Report Overview:
Total Clips (12)
Alumni; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Alumni; Students (3)
Athletics; Students (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Finance and Administration (1)
History of Kent State University (1)
Institutional Advancement; KSU at Salem (2)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Regina Brett to speak at Kent State Tuscarawas April 9 02/21/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Award-winning journalist Regina Brett will speak at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7 p.m. on April 9 in the Founders Hall auditorium, 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia. Brett will...


Alumni; Students (3)
Kent State tries to fill MAC Center for biggest 'Harlem Shake' 02/22/2013 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Kent State students will show off their dance moves on Thursday as the university tries to create the biggest “Harlem Shake” video on the...

(VIDEO) Kent State Does the Harlem Shake 02/22/2013 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — It's replaced Gangnam Style as the hottest thing on the Internet. On Thursday night, Kent State tried its hand at the craze! The KSU...

LOCAL: Kent State Trying to Create the Biggest "Harlem Shake" Video 02/22/2013 newstalkcleveland.com Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio – Kent State students will show off their dance moves on Thursday as the university tries to create the biggest “Harlem Shake” video on the...


Athletics; Students (1)
Kent State football player suspended following arrest for having stolen credit card, marijuana 02/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A Kent State University freshman football player is in trouble with the law and has been suspended from the team following his arrest on charges of possessing...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Portage County health departments receive grant to study shared services (Slenkovich, Hoornbeek) 02/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

An ongoing discussion among the Kent State University College of Public Health and Portage County's three health departments about shared services and...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Black History: Film chronicles birth of diversity in fashion (Ellington) 02/21/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...designers who were in the spotlight, and what that meant to the industry's future. "Versailles '73: American Runway Revolution," is being screened at Kent State University's main campus on Saturday, along with a director's lecture from Draper and Q&A with Draper and supermodel Pat Cleveland, who...


Finance and Administration (1)
City of Kent reaches out to Kent State on fracking policy (Vincent) 02/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The city of Kent will reach out to Kent State University in an attempt to create a joint policy on unconventional oil and gas drilling on campus and city-owned...


History of Kent State University (1)
Looking back (Photo) 02/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Descendants of many of Kent's founding families were on hand when Kent State University hosted an Early Residents Appreciation Dinner in 1968 to pay...


Institutional Advancement; KSU at Salem (2)
KSU-Salem receives $700,000 gift (Lefton, Meek, Nameth) 02/21/2013 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

SALEM -The James and Coralie Centofanti Foundation received thanks Wednesday on behalf of grateful Kent State University students, staff and generations to come for a $700,000 gift to finish the Health and Sciences Wing at the Salem campus. If...

KSU benefits from generosity (Lefton, Meek, Nameth) 02/21/2013 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

SALEM -The James and Coralie Centofanti Foundation received thanks Wednesday on behalf of grateful Kent State University students, staff and generations to come for a $700,000 gift to finish the Health and Sciences Wing at the Salem campus. If...


University Press (1)
About Books: Writer still looking for Buckeye oddities 02/21/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...his latest series of journeys. "In �Finding Utopia,' Randy McNutt sets off again to explore Ohio's forgotten nooks and byways," says the publisher, Kent State University Press, in publicity information. