. Operation Kid, a nine-week camp for age 2½ through grade 5. Different themes each week with age-appropriate activities, June 10-Aug. 9. Registration $20. Day care full-day $30 per day, $18 for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and $20 for 6:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 330-644-9692.

Crown Point Ecology Center Summer Farm & Science Camp - 3220 Ira Road, Bath Township. Lessons From the Land for ages 6-11. Investigate the natural cycles of plants, animals and people in the farm community through activities, crafts, hands-on gardening, hikes, cooking and tasting vegetables from the garden. Eight one-week day sessions June 10-Aug. 9, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. $195 per week. Call 330-668-8992 or visit www.crownpt.org .

Cuyahoga Falls Library Children's Summer Reading Program - 2015 Third St., Cuyahoga Falls. Dig Into Reading, June 6-Aug. 3. Family programs, story times, prizes and coupons. 330-928-2117.

Cuyahoga Falls Natatorium - 2345 Fourth St. Fun, Fit and Float Camp for ages 7-12, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., July 15-19 and July 22-26. Fitness sports games, Zumba, obstacle course, tree house, waterslide, diving board, boot camp, crafts and more. Half day on land and half day on water. $145 residents, $170 nonresidents. Before- and after-care available, $25 each. 330-971-8080.

Cuyahoga Falls Parks and Recreation Department - Quirk Cultural Center, 1201 Grant Ave. Lights, Camera, Action: Youth Theatre Camp for ages 7-12, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., June 24-28, registration $20 resident, $30 nonresident, class fee $50. Magic Camp for ages 9-14, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. June 24-28, registration $20 resident, $30 nonresident, class fee $50. Youth leisure classes June through August, various dates and times. Clay and Pottery Classes, ages 3-5 and 6-8 $15-$24; Get the Wheel Started, ages 9-11 and 12-17, $25-$30; and Get Fired Up, ages 5-7, $15-$20, and ages 8 and up, $25-$30; Family Ceramics Workshop, for parents and children ages 5 and over, $15-$20. Call 330-971-8425.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park Summer Camp - Residential camp in Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Theatre Camp, performing arts skills, grades 4-10, June 16-21, $425 overnight, $325 day camp. Farm Camp, learning about farm life, grades 4-8, July 21-26. $425. Survivor Camp, learning survival skills through daily adventures, grades 5-10, July 14-19, $425. Chef Camp, learning to cook using fresh, local foods, grades 7-11, July 21-26, $450. Tent Camping, grades 3-7, June 23-24, $65; and Junior Ranger Day Camp, ages 6-11, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., July 22-26 and July 29-Aug. 3, $200 week, before- and after-care available for second week. Email info@forcvnp.org or call 330-657-2796, ext 100, or visit www.conservancyforcvnp.org .

Dominion Summer Camp - 90 W. Thornton St., Akron. Ages 4-12, June 10-Aug. 16. 330-252-2277.

Ellet Community Center - 2449 Wedgewood Drive, Akron. Weekly themed camps for ages 5 and up, June 25-Aug. 2. Arts and crafts, dance, science, Disney and cheerleading. $25-$40 per week. Call 330-375-2809 for dates and times.

Emmanuel Christian Academy - 1650 Diagonal Road (House of the Lord). Summer enrichment program for ages 4-13. 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., June 10-July 26. Extended care available starting at 7 a.m., ending at 5:30 p.m. Reading, writing and math. Special activities and field trips. Entrepreneurship Camp for grades 4-8. Title XX accepted. 330-836-7182.

Fairlawn Parks & Recreation - 3487 S. Smith Road. Go Wild camps for ages 4 and up, 10 a.m. to noon, at Fort Island Park. Develop skills concerning wildlife and the environment. Ages 4-5, July 15-18, $35; ages 6-7, July 22-25, $35; ages 8-11, Aug. 5-8, $35. Beginners Archery Camp for ages 9 and up, 10:30-11:30 a.m. July 8-12, $35. Family Overnight Campout, 7 p.m. Aug. 16, $5 per person. Beginners After-School Archery Camp for ages 9 and up, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Sept. 3, 5, 10 and 12, $35. Call 330-668-9518.

Farnam Foundation & Ohio Living History Society - 4223 Brecksville Road, Richfield. A Child's Life in the Western Reserve. Ages 7 and up. Introduce children to 18th century life including chores, school, food, games and the home. June 5-7 and 19-21, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. $50 per day or $130 per week. 234-200-6547 or www.olhs.org .

Fast Lane Bowling and Party Center Day Camps - 193 Wooster Road N., Barberton. Camps are 9:30 a.m. to noon. Lego Camp, grades K-4, $25. Fashion Camp, grades 5-12, July 12, $30. Boys and girls use recyclable textiles to create designs. Dye Camp, grades K-12, July 26. Use cold-water dyes on any product you bring. Drama and Art Camp, grades K-6, July 29-Aug. 2, $225. Drama in the morning, art in the afternoon until 3:30 p.m. KidzArt Summer Camp drawing-based art enrichment program. Design a play, with makeup and costumes, with a performance at the end of the week. 330-753-7256.

Firestone Equestrian Center - 6801 Christman Road, Green. Day and overnight ranch camp for horse enthusiasts ages 8-16. Horsemanship and equestrian management utilizing mounted and unmounted lessons. Outdoor and indoor facilities. Campers grouped by age, experience and ability. Also swimming, team sports and traditional camping activities. 330-896-1964, www.gotcamp.org or email susang@akronymca.org .

Firestone Park Community Center - 1480 Girard St., Akron. Summer day camps for school-age children. Weekly themes including sports, dance, quilting and teens. 330-375-2806.

First United Methodist Church Summer Camps - 245 Portage Trail, Cuyahoga Falls. Everywhere Fun Fair Day Camp, grades 1-6, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., June 24-28. Vacation Bible School in the morning and field trips in the afternoon, $50, $45 additional siblings. Registration starts April 1. VBS only option for age 3-grade 6, $5 per child, $10 family maximum. Wesley Overnight Camp, Aug. 2-4, at Camp Aldersgate in Carrollton, grades 4-6 for three days and two nights. $100 before June 29, $125 after. Chess Camp, grade 1 and up, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., July 8-12, includes chess-themed trips and concluding tournament, no chess experience required, $150. 330-923-5241, ext. 218, or www.firstchurchcf.com .

Goddard School - 2073 Alexandria Way, Macedonia. For ages 6 weeks to 9 years, June 10-Aug. 15, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Theme is Hooray for the USA. Prices vary by age and number of days attended. 330-468-0488 or macedoniaoh@goddardschools.com .

City of Green's Summer Day Camp - Parks and Recreation Division, Green. Weekly day camps for ages 7-12, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily, June 24 through week of July 22, two camps each day with campers divided by age. $50 per week residents, $60 nonresidents. Martial Arts and Bookworm Camp, June 24-28; Survival and Native Skills Camp, July 1-5 (no camp July 4); Arts & Crafts and Science Experiment Camp, July 8-12; No Bake Cooking and Game Show Camp, July 15-19; and Alternative Sports and Construction Camp, July 22-26. 330-896-6621, or www.cityofgreen.org .

Here For You Child Development Center - 5625 Manchester Road, New Franklin. Summer programs for kindergarten to age 12. Different focus every week incorporating math, science, English and social skills. 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, part time or full time. Preschool program for ages 3-5, $37 per day, $147 per week. School age program for ages 6-12, $32 per day, $126 per week. 330-882-5300 or www.hereforyoucdc.com .

Homer Pettengil Summer Day Camp - East Akron Community House, 550 S. Arlington St., Akron. Ages 5-11. Weekly outings, field trips, theater trips, activities. Wellness program includes Zumba classes, African dance, martial arts, kickboxing and self defense, belly dance and praise dance. Teen mentoring program for ages 11-17. Lunch and snacks provided. First session June 17-July 19 (Monday-Friday), 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., $150; second session July 26-Aug. 23, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., $150; 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., $100. 330-773-6838.

Hudson Community Education and Recreation Camps - Day camps June-August for age 3 through high school include cooking, sewing, design, and technology. $85 to $300. Last Days of Summer camp, weeks of Aug. 12 and 17, with several field trips. Teen adventure weeks include trips to Cedar Point, canoeing, laser tag, limousine scavenger hunt, water parks and more. Teen sport and activity weeks include Frisbee golf, water polo, basketball, dodgeball, table tennis, lacrosse and trips to a Cleveland Indians game, Kendall Cliffs climbing and Fun 'n' Stuff. Car Camp and Theater Camp also offered. Jump Starts Sports Camp for all ages focus on one sport each week. Before- and after-care available. Open to Hudson residents and others. Discounts for early registration. 330-653-1210 or www.hudson.edu/hcer starting late March.

Illusion Factory Summer Camp - Northwest Family Recreation Center, 1730 Shatto Ave., Akron. Brush Up Your Shakespeare. Campers will present a mini-version of A Midsummer Night's Dream. Ages 9-15, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., July 22-Aug. 2, $340; ages 5-8, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. same days, $180. Call 330-376-5700.

Johnson's Corners Summer Camp - Johnson United Methodist Church, 3409 Johnson Road, Norton. Ages 5-14. June 7-Aug. 21, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., $75, before- and after-care available 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Title XX accepted. Different themes each week, field trips, crafts, games, inflatable waterslide, indoor gym, snacks provided. Call Jennie Lester at 330-825-1528.

Kenmore Community Center - 880 Kenmore Blvd., Akron. Weekly themed camps in ceramics, arts and crafts, quilting and more. Dates, times and costs to be announced. Call 330-375-2812.

Kids Academy of Copley - 3745 Copley Road. Infants to age 13, June 10-Aug. 23. School-age summer programs. Discounts for early registration. 330-666-8293, or www.kidsacademyofcopley.com .

Kids Country - June through August for ages 5-12. Swimming, field trips, crafts. Rates vary by location. Summit County locations are 4923 Hudson Drive, Stow, 330-686-7707; 2955 Smith Road, Fairlawn, 330-668-5144; and 1801 Town Parke Center, Green, 330-899-0909.

Kids Play - Summer camp program June through August for children ages 5-11, full and part time from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., at 388 S. Main St., Akron, 330-253-2373; 4530 Kent Road, Stow, 330-678-5554; and 1641 Boettler Road, Green, 330-896-2400. Breakfast, lunch and snack, field trips, special sports programs, reading, science and math skills. Cost varies according to schedule.

KidzArt Summer Camp - 2300 Graybill Road, Green. Drama and art camp for grades K-6, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., July 15-19, $225, $125 half-day. Drawing-based art enrichment program. Design a play in the morning, with makeup and costuming, with a performance at the end of the week. Art in the afternoon with theme-based projects including 3-D, canvas and more, with an art show on the last day for family and friends. 330-753-7256.

LifeCenter Plus Health & Fitness Center Summer Kids Camps - Half-day and full-day camps at 5133 Darrow Road, Hudson, June 10-Aug. 21. Themed camps for ages 3-15. Travel and adventure camps, soccer and golf, arts and science, model racing, zoo camp, around the world, crazy cookers, rock climbing. Sessions divided by age. Weekdays, full-day and half-day. Prices start at $90 per week. Before- and after-care available. Call Laura Coon at 330-655-2377, ext. 145, or email lcoon@lifecenterplus.com or www.lifecenterplus.com .

Magical Theatre Summer Camps - Barberton High School, 555 Barber Road. Day camp for ages 7-17. K.I.D. Camp develops performing skills with professional staff through day classes in acting, singing and dancing culminating in a performance, July 8-19, $395. Theater Camp at Cuyahoga Valley National Park, perform scenes that utilize the outdoors as a stage, overnight camp for grades 4-10, June 16-21, $425; day camp, $325. 330-848-3708 or www.magicaltheatre.org .

Music Camp By Nature - Adults Band Camp in Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Happy Days Lodge, 500 W. Streetsboro Road, and Hines Hill Center, 1403 W. Hines Hill Road, Peninsula. July 14-17. Rehearse and play, hike and bike, morning stretch for musicians and afternoon sessions on musical topics. Meals included and lodging available in the park or at nearby hotels. $350 for four-day camp, $25 discount before April 29. $150 fee for non-participating spouse or companion. 330-657-2909 or www.conservancyforcvnp.org .

McKinley Early Childhood Center - 2529 Romig Road, Akron. Summer program for ages 6 weeks to 12 years. Three field trips per week, including roller skating, Akron Zoo, movies and Akron Aeros game, free to parents. Program free upon enrollment to the center. Title XX accepted. Private pay is $143 full-time week (25-60 hours) or $96 part-time. 330-745-8818.

New Adventures Early Learning and Child Care Development Center Day Camp - 8054 Darrow Road, Twinsburg. For ages 5-12. June 3-Aug. 16, Monday-Friday each week, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Extended care hours 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. with lunch and snack provided. Themes include vacations, hands-on, sports and theater. Field trips included. Contact Christine Tobias-Sheets at 330-425-2030 or www.newadventuresearlylearning.com .

New Generation Show Choir Camp - ETC School of Musical Arts, 1932 Akron-Peninsula Road, Akron. For boys and girls, grades 3-5. Singing, dancing and activities. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Aug. 12-16. $200, includes lunch. Contact Robert Heid at etcchoir4@gmail.com .

New Hope Learning Center Summer Camp - 4415 Darrow Road, Stow. Ages 3-12, June 3-Aug. 16, 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Playground, indoor gym, field trips, weekly themes. Computers, art, music, fitness, hip-hop dance, talent shows, sports, martial arts demonstrations, nature studies, crafts and more. Cost varies according to schedule. 330-688-9970.

Northwest Family Recreation Center Summer Camps - 1730 Shatto Ave., Akron. June through August, four days per week, dates to be determined. Preschool Camp for ages 3-5, 10 to 11 a.m., Monday-Thursday, $50; Art Camp for ages 6-8 and 9-14, 1 to 4 p.m., Monday-Thursday, $60; Choreography Camp for ages 9-14, 1 to 4 p.m., Monday-Thursday, $50; Dance Camp for ages 3-5 and 6-8, 1 to 4 p.m., Monday-Thursday, $50; and Fairy Fantasy Camp for ages 5-7, 1 to 3 p.m., Tuesday-Thursday. 330-375-2849.

Peninsula Art Academy - 1600 W. Mill St., Peninsula. Summer day camps in glass fusing, clay building, drawing, painting, tie-dye, weaving, soap making and more. Learn about color theory and art history, and take a nature walk in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Classes and times vary, weekends and weekdays. Prices start at $9 per hour. Most programs for ages 6 and up. 330-657-2248, info@peninsulaartacademy.com or www.peninsulaartacademy.com .

Primrose Schools Summer Camp - 1295 Corporate Drive, Hudson. June 10-Aug. 23. Three- and five-day sessions available. Creative activities and field trips. Summer reading program, tennis, dance and martial arts. Call for rates. 330-653-3388, www.primrosehudson.com .

Project AGAPE Summer Camp - 442 Bell St., Akron. Ages 5-12 (must have completed kindergarten), June 10-Aug. 30, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Skating, swimming, bowling, karate, golf, field trips. Breakfast, lunch and snack included. Title XX or private pay. Meeting for parents of prospective campers at 5 p.m. May 31. 330-253-3711.

Redeemer Christian School S.T.E.A.M. Camp - 2141 Fifth St., Cuyahoga Falls. Two camps for grades 3-8 in science, technology, engineering, art and math. Crazy Concoctions, for grades 6-8, 8 a.m. to noon, July 22-26. Create paint, homemade soda, rocket formula and ice cream. Freaky Formulas, grades 3-5, 8 a.m. to noon, July 29-Aug. 2. Design your own crayon color, bubble gum, soda and toothpaste. $150 per week. 330-923-1280 or tina.boehlke@gmail.com .

Riverside Summer Camp - Riverside Preschool, 2433 S. Main St., Coventry Township. Grades 1-6, daily or weekly. On- and off-campus activities, sports, arts and crafts, games, cooking, swim lessons, bowling. Trips to Great Lakes Science Center, Amazone, Akron Aeros game and Summit County Fair. Junior camp program for ages 3-5. Call Vicki at 330-644-4517 or e-mail RiversidePreschool@sbcglobal.net .

St. Vincent-St. Mary High School Summer Camps - 15 N Maple St., Akron. Art camp, grades 6-9, mornings June 17-21, $75. Band, grades 6-9, mornings June 10-14, $75. Drama, grades 1-9, afternoons July 15-Aug. 4, $100 ($90 for additional siblings). CPR and AED training, grades 7-12 and adults, 1 to 4 p.m. and 5 to 8 p.m., date to be determined, $45 (includes 2-year certification through the American Heart Association). Girl Talk, grades 7-10, afternoons Aug. 5-9, $60. Irish Dance, grades 3-9, afternoons July 29-Aug. 1, $90. Photography, grades 6-12, mornings July 8-12, $75. Rushin' to Learn Some Russian, grades 4-9, grades 4-6 mornings, grades 7-9 afternoons, Aug. 5-9, $75. Study Skills, grades 7-12, afternoons July 30-Aug. 2, $60. Technology, grades 6-9, mornings June 15-19, $75. www.stvm.com or 330-253-9113.

Salvation Army Learning Zone Summer Enrichment Program - 190 S. Maple St., Akron. Day camp, June 10-Aug. 16. Ages 5-12 (and completed kindergarten), 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday-Friday. Christian-based education, weekly field trips, recreational activities, healthy meals included. $100 per week. Title XX accepted. Visit www.salvationarmyakron.org/learningzone or pick up applications at site after March 1. Parent orientation at 6 p.m. May 24. 330-434-7423.

Sarah's House Summer Enrichment Program - 414 Pine St., Akron. For ages 5-12. June 17-July 26, weekdays 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., $45 per week. Math and reading, dance, etiquette, arts and crafts, health and fitness, cooking, field trips and more. Breakfast and lunch included. 330-535-7272, or sarahshouseinc@yahoo.com .

S'Camp at Old Trail School - 2315 Ira Road, Bath Township. Morning, afternoon and all-day classes for ages 18 months to 14 years, June 10-Aug. 9, 2315 Ira Road, Bath Township. More than 100 offerings. Computers, fencing, scuba, extreme sports, rocketry, aviation, robotics, photography, filmmaking, theater, painting, cooking, bicycling, field hockey, diving, tennis, soccer and more. Rates vary; half-day sessions average about $150, all day $300. Transportation and extended care available. Call 330-666-1118, or visit www.oldtrail.org and click on ��summer camp'' to register online.

Shaw Jewish Community Center Summer Camps - 750 White Pond Drive, Akron. Themed day camps for grades 1-9, June 17-Aug. 16. Includes Lego, Weathervane Theatre, Akron Aeros and more. Prices vary; about $190 per week. Call Erin Katz at 330-835-0020, email campjcc@shawjcc.org or visit www.shawjcc.org .

Soap Box Derby Gravity Racing Challenge S.T.E.M. Summer Program - 1000 George Washington Blvd., Akron. For ages 9-12. Participate in building a car and racing down the Derby Downs track, and learn about science, technology, engineering and math. Set up your own mini-car and race it against others. Two sessions, June 10-14 and 17-21, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. $170 before March 30, $185 after. $10 discount for second child. Call 330-733-8723 or visit www.aasbd.org and go the Education tab.

Space Domes America - Old Trail School, 2315 Ira Road, Bath Township. For grades 1-5. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., July 22-26. Hand-on science activities including paleontology, animal studies, flight, volcanoes, weather, geology, ecology and chemistry. Trip to the covered bridge in Bath to study what the stream and surroundings were like in the past, and look for fossils. $265. Before-and after-care available.

Stow Silver Springs Day Camp - 5027 Stow Road. Weekly sessions June through mid-August for grades 1-6 include swimming, archery, games, crafts, cooking, sports, nature, field trips and special events. Prices to be determined. 330-689-5100.

Streaming Lion Arts Ministries - Zion Lutheran Church, 139 S. High St., Akron. Summer Dance Camp for ages 4-18. 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturdays in June. Learn dances of various forms. No experience required. $60. Email streaminglion@gmail.com or visit www.streaminglion.org .

Summer Dance Camp - Nan Klinger Excellence in Dance Studio, 2315 State Road, Cuyahoga Falls. One to four weeks, June-August. Classes include preschool ballet, beginner ballet, ballet technique, pointe, variations, jazz, modern, tap, hip-hop, stretch and strength and adult ballet. Call for prices and schedule at 330-928-6479, or visit www.klingerdance.com after mid-March.

Summer Fun Camp - Lawton Community Center, 1225 Lawton St., Akron. For ages 5-10, June 24-Aug. 9, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. $300 for seven weeks. Early payment plan. Morning and after-care at extra cost. Call Francine Blake, Chelsea Blake or Dawn Stiggers at 330-375-2825.

Walsh Jesuit High School Summer Warrior Enrichment Camp - 4550 Wyoga Lake Road, Cuyahoga Falls. For students entering grades 7-8 in the fall, to showcase the school's curriculum. June 17-28, 8:30 a.m. to noon, Monday-Friday. $225 new campers, $200 returning campers. 330-929-4205, 800-686-4694, www.walshjesuit.org .

Weathervane Playhouse Summer Camps - Acting, improvisation, stage directions, auditioning and more at 1301 Weathervane Lane, Akron. All camps Monday-Friday. Kids Take the Stage: Theater games teach fundamentals, ages 5-8, June 17-28; ages 8-11, July 8-19; ages 11-14, July 22-Aug. 2; all 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., $260. Imagine That: Games, storytelling and creative drama, ages 3-6, 10 a.m. to noon, June 10-14 and Aug. 5-9, $110. Theater Around the World, ages 8-13, Aug. 5-9, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., $160. Musical Theater: Training in voice, dance and audition technique for ages 5 to 9, July 8-12; ages 9-14, June 17-21; both 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., $180. Broadway Dance Camp: Training in movement for the stage, ages 5-9, July 15-19; ages 9-14, June 24-28, both 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., $160. Vocal Music Technique: Fundamentals for beginners to intermediate, ages 10-16, Aug. 5-9, 10 a.m. to noon, $110. Character Workshop: Creating a character, ages 7-16, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., July 22-26, $160. Audition Workshop: Create an audition package for ages 7-16, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. July 22-26, $160. Summer Stock: Produce and design a full production, ages 13-18, July 29-Aug. 9, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., performance at 7 p.m. Aug. 10, $350. 330-836-2626, ext. 17, or www.weathervaneplayhouse.com .

Western Reserve Academy Summer Program - 115 College St., Hudson. Adventure Camp, ages 8-14, six weekly camps June 17-July 26, 7:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Sports to outdoor adventure. Includes mountain biking, kayaking, swimming and more. English Language Institute for students for whom English is not their native language, resident camp for ages 13-17, June 23-July 27. Summer enrichment programs focus on dance, jazz improv, digital photography, screenwriting and filmmaking, creative nonfiction, advanced writing, cooking with chefs, youth leadership development, crime scene investigation and more. Dates and times to be determined. Call 330-650-9715, email summerprograms@wra.net or see www.wra.net/summerprograms .

YMCA Day Camp - For ages 6-12, includes nature, sports, games and crafts. Theme weeks, field trips and exploration, outdoor adventure. Prices vary. June-August at: Firestone Park branch, 350 E. Wilbeth Road, Akron, 330-724-1255; Green branch, 3800 Massillon Road, 330-899-9622; Lake Anna branch, 500 W. Hopocan Ave., Barberton, 330-745-9622; Riverfront branch, 544 Broad Blvd., Cuyahoga Falls, 330-923-9622; University Park, 477 E. Market St., Akron, 330-434-9622; Nordonia Hills branch, 8761 Shepard Road, Macedonia, 330-467-8366 or 330-650-6144; North Hill Early Care Center, 10 W. Tallmadge Ave., Akron, 330-762-7678; Cascade Village Early Care Center, 210 E. North St., Akron, 330-983-5573; WYDACA Early Care Center, 1250 W. Exchange St., Akron, 330-864-3560; A Y'S Place Early Care Center, 380 Mineola Ave., Akron, 330-836-7435; YMCA office, 330-376-1335 or www.akronymca.org .

YMCA Camp Y-Noah - 815 Mount Pleasant Road, Green. One- and two-week sessions June through August for ages 6-16. Day and resident camps and trip programs. Swimming, canoeing, climbing, horseback riding, arts and crafts, hiking, sports, science camp, sailing and cheernastics. Day camp $145-$275 per week, overnight camp $445 per week depending on programs. Contact Michael Landry at michaell@akronymca.org or 330-896-1964. Visit www.gotcamp.org or www.akronymca.org .

Yoga Summer Camp - Embrace Your Essence Yoga, 499B Portage Lakes Drive, Coventry Township. For preteens and teens. One-week day camp in June or July, dates to be determined. Includes yoga, art, life skills and healthy eating. Details will be posted online closer to camp week. Contact Emily Fatkins at 330-328-7219, email lovepeaceyoga@yoga.com or visit www.embraceyouressenceyoga.com .

Youth Excellence Performing Arts Workshop - Inventors Hall of Fame STEM School, 199 S. Broadway, Akron. July 22-28. Ages 12-17. Intense performing arts training in voice and extemporaneous speaking, art, dance, drama and mime, creative writing, orchestra, songwriting, photography and video. Emerging Leaders Institute, advanced classes for ages 18-21, $195-$225. Discount for registration by March 1. New this year is WEPAW for ages 4-11, $50, discounts for siblings. 330-786-9601, www.yepaw.org .

MEDINA COUNTY

University of Akron Medina County University Center - 6300 Technology Lane, Medina. College for Kids summer program for grades 1-8. June 17-July 25, Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to noon and/or 12:45 to 3:45 p.m. Call 330-721-2210 or email workforcereg@uakron.edu .

Camp Invention - Weeklong day camps for grades 1-6 in June and July at two locations in Medina County. Learn problem-solving and teamwork through hands-on activities in science, technology, engineering and math. Locations are Ellen Canavan Elementary School in Medina, June 24-28, $220, $215 online, and Hickory Ridge Elementary School in Brunswick, July 15-19, $230, $225 online.

Kids Country - 3550 Octagon Drive, Medina. Ages 5-12. June through August. Swimming, field trips, crafts, etc. Call 330-723-8697 for rates.

Medina County SPCA Summer Camp for Kids - 245 S. Medina St., Medina. For animal lovers ages 6-14, June 24-28. Younger children mornings, older children afternoons. 330-723-7722 or www.medinacountyspca.com .

Morning Star Farm Ministries Kids Day Camps - 9241 Friendsville Road, Seville. 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Boating, horseback riding, basketball, volleyball, fishing, playground, crafts and more. Snacks and drinks provided. Some transportation provided. $50 per week, $15 per day. Grades 1-4, June 24-28; grades K-2, July 8-12; grades K-6, July 15-19; grades 3-5, July 22-26 and grades 6-8, Aug. 5-9. 330-633-7349 or bprough48@gmail.com .

Salvation Army - 527 College St., Wadsworth. Seven-week academic day camp for grades 1-6, June 24-Aug. 9, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. $65 per week. Call Lindsey Kercher at 330-334-3920.

Summer Reinforcement Program - Northrop Elementary School, 950 E. Reagan Parkway, Medina. Half-day programs for ages 3-12, 9 a.m. to noon, June 12-July 12. Tutoring program open to residents of Medina County with emphasis on math and reading, reinforcement of basic classroom skills, autism and social group unit. Speech therapy offered. $275. Registration deadline June 4. Affiliated with United Way of Medina County. Call Jane Langol at 330-725-5311, or e-mail sumrein@zoominternet.net .

Wadsworth YMCA Day Camp - 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. June through August for grades K-5. Before-care at 7 a.m., camp 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., after-care ends at 6 p.m. Field trips, crafts, enrichment activities, nature hikes, swimming, games, sports. $130 per week for Y members, $150 nonmembers. Call Kathy Liggett at 330-334-9622 or visit www.akronymca.org/wadsworth .

PORTAGE COUNTY

A.C.E. Academy (Aviation Careers Education) - Kent State University. Explore careers in aviation. Grades 9-12, June 10-14, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. $185, includes flying a KSU Cessna with instructor, touring Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, air traffic control tower and radar room, United headquarters and operations tower, NASA Glenn, a corporate flight center, Ohio National Guard and MAPS Museum tower. 330-653-2447.

Camp Asbury - 10776 Asbury Road, Hiram. Faith-based, weeklong resident camps for grades 1-12 and day camps for grades 1-6. Six one-week sessions June 16-July 26. Canoeing, hiking, swimming, archery, nature exploration, art, music, ceramics, challenge courses, giant swing, mudslide, disc golf, outdoor cooking, photography and star-gazing. $334 per week residents, $159 day. A ministry of the United Methodist Church, accredited by the American Camp Association. Open house, 2 to 6 p.m. April 7. 330-569-3171, email info@campasbury.org or www.campasbury.org .

Camp Carl - Resident and day camps sponsored by the Chapel in Akron at the camp, 8054 Calvin Road, Ravenna, next to West Branch State Park. Weekly sessions June 9-Aug. 9 for ages 6-17. Activities include riding horses, tubing, canoeing, archery and more. Day camps Monday-Thursday and overnight camps Sunday-Friday. Explorer camps for grades 1-4 (day) are the Verge, Frontier and Submerge, $195. Wild West, Splash and Extreme camps for grades 4-6 (overnight), $350. For those entering grades 6-8, resident camp themes are The Edge, Over the Edge, H2O Camp, Radical and the Rapids and Camp Retro, $350. For grades 9-12, themes are the Crux, the Undertow and Reverb Camp, $350. High schoolers' leadership camp, Stepping It Up, $210. 330-315-5665 or www.campcarl.org .

Camp Invention - Stanton Middle School, 1175 Hudson Road, Kent. Weeklong day camp for grades 1-6, July 15-19. Learn problem solving and teamwork through hands-on activities in science, technology, engineering and math. $220, $215 online. 800-968-4332, or www.campinvention.org .

Hiram College Summer Camps - Academic residential camps for high school students: Emerging Writers Workshop in Creative Nonfiction, June 20-22, $55. Genomics Academy, for students interested in biology, June 23-26, $100. Robotics Academy, July 9-13, $100. Fine Arts Workshop, exploring the visual arts, July 14-16, $55. Institute of Theatre, July 17-20, $55. Contact Lisa Schneider at 330-569-5986 or schneiderlh@hiram.edu .

Kent Parks and Recreation - Summer Day Camp and Rec Camp for ages 6-12, weekly June 10-Aug. 16, Monday-Friday at Plum Creek Park, and June 10-Aug. 16 at Kent Recreation Center. Field trip and swimming each week. Crafts, sports, games and nature studies. Plum Creek camp 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, $75 per week for Kent residents, $85 nonresidents. Kent Recreation camp, 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., $105 residents, $115 nonresidents. Kinder Kamp at Roy Smith Shelterhouse for ages 3-5, 9 a.m. to noon Monday, Wednesday and Friday, $28 residents, $36 nonresidents per week. Four-week session, $102 and $128. Tic Toc Kinder Kamp, ages 3-5, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, location and prices same. Call 330-673-8897 or go to www.kentparksandrec.com .

Kent State University's PEAK Summer Camp Program - Weekly sessions for ages 6-12, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 16 (no camp July 1-5). Lunch and snacks provided. Daily swimming. $135 per week for Student Recreation and Wellness Center members and affiliates, $160 nonmembers, $15 less for additional siblings. Before- and after-care available for additional fee. Call Phelan Nichole Fletcher at 330-672-0460, email pfletch3@kent.edu or visit www.kent.edu/recservices .

Kent State University's Piano Institute - Grades 7-12, residential program for advanced piano students, July 14-24. $1,385. www.kent.edu/pianoinstitute , 330-672-3100, or mbratel1@kent.edu .

Kent State University Research Center for Educational Technology - Summer workshops for grades 1-5. Lego WeDo Robotics, grades 3-5, 1 to 3:30 p.m., June 24-25; Lego WeDo Robotics for girls, grades 3-5, 9 to 11:30 a.m., June 26-27; Beginning Technology Tools, developing computer skills, for grades 1-3, 9 to 11:30 a.m., June 24-25; and Creative Technology, grades 3-5, 1 to 3:30 p.m., June 26-27. Create interactive posters, produce video and music on computers. All workshops $45. To register, visit www.kent.edu/ehhs/centers/rcet or email cmcdon16@kent.edu .

Kent State University Summer Creative Camp - Inspire Camp, School of Visual Communication Design, for ages 14-19, introduces students to design, illustration, photography, interaction design, creative thinking and problem solving. Pre-college experience, led by faculty and graduate students. June 17-21, day camp $425, overnight $1,050. Email InspireCreativeCamp@gmail.com , or contact Jillian Coorey at 330-672-9706 or visit www.inspirecamp.com .

Kent State University's Young Business Scholars - On-campus program features overview of business careers and studies. July 21-26, $50. Five days and nights of college life, dormitory living, food and fun. For details, contact Elizabeth Sinclair, assistant dean, College of Business Administration at 330-672-1286, easincla@kent.edu , or visit www.kent.edu/business/undergrad/young-business-scholars .

Martial Arts Summer Day Camp - Martial Arts Ohio, 1458 S. Water St., Kent. June-August, five days a week, 6 a.m to 6 p.m. Structured activities, crafts and more. $145 per week. Trip to Geauga Lake Wild Water Kingdom twice a week, field trip every week for extra fee. Season pass to Geauga Lake is free with eight-week sign-up. Family rates available. 330-389-0304, www.martialartsohio.com .

MEDCAMP 2013 - Northeastern Ohio Medical University, 4209 State Route 44, Rootstown. July 11-13. Three-day medical experience for students entering ninth grade, designed to stimulate interest in medicine and pharmacy, and to expose them to career opportunities. Applicants must excel in science and math (grades B and above) and reside in Portage, Summit, Stark, Wayne, Ashtabula, Carroll, Columbiana, Mahoning, Richland, Trumbull or Tuscarawas counties. Students will stay overnight in a Kent State University dormitory. 330-325-6584, or www.neomed.edu/academics/ahec/medcamp . Applications due April 19.

Porthouse Theatre Academy - High School Division Academy, School of Theatre & Dance, Kent State University. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., June 24-28 and July 29-Aug. 2. Musical theater summer intensive program for high school students interested in advanced study and preparing for university auditions. Taught by professional faculty. Class in the morning, master classes with professional actors and staff in the afternoon. $350 per week; second week $300 if participating in both sessions. $50 sibling discount. Contact Lisa Marie at lschuell@kent.edu or see www.theatre.kent.edu . For information, call Patricia at 330-672-0111.

Ravenna Christian School Day Camp - 6401 state Route 14, Ravenna Township. Early June to late August. Swimming at Clearwater Park in Hartville on Tuesdays and Fridays. Field trips on Thursdays. $140 per week, $30 per day with minimum of two days. Registration deadline is May 24. $60 before April 1, $70 after. 330-297-9310.

Ravenna Parks and Recreation - Summer Day Camp June 10-Aug. 9 for grades K-7, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. Games, sports, arts and crafts, swimming, gardening, nutrition and fitness, special events and field trips. Registration fee is for all 10 weeks and includes field trips. Lunch provided. $265 for grades K-5, $290 grades 6-7. Before day camp for grades K-7, $115; after day camp, $110. Junior Camp Counselor program, grades 8-10, 7:45 a.m. to 4 p.m., $265-$365. Prices slightly higher for nonresidents, or children whose parents don't work in the city. Forms available at recreation office, 530 N. Freedom St., or call 330-296-2864.

STARK COUNTY

Camp Berean Way - Calvary Chapel, 8151 Stuhldreher Drive NW, Jackson Township. For ages 8-17. Overnight Bible teaching camp at Camp Y-Noah in Green, Aug. 4-9, six days and five nights. $265, discounts available. Swimming, boating, crafts, games and campfires, with morning and evening Bible teaching. 330-854-0198, or 330-833-4347.

Camp Invention - Weeklong day camps for grades 1-6 in June and July at four locations in Stark County. Learn problem solving and teamwork through hands-on activities in science, technology, engineering and math. $220, $215 online. North Canton (Hoover High School), June 10-14; Plain Township (GlenOak High School), June 17-21; Canton (Faircrest Middle School), July 8-12; and Louisville (Louisville Middle School), June 17-21. 800-968-4332, or www.campinvention.org .

Canton Joint Recreation District Camps - Summer Camps at Stadium Park, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday-Friday, grades 1-3, June 3-Aug. 1. Games, sports, arts and crafts, swimming, special events and field trips. Summer Camp 2 at Weis Park, grades 4-6, June 3-Aug. 1. Softball, kickball, flag football, soccer and tennis. $300-$345, price increases $25 after May 4. Extended hours before and after, additional $200 for nine weeks. Registration deadline May 24. 330-456-4521.

Canton Montessori School Summer Camp - 125 15th St. NW, Canton. Pre-primary camp, ages 3 years to first grade, divided into four sessions, mornings, Monday-Friday. Full summer camp, five-day and three-day options. 330-452-0148.

Canton Symphony Orchestra Summer String Day Camp - Fieldcrest of North Canton, 1346 Easthill St. SE, North Canton. For grades 6-12 who play violin, viola, cello and bass. $275 per week, $250 before April 30. Conductor Eric Benjamin and orchestra musicians and education staff are instructors. Contact Lisa Boyer at 330-452-3434, ext. 604, lboyer@cantonsymphony.org or visit www.cantonsymphony.org/stringcamp .

Here For You Child Development Center - 7641 Wales Ave., Jackson Township. Summer programs for children in kindergarten to age 12. Different focus every week incorporating math, science, English and social skills. 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, part time or full time. Preschool program for ages 3-5, $37 per day or $147 per week. School age program for ages 6-12, $32 per day or $126 per week. 330-882-5300 or www.hereforyoucdc.com .

Kids Country - June through August in Hartville. Ages 5-12. Swimming, field trips, crafts, etc. Call 330-877-2600 for rates.

McKinley Museum - 800 Monument Drive NW, Canton. Summer Science Camp, the world of science through fun and educational activities, grades 1-5, July 8-12, 9 a.m. to noon. One day or all five, $20 per day nonmembers, $18 members, reservations required; Lights! Camera! Action! Learn about moviemaking, storyboards, props, acting and special effects, grades 6-9, Aug. 5-9, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., $135 nonmembers, $125 members. Call Christopher Kenney at 330-455-7043 or go to www.mckinleymuseum.org .

Stark State College of Technology - 6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Kids College for children entering grades 1-7. More than 100 classes in science, computers, creative arts, theater, sports and more. Sessions June 10-13, 17-20, 24-27 and July 1-5. $109 per week for all-day sessions or $69 per week for half-days. Student may attend one, two, three or all four weeks, mornings (three classes), afternoon (two classes) or all day (five classes). Camp Scrubs for grades 6-9, June 17-21 or July 15-19, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Aultman College of Nursing, 2600 Sixth St. SW, Canton. Introduction to medical field and nursing career. $199. 330-966-5455.

YMCA Day Camp - Summer day camps for grades 1-8. Includes swimming, outdoor games, field trips and more. June-August at: David YMCA, Jackson Township, 330-830-6275; Lake Township branch, 330-877-8933; Meyers Lake branch, Canton, 330-454-9018; North Canton branch, 330-305-5437; Louisville branch, 330-875-1611; and Alliance branch, 330-823-1930.

WAYNE COUNTY

B-Wiser Science Camp - College of Wooster, 1189 Beall Ave. Weeklong residential camp for girls entering eighth grade, June 9-14. Team-taught, hands-on experience with lab work in earth science, life science, chemistry, robotics, physics and engineering. Call 330-263-2101 or email mkilpatrick@wooster.edu . Applications at www.bwiser.spaces.wooster.edu . Deadline April 20.

Camp CHOF - 1820 Deerfield Road NW, Dalton. Weekly faith-based resident camps for grades 3-12. Swimming, go-karts, paintball, crafts, waterslide, climbing wall/zip line, challenge course, archery, field games and more. Discovery Camp, grades 3-5, June 16-21 and July 7-12. Camp Ignite, grades 6-8, June 9-14 and June 30-July 5. Collision Camp, grades 9-12, June 23-28 and July 14-19. Resident camp $210 per week. Day camp for grades K-2, six weekly camps, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., June 10-July 19. Swimming, go-karts, crafts and games, $110 per week. 330-477-6267, ext. 126, email campchof@cantonbaptist.org or www.campchof.org .

Wayne Center for the Arts - 237 S. Walnut St., Wooster. Art summer camps for age 4 to grade 8. $80 to $195. Clay Camp: Smithsonian: A Week at the Museums, completed grades 2-8, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., June 10-14. Junior Camp: What Comes Out at Night, ages 4-8, 9:30 a.m. to noon, June 17-21. Dance and Art Camp: Medieval Times, July 9-13, ages 4-6, 9:30 a.m. to noon; ages 6-9, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Junior Camp: We Love Earth, ages 4-6, 9:30 a.m. to noon, July 15-19. Clay and Visual Arts Camp for Elementary Students: Green Earth, grades K-5, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 330-264-2787, ext. 201.

OTHER COUNTIES

Beulah Beach Camp - 6101 W. Lake Road, Vermilion. On Lake Erie. Ages 7-18. 100 acres of beaches, sports fields and backwoods. Overnight camps, weekly June 16-Aug. 9, includes sports, adventure, watersports and more, $155-$350. Day camps, June 10-Aug. 16, $125 per week. 440-967-4861.

Camp Patmos - Six days of adventures and spiritual challenge, for grades 4-12, on Kelleys Island. Also family and specialty camps. Various sessions available, June 10-Aug. 3. Sailing, wakeboarding, water skiing, tubing, swimming, rafting, soccer, softball and more. $340 per week. Day camp, July 1-7, $250. 419-746-2214, or www.camppatmos.com .

Can-Do-It Farm - Horseback riding camp for girls, ages 8 or older, June through August, at 2279 E. Union Road, Jefferson. Weeklong resident camp $900, half camp $450, includes riding lessons, safety equipment, horses, room and board. Day camp $45 per day. 440-858-2244 or http://cdifarm.com .

Cleveland Metroparks Zoo - Day camp for ages 5-12. Weeklong sessions June 17-Aug. 16. Explore the world of animals and exotic habitats, meet the keepers, conservation-themed games and scientific experiments for older kids. Full-day camps 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, $190. Half-day (mornings), $135. Members $165 for full-day camp and $115 for half-day. Counselor-in-training for ages 13-14. Registration begins March 15; members, March 1. 216-635-3391 or http://www.clemetzoo.com .

CSB Ministries Summer Adventure 2013 - Brigade Camp at Stony Glen, Madison. Activities and Christian values for boys, grades 1-12, June 9-July on 322 scenic acres. Also, father/son and father/daughter camps. Choices for older boys include music, paintball, mountain biking, rock climbing. 330-677-2996 or www.ohiobrigadecamp.org .

Cuyahoga Valley Career Center Summer Camps - 8001 Brecksville Road, Brecksville. Day camps for grades 7-9, June 10-14 and June 17-21, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. $175 per week, out-of-district students $205. $10 discount before April 26. Camps June 10-14 include Discover IT, Lego Robotics, Care 4 Kids �N Petz, Chef for a Week, CSI: Cuyahoga Valley, Pulp to Paper to Art, Video Game Design. Camps June 18-22 are Gourmet Chef for a Week, Create It! Print It! Wear It!, Advanced Video Game Design, Camp Med. Camps for both weeks are Movie Makers, Tool Time and Beautiful You. 440-838-8851 or www.cvccworks.com .

Faith Ranch - High Adventure Horse and Bible Camps, weekly sessions for ages 7-18, June 16-Aug. 3. Two miles north of Jewett, 1½ hours south of Akron. Each camper has riding instruction and a horse for the week. Devotions, campfires, swimming, archery, crafts, challenge courses and more. $380 week, $280 half-week. 740-946-2255, reservations@faithranch.org or www.faithranch.org .

Falcon Camp - Resident camp for boys and girls ages 6-16, 4251 Delta Road SW, Carrollton. Two-, four-, six- and eight-week sessions, June 23-Aug. 17. Horseback riding, sailing, nature study, swimming, archery, tennis and more. $2,190-$6,800. About four hours riding time each day. 800-837-CAMP, info@falconcamp.com , http://www.falconcamp.com .

4-H Camp Whitewood - 7983 S. Wiswell Road, Windsor. Resident and day camp offering one-week sessions June to August, in Ashtabula County's Amish country. Women's weekend and specialty camps like Teen Camp, K-9 Camp, Shooting Sports Camp and Creative Arts Camp. Swimming, boating, archery, riflery, crafts, hiking, games, songs and more on 227 acres of forests, gorge, lakes and creeks. Membership in 4-H not required. Rates vary. 800-967-2267 or http://www.4hcampwhitewood.com .

Junior Medical Camp - Cleveland Museum of Natural History hosts weeklong day camps June-August that explore the science behind medicine and health. For grades 3-12 interested in learning about the human body, health and practice of medicine. $275 per week, $250 museum members. Call 216-231-4600, ext. 3214, 800-317-9155 or visit www.juniormedicalcamp.org .

National Computer Camp - Notre Dame College in South Euclid. Boys and girls ages 8-18, overnight and day programs, July 7-12 and July 14-19. Learn all aspects of computer programming. Day camp $830, residence camp $985, $245 per weekend between successive camp weeks. Call 203-710-5771, visit www.nccamp.com or email info@nccamp.com .

Ohio Forestry and Wildlife Conservation Camp - FFA Camp Muskingum, Carrollton. June 9-14. For students age 15 through grade 12. Residential camp educates students about Ohio's forest and natural resources, tree measurement and wildlife management. Also recreation and team-building activities. About $350, includes all meals, lodging and educational materials. 614-497-9580, e-mail info@ohioforest.org or visit www.ohioforest.org .

Pleasant Hill Outdoor Center - Residential camp for ages 7-16 in Perrysville, on Pleasant Hill Lake, near Mansfield. General sports, wilderness activities and adventure. Soccer, softball, swimming, rafting, arts and crafts, backpacking, canoeing, mountain biking, horseback riding. Weekly camps June 23-Aug. 2, $299-399. Horse camp and sailing camp, $499. 419-938-3715, infor@phoc.org or www.phoc.org .

Round Lake Christian Camp - 114 State Route 3, Lakeville. Grades 1-12, June 16-Aug. 9. Day and overnight camps include traditional Bible, wilderness, basketball, motocross and extreme adventure. Most weekly camps $220. 419-827-2017, www.roundlake.org .

YMCA Camp Tippecanoe - Located on 1,100 acres in Harrison County, one hour south of Canton. Ages 7-17, weekly camps June 16-July 27. Horse riding, sailboating and typical outdoor camp activities. $369 per week for Adventure Camp for Y members, $415 nonmembers, specialty camps higher. Mini Week or two-week sessions. 800-922-0679, ycamptipp@ymcastark.org or visit www.ymcacamptippecanoe.org .

SPORTS CAMPS

Baseball/softball

Akron Racers Softball All-Skills Camps - Firestone Stadium, 1575 Firestone Parkway, Akron. June 25, pitching, hitting and defense; July 9, mental game, bunting, slapping, outfield; July 23, hitting, baserunning, pitching, catching. Ages 8 to 12, mornings; ages 13 to 18, afternoons. Registration $60, after deadline $75. Deadlines are two days before each camp. Coaching seminar, 6 to 8 p.m. June 10. $60 before June 6, $75 after. Contact Lisa Simpson at 330-376-8188 or lisasimpson@akronracers.us .

Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy baseball - Boys ages 11-14, mornings June 24-27, $85. Fundamentals of hitting, pitching and defense. Bring your own equipment. 330-929-4151, www.cvcaroyals.org .

Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy softball - Girls ages 7-14, mornings, June 24-27, $85. 330-929-4151, www.cvcaroyals.org .

Kent State University baseball - Ages 8-18. Hitting camp, June 26; pitching and catcher camp, both June 27; prospect camp, June 18 and Aug. 10. 330-672-8545 or www.kentstatebaseballcamps.com .

St. Vincent-St. Mary High School baseball - Patterson Park, Akron. Grades 5-8, mornings July 1-3, $60. www.stvm.com .

Basketball

University of Akron - Keith Dambrot Summer Basketball Camps for boys and girls. Zips Basketball School, grades 1-12, June 17-20; and grades 1-7, July 22-25, $165 per session. Team concepts, fundamentals, conditioning, shooting instruction and more. Zips Offensive Skills Camp, grades 8-12, June 24-27; and grades 3-7, July 8-11, $190 per session. $15 discount before April 30. Multi-session and multi-camper discounts available. www.AkronBasketballCamps.com .

University of Akron - Girls individual camp, ages 9-14, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 24-27, prices start at $75. Li'l Zips day camp, boys and girls, ages 3-8, 9 to 11 a.m., June 25, $50. Call Candace Smith at 330-972-8274 or email clw23@uakron.edu .

Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy - Boys camp, ages 7-14, June 10-13, full day, $125. Girls camp, ages 8-14, June 17-20, mornings, $85. 330-929-4151, www.cvcaroyals.org .

Kent State University - Boys elite camp, grades 10-12, June 30; team camp, JV and varsity, June 29; day camp, grades 1-6 and 7-11, June 24-28, www.kentsatemensbasketballcamps.com . Girls youth day camp, June 17-20; team camp, high school/AAU division, June 21-23, www.kentsatewomensbasketballcamps.com . 330-672-2421.

St. Vincent-St. Mary High School - Boys camp, grades 3-8, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 15-18, $165. Girls camp, July 22-25, grades 3-5, mornings; grades 6-8, afternoons, $80. www.stvm.com .

Trinity United Church of Christ - 915 N. Main St., Akron. Grades K-3, 9 to 11 a.m., June 24-28, $50. Participants receive T-shirt and basketball. Sponsored by United Christian League. Call Phil Lombardo at 330-690-3031 or email unitedchristianleague@gmail.com .

Walsh Jesuit High School - Girls camp, grades 4-9, 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 10-13, $75. 330-929-4205, www.walshjesuit.org .

Bowling

The Fast Lane Bowling Center - 193 Wooster Road N., Barberton. Grades K-8, 9:30 to noon, Aug. 16, $25. Supervision and instruction, games and a tournament. 330-753-7256.

Cheerleading

Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy - Ages 7-14, mornings, Aug. 5-7, $50. 330-929-4151, www.cvcaroyals.org .

St. Vincent-St. Mary High School - Grades 2-9, mornings, July 29-Aug. 1. www.stvm.com .

Field hockey

Kent State University - Individual, grades 7-12, July 22-26. 330-672-2421 or www.kentstatefieldhockeycamps.com .

Football

University of Akron - Grades 9-12, 6 to 9 p.m., June 23, $40 early registration ($50 walk-up). Grades 1-8, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 17-18, 9 a.m. to noon June 19, $135. 7-on-7 high school team passing camps, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 27, $200 per team, limited to first 16 teams. Big man camps, 9 a.m. to noon, July 27, $10 if participating in passing camp, $50 if not. 330-972-7466.

Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy - Boys ages 9-14, June 17-20, mornings, $85. Basic fundamentals and techniques. 330-929-4151, www.cvcaroyals.org .

Kent State University - Satellite camp, grades 8-12, June 7. Elite underclassmen, grades 8-10, June 11. Elite junior, grade 11, June 12. Elite senior, grade 12, June 13. Youth, grades 6-8, June 14. 330-672-2421 or www.kentstatefootballcamps.com .

Mount Union College - Larry Kehres Football Camps, 1972 Clark Ave., Alliance. Grades 6-12. June 10-12 and June 25-27. Campers will be divided into groups and 7-on-7 teams based on age and skill level. One-on-one instruction from Mount Union position coaches. Overnight $250, commuter $180. Email kehresvg@mountunion.edu .

St. Vincent-St. Mary High School - Grades 2-8, mornings June 24-26, $60. www.stvm.com .

Walsh Jesuit High School - Boys grades 5-9, mornings June 10-12, $75. Emphasizes offensive and defensive position-specific drills and techniques. Speed and agility training, proper and safe tackling technique. Registration form online at www.walshjesuit.org starting in April, or contact Dan Larlham at larlhamd@walshjesuit.org .

Golf

Brandywine Country Club - 5555 Akron-Peninsula Road, Peninsula. Six-week program June 17-July 23. Junior Academy, ages 7-12, Monday or Tuesday; Teen Academy, ages 13-16, Tuesday. 330-657-2525 or www.golfbrandywine.com .

Edwin Shaw Rehab Challenge Golf Course - 1596 Flickinger Road, Akron. Junior golf camps for ages 7-14, 9 a.m. to noon, June 10-13, June 24-27 and July 8-11. Advanced junior golf program, ages 10-15 with at least three years experience, Wednesdays June 12-Aug. 7, 12:30 to 3 p.m., four weeks at public courses. Challenge golf classes for people with disabilities, Saturday mornings April 20-June 29. 330-784-5400.

Loyal Oak Golf Course - 2909 S. Cleveland-Massillon Road, Norton. Junior Golf Summer Program, Tuesday or Friday, noon to 3 p.m. Start June 7 or June 11. Also ladies day event. 330-825-2904.

St. Vincent-St. Mary High School - Mud Run Golf Course, Akron. Boys and girls grades 5-8, 9 to 11 a.m., June 14, 21 and 28, and July 12 and 19, $60. www.stvm.com .

Gymnastics

Kent State University - Overnight and commuter camp, ages 7-18, June 23-27 and July 7-11. 330-672-2421 or www.kentstategymnasticscamps.com .

West Side Gymnastics - 1347 Sunset Drive, Copley. Eight minicamps, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesdays. Ocean Life, June 19; Disney Monsters Inc., June 26; I Spy, July 3; Princess Party (girls)/Cars (boys), July 10; Island Explorer, July 17; It's a Buggy World, July 24; Water Fun, July 31; and Outer Space, Aug. 7. Camps are on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For pricing, call 330-666-9401 or visit www.westsidegymnastics.net .

Hockey

Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy - Lakefront Arena, Parma. Ages, 7-14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Aug. 6-8, $150. 330-929-4151, www.cvcaroyals.org .

Lacrosse

Stow-Munroe Falls High School - Grades 3-6 and 7-9, 6 to 7:30 p.m. June 11-13, $50. Stow High coaches and players will conduct camp. Basic stick skills, drills and scrimmages. stowlacrosse@gmail.com .

College of Wooster - Revolution Lacrosse Camps for ages 8-18, all skill levels. Boys July 21-25, girls July 14-18. Overnight $515, commuter $455. http://revolutionlacrossecamps.com , email info@sportcamp101.com 330-333-2267.

Soccer

University of Akron - Day camp, boys and girls ages 7-12, June 10-14 and June 24-28, $230. Little Stars, boys and girls ages 4-6, June 10-14 and June 24-28, $110. Residential/commuter camp, boys only 10-18, July 7-11 and July 14-18, residents $610, commuters $500. To register, visit www.akronsoccercamp.com .

Akron Inner-City Soccer Club - Free, five-week camp for children of Akron, boys and girls ages 5-14. June 10-July 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Monday-Friday. Call Dele Olabisi at 330-524-3776, email akroninnercitysc@gmail.com or visit www.inner-citysoccer.org .

Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy - Boys and girls grades 1-8, mornings July 22-25, $85. 330-929-4151, www.cvcaroyals.org. Kent State University - Girls high school tournament teams, July 12-14 and July 26-28; boys high school tournament teams, July 19-21; youth camp, ages 5-14, June 10-14; high school resident, grades 8-12, July 10-12; 330-672-2421 or www.kentstatesoccercamps.com .

Northwest Family Recreation Center - 1730 Shatto Ave., Akron. British Soccer Camp, Aug. 5-9. First Kicks, ages 3-4, 9 to 10 a.m. and 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., $80. Mini Soccer, ages 4-6, 10:30 a.m. to noon and 2 to 3:30 p.m., $94. Half day, ages 6-16, 9 a.m. to noon and 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., $125. Full day, ages 8-16, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., $175.

St. Vincent-St. Mary High School - Grades K-8. Boys camp, mornings July 8-11; girls camp, mornings July 15-18. $80. www.stvm.com .

Walsh Jesuit High School - Azzurri Soccer Camp for boys and girls ages 6-18. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., July 15-19. Email sdmac10@sbcglobal.net or call Dino at 330-607-0484.

Walsh Jesuit High School - One Touch Soccer Camp for boys and girls 7-17. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 22-26. $185, sibling discounts available. Contact John Kissner at 330-836-0574 or email kissner1972@yahoo.com .

Western Reserve Academy - Western Reserve Academy, Hudson. Boys and girls ages 7-17, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 24-28. $275, includes lunch, T-shirt and soccer ball. 330-673-3330 or www.everestsoccer.com .

College of Wooster - Residential camp for girls ages 10-18. June 23-26 and July 7-10. $435 per week, discounts available. Commuter $315. 330-317-8808 or www.woostersoccercamp.com .

Tennis

Case Western Reserve University - Wilson Collegiate Tennis Camps, ages 8-18, all skill levels. College prep camp, June 10-12 and July 29-31, $425 overnight, $365 commuter. www.wilsontenniscamps.com/case-western or email info@wilsontenniscamps.com or 330-333-2267.

Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy - Boys and girls ages 7-16, mornings July 8-12, $85. 330-929-4151, www.cvcaroyals.org .

Green Tennis Club - 2232 Raber Road. Junior Day Camps. Beginner/Intermediate, ages 10-17, June 10-14, July 8-12, and July 29-Aug. 2, $130 per week. Elementary, ages 5-9, June 17-21 and July 15-19, $100 per week. High school, June 24-28 and July 22-26, $130 per week. Elementary camp 9 a.m. to noon, all others 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call Keith at 330-699-5028, or visit www.greentennisclub.net .

Towpath Tennis Center - 2108 Akron-Peninsula Road, Akron. Summer programs start June 10. USTA 10 and under beginner clinics, and 18 and under junior tournament training. Call 330-928-8763 for times and fees, or visit www.towpathtennis.com .

Walsh Jesuit High School Tennis Camp - July 15-19, 3 to 5:30 p.m., $140. Contact Paul Boslet at 330-666-3778.

College of Wooster - Wilson Collegiate Tennis Camps, ages 8-18, all skill levels. June 16-20, June 23-27 and July 21-25. $635 overnight, $565 commuter. Match Play, July 7-11 and July 14-18. $705 overnight, $635 commuter. www.wilsontenniscamps.com/college-of-wooster or info@wilsontenniscamps.com , 330-333-2267.

Track & field

Kent State University - Individual camp, boys and girls, ages 10-18, dates to be determined. 330-672-2421 or www.kentstatecamps.com .

Volleyball

Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy - Girls grades 4-9, 6 to 9 p.m., June 17-20, $85. Call 330-929-4151, www.cvcaroyals.com .

St. Vincent-St. Mary High School - July 8-11. Boys and girls grades 3-5, mornings; grades 6-8, afternoons. $80. www.stvm.com .

Wrestling

Kent State University - High school team camp, grades 8-12, June 15-18, resident $285, commuter $145. Junior high team camp, grades 6-8, June 23-25, resident $180, commuter $130. Technique camp, Pin to Win camp and Intensive camp, June 19-22 and July 6-9, resident $285, commuter $190. Biddy youth camp, ages 10 and under, June 20-22 and July 7-9, $60. www.kentstatewrestlingcamps.com .

St. Vincent-St. Mary High School - Boys grades 3-12, mornings July 22-25, $75. www.stvm.com .

Miscellaneous sports

All Sports Camp - Walsh University's Hoover Park, North Canton; new location at Akron General Medical Center in Green. Boys and girls, grades K-7. Five weekly sessions in June and July, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. full day, or 9 a.m. to noon half day, with free extended care available. $145 per week full day. Discounts for siblings and for attending all five sessions. More than 20 sports including basketball, baseball, football, soccer, kickball, track and field, hiking, bocce ball, softball, running, cornhole, volleyball and slip 'n' slide, with technical drills, skill instruction and game situations. www.allsportscamp.net .

Archbishop Hoban Summer Sports Camps - Camps in June and July at the school facilities, including boys and girls basketball, cheerleading, wrestling, football, boys and girls lacrosse, boys and girls soccer, boys and girls volleyball, softball and tennis. Golf and bowling will be held offsite. Link will be available on the website when details are announced. www.hoban.org or 330-773-9107.

Hudson Community Education and Recreation Sports Camps - Summer sports camps conducted by Hudson High School varsity coaches, including baseball, football, soccer, field hockey, lacrosse, volleyball, tennis, golf, ice hockey, archery, cheerleading, basketball and track. 330-653-1210 or www.hudson.edu/hcer .

Pinnacle Sports Summer Day Camp - 313 Medina Road (state Route 18), Granger Township. Seven weeks of camp for boys and girls, June 10-Aug. 2 for ages 5-13. Focuses on a different sport each week, indoors and out. $160 per week members, $192 per week nonmembers. Discounts for multiple children or multiple weeks. Day option $40 per day members, $50 nonmembers. Soccer, June 10-14; baseball and softball, June 17-21; fitness, June 24-28; Olympic, July 8-12; basketball, July 15-19; Pinnacle partners, July 22-26; and all sports, July 29-Aug. 2. 330-239-0616 or www.pinnaclesports.org .

SPECIAL NEEDS

Akron Rotary Camp - 4460 Rex Lake Drive, New Franklin. June through August for age 6 to adulthood. Resident and day camps for those with physical, educational or developmental disabilities. Traditional camp activities adapted to meet the needs of each camper. Sponsored by the Rotary Club of Akron with the Akron Area YMCA, $525 per week. Day camp $290. Financial assistance available. Call 330-644-4512, email rotarycamp@akronymca.org or visit www.rotarycamp.org .

All-Star Training Club Academic/Sports Camp - For individuals with special needs age 6 or older at Weaver School, 89 E. Howe Ave., Tallmadge. Also open to those who do not have special needs considerations. Goal is inclusion of all populations with enrichment in social, academic and physical awareness. Six weeks, June 24-Aug. 2. Transportation and scholarship available. Application deadline is April 26. Call Dan Lancianese at 330-352-5602.

Aluminum Cans for Burned Children Summer Camp - Ages 7-17 who have been treated at Akron Children's Hospital burn unit, Aug. 4-9 at Akron Rotary Camp, 4460 Rex Lake Drive, New Franklin. Contact Becky Mundy at 330-543-8813.

Asthma Camp - For children ages 8-15 with asthma, overnight July 17-22, at Flying Horse Farms in Mount Gilead, near Columbus. Participants will be transported by bus. Fishing, swimming, canoeing, crafts, hikes and other outdoor activities. Free to eligible families. Call Lisa Jones or Tracy Rise at 330-543-8585 or email ljones4@chmca.org or trise.@chmca.org.

Autism Bike Camp - Copley High School, 3807 Ridgewood Road, Copley Township. The Autism Society of Greater Akron is hosting a bike camp for individuals with disabilities. I Can Bike is a weeklong camp, July 15-19, for ages 8 and older who wish to learn to ride a conventional two-wheel bicycle without training wheels. $175. www.autismohio.org/greaterakron . Registration starts May 1.

Camp Ed Bear - May 31-June 2 at Camp Carl, 8054 Calvin Road, Ravenna. For children and adolescents who are coping with cancer, leukemia, sickle cell anemia, hemophilia or serious blood disorders. For current or former patients of Akron Children's Hospital. Call Sharon Beach or Doug Palmer at 330-543-8831.

Camp Promise - Hospice Care Center, 3358 Ridgewood Road, Copley Township. The Hospice of Visiting Nurse Service Center for Loss and Hope will hold a free camp for ages 6-11, Aug. 5-8, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. To help children process a significant loss such as a parent, grandparent or sibling. Children will learn to manage and understand their grief through activities such as craft-making, music and art therapy. Meals and snacks provided. Experienced facilitators will oversee children. Call Rochelle Sheppard at 330-668-4662 or 800-335-1455, ext. 4662.

Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health A+ Camp - Shipley Building, 919 Second St. NE, Canton. Five-day, four-night adventure for clients of the agency, ages 8-18. Traditional residential camp and intensive therapeutic services at 240-acre camp. Includes pool, heated cabins, dining hall, hiking trails and new shower facilities. $200 per week. Sessions are June 17-21 and 24-28 and July 8-12 and 15-19 and July 29-Aug. 2 and Aug. 5-9. Call 330-454-7917, Ext. 123.

EJ Therapy Summer Programs - Gault Family Learning Center, 716 Beall Ave., Wooster. Four-week program meeting twice a week in June and July. Occupational therapy programs in small group setting for children with developmental delays, ADD/ADHD, autism, sensory processing issues, special needs as well as typical children who are struggling. Handwriting, keyboarding, kindergarten readiness, sensory needs and strategies, boys and girls club focusing on social interaction and imaginative play. $150-250. 330-262-4449 or www.ejtherapy.com .

Hattie Larlham Summer Camps - 9772 Diagonal Road, Mantua. Age varies by camp. Connect with Movement and Play, designed for children with autism spectrum disorders, sensory processing issues and motor planning or movement disabilities: ages 5-12, June 10-14, June 17-21, July 8-12, July 15-19, July 22-26, Aug. 5-9, Aug. 12-16 and Aug. 19-23. Connect with Teens, ages 13-17, June 24-28 and Aug. 19-23. Connect with Art, includes painting, photography, pottery and musical expression: ages 5-12. June 24-28. Connect with Community, interacting with people from different professions: ages 5-12, July 29-Aug. 2. Connect with Hattie's Friends, an integrated camp for children with and without disabilities to come together: ages 6-12, June 10-14, June 17-21, Aug. 5-9 and Aug. 12-16. Connect with Horseback Riding: ages 5-15, July 8-12 and July 15-19. $200 per week, except Connect with Horseback Riding, which is $250 per week, and Connect with Hattie's Friends, which is $100 per week. Daily rates available upon request. Call Karen Stoltzfus at 330-274-2272, ext. 3102, or email karen.stoltzfus@hattielarlham.org .

Language Learning Associates Summer Camps - LLA Therapy, 150 N. Miller Road, Fairlawn. Seven camps offered June-August by specialists in speech language pathology, occupational therapy, special education and behavioral analysis. Social Butterflies, for ages 5-7, and Social Explorers, for ages 8-10, are for children who need to improve conversational, social and play skills with peers, one-hour sessions over eight weeks. Social Life Skills Group, aimed at middle and high school students, is for those who have difficulties with advanced social concepts and independent living skills, six morning sessions. Food Science and Family Food camps deal with ages 7 and over who have feeding difficulties, weekly for 90 minutes. Handwriting Camp, for ages 6-9, and Pre-Writing Camp, for ages 4-5, address problems with motor skills needed to improve writing. Call 330-867-2240 for prices or to register.

Lawrence Summer School - Summer programs for grades K-6 with learning disabilities and attention deficits, at 1551 E. Wallings Road, Broadview Heights, June 12-July 10. Students do not need to be enrolled in Lawrence School to take advantage of the four-week, half-day (mornings) academic program. Ready, Set, Grow Kindergarten Readiness Program, $750. Lions LEAP Summer Program, for grades 1-6, remediation in reading, written expression, language arts and mathematics. $900. 440-526-0717, admissions@lawrenceschool.org or www.lawrenceschool.org .

Life Steps Camp - 1120 N. Huntington St., Medina. For kids and adults with disabilities. Eight weekly camps with field trips, horseback riding, crafts, games and life skills training such as cooking, grocery shopping and housekeeping. $300 per week. Themes: June 10, Where the Wild Things Are; June 17, Top Chef; June 24, The Amazing Race; July 8, Artful Antics; July 15, Minute to Win It; July 22, Superheroes; July 29, Sweet Genius; and Aug. 5, Museum Madness. Contact Sharon Biggins at 330-591-4434 or visit www.medinacreativehousing.com .

Northeast Ohio Doing It Deaf Summer Youth Program - Greenleaf Family Center, 580 Grant St., Akron. For deaf and hard-of-hearing youths and children of deaf adults in Summit, Portage, Wayne, Holmes and Medina counties, June until the school year begins. Free. Activities at various Northeast Ohio locations, to be determined. Call Shannon at 330-376-9494, ext. 248.

Society for Handicapped Citizens of Medina County - 4283 Paradise Road, Seville. Camp Paradise residential or day camps. Eight weekly themed camp sessions. 877-546-8568 or www.shc-medina.org .

Solution Behavioral Consulting Camp - Macedonia Recreation Center, 1494 E. Aurora Road, Macedonia. An integrated camp for ages 6-11 with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disorders. Five-week program with structured sessions in social skills, academics and other educational goals. Also, group games, arts and crafts, swimming and field trips. June 17-July 19, 9:15 a.m. to 3 p.m. 330-606-3633, solutionsbehavioral@gmail.com or www.solutionsbehavioral.com .

Total Education Solutions Camps - 61 N. Cleveland-Massillon Road (Suite B), Fairlawn. For children with disabilities, including autism. Social skills camps for all ages. June 10-Aug. 17, 9 a.m. to noon, Monday-Thursday. Includes Lego camp, Girl Power, Teen Group, specialized reading camps and therapy camps. Materials and snacks included. Call Tawnia Novak at 330-668-4041 for prices, or visit www.tesidea.com .

Wooster Community Hospital's HealthPoint Social Skills Groups - 3727 Friendsville Road (Suite 1), Wooster. Ages 3-12 with expressive and/or pragmatic language disorders, and those who have difficulty with self-regulation and behavioral difficulties who need the support of a structured social skills program. Includes autism spectrum disorders, sensory disorders or with diagnoses impacting verbal and non-verbal social communication. Physician referral required for speech and/or occupational therapy. Groups meet for 45-60 minutes one time a week. Sessions start in June. Evaluations in May. 330-202-3300.

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News Headline: Flashes have several strong performances against No. 1 Oklahoma State (Andrassy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Kent State wrestling has been building its credibility into a nationally recognized program, and it got a glimpse of what the top dogs look like as the Golden Flashes hosted No. 1 Oklahoma State — the New York Yankees of collegiate wrestling — as a part of the NWCA Cliff Keen Regional tournament on Sunday at the M.A.C. Center.

Kent State came up with a few strong performances against the Cowboys but couldn't sustain some early momentum, falling 34-10. Senior Stevie Mitcheff defeated Eddie Klimara 3-2 to start the match at 125 pounds, and 133-pounder Mackenzie McGuire, a freshman, upset Jonathon Morrison of OSU, who was ranked No. 6 in the country in that weight class. McGuire had a takedown in the first period and an escape in the final period to hold Morrison off 3-2.

“They're the No. 1 team in the country for a reason,” KSU coach Jim Andrassy said. “We had three guys that wrestled really, really well, and we had a huge upset at 133. That's the kind of match that gets you to the national tournament.”

Senior Dustin Kilgore (197 pounds), in his final matches at the M.A.C. Center of his storied career, didn't disappoint. Kilgore beat the No. 9 197-pounder in the country, Oklahoma State's Jon Morrison, by a major decision of 12-3.

Kilgore has long been a central instrument in Kent State gaining a foothold on the national wrestling scene. The Golden Flashes are currently a young team and have a couple of talented redshirts this year who will be available next season. On Sunday, KSU had its hands full with the Cowboys. Kilgore says facing that kind of competition is a necessary evil to creeping up into the top 10 programs.

“Those aren't the opponents we get to match up against very often, so it makes it hard going from smaller teams to the No. 1 team in the country,” Kilgore said. “It's a big step and it's hard on our guys. A lot of times our guys kind of freeze up, they don't know what to do. They haven't wrestled guys that tough. But they're gonna have to face opponents like this, right here.”

In the consolation match, KSU ripped through No. 18 Wisconsin 33-10. Kilgore pinned the No. 18 197-pounder Jackson Hein in the second period, improving his record to 36-0 this season. That pin also tied Jim Swetter's school record for pins in a season with 17, which leads the nation. He also extends his record of 171 victories for the Golden Flashes and has now won 65 dual matches in a row.

The Golden Flashes now have three weeks before the Mid-American Conference tournament.

Olympic wrestling

Earlier this week, the wrestling community received a hard hit after it was announced by the International Olympic Committee that wrestling would by eliminated as an Olympic spot in 2020. The president of wrestling's international federation, Raphael Martinetti, then stepped down this past week.

Kilgore and Andrassy both urged fans not to give up hope. The fight isn't over.

“Personally, I don't think it's gonna end,” Kilgore said. “Lot of talk going around, lot of politics going on with that. The president just dropped out so I think we're gonna get somebody really good and us individual countries, we're gonna come together. We're gonna all work together. We've been fighting on the mat as long as we can remember but things are different this year. We're coming together as one as a wrestling community. We're going to get our sport back.”

Andrassy agreed, saying people have jumped to conclusions about the final announcement.

“There still have to be two meetings, one in Russia in May and a final one in September, so it isn't a final decision at all,” he said. “I'd be really surprised if they dropped it. I have faith they'll get this done.”

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News Headline: Kent State Sports Report: Kilgore floored by decision to pull wrestling from 2020 Olympic games | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dustin Kilgore was floored when he first caught word that the International Olympic Committee executive board voted to remove wrestling from the list of 25 "core" summer sports last Tuesday, effectively nixing the sport from the 2020 Olympics at this time.

"l looked at my phone and I had texts from (KSU coach Jim Andrassy) and some other people telling me (wrestling) is out of the Olympics," said Kent State's star senior grappler, currently unbeaten and ranked No. 1 in the nation at 197 pounds. "The first thing I'm thinking of is 2016."

Kilgore has dreamed of being an Olympian since his days as a youth wrestler growing up in Berea. After earning a national championship as a junior at Kent State in 2011, then competing with the top grapplers in the world during his Olympic redshirt season last year, the chances of that dream becoming a reality had soared.

Throughout his amazing run into the wrestling elite, Kilgore has had his sites firmly set on competing in the 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil. While wrestling is safe for 2016, it's status from that point on is uncertain.

Kilgore, like the entire wrestling world, calmed down and refocused his energy as days passed following the stunning announcement by the IOC.

"It was a shock. At first I was really worried," said Kilgore. "But I think a lot of people throughout this country and other countries are working really, really hard to make things happen. Wrestlers, we're at the bottom of it; we can only do so much. But we've got the people on top that can really change things."

Someone familiar with those people is Oklahoma State head coach John Smith, an Olympic Gold Medalist in 1988 and 1992. Smith was in Kent on Sunday leading his Cowboys to the NWCA National Duals Regional title at the M.A.C. Center, and spoke at length on the Olympic wrestling controversy afterward.

"I really believe that (cutting wrestling) wasn't on merit. I believe that, I really know that," said Smith. "They can take the 39 different criteria of whose in and whose out and ignore them or apply them. I'm not sure that they were applied. But we also need to look at ourselves and ask ourselves why this happened, which we're doing.

"We've taken a step as an international governing body. Our president has resigned. I don't know enough to say whether he did or didn't do his job. But I do believe we will create a situation for ourselves in May that will make sure we get back in in 2020."

Smith was referring to an IOC meeting scheduled for May in Russia, during which three sports will remain alive for one extra spot in the 2020 Olympics. The final Olympic sport will be selected during a meeting in September.

"The good thing is they left a process for us to get back in," said Smith. "I feel thankful we have the opportunity to get back in, and we'll use that opportunity to make it real, real hard to say no to wrestling. They're gonna hear the voices.

"Keep in mind wresting in (the 2012 Olympics) had over 70 countries that participated. It's been in the Olympic Games from the beginning. It just doesn't seem right with it out. The fight's just started, and I tell you there will be a fight."

Kent State head coach Jim Andrassy can see quite a fight coming if the IOC eliminates wrestling at that May meeting in Russia.

"There's less than a million people in the world who do modern pentathlon (one of the sports kept in the Olympics instead of wrestling), and there are a million people in the United State who wrestle. And it's not even our national sport," said Andrassy. "Russia, Iran, Iraq -- wrestling's their national sport. They're going into Russia to have this meeting, and if they cut wrestling in Russia it'll be interesting to see what happens.

"But I don't think it will happen. I think this will just make wrestling stronger."

GYMNASTICS

No. 22 Kent State recorded a new season-high point total while defeating MAC rival and 24th-ranked Central Michigan 196.050-194.900 on Friday at the M.A.C. Center.

Junior Marie Case once again led the way for the Flashes by posting the best all-around performance of the day when her scores totaled 39.025, featuring a first-place finish on floor exercise (9.900).

Senior Lindsay Runyan gave Kent State a split on the uneven bars when she tied for first with Central Michigan's Kylie Fagen with a score of 9.900. Senior Lauren Wozniak also won the vault when she earned a 9.900 from the judges.

Kent State will visit Northern Illinois on Saturday.

BASEBALL

USA Baseball has named Kent State senior first baseman George Roberts to its preseason Golden Spikes Award Watch List, which recognizes the top 50 players in the country that will vie for the coveted Golden Spikes Award given to the top player in the county at the end of the season.

Roberts led the Flashes in batting average (.364), RBI (66) and slugging percentage (.549) in 2012. He also scored 45 runs and hit 23 doubles and eight home runs on his way to being named MAC Player of the Year and Louisville Slugger Second Team All-American.

TRACK & FIELD

Junior Katie Reiser sprinted her way into the record books by clocking a school-record 7.50 in the finals to claim first place at Saturday's Kent State Tune Up.

Junior Shanequa Williams won the 200 in 24.14 and the 400 in 54.43. Senior Keri Dantley recorded the sixth-best mark in school history to win the triple jump (40-11.5), and junior Ann Marie Duffus won the long jump with a leap of 19-7.

On the men's side, a pair of freshmen took top honors in field events. Jesse Oxley posted a mark of 16-4.75 in pole vault, Cody Jones cleared 6-9 to win the high jump, and senior Brandon Bailey won the 60 meters in 6.88.

Kent State will look to have a strong showing at this weekend's MAC Indoor Track & Field Championships. The women have won two of the last three conference crowns, while the men have taken second place two years in a row.

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News Headline: Kent State hosts monumental day for wrestling program (Andrassy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: While an upset of top-ranked Oklahoma State simply wasn't in the cards, Sunday was still a day Kent State wrestlers and fans won't soon forget.

The Golden Flashes fell to the powerhouse Cowboys 34-10, but bounced back to rout No. 18 Wisconsin 33-10 in the third-place dual of the NWCA Cliff Keen Regional, part of the national dual-meet tournament held for the first time at the M.A.C. Center.

Senior Dustin Kilgore, unbeaten and ranked No. 1 at 197 pounds, went out with a bang by knocking off a pair of top-20 opponents during his final meet in Kent. After defeating No. 9 Blake Rosholt of Oklahoma State 12-3 in his opener, the only wrestling national champion in Golden Flashes history ended his home career appropriately by pinning No. 18 Jackson Hein of Wisconsin with a patented second-period cradle at 4:56.

"It was a great feeling," said Kilgore, after notching his school record-tying 17th pin of the season, which leads the nation. "It was really exciting because of the environment we had. It's something we've never done before. This was four great teams wrestling and going at it, we had a huge crowd, fans were all riled up. They came here looking for some good matches, and I think they found some."

Kilgore (36-0) himself was looking for some competition, which has been hard to come by. He is now 36-0 with 29 bonus-point victories this season, and has now won 55 consecutive matches,

"Those were two awesome matches. It was exciting," said Kilgore. "I was looking forward to those matches. I went in the with the mindset that I want to dominate. That's the way I approach every match."

Flashes coach Jim Andrassy was pleased to see his star go out with a pin that brought a sizable crowd to its feet.

"Name a better athlete in the history of Kent State to leave here," Andrassy said. "Dustin's already won a national championship, if he doesn't win another one I'll be surprised. It was great having him in the gym and in this event this week. He will be missed."

Fellow senior Stevie Mitcheff (26-10) also went 2-0 on the day at 125 for Kent State, edging the Cowboys' Eddie Kilmara 3-2 in his opener before pinning the Badgers' Matt Cavallaris in 2:55.

"Stevie's wrestling better than he ever has in his life," said Andrassy.

Freshman Mack McGuire (22-16) pulled off the upset of the day when he stunned sixth-ranked Jon Morrison of Oklahoma State 3-2. A first-period takedown and a third-period escape was all the scoring McGuire needed to give the Flashes a 6-0 team lead after two bouts.

"He's a guy we were gonna redshirt until January," said Andrassy. "He's done everything we've asked since then and come on and had some really good wins. (Today's) win could get him in the national tournament."

Oklahoma State won the next six matches to secure the win over Kent State (10-6), then went on to knock off Northern Iowa 39-7 in the Sunday's regional final to advance to next week's eight-team championship tournament in Minnesota.

"Our guys fought very hard against the No. 1 team in the country," said Andrassy. "Other than Dustin, I didn't know what to expect. You watch the first two matches and I thought we were in better shape then them. We wrestled very hard. Then you got to see why Oklahoma State's No. 1 in the country."

Also earning victories for the Flashes against Wisconsin were senior Tommy Sasfy (157), sophomore Caleb Marsh (165), and redshirt freshman Sam Wheeler (174).

"I thought we could beat Wisconsin," said Andrassy. "I thought were the second-best team when the pairings were announced five months ago, and I thought the same before today. I think we're a team anywhere from No. 15 to 20 in the nation. We're a team that's actually starting to come around and peak, and I'm real excited about what's coming up."

Kent State will now begin preparations for the MAC Championships, set for March 10 in Buffalo.

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News Headline: Researcher: Horizontal shale drilling is much less harmful (Lutz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State professor performs study that shows big decline in wastewater produced

Kent State University has a new researcher who has brought with him some surprising information about what's becoming a critical subject in Ohio — wastewater produced by fracking.

It turns out horizontal shale drilling produces smaller volumes of toxic wastewater than conventional wells to get the same amount of gas, according to Brian Lutz, an assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State.

Dr. Lutz only arrived at Kent State from Duke University last November, but the Lordstown native spent much of the last few years next door, in Pennsylvania. He has been studying how much wastewater is produced by drilling in the Marcellus shale formation. Dr. Lutz also has looked at how the volume of water used in fracking and other drilling methods, including old-style vertical wells, compares with the volume of natural gas produced by those drilling methods.

There was no real comparison, Dr. Lutz and his fellow researchers said in a January report. Horizontal shale wells were far more efficient in terms of the amount of wastewater they produced compared to their gas output.

“We were surprised,” Dr. Lutz said. “While a shale well produces 10 times as much wastewater as a vertical well, it also produces 30 times as much gas.”

Looking only at the wastewater ignores the incredible amounts of gas that are produced by horizontally drilled and fracked wells as opposed to their older, vertical counterparts, Dr. Lutz said.

Drillers know this correlation, and it's a key reason that drilling in the shale is so profitable for them.

Wastewater, which consists of fracking fluid that was pumped down the well to start its production and naturally occurring brine that already is in the ground, represents a cost to drillers. Each barrel must be recycled or pumped down an injection well at a cost of about $2 per barrel, injection well operators report. Gas, of course, represents revenue, so the higher the gas-to-wastewater ratio, the better for them.

Figuring out the tradeoffs

From an environmental position, other effects of fracking can be viewed similarly, Dr. Lutz says.

For example, on the surface one shale well is a large undertaking that involves a drilling pad of five acres or so, and a lot of truck traffic. But, Dr. Lutz said, because one shale well produces the same amount of gas as 30 conventional wells, “shale gas wells also likely result in less surface disturbance per unit energy recovered since fewer well pads are needed.”

Dr. Lutz and his fellow researchers say policy makers and the public should realize that all forms of oil, gas and coal production have environmental consequences, and should compare them accordingly.

“This is the reality of increasing domestic natural gas production,” said Martin Doyle, professor of river science at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment and co-author of the study. “There are significant tradeoffs and environmental impacts whether you rely on conventional gas or shale gas.”

Dr. Lutz noted that coal mining, which in this part of the world often means mountaintop-removal mining in West Virginia, also can have dire economic consequences, including an impact on water. When it rains, a surface coal mine is exposed and much of the water that falls on the mine washes off into the surrounding area, along with whatever it picked up along the way, Dr. Lutz said.

Awash in wastewater

Dr. Lutz and other researchers don't downplay the amount of wastewater produced by shale drilling in this part of the country. And that amount only will increase as more wells are drilled and existing wells continue to produce brine, they say.

“Despite producing less wastewater per unit gas, developing the Marcellus shale has increased the total wastewater generated in the region by approximately 570% since 2004, overwhelming current wastewater disposal infrastructure capacity,” Dr. Lutz's recent report states.

Drillers in Pennsylvania are learning to use and produce less water and Pennsylvania is able to manage more than 80% of its wastewater internally, but much of the rest is shipped to Ohio injection wells, Dr. Lutz said.

With drilling now expected to ramp up in Ohio, the state's injection wells might have difficulty keeping up with the amount of water produced, Dr. Lutz said. However, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources again is permitting new injection wells, and more than 30 are planned for Ohio based on pending applications, the department recently reported.

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News Headline: Black History Month events continue at Miles College | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: al.com
Contact Name: Jesse Chambers
News OCR Text: FAIRFIELD, Alabama -- Black History Month, celebrated each February, is a marvelous opportunity for African-Americans to celebrate their culture.

It is also a great time for people of other ethnic groups to learn more about the enormous contributions that African-Americans have made to the United States.

Miles College has hosted numerous events this month, including speakers, film screenings and musical performances.

And there are several events remaining at Miles before the end of Black History Month for 2013.

Monday, Feb. 18. Miles College and Civil Rights in Birmingham. Brown Hall Auditorium. This discussion is part of the Chapel Forum Programs. 11 a.m.

Wednesday, Feb. 20. Excerpts from Crowns: Portraits of Black Women in Church Hats and music from The Inspirational Singers. Brown Hall Auditorium. Crowns is a play by Regina Taylor. Part of the Chapel Forum Programs. 11 a.m.

Wednesday, Feb. 20. An "Expression" of the Voice. Woods Auditorium, Pearson Hall. This forum discussion will be hosted by Charles E. Stallworth of the Miles College Division of Humanities. 6 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 21. Spoken Word. Student Union Building. Snacks provided. 6 p.m.

Monday, Feb. 25. Topic: National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) Then & Now. Brown Hall Auditorium. This discussion is part of the Chapel Forum Programs. 11 a.m.

Monday, Feb. 25. Crowns: Portraits of Black Women in Church Hats. Birmingham Public Library--Avondale Branch. 509 40th St. South. The Miles College drama department will perform excerpts from Regina Taylor's play. Free. 6 p.m. 205-324-8428.

Wednesday, Feb. 27. Miles College Choir. Brown Hall Auditorium. The choir will perform under the direction of Dr. Bernard Williams. Part of the Chapel Forum Programs. 11 a.m.

Thursday, Feb. 28. One College, One Book -- Leaving Birmingham: Notes of a Native Son, by Paul Hemphill. Learning Resources Center. This discussion of a work of non-fiction by acclaimed writer and Birmingham native Hemphill will be led by Tony Bingham of the Miles College Division of Humanities. 11 a.m.

Black History Month, or National African-American History Month, began as Negro History week in 1926, thanks to the efforts of historian Carter G. Woodson and clergyman Jesse E. Moorland. Woodson and Moorland picked February because of the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The two men were also the founders in 1915 of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History.

By the late 1960s, Negro History Week evolved into Black History Month, especially on college campuses, including Kent State. President Gerald R. Ford officially recognized Black History Month in 1976.

The theme of Black History Month 2013 is "At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington," marking the 150th and 50th anniversaries of those events.

Miles College is located at 5500 Myron Massey Boulevard, Fairfield. For more information, call 205-929-1000 or go to www.miles.edu.

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News Headline: Black History Month | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: VIP Jackson Magazine - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Black history month started as Negro History Week, by Carter G. Woodson, as a commemoration of the contribution of Americans of African descent in 1926. The timing , the second week in February, coincided with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. By 1976 the federal government had recognized the expansion of Black History week into Black History month, a trend started by the Black Student Union at Kent State University in 1969. From it?s outset, the commemoration was met with praise as well as hostility. In the black community, it created and still sustains pride and interest in the often forgotten contributions of one of the, as former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice termed,? founding population(s)of this country.? The commemoration in other circles however evokes cries of separatism, divisiveness and ethnic nationalism. Even the Mississippi born actor Morgan Freeman has renounced the holiday, stating that black history is American history and should be treated as such. In as much as the celebration of black history still seems to create differences of opinion both outside and within the race it purports to acknowledge, perhaps certain things need to be acknowledged. The African American culture and the survival of its people can not be explained through the lens of the typical patriotic view that is affixed to text book accounts of history. Blacks have often complained that the black history, that conventional American history presents has consisted around slavery, the civil rights era, Booker T. Washington, Frederick Douglass, and Martin Luther King. No mention of W.E.B. Dubois, Marcus Garvey, the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, Tuskegee Airmen or Garrett Morgan is normally made. The journey through the past that black history requires evokes painful memories that seem to counter the American ethos of freedom, opportunity and fairness. The strides made within the last few generations would have many saying, why dwell on the negative when you?ve come so far? This particular rationale doesn? t seem to influence celebrations of other struggles past. We don?t question the value of remembering December 7, 1941, just because we?re now allied with Japan; or the surrender at Appomattox, because the country is no longer divided ; or July 4th, 1776 because the U.K. has been a steadfast friend for the better part of our history. History is history whether painful or pleasant, it has the gift of giving us insight as to where we were , and where we are. Black history month, by the mere fact that it irritates some, proves it?s necessity. Black history is the exception that proves the rule, that liberty, equality and fairness CAN be found in this country. But the history of the African American shows some stories need a book of their own.

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News Headline: Joffrey Ballet, PIXAR IN CONCERT and More Set for Cleveland Orchestra's 2013 Blossom Music Festival, 7/3-9/1 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: BroadwayWorld.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Cleveland Orchestra has announced the 2013 Blossom Music Festival season. The Orchestra will present 19 concerts at Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Valley National Park from July 3 - September 1. Continuing a 40-year tradition, the Blossom season opens with Salute to America concerts with the Blossom Festival Band. Music Director Franz Welser-MÖst conducts three programs at Blossom, including opening night for The Cleveland Orchestra . Highlights of the season are The Joffrey Ballet's return under the direction of Tito MuÑoz and the Blossom Music Festival premiere of Pixar in Concert with conductor Richard Kaufman.

The Blossom season showcases the Orchestra in nine programs and features three principal musicians as soloists: Joshua Smith , flute, Mark Kosower, cello, and Franklin Cohen, clarinet. Conductors Nicholas McGegan, StÉphane DenÈve, Bramwell Tovey, Jahja Ling, and David Afkham return to Blossom, and Kirill Karabits makes his Cleveland Orchestra debut. Returning guest artists include pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, soprano Christine Brewer, bass Alan Held , and violinist Gil Shaham. Debut artists include soprano Luba OrgonÁŠovÁ, pianist CÉdric Tiberghien, violinist Ray Chen, and pianist Martin Helmchen.

A wide variety of popular music will be featured at Blossom this summer, including a premiere performance of the music of Simon & Garfunkel under the direction of Michael Krajewski. Broadway stars will take the stage in a Broadway's Leading Men program, led by Jack Everly . Cleveland Orchestra conductor Robert Porco will conduct highlights from the Gershwins' Porgy and Bess, and Bramwell Tovey leads an evening of the music of popular song, including music by Cole Porter and Jerome Kern .

Franz Welser-MÖst Conducts

Music Director Franz Welser-MÖst conducts the Orchestra's opening night at Blossom on Friday, July 5, with a program featuring soprano Luba OrgonÁŠovÁ in her Cleveland Orchestra debut performing as soloist in Strauss's Four Last Songs, followed by Shostakovich's Symphony No. 8.

Mr. Welser-MÖst will lead Beethoven's Grosse Fuge for string orchestra, Liszt's Totentanz for piano and orchestra with Jean-Yves Thibaudet, and Beethoven's Symphony No. 3 ("Eroica") on Saturday, July 6. A commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Wagner's birth will be presented Saturday, July 13. Mr. Welser-MÖst will conduct selections from Tristan and Isolde, Die WalkÜre, and Die GÖtterdÄmmerung. Soprano Christine Brewer and bass Alan Held will join the Orchestra in excerpts from the final scene of Die WalkÜre. Ms. Brewer will also sing the "Liebestod" from Tristan and Isolde and BrÜnnhilde's Immolation Scene from Die GÖtterdÄmmerung.

The Joffrey Ballet Returns

The Cleveland Orchestra and The Joffrey Ballet continue an ongoing collaboration in two performances on Saturday, August 17, and Sunday, August 18, featuring Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the work's shocking Paris premiere in 1913. The production is a reconstruction (currently on tour across the country) created by the Joffrey in 1987, of Vaslav Nijinsky's original choreography and the costumes designed by Nicholas Roerich. In addition to The Rite of Spring, the programs will include Interplay, choreographed by Jerome Robbins to music by Morton Gould , an energetic and brightly colored ballet full of youthful playfulness, and John Adams 's Son of Chamber Symphony, reminiscent of classical ballets such as Swan Lake, but distinctly contemporary, with choreography by Stanton Welch .

Pixar in Concert

Pixar in Concert premieres at the Blossom Music Festival on Saturday, August 31, and Sunday, September 1, on Labor Day weekend. The Cleveland Orchestra will perform selections from all 13 smash-hit Pixar films with visually stunning clips projected on large screens. The clips capture the essence of each film, including their beloved characters and the popular music. The films are: A Bug's Life, Brave, Cars and Cars 2, Finding Nemo, Monsters, Inc., Toy Story, Toy Story 2 and 3, Ratatouille, Up, and WALL·E. The concerts will be followed by fireworks, weather permitting.

Orchestral Masterworks

The Orchestra takes the spotlight at Blossom in performances of masterworks from the classical, romantic, and twentieth-century eras. Nicholas McGegan will lead a performance of Haydn's Symphony No. 103 ("Drum Roll). StÉphane DenÈve leads Debussy's La Mer, Ravel's La Valse, and Saint-SaËns's Piano Concerto No. 2 with CÉdric Tiberghien in his Cleveland Orchestra debut. Conductor Kirill Karabits makes his debut in a program including Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto with Gil Shaham and Prokofiev's Symphony No. 5. Bramwell Tovey will conduct Holst's The Planets. Violinist Ray Chen, in his Cleveland Orchestra debut, joins conductor Jahja Ling for Vivaldi's The Four Seasons. David Afkham will conduct Schubert's Symphony in C major ("The Great"). The program also includes Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 1 with debuting guest artist Martin Helmchen.

Cleveland Orchestra principals appearing as soloists at Blossom this season are: Joshua Smith in Mozart's Flute Concerto No. 1, Mark Kosower in Barber's Cello Concerto, and Franklin Cohen in Navarro's II Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra.

Popular Favorites and Broadway Hits

The smooth sounds of Simon & Garfunkel will be revisited onstage at Blossom in a tribute by vocalists AJ Swearingen and Jonathan Beedle, conducted by Michael Krajewski. Chart-topping songs on the program include "Bridge Over Troubled Water," "The Sound of Silence," "The Boxer," "America," and "Mrs. Robinson."

Highlights from the Gershwins' Porgy and Bess return to the Blossom stage conducted by Robert Porco. Acclaimed for her recent portrayal of Bess at the San Francisco Opera, soprano Laquita Mitchell will be joined onstage by Leontyne Price Vocal Competition winner Eric Greene, baritone, as Porgy, Broadway star Rodrick Dixon , tenor, as Sportin' Life, and the Blossom Festival Chorus.

Four of today's most talented Broadway leading men, along with one leading lady, join conductor Jack Everly and the Orchestra for great moments in musical theater history, including selections by Andrew Lloyd Webber , Stephen Sondheim , and Rodgers & Hammerstein . The hits include "Ya Got Trouble" from The Music Man, "Maria" from West Side Story, and a medley from LES MISERABLES.

Blossom Festival Band

Continuing a 40-year annual tradition, the Blossom Festival Band, conducted by Loras John Schissel, celebrates Independence Day with A Salute to America on Wednesday, July 3, and Thursday, July 4. The program features music by Gershwin and Sousa, and the explosive Tchaikovsky "1812" Overture, followed by fireworks.

Kent/Blossom Music

Celebrating its 46th season in 2013, Kent/Blossom Music began under the direction of George Szell when The Cleveland Orchestra and Kent State University launched a partnership in 1968, the year Blossom Music Center opened. Kent/Blossom Music's advanced training program brings more than 40 musicians from around the world to Ohio each summer for professional training in chamber music and orchestral studies. Participants receive lessons, coachings, and masterclasses with members of The Cleveland Orchestra and other elite faculty for five weeks in June and July. On Saturday, July 27, participants will perform with The Cleveland Orchestra in a side-by-side concert and also present a pre-concert program, conducted by Cleveland Orchestra Assistant Conductor James Feddeck, prior to The Cleveland Orchestra 's concert at the Blossom Music Festival.

Twenty Cleveland Orchestra musicians serve on the faculty at Kent/Blossom Music. Twenty alumni of Kent/Blossom Music are now members of The Cleveland Orchestra .

Family-friendly "Under 18s Free" tickets continue at every Blossom Music Festival concert

The Cleveland Orchestra continues its mission to offer free tickets to young people 17 and under for every Blossom concert again this season. More than 26,000 young people attended Blossom Music Festival concerts through the "Under 18s Free" ticket program in 2011 and 2012.

The "Under 18s Free" initiative is an integral part of The Cleveland Orchestra 's Center for Future Audiences, which was created to provide broader access for the Northeast Ohio community and is endowed through the leadership and generosity of the Maltz Family Foundation.

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News Headline: Kent State to get Boost in State Share of Instruction Money (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: 2014 projections show university will get increase in state support at 7 of 8 campuses

http://kent.patch.com/articles/kent-state-to-get-boost-in-state-share-of-instruction-money/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1360991201

After riding out cuts in state financial support in 2012 Kent State University is expected to see increases in state higher education dollars at seven of its eight campuses for 2014.

Gov. John Kasich's proposal for Ohio's biennium budget starting next year shows overall increases in the State Share of Instruction dollars to Ohio's public universities and colleges for fiscal year 2014 compared with 2013.

The proposal shows only the Kent State Trumbull campus will see a drop in 2014, of 0.4 percent, based on recommendations from the Ohio Higher Education Funding Commission.

The commission recommended the Kent campus see the largest increase, of 5.3 percent, raising the state's contribution from $96.7 million in Kent State's 2013 budget to $101.9 million in 2014.

Kent State relies heavily on state dollars to operate.

In 2012, the bulk of the university's eight-campus $574.2 million budget came from tuition and fees to make up 61.3 percent of the total budget. State appropriations accounted for 21.5 percent of the overall budget that year.

And in fiscal year 2012 the university saw a 13.1 percent, or about $12 million, cut in state dollars.

In a prepared statement, Kent State President Lester Lefton pointed to the university's role in the Northeast Ohio economy as an important reason to maintain state-level support of higher education.

“Gov. Kasich clearly understands the important role higher education plays in the economic revitalization of Ohio and our nation," Lefton said. "We appreciate that the governor continues to prioritize higher education. The Kent State community is committed to student success and helping our students graduate."

The higher education funding committee's recommendations for the university's eight campuses are:

Campus

FY2013 Actual ($)

FY 2014 Projected ($)

Percent Change

Kent

96,737,165

101,874,112

+ 5.3

Ashtabula

4,050,680

4,219,509

+ 4.2

East Liverpool

2,048,742

2,139,445

+ 4.4

Geauga (Twinsburg)

3,337,559

3,482,511

+ 4.3

Salem

3,738,460

3,853,605

+ 3.1

Stark

8,456,186

8,504,747

+ 0.6

Trumbull

4,643,535

4,626,705

- 0.4

Tuscarawas

4,851,369

4,866,882

+ 0.3

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News Headline: Kent State's Twinsburg Campus Would Get More Funds In Proposed Budget (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: 2014 projections show university will get increase in state support at 7 of 8 campuses, including Twinsburg.

http://twinsburg.patch.com/articles/kent-state-s-twinsburg-campus-would-get-more-funds-in-proposed-budget/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1360991147

After riding out cuts in state financial support in 2012 Kent State University is expected to see increases in state higher education dollars at seven of its eight campuses for 2014, including the campus in Twinsburg.

Gov. John Kasich's proposal for Ohio's biennium budget starting next year shows overall increases in the State Share of Instruction dollars to Ohio's public universities and colleges for fiscal year 2014 compared with 2013.

The proposal shows only the Kent State Trumbull campus will see a drop in 2014, of 0.4 percent, based on recommendations from the Ohio Higher Education Funding Commission.

The commission recommended the Twinsburg campus see an increase of 4.3 percent, raising the state's contribution from $3.33 million in Kent State's 2013 budget to $3.48 million in 2014.

Kent State relies heavily on state dollars to operate.

In 2012, the bulk of the university's eight-campus $574.2 million budget came from tuition and fees to make up 61.3 percent of the total budget. State appropriations accounted for 21.5 percent of the overall budget that year.

And in fiscal year 2012 the university saw a 13.1 percent, or about $12 million, cut in state dollars.

In a prepared statement, Kent State President Lester Lefton pointed to the university's role in the Northeast Ohio economy as an important reason to maintain state-level support of higher education.

“Gov. Kasich clearly understands the important role higher education plays in the economic revitalization of Ohio and our nation," Lefton said. "We appreciate that the governor continues to prioritize higher education. The Kent State community is committed to student success and helping our students graduate."

The higher education funding committee's recommendations for the university's eight campuses are:

Campus

FY2013 Actual ($)

FY 2014 Projected ($)

Percent Change

Kent

96,737,165

101,874,112

+ 5.3

Ashtabula

4,050,680

4,219,509

+ 4.2

East Liverpool

2,048,742

2,139,445

+ 4.4

Geauga (Twinsburg)

3,337,559

3,482,511

+ 4.3

Salem

3,738,460

3,853,605

+ 3.1

Stark

8,456,186

8,504,747

+ 0.6

Trumbull

4,643,535

4,626,705

- 0.4

Tuscarawas

4,851,369

4,866,882

+ 0.3

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News Headline: KSU to host Women in Business conference (Walker, Cook-Euell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University presents
its 3rd annual Spirit of Women in
Business Conference on March 6
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Kent
Student Center
The theme of this year's conference
is “The Enlightened Woman.”
Students, professionals and seasoned
business veterans are encouraged
to attend.
“The conference is important for
women of all walks of life, not just
business women,” said Veronica
Cook-Euell, Kent State's supplier diversity
program manager, keynote
chair of the 2013 Spirit of Women
in Business Conference planning
committee and last year's conference
co-chair. “The conference provides
a common ground and shows
us how important it is for women to
support ourselves and one another.”
Two speakers will deliver keynote
addresses at the event. Bernett L.
Williams, vice president of external
relations at Akron Children's Hospital,
will bring the powerful message
“I Choose” at the breakfast keynote
address at 9 a.m. in the Kent Student
Center Ballroom. Colette Carlson,
human behavior expert and author,
delivers the afternoon keynote
address at 1 p.m., bringing humor
and actionable insights to the topic
of “Speaking Your Truth.”
The 2013 Spirit of Women in
Business Conference includes
three break-out sessions.
“The sessions are aimed at providing
conference attendees with
ideas for enhancing their personal
and professional skills,” said Laurie
Walker, program director for Kent
State's Executive MBA Programs
and this year's conference co-chair
with Angela Neal-Barnett, Ph.D., a
Kent State professor in the Department
of Psychology.
Regular registration for the conference
is $50 and ends Feb. 28.
Late or on-site registration (March
1-6) is $55. Students can register
for $15. Kent State faculty and staff
members can register for $45 for
regular registration through Feb.
28 or register for $55 for late or
on-site registration.
Last year's event sold out early,
so those who are interested in attending
this year's conference are
urged to register as soon as possible
atwww.kent.edu/business/wib.
For more information about the
Spirit of Women in Business Conference,
including pricing, registration
and the complete schedule
of programs, visitwww.kent.edu/
business/wib or contact Barbara
Boltz at bboltz@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Steubenville case shows universities on heightened alert for problem students (Jarvie, Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The social-media frenzy following accusations that a 16-year-old girl was raped by two Steubenville High School football players prompted Kent State University in January to issue an unusual statement regarding a Steubenville teammate who has received a wrestling scholarship to the university.

Kent said it was monitoring the case as it related to the student, who has not been implicated in any wrongdoing but who was a target of online allegations.

Ohio State University at the time also faced public pressure and issued a statement calling the Steubenville situation "particularly disturbing." The response came after a hacked video from the night of the reported attack showed a Steubenville student, who became an OSU freshman, making fun of the victim. The freshman later withdrew from OSU.

While neither university took action, their statements, in an environment of enhanced campus security and social media hypervigilance, raised questions of where and how public universities draw the line on admissions based on non-academic factors.

Evaluating suitability for admission or residence hall placement can be tricky business. Most colleges and universities consider criminal histories for admission, according to a 2010 survey by an association of registrars and admissions officers. But there is wide variation in how the information is used.

Another survey of 350 college admissions officers by Kaplan Test Prep last year found one-quarter had used Google or Facebook to check out applicants, and the discovery of online information increasingly influenced applicants' acceptance chances. That information included everything from plagiarized essays to the use of vulgarities and photos showing alcohol consumption.

Officials from Northeast Ohio universities said they don't routinely check out the social-media activity of prospective or current students. But they have taken action when inappropriate or threatening material comes to their attention.

At OSU, a sophomore lost his job as a residence hall adviser several years ago after the university learned of posted photos of him with underage students who were drinking beer and wine.

Leigh Anne Spraetz, president of Academic Futures Inc., a Georgia college counseling service, said she knows of a young man whose Facebook post about making fake IDs cost him college admission. Spraetz said many colleges are stepping up social-media monitoring, though they don't have time or staff to look at everyone.

"I'm also hearing they're looking at postings when [considering] honors programs or scholarships," she said.

As for criminal histories, most colleges and universities ask for the information on admission applications.

The University of Akron does not, but it began asking the question on student housing applications about five years ago after it learned a dorm resident involved in an assault had a criminal background. Akron houses about 3,000 students in dorms.

Universities say that when a prospective student admits to a criminal past, officials conduct background checks. Their responses depend on the severity of the crime.

For instance, at the University of Akron, a sexual assault would preclude a student from living in a dorm but not necessarily from attending the school, said Dale Adams, director of student judicial affairs.

Cleveland State University said it generally won't accept a student who has committed a violent crime.

"It is possible, but not likely, that someone who committed a violent crime and completed all sanctions/sentence would be admitted," James Drnek, CSU's dean of students, said in an email. "There is a slight chance that the potential student could make a compelling case for admission."

Kent, meanwhile, said it will accept students with a violent crime in their pasts, if they have served their sentences. But the person would not be allowed to live on campus.

Two years ago, CSU also began asking applicants if they had ever been expelled, suspended or disciplined by another college or high school. An admissions committee reviews positive responses.

Past drug offenses or other nonviolent crimes would not keep applicants out of CSU, but they would probably be turned down for campus housing.

The harshest penalties are often meted out to those who lie on admissions forms that they have no criminal record. Students who falsify applications are typically kicked out.

"That's by far the biggest violation in regard to this policy," said Greg Jarvie, Kent's vice president for enrollment management and student affairs.

There is debate over using criminal records as a basis to deny admissions. The Center for Community Alternatives, a New York-based nonprofit that advocates for the reintegration of criminal offenders, argues that there is no evidence that students with criminal records pose a safety risk on campus. The group, which partnered with the admissions officers association on its 2010 survey, also says admission policies that take into account criminal records pose a civil rights issue because of racial disparities in the justice system.

On the social-media front, Jarvie said he had reservations about making judgments based on Facebook posts, unless something of a threatening or criminal nature is brought to the university's attention.

"There are a lot of distasteful things that get out there. The First Amendment protects everybody," he said.

Jarvie declined to discuss the matter of the Steubenville student who is to attend Kent next fall. The university had posted a statement on its Facebook page last month, after allegations had been made online in connection with the rape case, according to news accounts.

Some posters on the university's Facebook page re-posted inaccurate information about the case and urged the university to revoke his scholarship, Patch.com, a local news site, reported.

"We understand the severity and the seriousness of the allegations, and as we collect more information we will take appropriate steps as warranted," university spokesman Eric Mansfield told Patch. "We are now following the developments from Steubenville very closely."

Mansfield more recently told The Plain Dealer that the university was watching the case but never said it was reviewing the student's admission, as some media reported. The status of the incoming freshman has not changed, he said.

"There is nothing currently before the university to consider for action," he said in an email. "He's been accepted for 2013-14."

Though university officials declined to discuss online allegations spun from the Steubenville case, Jarvie -- speaking generally -- urged caution about accepting information from social media.

"I think that's dangerous," he said. "If anyone is making decisions off that information, I hope they're 100 percent right."

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News Headline: Final session of "MBA Lite: Renew Your Business" at Hudson Library | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: www.ohio.commldohio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The final session in the “MBA Lite: Renew Your Business,” a four-part mini-series of advanced programs for the small business community, will take place Feb. 25 at the Hudson Library.

The series, offered by Hudson Library & Historical Society's Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship Research, began in January and will continue with three programs this month, according to Hudson Library's website .

Denise Easterling, CPA and Entrepreneur Faculty Advisor for Collegiate Entrepreneur's Organization for Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation at Kent State University, will present “Entrepreneurial Marketing: How to Market the “New” Feb. 25.

The series kicked off with “Driving Change in Stable Organizations” with Dr. Susan Hanlon, Assistant Dean of the College of Business Administration at The University of Akron, Jan. 28.

“Financing for a Small Business,” with PNC's Business Banking Officer Jon Novak took place Monday.

Registered patent attorneys Howard Wernow and John Gugliotta presented “Value added IP: Why Intellectual Property Adds Value to Small Business” Wednesday.

Registrants must attend each session in the mini-series in order to earn a certificate after completion. The programs will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Hudson Library located at 96 Library Street. The programs will include 75 minutes of teaching time, followed by a question and answer period.

Programs are free, but require registration. Interested entrepreneurs can register for the workshops by calling 330-653-6658 ext. 1010 or register online at www.hudsonlibrary.org .

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News Headline: Fashion designer Suede unveils his new SUEDEsays line at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New York-based fashion designer, Season 5 "Project Runway" contestant and Kent State University graduate Suede recently introduced his new SUEDEsays line of fabrics and patterns with a free fashion show in the Rockwell Hall Auditorium at KSU.

Suede, who also recently competed on "Project Runway All Stars" Season 2, unveiled his SUEDEsays line with 15 exclusive runway looks.

The fashion show, presented in conjunction with Jo-Ann Fabric And Craft Stores, Simplicity, the Fashion School at Kent State University, and Springs Creative, also involved current KSU students -- 11 of the 15 models in the show are KSU students, and the Fashion Student Organization provided assistance on the day of the show.

The event included a free meet-and-greet between showtimes. Suede also appeared at the Hudson Jo-Ann Store the day before the show.

For more information about Suede and his SUEDEsays fabrics and patterns, visit www.suedesays.com.

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News Headline: Celebrations - Feb. 17 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State fashion merchandising student received the Ray M. Greenly Scholarship from the National Retail Federation. Senior Brittany Casper of Brunswick was among 24 students nationwide to earn the $5,000 scholarships.

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News Headline: KSU fashion merchandising major earns scholarship | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The National Retail Federation selected Kent State University senior fashion merchandising major Brittany Casper to receive its Ray M. Greenly Scholarship that is awarded to the next generation of retail leaders.

Casper, who is from Brunswick, is among 24 students nationwide to earn the $5,000 scholarship.

She received the award at the National Retail Federation's Annual Convention and Expo, also known as the Retail's BIG Show. The Retail's BIG Show is the annual flagship industry event hosted in New York City in January by the NRF.

Casper received a stipend in addition to her scholarship to attend the 2013 show that took place from Jan 13-16.

"This scholarship opportunity sounded incredible because it would give me insight into retail areas that I wouldn't normally have contact with," she said. "Looking at it from the overall retail perspective will help me learn how the other industries function and how to apply that to what I want to do."

Casper has internship experiences working at Urban Zen, Agentry PR, Todd Snyder and Giorgio Armani. Casper is excited to be returning to New York City.

"I want to be a buyer for a major fashion corporation so that I can help shape the industry," she said.

Kent State is a member of the NRF Foundation university partner schools, a partnership of schools nationwide that offer future retail leaders high-quality education and access to big names in retail.

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News Headline: Speech's timing lets governor sell big ideas (Cassell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By timing the address to follow his major budget, tax reform and school funding proposals, Ohio Gov. John Kasich's annual State of the State speech Tuesday in Lima will feel more like a stump speech for 2014 than the typical litany of big policy initiatives.

The Republican governor will use the speech to promote his latest ideas for the state, rather than announce them.

He's said as much.

"For those that are thinking that they want to come to Lima on the 19th for a whole bunch of new things in the State of the State, don't come," he said in unveiling his $63.2 billion, two-year budget this month. "Because I think we've got it all out on the field right now."

For the second consecutive year, Kasich is taking the address outside Columbus, and outside the Statehouse, where pro-labor protesters packed the halls and sent up disruptive shouts during his first address in 2011.

Last year, Kasich made history when he first gave the speech elsewhere, picking the Democratic and union stronghold of Steubenville to highlight positives he said were taking place in economically hard-hit eastern Ohio, particularly surrounding K-12 education and oil and gas exploration.

With Lima, in northwest Ohio, Kasich has found a manufacturing hub with significantly improved employment, which also sits in the heart of reliably Republican farm country. The new leader of the Ohio Senate that's sometimes block Kasich's plans, President Keith Faber of Celina, lives nearby.

Located about 80 miles south of Toledo, Lima was built around factories that made locomotives and school buses. Heavy industry still drives the city, home to an oil refinery, a Ford Motor Co. engine plant and the nation's only tank manufacturing plant.

Like many of Ohio's industrial cities, poverty is a problem in some neighborhoods, but the city's unemployment has been nearly cut in half from two years ago and now stands at 7 percent.

President Barack Obama's campaign rally just days before the election last November marked the first time a sitting Democratic president visited Lima since Harry Truman stopped there in 1948. In the end, Obama's rival, Republican Mitt Romney, handily won Allen County last year, scoring 61 percent of the vote to Obama's 37 percent.

By reversing the usual speech-then-budget pattern of past governors, the former congressman is following a classic campaign format: Announce a big policy initiative, then hit the road to sell its merits.

"He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive audience. He's trying to paint himself as a proactive governor coming forward with all those proposals kind of rapid-fire."

To review:

-In mid-December, Kasich announced his plan to borrow against future toll revenue on the Ohio Turnpike to generate up to $3 billion for highway and bridge construction projects

-On Jan. 9, the private nonprofit job-creation entity Kasich created, JobsOhio, announced with the administration that it was moving forward with the sale of $1.5 billion in bonds backed by future state liquor proceeds - disregarding a pending lawsuit against the entity's constitutionality.

-On Jan. 31, the administration released its much-anticipated overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula. Kasich said the aim was helping students in poor districts compete by narrowing tax-base disparities, while rewarding innovation and expanding access to vouchers. The plan gave an overall boost to the K-12 bottom line, proposing $15.1 billion in spending over two years, but left the bulk of individual districts with little to no increase in the first year.

-Four days later, Kasich unveiled a budget packed with significant policy overhauls. They included a restructuring of Ohio's tax code to phase in reductions to income and small-business taxes and applying the state sales tax, at a slightly lower rate, to long list of additional services. The budget also incorporates an expansion of Medicaid through the federal health care overhaul, the new K-12 school-funding formula, and a new way of funding public colleges and universities that fosters cost-saving collaboration and emphasizes college completion over enrollment.

Mark Cassell, an associate political science professor at Kent State University, said Kasich's budget and school funding package is "very mixed" for Ohioans. By laying out the plan ahead of the State of the State, the governor has given himself a forum to defend it.

"There's a bit of smoke and mirrors in there," Cassell said. "In the last budget, he pushed along these draconian cuts to the local level. He can now proclaim to be very generous to those local governments and schools, while offering these tax cuts. But broadening the sales tax will mean rising costs for everyone, and the poor will be hit the hardest."

Cassell said, "I think he genuinely believes these things are going to work to improve the state's economy." The State of the State will be his chance to sell them.

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News Headline: Cspan bus made a special stop at Kent State University | Email

News Date: 02/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >> Special bus for history buffs rolled into town today. Cspan bus made a special stop at kent state university. It shows the vast library of historic video clips and the series on first ladies. >> Visitors can watch hundreds of hours of archived video and learn about current events and history. >> This is just launched. We are in our 20th year and on the first ladies tour. And we are visiting ohio because 71st lied did is are from ohio. >> If you are interested in hopping aboard the c-span bus. It will be at the library in canton tomorrow from 10 until noon and flee and open to the public. Can you watch the first lady special on c-span this monday at 9:00 in honor of president's' day.

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News Headline: Lincoln assassination reaction focus of event | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Chillicothe Gazette - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHILLICOTHE — Leonne Hudson, a professor of history at Kent State University, will talk about “Supplying the Missing Pages in African-American History” at 11:30 a.m. Feb. 28 in room 206 of Bennett Hall on the campus of Ohio University-Chillicothe.

The Black History Month discussion will focus on the reaction of African-American soliders in the Civil War to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

Hudson, who has published several articles on the Civil War, is a member of the Ohio Civil War 150 advisory committee that is responsible for planning the commemoration of the sesquicentennial of Ohio’s role in the war.

The presentation is free and open to the public.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Former Rep. Dennis Kucinich stays in the public eye as Fox News contributor (Hanson, Leach) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Eaton, Sabrina
News OCR Text: Dennis Kucinich is a newly hired commentator on Fox News.

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Dennis Kucinich likes to describe himself as a "rooster in the Fox lair" when he takes to to promote his upcoming appearances on the conservative Fox News network.

Far from being a replacement for former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, a Tea Party favorite who left Fox News around the time it hired Kucinich as a paid commentator, the Democratic ex-congressman is serving as a left-wing foil for the network's reliably right-wing hosts.

It's in the eye of the beholder whether Kucinich's new friends on Fox are cooking his rhetorical rooster or whether he's outfoxing them the way Foghorn Leghorn thwarted Looney Tunes predators. Regardless, the kerfuffles between them make entertaining television.

Brookings Institution politics and media expert Stephen Hess views Kucinich's Jan. 16 hiring as part of Fox's effort to retrench after it was embarrassed last year by its commentators who predicted a landslide Mitt Romney presidential victory. The network just renewed Karl Rove's contract but let Dick Morris go. Hess, a former presidential speechwriter for Dwight Eisenhower, says the network needed to add another liberal voice like Kucinich's.

The fact that Kucinich is "not the most doctrinaire liberal" who is willing to "take a shot or two at his own party" makes him more appealing to the network, says Washington Post media critic Erik Wemple. According to Wemple, Kucinich brings a recognizable political name, a wealth of experience and a civil demeanor to his new job.

"I don't know how many people were expecting Dennis Kucinich to become a Fox News contributor -- I was not -- but it's a fun move," says Wemple.

Since Fox Chairman and CEO Roger Ailes announced Kucinich's hiring, saying his "willingness to take a stand from his point of view makes him a valuable voice in our country's debate," the two-time presidential candidate has shown up on many of its shows to serve as the network's liberal whipping boy for President Barack Obama and his fellow Democrats.

When Fox's Bill O'Reilly called Minnesota Democratic Sen. Al Franken a "complete weasel" during Kucinich's Jan. 17 debut as a Fox News contributor, the former Cleveland mayor shot back to defend Franken's stance on gun rights. As often happens on O'Reilly's show, the exchange devolved into a shouting match.

"You're crazy," O'Reilly bellowed at Kucinich, after denouncing Franken for not saying whether he'd back an assault weapons ban. "He recognizes that he needs votes in the state and that wouldn't be popular."

Kucinich hollered that O'Reilly should read a detailed article on Franken's views that appeared in a Minnesota newspaper.

"We have to recognize a larger question in our society," Kucinich said. "There is a lot of fear in our society. People are mistrustful of government."

Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com

TV format favors right

After watching their exchange, Kent State University broadcast journalism professor Gary Hanson observed that O'Reilly had a stronger voice and appeared larger on camera than Kucinich, a contrast that "undoubtedly plays into the reasons Fox viewers tune in and reinforces the idea that conservatives are strong and liberals are less so."

"One inherent disadvantage that liberals have in this format is that black vs. white, good vs. evil points of view play out better in this TV format," Hanson said in an email. "Liberal positions that are often more nuanced and need more explanation are tougher to do here. O'Reilly's position is summed up in a sound bite: 'Franken is a weasel.' Kucinich's job to defend Franken's positions is harder to do."

Hanson says Kucinich needs to "adopt the role of a gladiator riding into the battle with a sharp sword, not a dull one. He needs to work on making that sword sharper. He's not there yet, but he's on the right track. It makes for good TV. Whether it makes for good public policy is another story."

The following week, Kucinich served as the Democratic Party's human sacrifice on Fox News' "Cashin' In, " where its host, Eric Bolling, and a belligerent stable of panelists including Wayne Rogers, who starred in the 1970s hit television show "M*A*S*H," flagellated him over potential tax increases.

"We have both a tax and a spending problem," Kucinich told the group. "There's no question our government wastes a lot of money. People have every right to be upset every time they hear about a tax increase. We need to look at our monetary policy, because frankly, that's driving our tax system as well. People right now should know that our government spent hundreds of billions of dollars wasted on war."

"Why give them more?" Bolling said.

"The point is that there are ordinary needs that have to be met to keep the government going," Kucinich answered. "On a state level, there are services that have to be provided. State and local taxes provide services that are necessary for keeping a civil society going. But the issue of waste is a huge issue, and it needs to be regarded."

"So, the congressman says, 'They waste a lot of money up there in D.C. Let's give them more because they kind of need it,' " Bolling said as he sought another panelist's opinion.

Kucinich has also been called upon to discuss Obama's Cabinet picks with skeptical Fox News hosts. On Feb. 1, Fox's Laura Ingraham asked Kucinich, the sponsor of legislation to create a Cabinet-level Department of Peace, to defend Obama's war department pick: former Nebraska GOP Sen. Chuck Hagel,

"Look, he's a combat veteran," Kucinich said. "He'll be the first enlisted man who became Secretary of Defense. He has two Purple Hearts. He saved a man's life, took shrapnel to the chest. I mean, he could be an action hero. Instead, he's going to be Secretary of Defense."

When Ingraham criticized Hagel's recent appearance before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Kucinich retorted: "You know, this isn't 'Dancing with the Stars.' He wants to be Secretary of Defense. The troops will love him based on the fact that he actually served and understands their problems."

Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com

Deep understanding of issues

Former Akron Beacon Journal editor Janet Leach, who now heads Kent State's Media Law Center for Ethics and Access, says Kucinich's input on Fox shows he's well-informed, with a deep understanding of the issues and how Washington works. She said she particularly appreciates that he "expresses his viewpoint without turning up the volume, as so many TV commentators do these days."

"His analyses are framed by his long-held liberal views, whether you agree with him or not," Leach said in an email. "So, this opportunity with Fox seems to give Kucinich the national stage he sought with his presidential campaigns."

Kucinich did not respond to repeated interview requests for this article. In an interview last month, he told The Plain Dealer that he relished "the opportunity to go into the lion's den" on the Fox network.

"I don't yield to anybody on standing up for what I believe in," he continued. "If all you do is talk to people who agree with you, how are you going to change anybody's mind?"

Since leaving Congress Jan. 3, Kucinich has promoted a liberal political action committee that he started called Kucinich Action, which engaged in an unsuccessful lobbying effort to get Obama to appoint Arizona Democratic Rep. Raul Grijalva as the next Secretary of the Interior.

This month, he accepted an award for lifetime service from the Ohio AFL-CIO. He told the liberal Rob Kall Bottom Up Radio Show on WNJC in New Jersey that he is also working on a writing project and going on a speaking tour that includes Santa Barbara and Oakland, Calif., and at "a major labor rally in Wisconsin."

"I'm continuing to stay active, and to advance those things that I've been talking about for my entire life, and in particular, the last 16 years in the United States Congress," Kucinich said.

Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com

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News Headline: Travel Photo Contest judges announced; deadline to enter is Friday | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Glaser, Susan
News OCR Text: Focus on this: Amateur photographers have less than a week to get us their favorite images from the road. Then it's up to the judges to decide.

Deadline to enter the sixth annual Plain Dealer Travel Photo Contest is Friday, Feb. 22.

Bill Gugliotta, director of photography at The Plain Dealer, announced last week the contest's panel of judges. They are:

• Roger Mastroianni, a longtime local photographer who is the house photographer for the Cleveland Orchestra, Cleveland Play House and Great Lakes Theater. His work has appeared in numerous national publications and is part of the permanent collection at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. View his art at rogermastroianni.com.

• Nancy McEntee, a professor of photography and chair of the film, video and photographic arts department at the Cleveland Institute of Art. Her work, largely in black and white, can be found in numerous books, magazines, and public and private collections. McEntee has degrees from the Milton Avery Graduate School for the Arts at Bard College and the Cleveland Institute of Art. View her work at nancymcentee.com.

• Susan Kirkman Zake, a lecturer in Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, where she teaches classes in new media and is an adviser to the award-winning student media newsroom. Zake is the former managing editor for multimedia and special projects at the Akron Beacon Journal, where she began work as a staff photographer in 1986. She shares in three Pulitzer Prize team awards, including two at the Beacon Journa

The three will meet next month to choose first- and second-place winners in each of three categories: People of the World, Sense of Place and Close to Home. They also will choose one grand-prize winner, as well as two winners in the new Youth Division.

The grand-prize winner will receive a seven-night, all-inclusive trip to Mexico's Riviera Maya region, courtesy of Apple Vacations (applevacations.com) and Barcelo Hotel & Resorts (barcelo.com). Apple Vacations and Barcelo also are providing three first-place prizes, one in each Adult Division category, consisting of a four-night trip for two to the Riviera Maya. Both the grand- and first-place prizes include airfare, accommodations, resort transfers, meals, drinks and tips.

Second-place winners, one in each category, will receive a two-night stay at the Lodge at Geneva-on-the-Lake in Ashtabula County. Third-place winners, one in each category, will receive a Nikon Coolpix S6300 camera, courtesy of Dodd Camera.

The contest also includes the People's Choice Award, determined by online voting starting Sunday, March 31. Winners will be announced Sunday, April 21, in The Plain Dealer's Travel section and on cleveland.com/travel.

Also, new this year is a Youth Division, for photographers ages 13-17. Teen photographers can enter up to three images, total, in any of the three Adult Division categories. Top prize in the Youth Division is a Nikon Coolpix S6300 camera, courtesy of Dodd Camera. Second prize is four passes to the Greater Cleveland Aquarium. For entry details and rules: cleveland.com/travelcontest.

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News Headline: Kent State Students Bring Anti-Bullying Campaign to Portage County | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Lyndsey Sager
News OCR Text: Students, parents and teachers at Rootstown Middle School will see a new anti-bullying program next week as a group of five Kent State University students present “Pledge to Prevent: Bullying Stops Here.”

The program, created and implemented by the KSU students, encourages bullying awareness in the middle school by teaching students about bystander techniques, educating parents on how to talk with children about bullying and providing the teachers and administrators with information about how to prevent bullying in the school.

Initial research by the KSU students found that Rootstown Middle School sees a similar level of bullying as other middle schools in America. The survey, which included 265 respondents from the school, found that 72.2 percent of the children say they have been bullied. Nationally, it is estimated that 77 percent of students have been bullied.

The students leading the program include senior public relations majors Kirsten Bowers, Wezley Garlick, Mary Kate Garvey, Caitlin Potts and Lyndsey Sager. The campaign is part of the Public Relations Society of America's Bateman competition, a national competition among students belonging to college chapters of PRSA.

“Working on the campaign has been a great experience for me,” Caitlin Potts, one of the campaign leaders, said. “It's been a lot of work, but researching, creating and now implementing the campaign has taught me a lot.”

Among the activities planned for Pledge to Prevent week are an anti-bullying poster design competition, a Jeopardy-style game in the lunchroom and humorous anti-bullying videos.

The students at Rootstown Middle School will also see bystander technique stickers, which they will be given to put on a favorite folder or notebook as a reminder of how to stand up to a bully.

Additionally, posters, including “bullying STOPS here” stop signs, will be hung throughout the middle school building.

The students say the main push of the campaign is to get students, parents and teachers to sign anti-bullying pledge cards to decrease bullying in the school.

The campaign will culminate during the final week of February, with a parent and community meeting about bullying and school safety. At the meeting, the KSU students will share the details and results of their program with the parents and community.

Beginning next week, a display will be available at the Ravenna Public Library, one of the campaign's partners, with more information about bullying in the school.

For more information about the program, check out @PledgeToPrevent on Twitter, or go to Facebook.com/PledgetoPreventRootstown.

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News Headline: WKSU News: 'White Coats' chronicles the painful transition from student to M.D. (Marino) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU journalism prof. takes us inside the lives of three medical students undergoing a grueling transformation

Med. student Millie Gentry is surrounded by the books that consumed her for a good portion of her second year at Case med School. She struggled to maintain a sense of normalcy during her four years earning her M.D., and still today as a resident physician.

Few relationships engender as much trust as that of doctor and patient. But how does someone become a physician worthy of absolute trust?

WKSU's Jeff St.Clair talks with the author of a new book that looks at how students become doctors at a Northeast Ohio medical school.

Donning the white coat

The white coat ceremony marks the beginning of a new med student's four year transition into a medical doctor at Case Western University Medical School. At the ceremony, students, for the first time, don the white coat that symbolizes their chosen profession. It's also the starting point for author and Kent State University journalism professor Jacqueline Marino's chronicle of that transformation.

Marino looks at the central role doctors hold in our lives. "Think about how many times we see doctors. We see doctors at the beginning of life and at the end of life and every other significant medical event there's a doctor there. We are conditioned to just go to the doctor, ‘the doctor will have the answers, the doctor will figure it out,' well the doctor is a human being whose body can also be afflicted by all of these things, whose mind can be afflicted."

The afflictions of medical school test the students' minds and bodies. Marino tracks the exhaustion, the expense of medical school, the sheer amount of knowledge that students attempt to absorb. She says those are problems every student shares, "But there are also individual problems that people are going to face depending on where they're from and what their personal issues are, and that's what I wanted to show with the book."

Marleny Franco

The three students Marino followed through their journey come from widely differing backgrounds. One, Marleny Franco, was born in the Dominican Republic, raised in a Spanish speaking neighborhood in Boston, and felt it was important to share her story.

"I don't have any other physicians in my family, I come from a family of immigrants, and I really wanted there to be that voice so that people knew that people from all sorts of backgrounds could work hard and go to medical school and become a physician."

Each student has their own personal challenges to overcome during. Franco struggled with med students' all too common affliction, depression.

"I put a tremendous amount of pressure on myself during that period of my life. I felt like if I didn't perform and I didn't deliver academically I was not only letting myself down but everyone who had believed in me."

Millie Gentry

Millie Gentry came from a small town in Arizona. She had hoped to maintain a social life during medical school, but discovered that becoming a physician is all consuming.

"Finding that balance is the most difficult thing and I think it extends beyond medicine into everybody's life, it's just more difficult as a medical student or physician because you have so many more demands put on your time."

Now entering her residency, she still sometimes wonders if it's worth all the stress.

"Even now there are times I want to quit and I dream about doing something else like opening up a food truck or something and it's a big joke. But people who go into medicine aren't really quitters and they keep doing it, and keep doing it, and keep doing it, and they've gotten this far because they refuse to quit."

Mike Norton

There's a line in Marino's book that sums up the dichotomy of the ever changing medical field. She says,"medicine is an imperfect science practiced by perfectionists. They want things to be better, they want to be better, they want us, the patients, to help them be better."

The third subject in Marino's book is Mike Norton. Norton brought his wife and young child with him from Utah to study in Cleveland, where he struggled with his own form of perfectionism.

"There were many times as a third year medical school student that I felt almost that I was on an island, with a lot of people whose evaluations of me were subjective..."

Norton struggled both with his ADHD, and with the opaque criteria for success.

"and for me that was a very difficult adjustment to make."

The journey from student to M.D.

After spending four years with them, writer Jacqueline Marino explores the transformations these three young people experience on their way to becoming doctors.

"Their lives are so interesting, the challenges are so big, and their ambitions are huge too. I don't mean just personal ambition...they just want to be better. That's hard to do, to always want to be better with all the changes, all the stresses in the world, but they're always striving. I really respect that. It's really exciting to watch that."

A copy of Marino's book White Coats has been given to every student entering the most recent class of at Case Western Reserve University Medical School.

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News Headline: 2013 North Coast Road Racing Grand Prix: | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Star-Beacon - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Community Calendar

Sponsored by Achilles Running Shop

(Race information and results at www.ashtabuladistancerunners.org )

n March 16 - Shamrock Kick off 2 Mile, 9 a.m., Kent State University-Ashtabula Campus, West 13th St., Ashtabula

Director: Warren Dillaway 812-5392

n April 14 - Run from your Taxes 5K Run and 1 Mile Walk, 4 pm Geneva State Park picnic area

Director: Warren Dillaway 812-5392

n April 20 - Kent State Physical Therapy Pancreatic Cancer Run/Walk 5K & Kids 1 Half Mile Race 8 a.m., Kent State Ashtabula Health and Science Building Parking Lot, Director Tiffany Kiphart 964-4294

n May 11 - Campus to Campus Mile (8:30 a.m.) & 5 mile (9 a.m.) Ashtabula Area City Schools Elementary School Complex, details to come,

n May 18 - Spring for Sidewalks 5K, 9 a.m., Infield Chiropractic, 6177 Rt. 193, Kingsville

Director: Dr. Infield 224-0680

n May 26 - First LT. Michael L. Runyan 5k Run and Walk, 8:30 a.m., Spire Institute, 1822 S. Broadway, Harpersfield Township, Director: Scott Runyan, 383-9185

n May 27 - Lift Bridge Memorial Day 5K, 9 a.m. Bridge St. at Lift Bridge, Ashtabula Harbor

Director: Warren Dillaway 812-5392

n June 1 - Melanie Moretti Mismatched Socks 5K, 9 a.m., Edgewood High School, Blake Road, Ashtabula Township, Director: Michelle Sardella, 969-4391

n June 8 - Run From The Nun Good Habits 5K. 9 a.m. Lake Shore Park, Ashtabula Township

Director: Steve Wychock 964-2035

n June 15 - Greenway Trail 5 Mile, 9 a.m., Lampson Road entrance to Greenway Trails, Austinburg Township

Director: Erik van't Veer 477-9823

n July 4 - Ashtabula YMCA Firecracker 5K, 8:30 a.m., 263 W. Prospect, Ashtabula,

Director: John Bowler 997-5321

n July 13 - Pyma-Laker 5K (9 a.m.) and Half Mile Childrens' Race (8:30 a.m.) Birch Landing, Andover Township

Director: Tony Noxon 813-4537

n July 20 - Indian Trails Adventure Run, 3 Mile & 8 Mile Trail Run 8:30 a.m. crossing Ashtabula River, Cederquist Park

Director: Warren Dillaway 812-5392

n July 27 - Windmill 5K Run and Walk, 9 a.m., Conneaut Community Center for the Arts, 1025 Buffalo St., Conneaut

Director: Sean Smith 812-9384

n Aug. 24 - Wine and Walleye 5K and Guppy Run, 9 a.m., Bridge Street near Lift Bridge, Ashtabula Harbor

Director: Ashtabula Area Chamber of Commerce, 998-6998.

n Sept. 7 - Race to Cure Blindness 5K, 9 a.m., Kent State University, Ashtabula Campus

Director: Kathy Peterson 969-1940

n Sept. 14 - Suicide Awareness 5K, 9 a.m., Mental Health Board (Rt 84 and State Road) in Ashtabula Township

Director: Diedre Fleming, 381-9421

n Sept. 21 - Speech and Hearing Rehab 5K, 9 a.m., Lampson Road entrance to the Greenway Trail

Austinburg Township

Director: Miriam Cartner, 992-4433

n Sept. 22 - Spire Half Marathon, 7:30 a.m., Spire Institute, Route 534, Harpersfield Township

Director: Achilles Running Shop, 942-2059

n Sept. 29 - Run for the Grapes 5K, 9 a.m., UH Memorial Geneva Medical Center, Route 20 west of Downtown Geneva

Director: Jeff Piotrowski 415-1091

n Oct. 12 - Spiderweb "Kenny's 5K", 9 a.m., Spiderweb, 133 E. Jefferson St., Jefferson

Director - Pat Cramer, 576-4561

n Oct. 19 - Run for the Woodlands, 9 a.m., North Kingsville Presbyterian Church, 6546 Church St., North Kingsville

Director: Julie Simmons 813-1198

n Oct. 26 - Bridge to Bridge 11 Mile and 5K, 9 a.m., Bridge Street near Lift Bridge, Ashtabula Harbor Ashtabula

Director: Howard Mack, (216) 402-5592

n Nov. 2 - Ichabod Headless 1 Mile, 4 pm, Lakeside High School, 6600 Sanborn Road, Saybrook Township

Director: Warren Dillaway 812-5392

n Nov. 28 - Main Avenue 1 Mile, 9 a.m., former site of McKinsey Elementary School, Bunker Hill Road, Ashtabula

Director: Steve Sargent, 998-6465

n Dec. 7 - Jingle Bell 5K, 9 a.m., Point Park at west end of Walnut Boulevard in Ashtabula

Director: Warren Dillaway 812-5392

n All races subject to change in time and date.

n Check website ( www.ashtabuladistancerunners.org ) for race applications for revised details.

n Awards & a free dinner will be held in January 2014 for those completing at least six races.

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News Headline: Area entertainment events beginning Feb. 15 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BROADWAY'S ROCKIN' MUSICAL

 "Rock of Ages," the hit Broadway musical that includes songs by Pat Benatar, Bon Jovi, Journey, Styx and REO Speedwagon, will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. Tickets, $45 to $66, may be ordered at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac and 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Concert will feature Black Squirrel Winds | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Franz Dansi
News OCR Text: Members of Black Squirrel Winds are Kent Larmee (left), Mark DeMio, Amitai Vardi, Diane McCloskey and Danna Sundet.

NEW PHILADELPHIA  The Black Squirrel Winds will perform at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at  7 p.m. Feb. 26 in Founders Hall auditorium.

Sponsored by the Kent State Tuscarawas Artist/Lecture Series, the concert is free, and tickets are not required. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m., and seating is available on a first- come, first-served basis.

The program will include works by Franz Dansi, Jean-Philippe Rameau and Darius Milhaud.

Members of The Black Squirrel Winds are Kent faculty members Diane McCloskey, flute; Amitai Vardi, clarinet; Danna Sundet, oboe; Mark DeMio, bassoon and contrabassoon; and Kent Larmee, horn. Saxophonist Jeffrey Heisler will perform with the group.

Kent State Tuscarawas is at 330 University Drive NE.

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News Headline: Angela Johnson to be honored at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Author Angela Johnson of Kent will be presented the Virginia Hamilton Literary Award in April during Kent State University's annual Virginia Hamilton Conference on Multicultural Literature for Youth.

Johnson has written more than 40 picture books, novels, short-story collections and books of poetry. Among other honors, she has been named a MacArthur Fellow, received the American Library Association's Coretta Scott King Award for several of her books, and was awarded an honorary doctorate from Kent State University in 2007.

Johnson's newest book is "Lottie Paris and the Best Place," to be published in March.

The Virginia Hamilton Award is presented to an author or illustrator in recognition of artistic excellence that contributes to the field of multicultural literature for children or adolescents.

The award honors Ohio author Virginia Hamilton, an African-American author of children's books. She wrote 41 books, including "M. C. Higgins, the Great," for which she won the U.S. National Book Award and the Newbery Medal in 1975.

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News Headline: Portman Visit Highlights Northeast Ohio's Liquid Crystal Assets | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Recognizing Northeast Ohio as a global leader in the flexible electronics industry, U.S. Senator Rob Portman will attend a liquid crystal technology roundtable with NorTech staff and others at AlphaMicron in Kent, and tour the company's facilities during a visit to the region on Friday, Jan. 11.

Portman (R-Ohio) will have a discussion on Northeast Ohio's role in the development of cutting-edge liquid crystal technologies with representatives from regional companies in the field, as well as officials from the Greater Cleveland Partnership, Kent State University, NorTech and the City of Kent.

The Senator is scheduled to be at AlphaMicron at 1950 State Route 59 in Kent from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Both the roundtable and tour are open to the media.

The other companies joining the roundtable discussion are Akron Polymer Systems, Crystal Diagnostics, Hana and Kent Displays.

Portman's visit highlights the region's liquid crystal assets and its historical leadership in the flexible electronics industry. The flexible electronics science and manufacturing process produces ultra-thin electronic components and devices printed on materials that flex, bend, fold or stretch. It is used in products such as LCD display screens, which can be written on with either a stylus or finger.

A regional innovation cluster has emerged around the flexible electronics industry in Northeast Ohio. To recognize that cluster and accelerate its growth, NorTech launched its FlexMatters® initiative in 2010.

"The modern liquid crystal displays you see today had their beginnings right here in Ohio," says NorTech Vice President Byron Clayton, who heads the flexible electronics industry cluster. "We have a legacy."

That legacy emerged from the world-renowned work of the Liquid Crystal Institute (LCI) at Kent State University and the College of Polymer Science and Polymer Engineering at the University of Akron. From 1991 to 2002, the National Science Foundation funded the Center for Advanced Liquid Crystalline Optical Materials (ALCOM), a collaboration between the LCI, the University of Akron and Case Western Reserve University. ALCOM attracted more than $55 million in funding and created the technology and intellectual property used to spin off flexible electronics companies and attract existing companies to the field. Since 2002, the Ohio Third Frontier Program has invested more than $60 million in Northeast Ohio's flexible electronics cluster.

The FlexMatters cluster has over 50 members and is developing innovative technologies in multiple applications in five key markets: aerospace and defense, consumables, commercial and consumer electronics, and bioflex. It consists of businesses, suppliers, service providers and institutions focused on advanced manufacturing of flexible electronic devices and materials.

The cluster's potential to attract capital and create jobs in Northeast Ohio has been recognized by the Small Business Administration (SBA), which invested $1.2 million in 2010 and 2011 – $600,000 each year – to support entrepreneurial involvement in the cluster. Northeast Ohio also is one of only seven regions across the country that received a $385,000 Regional Innovation Cluster Contract from SBA last October.

One of the companies the FlexMatters® cluster has helped is Kent, Ohio-based startup AlphaMicron, which created a flexible film that when put on a visor can instantly change from light to dark with the press of a button. The technology is used in eyewear for the U.S. military and visors for motorcyclists.

In addition to visiting AlphaMicron during his trip to Northeast Ohio, Sen. Portman will also tour Dearing Compressor & Pump Co. in Youngstown and Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown.

"Northeast Ohio is at the forefront of cutting-edge technology, from the manufacturers at Dearing Compressor & Pump Co. whose compressors have enhanced natural gas exploration, to the scientists at AlphaMicron who revolutionized eyewear to protect our Armed Services in combat, to the educators at NEOMED who have ensured that Ohio's medical professionals are well-equipped to treat the local community," Portman said. "As these technologies continue to progress and develop, they will solidify Ohio's position at the center of technological advancement while creating more opportunities for Ohio's workforce and making America a leader in innovation."

NorTech is a technology-based economic development organization that is working towards the revitalization of Northeast Ohio by accelerating the growth of regional innovation clusters in targeted emerging industries. Serving 21 counties in Northeast Ohio, NorTech works as an intermediary to connect small, large and mid-size companies and universities for business, funding and research opportunities that result in job creation and capital attraction. NorTech is currently focused on three industries: advanced energy, flexible electronics and water technologies. Visit us at www.nortech.org.

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News Headline: Photography exhibit benefits KSU scholarships (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hudson Fine Art & Framing Co. recently enjoyed a lively turnout of buyers and onlookers curious to see an exhibit of the photography works of Kent State University President Lester Lefton, which were available for sale.

All the proceeds go to support scholarships for international students at KSU.

A proponent of meticulous post-processing of images, as opposed to capturing a moment in time as practiced by street photographers, Lefton utilizes the tools available in digital photography to enhance colors, but not objects.

Post-processing may be controversial among adherents of capturing a moment in time, but Lefton's program notes explain that the end product of his work reflects his artistic sensibility and the way he views the world.

"There is much written and much debated about the role of photography in society, the role of post-processing, and the purity of photography as an art form. My feeling is everybody should keep calm and shoot more. Let's populate the world with more art, however you define it. It will make for a better world," Lefton said.

The evening collection consisted of 29 such photographs. The photographs were all from countries he has visited and include scenes from Russia, Italy, Greece, Spain, Germany, Norway, Lithuania, Turkey, Germany, Cuba and Canada.

Subjects ranged from those of a beggar in St. Petersburg, a Florentine street scene and a the Jewish Museum in Berlin to a view of Trinidad, which is a world heritage site in central Cuba.

A print of the Notre Dame Basilica in old Montreal was up for a silent auction. Prices ranged from $49.99 to $485.99.

Those who visited the exhibit dined on an assortment of finger foods and a variety of wines.

Sponsoring the event were Gary Brahler and Kathyrn Dix Brahler.

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News Headline: University of Akron, Kent State University physics professors astonished by meteor in Russia (Gleeson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Meteor moved at 19 miles per second

A meteor streaks across the sky and explodes over Russia's Ural Mountains with the power of an atomic bomb Friday, its sonic blasts shattering countless windows and injuring nearly 1,000 people.

AKRON, Ohio - You don't have to study physics or be from Russia to be fascinated by the tremendous speed and force of a meteor that injured thousands in Russia and shattered a countless number of windows.

But, NewsChannel5 found a University of Akron physics professor, Sergei Lyuksyutov, who lived most of his life in Russia.

His reaction to the meteor?

"It was quite astonishing," Lyuksyutov said.

The associate professor of physics is familiar with the area where the meteor streaked across the sky and terrified Russians on Friday morning. He calculated the meteor was moving at 19 miles per second.

"Fortunately, there were no fatalities as far as I know, but damage was substantial because of sonic wave," Lyuksyutov said.

As bad as the damage was, Lyuksyutov pointed out that an iron meteorite, known as Sikhote-Alin, was 10 times more powerful when it crashed in Russia in 1947.

Jim Gleeson, chairman of physics at Kent State University, said millions of meteors enter the earth's atmosphere every year, but most burn up before reaching the planet.

"What makes this unusual is that it was probably bigger than most and it was close to where people live," Gleeson said. He said most meteorites land in oceans or deserts.

When asked what would happen if a meteor landed at Kent State, Gleeson said, "Landed at Kent State? There wouldn't be a Kent State anymore probably."

While there was no warning of the meteor in Russia, scientists have been keeping an eye on an asteroid that passed close to the earth, relatively speaking.

"It's not going to hit the earth. 17,000 miles away is the closest it's going to get. That's very close, but it's not too close," Gleeson said.

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News Headline: Kasich rolling his priorities into spotlight (Cassell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By timing the address to follow his major budget, tax reform and school funding proposals, Ohio Gov. John Kasich's annual State of the State speech Tuesday in Lima will feel more like a stump speech for 2014 than the typical litany of big policy initiatives.

The Republican governor will use the speech to promote his latest ideas for the state, rather than announce them.

He's said as much.

"For those that are thinking that they want to come to Lima on the 19th for a whole bunch of new things in the State of the State, don't come," he said in unveiling his $63.2 billion, two-year budget this month. "Because I think we've got it all out on the field right now."

For the second consecutive year, Kasich is taking the address outside Columbus - and outside the Statehouse - where pro-labor protesters packed the halls and sent up disruptive shouts during his first address in 2011.

Last year, Kasich made history when he first gave the speech elsewhere, picking the Democratic and union stronghold of Steubenville to highlight positives he said were taking place in economically hard-hit Eastern Ohio, particularly K-12 education and oil and gas exploration.

With Lima, in Northwest Ohio, Kasich has found a manufacturing hub with significantly improved employment, which also sits in the heart of reliably Republican farm country.

By reversing the usual speech-then-budget pattern of past governors, the former congressman is following a classic campaign format: Announce a big policy initiative, then hit the road to sell its merits.

"He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "He's trying to paint himself as a proactive governor coming forward with all those proposals."

Kasich's administration recently announced a much-anticipated overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula.

He also unveiled a budget packed with significant policy overhauls, including significant changes to taxes and an expansion of Medicaid.

Mark Cassell, an associate political science professor at Kent State University, said Kasich's budget and school funding package is "very mixed" for Ohioans. The governor's speech will give him a forum to defend it.

"There's a bit of smoke and mirrors in there," Cassell said. "In the last budget, he pushed along these draconian cuts to the local level.

"He can now proclaim to be very generous to those local governments and schools, while offering these tax cuts. But broadening the sales tax will mean rising costs for everyone."

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News Headline: Speech's timing lets Ohio governor sell big ideas (Cassell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) -- By timing the address to follow his major budget, tax reform and school funding proposals, Ohio Gov. John Kasich's annual State of the State speech Tuesday in Lima will feel more like a stump speech for 2014 than the typical litany of big policy initiatives.

The Republican governor will use the speech to promote his latest ideas for the state, rather than announce them.

He's said as much.

"For those that are thinking that they want to come to Lima on the 19th for a whole bunch of new things in the State of the State, don't come," he said in unveiling his $63.2 billion, two-year budget this month. "Because I think we've got it all out on the field right now."

For the second consecutive year, Kasich is taking the address outside Columbus, and outside the Statehouse, where pro-labor protesters packed the halls and sent up disruptive shouts during his first address in 2011.

Last year, Kasich made history when he first gave the speech elsewhere, picking the Democratic and union stronghold of Steubenville to highlight positives he said were taking place in economically hard-hit eastern Ohio, particularly surrounding K-12 education and oil and gas exploration.

With Lima, in northwest Ohio, Kasich has found a manufacturing hub with significantly improved employment, which also sits in the heart of reliably Republican farm country. The new leader of the Ohio Senate that's sometimes block Kasich's plans, President Keith Faber of Celina, lives nearby.

Located about 80 miles south of Toledo, Lima was built around factories that made locomotives and school buses. Heavy industry still drives the city, home to an oil refinery, a Ford Motor Co. engine plant and the nation's only tank manufacturing plant.

Like many of Ohio's industrial cities, poverty is a problem in some neighborhoods, but the city's unemployment has been nearly cut in half from two years ago and now stands at 7 percent.

President Barack Obama's campaign rally just days before the election last November marked the first time a sitting Democratic president visited Lima since Harry Truman stopped there in 1948. In the end, Obama's rival, Republican Mitt Romney, handily won Allen County last year, scoring 61 percent of the vote to Obama's 37 percent.

By reversing the usual speech-then-budget pattern of past governors, the former congressman is following a classic campaign format: Announce a big policy initiative, then hit the road to sell its merits.

"He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive audience. He's trying to paint himself as a proactive governor coming forward with all those proposals kind of rapid-fire."

To review:

--In mid-December, Kasich announced his plan to borrow against future toll revenue on the Ohio Turnpike to generate up to $3 billion for highway and bridge construction projects

--On Jan. 9, the private nonprofit job-creation entity Kasich created, JobsOhio, announced with the administration that it was moving forward with the sale of $1.5 billion in bonds backed by future state liquor proceeds -- disregarding a pending lawsuit against the entity's constitutionality.

--On Jan. 31, the administration released its much-anticipated overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula. Kasich said the aim was helping students in poor districts compete by narrowing tax-base disparities, while rewarding innovation and expanding access to vouchers. The plan gave an overall boost to the K-12 bottom line, proposing $15.1 billion in spending over two years, but left the bulk of individual districts with little to no increase in the first year.

--Four days later, Kasich unveiled a budget packed with significant policy overhauls. They included a restructuring of Ohio's tax code to phase in reductions to income and small-business taxes and applying the state sales tax, at a slightly lower rate, to long list of additional services. The budget also incorporates an expansion of Medicaid through the federal health care overhaul, the new K-12 school-funding formula, and a new way of funding public colleges and universities that fosters cost-saving collaboration and emphasizes college completion over enrollment.

Mark Cassell, an associate political science professor at Kent State University, said Kasich's budget and school funding package is "very mixed" for Ohioans. By laying out the plan ahead of the State of the State, the governor has given himself a forum to defend it.

"There's a bit of smoke and mirrors in there," Cassell said. "In the last budget, he pushed along these draconian cuts to the local level. He can now proclaim to be very generous to those local governments and schools, while offering these tax cuts. But broadening the sales tax will mean rising costs for everyone, and the poor will be hit the hardest."

Cassell said, "I think he genuinely believes these things are going to work to improve the state's economy." The State of the State will be his chance to sell them.

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News Headline: Speech's timing lets Ohio gov sell ideas (Cassell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, Ohio - By timing the address to follow his major budget, tax reform and school funding proposals, Ohio Gov. John Kasich's annual State of the State speech Tuesday in Lima will feel more like a stump speech for 2014 than the typical litany of big policy initiatives.

The Republican governor will use the speech to promote his latest ideas for the state, rather than announce them.

He's said as much.

"For those that are thinking that they want to come to Lima on the 19th for a whole bunch of new things in the State of the State, don't come," he said in unveiling his $63.2 billion, two-year budget this month. "Because I think we've got it all out on the field right now."

For the second consecutive year, Kasich is taking the address outside Columbus, and outside the Statehouse, where pro-labor protesters packed the halls and sent up disruptive shouts during his first address in 2011.

Last year, Kasich made history when he first gave the speech elsewhere, picking the Democratic and union stronghold of Steubenville to highlight positives he said were taking place in economically hard-hit eastern Ohio, particularly surrounding K-12 education and oil and gas exploration.

With Lima, in northwest Ohio, Kasich has found a manufacturing hub with significantly improved employment, which also sits in the heart of reliably Republican farm country. The new leader of the Ohio Senate that's sometimes block Kasich's plans, President Keith Faber of Celina, lives nearby.

Located about 80 miles south of Toledo, Lima was built around factories that made locomotives and school buses. Heavy industry still drives the city, home to an oil refinery, a Ford Motor Co. engine plant and the nation's only tank manufacturing plant.

Like many of Ohio's industrial cities, poverty is a problem in some neighborhoods, but the city's unemployment has been nearly cut in half from two years ago and now stands at 7 percent.

President Barack Obama's campaign rally just days before the election last November marked the first time a sitting Democratic president visited Lima since Harry Truman stopped there in 1948. In the end, Obama's rival, Republican Mitt Romney, handily won Allen County last year, scoring 61 percent of the vote to Obama's 37 percent.

By reversing the usual speech-then-budget pattern of past governors, the former congressman is following a classic campaign format: Announce a big policy initiative, then hit the road to sell its merits.

"He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive audience. He's trying to paint himself as a proactive governor coming forward with all those proposals kind of rapid-fire."

To review:

--In mid-December, Kasich announced his plan to borrow against future toll revenue on the Ohio Turnpike to generate up to $3 billion for highway and bridge construction projects

--On Jan. 9, the private nonprofit job-creation entity Kasich created, JobsOhio, announced with the administration that it was moving forward with the sale of $1.5 billion in bonds backed by future state liquor proceeds -- disregarding a pending lawsuit against the entity's constitutionality.

--On Jan. 31, the administration released its much-anticipated overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula. Kasich said the aim was helping students in poor districts compete by narrowing tax-base disparities, while rewarding innovation and expanding access to vouchers. The plan gave an overall boost to the K-12 bottom line, proposing $15.1 billion in spending over two years, but left the bulk of individual districts with little to no increase in the first year.

--Four days later, Kasich unveiled a budget packed with significant policy overhauls. They included a restructuring of Ohio's tax code to phase in reductions to income and small-business taxes and applying the state sales tax, at a slightly lower rate, to long list of additional services. The budget also incorporates an expansion of Medicaid through the federal health care overhaul, the new K-12 school-funding formula, and a new way of funding public colleges and universities that fosters cost-saving collaboration and emphasizes college completion over enrollment.

Mark Cassell, an associate political science professor at Kent State University, said Kasich's budget and school funding package is "very mixed" for Ohioans. By laying out the plan ahead of the State of the State, the governor has given himself a forum to defend it.

"There's a bit of smoke and mirrors in there," Cassell said. "In the last budget, he pushed along these draconian cuts to the local level. He can now proclaim to be very generous to those local governments and schools, while offering these tax cuts. But broadening the sales tax will mean rising costs for everyone, and the poor will be hit the hardest."

Cassell said, "I think he genuinely believes these things are going to work to improve the state's economy." The State of the State will be his chance to sell them.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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News Headline: Speech's timing lets Ohio governor sell big ideas (Cassell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Houston Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — By timing the address to follow his major budget, tax reform and school funding proposals, Ohio Gov. John Kasich 's annual State of the State speech Tuesday in Lima will feel more like a stump speech for 2014 than the typical litany of big policy initiatives.

The Republican governor will use the speech to promote his latest ideas for the state, rather than announce them.

He's said as much.

"For those that are thinking that they want to come to Lima on the 19th for a whole bunch of new things in the State of the State, don't come," he said in unveiling his $63.2 billion, two-year budget this month. "Because I think we've got it all out on the field right now."

For the second consecutive year, Kasich is taking the address outside Columbus, and outside the Statehouse, where pro-labor protesters packed the halls and sent up disruptive shouts during his first address in 2011.

Last year, Kasich made history when he first gave the speech elsewhere, picking the Democratic and union stronghold of Steubenville to highlight positives he said were taking place in economically hard-hit eastern Ohio, particularly surrounding K-12 education and oil and gas exploration.

With Lima, in northwest Ohio, Kasich has found a manufacturing hub with significantly improved employment, which also sits in the heart of reliably Republican farm country. The new leader of the Ohio Senate that's sometimes block Kasich's plans, President Keith Faber of Celina, lives nearby.

Located about 80 miles south of Toledo, Lima was built around factories that made locomotives and school buses. Heavy industry still drives the city, home to an oil refinery, a Ford Motor Co. engine plant and the nation's only tank manufacturing plant.

Like many of Ohio's industrial cities, poverty is a problem in some neighborhoods, but the city's unemployment has been nearly cut in half from two years ago and now stands at 7 percent.

President Barack Obama 's campaign rally just days before the election last November marked the first time a sitting Democratic president visited Lima since Harry Truman stopped there in 1948. In the end, Obama's rival, Republican Mitt Romney, handily won Allen County last year, scoring 61 percent of the vote to Obama's 37 percent.

By reversing the usual speech-then-budget pattern of past governors, the former congressman is following a classic campaign format: Announce a big policy initiative, then hit the road to sell its merits.

"He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley , a political scientist at the University of Dayton . "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive audience. He's trying to paint himself as a proactive governor coming forward with all those proposals kind of rapid-fire."

To review:

—In mid-December, Kasich announced his plan to borrow against future toll revenue on the Ohio Turnpike to generate up to $3 billion for highway and bridge construction projects

—On Jan. 9, the private nonprofit job-creation entity Kasich created, JobsOhio, announced with the administration that it was moving forward with the sale of $1.5 billion in bonds backed by future state liquor proceeds — disregarding a pending lawsuit against the entity's constitutionality.

—On Jan. 31, the administration released its much-anticipated overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula. Kasich said the aim was helping students in poor districts compete by narrowing tax-base disparities, while rewarding innovation and expanding access to vouchers. The plan gave an overall boost to the K-12 bottom line, proposing $15.1 billion in spending over two years, but left the bulk of individual districts with little to no increase in the first year.

—Four days later, Kasich unveiled a budget packed with significant policy overhauls. They included a restructuring of Ohio's tax code to phase in reductions to income and small-business taxes and applying the state sales tax, at a slightly lower rate, to long list of additional services. The budget also incorporates an expansion of Medicaid through the federal health care overhaul, the new K-12 school-funding formula, and a new way of funding public colleges and universities that fosters cost-saving collaboration and emphasizes college completion over enrollment.

Mark Cassell, an associate political science professor at Kent State University , said Kasich's budget and school funding package is "very mixed" for Ohioans. By laying out the plan ahead of the State of the State, the governor has given himself a forum to defend it.

"There's a bit of smoke and mirrors in there," Cassell said. "In the last budget, he pushed along these draconian cuts to the local level. He can now proclaim to be very generous to those local governments and schools, while offering these tax cuts. But broadening the sales tax will mean rising costs for everyone, and the poor will be hit the hardest."

Cassell said, "I think he genuinely believes these things are going to work to improve the state's economy." The State of the State will be his chance to sell them.

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News Headline: Speech's timing lets Ohio governor sell big ideas (Cassell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Marietta Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — By timing the address to follow his major budget, tax reform and school funding proposals, Ohio Gov. John Kasich's annual State of the State speech Tuesday in Lima will feel more like a stump speech for 2014 than the typical litany of big policy initiatives.

The Republican governor will use the speech to promote his latest ideas for the state, rather than announce them.

He's said as much.

"For those that are thinking that they want to come to Lima on the 19th for a whole bunch of new things in the State of the State, don't come," he said in unveiling his $63.2 billion, two-year budget this month. "Because I think we've got it all out on the field right now."

For the second consecutive year, Kasich is taking the address outside Columbus, and outside the Statehouse, where pro-labor protesters packed the halls and sent up disruptive shouts during his first address in 2011.

Last year, Kasich made history when he first gave the speech elsewhere, picking the Democratic and union stronghold of Steubenville to highlight positives he said were taking place in economically hard-hit eastern Ohio, particularly surrounding K-12 education and oil and gas exploration.

With Lima, in northwest Ohio, Kasich has found a manufacturing hub with significantly improved employment, which also sits in the heart of reliably Republican farm country. The new leader of the Ohio Senate that's sometimes block Kasich's plans, President Keith Faber of Celina, lives nearby.

Located about 80 miles south of Toledo, Lima was built around factories that made locomotives and school buses. Heavy industry still drives the city, home to an oil refinery, a Ford Motor Co. engine plant and the nation's only tank manufacturing plant.

Like many of Ohio's industrial cities, poverty is a problem in some neighborhoods, but the city's unemployment has been nearly cut in half from two years ago and now stands at 7 percent.

President Barack Obama's campaign rally just days before the election last November marked the first time a sitting Democratic president visited Lima since Harry Truman stopped there in 1948. In the end, Obama's rival, Republican Mitt Romney, handily won Allen County last year, scoring 61 percent of the vote to Obama's 37 percent.

By reversing the usual speech-then-budget pattern of past governors, the former congressman is following a classic campaign format: Announce a big policy initiative, then hit the road to sell its merits.

"He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive audience. He's trying to paint himself as a proactive governor coming forward with all those proposals kind of rapid-fire."

To review:

—In mid-December, Kasich announced his plan to borrow against future toll revenue on the Ohio Turnpike to generate up to $3 billion for highway and bridge construction projects

—On Jan. 9, the private nonprofit job-creation entity Kasich created, JobsOhio, announced with the administration that it was moving forward with the sale of $1.5 billion in bonds backed by future state liquor proceeds — disregarding a pending lawsuit against the entity's constitutionality.

—On Jan. 31, the administration released its much-anticipated overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula. Kasich said the aim was helping students in poor districts compete by narrowing tax-base disparities, while rewarding innovation and expanding access to vouchers. The plan gave an overall boost to the K-12 bottom line, proposing $15.1 billion in spending over two years, but left the bulk of individual districts with little to no increase in the first year.

—Four days later, Kasich unveiled a budget packed with significant policy overhauls. They included a restructuring of Ohio's tax code to phase in reductions to income and small-business taxes and applying the state sales tax, at a slightly lower rate, to long list of additional services. The budget also incorporates an expansion of Medicaid through the federal health care overhaul, the new K-12 school-funding formula, and a new way of funding public colleges and universities that fosters cost-saving collaboration and emphasizes college completion over enrollment.

Mark Cassell, an associate political science professor at Kent State University, said Kasich's budget and school funding package is "very mixed" for Ohioans. By laying out the plan ahead of the State of the State, the governor has given himself a forum to defend it.

"There's a bit of smoke and mirrors in there," Cassell said. "In the last budget, he pushed along these draconian cuts to the local level. He can now proclaim to be very generous to those local governments and schools, while offering these tax cuts. But broadening the sales tax will mean rising costs for everyone, and the poor will be hit the hardest."

Cassell said, "I think he genuinely believes these things are going to work to improve the state's economy." The State of the State will be his chance to sell them.

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News Headline: Speech's timing lets Ohio governor sell big ideas (Cassell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Palm Beach Post - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By timing the address to follow his major budget, tax reform and school funding proposals, Ohio Gov. John Kasich 's annual State of the State speech Tuesday in Lima will feel more like a stump speech for 2014 than the typical litany of big policy initiatives.

The Republican governor will use the speech to promote his latest ideas for the state, rather than announce them.

He's said as much.

"For those that are thinking that they want to come to Lima on the 19th for a whole bunch of new things in the State of the State, don't come," he said in unveiling his $63.2 billion, two-year budget this month. "Because I think we've got it all out on the field right now."

For the second consecutive year, Kasich is taking the address outside Columbus, and outside the Statehouse, where pro-labor protesters packed the halls and sent up disruptive shouts during his first address in 2011.

Last year, Kasich made history when he first gave the speech elsewhere, picking the Democratic and union stronghold of Steubenville to highlight positives he said were taking place in economically hard-hit eastern Ohio, particularly surrounding K-12 education and oil and gas exploration.

With Lima, in northwest Ohio, Kasich has found a manufacturing hub with significantly improved employment, which also sits in the heart of reliably Republican farm country. The new leader of the Ohio Senate that's sometimes block Kasich's plans, President Keith Faber of Celina, lives nearby.

Located about 80 miles south of Toledo, Lima was built around factories that made locomotives and school buses. Heavy industry still drives the city, home to an oil refinery, a Ford Motor Co. engine plant and the nation's only tank manufacturing plant.

Like many of Ohio's industrial cities, poverty is a problem in some neighborhoods, but the city's unemployment has been nearly cut in half from two years ago and now stands at 7 percent.

President Barack Obama 's campaign rally just days before the election last November marked the first time a sitting Democratic president visited Lima since Harry Truman stopped there in 1948. In the end, Obama's rival, Republican Mitt Romney , handily won Allen County last year, scoring 61 percent of the vote to Obama's 37 percent.

By reversing the usual speech-then-budget pattern of past governors, the former congressman is following a classic campaign format: Announce a big policy initiative, then hit the road to sell its merits.

"He's trying to seize the initiative a little bit, kind of take a proactive approach," said Grant Neeley, a political scientist at the University of Dayton. "It's the second time he's taking the State of the State address outside the capital, so he feels like it's a more receptive audience. He's trying to paint himself as a proactive governor coming forward with all those proposals kind of rapid-fire."

To review:

—In mid-December, Kasich announced his plan to borrow against future toll revenue on the Ohio Turnpike to generate up to $3 billion for highway and bridge construction projects

—On Jan. 9, the private nonprofit job-creation entity Kasich created, JobsOhio, announced with the administration that it was moving forward with the sale of $1.5 billion in bonds backed by future state liquor proceeds — disregarding a pending lawsuit against the entity's constitutionality.

—On Jan. 31, the administration released its much-anticipated overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula. Kasich said the aim was helping students in poor districts compete by narrowing tax-base disparities, while rewarding innovation and expanding access to vouchers. The plan gave an overall boost to the K-12 bottom line, proposing $15.1 billion in spending over two years, but left the bulk of individual districts with little to no increase in the first year.

—Four days later, Kasich unveiled a budget packed with significant policy overhauls. They included a restructuring of Ohio's tax code to phase in reductions to income and small-business taxes and applying the state sales tax, at a slightly lower rate, to long list of additional services. The budget also incorporates an expansion of Medicaid through the federal health care overhaul, the new K-12 school-funding formula, and a new way of funding public colleges and universities that fosters cost-saving collaboration and emphasizes college completion over enrollment.

Mark Cassell, an associate political science professor at Kent State University, said Kasich's budget and school funding package is "very mixed" for Ohioans. By laying out the plan ahead of the State of the State, the governor has given himself a forum to defend it.

"There's a bit of smoke and mirrors in there," Cassell said. "In the last budget, he pushed along these draconian cuts to the local level. He can now proclaim to be very generous to those local governments and schools, while offering these tax cuts. But broadening the sales tax will mean rising costs for everyone, and the poor will be hit the hardest."

Cassell said, "I think he genuinely believes these things are going to work to improve the state's economy." The State of the State will be his chance to sell them.

Copyright The Associated Press

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News Headline: Kent State students take mock trial seriously (Kratcoski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For Kent State University's Mock Trial Team, competition is a matter of life and death.

Well, not actual death.

The nine students on the team wrapped up their season this week after competing in the American Mock Trial Association Founding Fathers Regional Competition at Washington and Jefferson College in Washington, Pa. The team, composed of all first- or second- year members, took part in a mock trial based on the scenario of a grieving husband suing a diving company after his wife drowns during a diving excursion.

Led by Peter C. Kratcoski Sr., an emeritus and adjunct professor of sociology at KSU, and Peter C. Kratcoski Jr., a Kent attorney and KSU instructor, the team operates more like an independent study experience than a traditional class. Students in the club familiarize themselves with the details of a cases, preparing for roles as both attorneys and witnesses in front of competition judges, who rank their performances alongside students from competing teams.

Although the team from KSU did not advance from past the regional competition at Washington and Jefferson College, two students, Zachary Nickels and Thomas Walsh, won all-regional tournament awards for their performances as witnesses in the event. KSU's competition at the event included teams from Carnegie Mellon University, Michigan State University and the University of Michigan.

Walsh, who played a U.S. Coast Guard special agent at the trial, said his previous drama experience helped him excel as a witness.

"I was in theater all four years of high school, that probably contributed to (the recognition)," Walsh said.

He said witnesses in mock trials try not to give too much away to the opposing teams' attorneys, while also sticking to the facts and refraining for acting hostile.

Kratcoski Jr., who took over as the team's supervisor after founder Dr. Thomas Hensley retired, said students have to combine acting skills with a strong knowledge of the material in order to be successful at mock trial competitions.

"It's really a combination of the two," he said. "They really have to know their material or they get marked down significantly."

Kratcoski Jr. said the competition judges have reined in the costumes and acting flourishes a little in recent years, in an effort to put the emphasis back on the material.

"It was almost getting too dramatic," he said.

Kratcoski Sr. added that students need "knowledge of the case and the ability to think on your feet" to succeed at mock trial events.

Team members described mock trial as a team event, but one with a lot of pressure on the individuals. In sports terms, it might compare to gymnastics or wrestling, where individual athletes' scores get added to the whole.

Freshman Justin Martin said one member can put up a great performance, but "if the rest of the team isn't picking it up, it can be a train wreck."

"It's definitely a team sport, but there's a lot of individual preparation," freshman Mary Waddington said.

The team meets once a week, but that "individual preparation" outside of class may be the key to success. Nickels, a freshman who competed in mock trials throughout high school, credited his high finish among witnesses at the competition to the 10 to 15 hours per week he spends on practice and research in his free time.

Nickels said one of his goals in college is to help the team mature into a force that can compete "at the national level."

Kratcoski Jr. said preparing with the team helps students, especially those thinking about going to law school, improve skills key to being successful in their future careers.

"One of the first things we see is they grow in confidence," he said about his students.

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News Headline: C-SPAN Bus visits Kent State University campus | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The C-SPAN Bus made an appearance on Kent State University campus Friday morning, bringing a treasure trove of historical and political information to those students who were not asleep or in class.

Luckily for those who missed it, the research tools available on the bus are available 24 hours a day online, too.

Jennifer Curran, marketing representative for C-SPAN, said the bus uses technology to let students and the public know what the non-profit, public affairs stations have to offer.

"The goal is to raise awareness of C-SPAN," she said. "We have touch screen kiosks than demonstrate all the resources from our three networks."

C-SPAN, or the Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network, is a private, non-profit company created and funded by the cable television industry to provide the country with coverage of its political processes, with a focus on congressional hearings.

C-SPAN, launched in 1979, focuses on coverage of the U.S. House of Reprsentatives, while C-SPAN 2 began featuring the Senate and Book-TV programming after its 1986 launch. C-SPAN 3 shows additional public affairs and American history programs.

The networks' website, cspan.org, offers 190,000 hours of programming, which students and researchers can edit down to video clips for use in presentations, along with Congressional voting records and other information

Curran said the current bus trip is promoting the networks and website, as well as the new series "First Ladies: Influence and Image," a show documenting the lives of the wives of the U.S. Presidents, which will debut at 9 p.m. Feb. 25 and run every Monday.

Today, the bus will continue its tour of Ohio at the National First Ladies' Library in Canton.

Curran said many of the high school and college students who have viewed the bus so far were aware of the networks, but surprised by the amount of research material C-SPAN offers online.

"The students are really interested in going through our online resources, especially those they can use for school," she said.

Curran said college students who toured the bus have also expressed interest in C-SPAN's internship opportunities, which can include research, programming and scheduling duties.

"It's not a coffee-run internship," she said.

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News Headline: Grandparents learn to text to keep in touch with grandchildren | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Southern Illinoisan - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AKRON, Ohio — Grandparents may turn up their noses at text messaging as a way to communicate with their tech-savvy grandchildren. They want to hear the kids' voices, and they can use the phone to talk not type. But is that realistic in today's world? And are they at risk of missing out on a relationship with the youngsters they love?

“It's natural for grandparents to want as much personal interaction with their grandchildren as possible. Many grandparents feel like texting is so impersonal and detached (and) really do get a great deal of happiness from hearing their grandchildren's voices,” said Amy Goyer, AARP's home and family expert. “There is nothing wrong with trying to

balance phone calls and in-person time with texting

or emailing, but as grandchildren grow up, grandparents may have to adjust to their changes and preferences.”

Kids often have hectic lives. And sometimes texting is the best way to keep in touch whether Granny and Gramps like it or not.

“I'd say they run the risk of losing touch with their grandchildren's everyday lives if they don't text,” Goyer added. “That doesn't mean their whole relationship will fall apart, but they can stay in closer touch if they are willing to text.”

Goyer added that those older than 50 are high adopters of technology, and grandparents are often motivated by their grandchildren to learn how to use new forms of technology such as texting.

Many grandparents who live miles away from their loved ones have taken to Skype to hear and see their grandkids. With the free software application, a webcam and a high-speed Internet connection, users can talk to and see each other live via the Internet. But many busy teens and 20-somethings say texting is more convenient.

Nancy Lemmon and her 17-year-old grandson, Tyler Moore, aren't separated by miles. In fact, they live just a few doors from each other in Stow, Ohio. Still, they text regularly to communicate.

Moore is a busy guy. Though technically a student at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, he is taking 18 hours of post-secondary classes at Kent State University and participating in an internship in the psychology department. With those things and other activities, he's not the easiest guy to get in touch with for a voice conversation.

“They do not want to chat on the phone with their grandmother, or anyone else for that matter. They want to communicate short and sweet,” Lemmon explained. “Tyler may respond to me when I ask how he did at Kent this semester. He may let me know he has arrived safely at a destination out of town. He can tell me that he scored the highest grade in his psychology class or he got a 4.0 this semester at school, but the words that warm my heart the most is when he simply texts, ‘I Love You.'“

Sitting in his grandmother's home, Moore acknowledged the two would go longer periods of time without communicating if it weren't for texting.

“People don't talk on the phone that much anymore,” he said.

If grandparents can adjust to thinking of texting as a way to bring them closer to their grandchildren, Goyer thinks they will be more willing to adopt it as a method of communication.

“The reality is that tweens, teens and young adults these days use texting as their most common form of communication and if grandparents . really want to be in touch they'd better learn to text, even if it's just the basics,” Goyer said.

And Lemmon offered: “Keep on texting, grandmas, and stay in touch. We have to learn the technology in order to savor these important relationships.”

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News Headline: KSU instructor with felony record teaching two police courses (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Carol Biliczky
News OCR Text: A part-time instructor at Kent State is teaching courses in police work — even after pleading guilty to felony charges.

Dan Fitzpatrick, 57, of Ravenna, entered pleas last month in Portage County Common Pleas Court to possession of drugs, a fifth-degree felony; carrying a concealed weapon, a loaded Glock, 9 mm handgun, a fourth-degree felony; and operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol, a first-degree misdemeanor.

“Dan Fitzpatrick is continuing to teach two courses this semester,” KSU spokesman Eric Mansfield said this week. “Beyond that, we are not going to comment on the personal lives of our employees.”

The charges stemmed from a Dec. 25, 2011, stop by the State Highway Patrol in Portage County.

Fitzpatrick joined KSU's police department in 1978 and retired in 2008 as assistant chief. He later served as a security consultant to the university's branch campuses until 2011.

He has taught part time since at least 2011, Mansfield said.

Currently, he teaches “Investigative Process” and “Police Role” and is paid a total of $5,300 for both courses, Mansfield said.

The university has a policy governing employee behavior on the job and in the course of their duties, but Fitzpatrick was arrested for incidents off the job, so the policy does not apply to him, Mansfield said.

“He has acknowledged his mistakes in open court and accepted an agreement to attend treatment and monitoring under the court's supervision,” Mansfield said in an email. “While the university does not condone this behavior, we accept the court's recommendation of treatment in lieu of conviction.”

After completing a one-year drug-treatment program, Fitzpatrick can ask for his felony convictions to be dismissed.

Mansfield said Fitzpatrick's performance as an instructor “has not been affected by these activities, and his student evaluations remain good.”

Neither Fitzpatrick nor his attorney, Tim Hart of Kent, returned calls requesting comment.

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News Headline: Her name is Molly. | Email

News Date: 02/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Her name is molly. She is very popular and also dangerous and potentially deadly. Your teenage kids probably know about her and perhaps even party with her. Tom meyer introduces us to molly. . >>> They have been singing about molly for of decades. >> Good golly, miss molly. >> While the name is the same. It has a different meaning today. >> Everybody mostly I have heard about it through rap songs. I listen to a lot of hip-hop. >> We are smoking loud and drinking. >> You will find her at concerts. >> How many people in the crowd have seen molly? >> She is a huge hit on college campuses locally. Including cleveland state, case and kent state. You will find her at club answer especially at raves. All night dance parties. So, what is molly and why should you be concerned. >> Molly is an incredibly potent amphetamine like drug which is dangerous in terms of abuse and very dangerous in terms of addiction. >> Both the fbi in cleveland have it on their radar. >> It is touted as a sex drug. >> It has made a resurgence in the past six to eight months. >> It is an illegal substance. We are looking at it federally. >> Molly is considered to be a fewer form of ecstasy. Comes in capsules. Tablets and powder. >> They share their experiences with the drug on line. Molly floods the user's brain with excess serotonin, the neurotransmitter associated with happiness. And it has severe consequences including seizures. Strokes and heart attacks which could cause death. >> The friend that I knew took molly one time was really paranoid and curled up in a ball.

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News Headline: Kent State University library closes due to water line break | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: www.ohio.commldohio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Library located on the Kent State University's main campus closed Saturday afternoon because of a water line break. The library is expected to be closed for several hours. Visit the Kent State website for updates.

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News Headline: Broadway tunes take stage at worship service in Kent (Swoboda, Burke) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Katie Byard
News OCR Text: Christ Episcopal Church choir member Katherine Burke (center) leads the choir through the center isle as they sing the song "Consider Yourself" during their Broadway Music Mass in Kent. (Phil Masturzo /Akron Beacon Journal)

KENT: A Broadway show featuring singing and dancing cowboys may seem an unlikely place to go to for inspiration when creating a Sunday morning worship service.

But a hit song from that show — Oklahoma! — and other Broadway tunes were on center stage Sunday during Christ Episcopal Church's first Broadway Musical Mass.

The church's choir, for its processional hymn, belted out a hit song from Oklahoma!: Oh, What a Beautiful Morning.

“You can't possibly have a better opening than Oh, What a Beautiful Morning. It has such a soaring melody,” said church member Katherine Burke, who picked out the tunes for the service with her husband, Jonathan Swoboda.

The selections, woven into a traditional service, were a hit with the roughly 90 fellow church members and visitors, who enthusiastically applauded at the beginning and end of the service.

“The music was wonderful,” said visitor Karen Davis, an educational aide who lives in Tallmadge. “The choir was awesome. We were wondering how they would fit [the songs] into a church service.”

Davis said she was especially touched by the final hymn, Brotherhood of Man from How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.

“It brought back memories,” Davis said, explaining that she and her husband, Larry Davis, who also attended Sunday's service, sang Brotherhood of Man as teenagers as part of a singing troupe. Larry Davis is a music teacher at Tallmadge High School.

Packed into the church's wooden pews, the couple and others in attendance joined in on the chorus, singing: “A benevolent brotherhood of man. A noble tie that binds … ”

The worship service's prelude also had an inclusive, jovial tone, with the choir singing “Consider yourself at home! Consider yourself one of the family!” from the song Consider Yourself from Oliver!, the musical based on Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist.

Swoboda, who accompanied on piano, said he and his wife picked out well-known tunes as well as ones that might have been unfamiliar to attendees.

Both Swoboda and Burke work in the School of Theater and Dance at Kent State University, where he is a professor and she is an adjunct instructor.

Day by Day from Godspell, was the only song featured that had a religious theme.

Still, Swoboda said, “It was hard to weed songs out … There's a lot of more repertoire that's appropriate than people think.”

Choir members, wearing their white robes, said they enjoyed singing the tunes as worship songs.

“It gave you a chance to strut your stuff in a different way,” choir member Liz Pryor said.

The Rev. Julie Blake Fisher said she embraced the idea of the Broadway Musical Mass when it percolated from the congregation a while back.

“I was thrilled,” she said. “We had already started doing some out-of-the-box music,” including offering a Mountain Music Mass, when musicians' fiddles, banjos and guitars take center stage.

The church also has been the site of a U2charist featuring recorded music of the rock band U2. (The U.S. Episcopal Church started the U2charist services, which call on congregations to support international Millennium Development Goals, including eradicating extreme poverty.)

Christ Episcopal Church is located at 118 South Mantua Street in Kent.

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News Headline: BOOKS | Email

News Date: 02/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Connors, Joanna
News OCR Text: From history to poetry, readers have a pair of very different free events to choose from Tuesday night. Author and lawyer James Robenalt will present "The Ethics of Clarity: Watergate 40 Years and Counting," a program he developed with former White House counsel and Watergate witness John Dean. Robenalt, author of "Linking Rings, W.W. Durbin and the Magic and Mystery of America," and "The Harding Affair: Love and Espionage During the Great War," is working on a book on Watergate. He speaks at the Beachwood branch of the Cuyahoga Country Public Library, 25501 Shaker Blvd., at 7 p.m. Register at cuyahogalibrary.org or call 216-831-6868. Also, Kent State University's Wick Poetry Center resumes its annual reading series with two award-winning poets, Lisa Ampleman and Heather Kirn Lanier. They speak at 7:30 p.m. at Kent Student Center. Go to www.kent.edu/wick.

Copyright © 2013 The Plain Dealer.

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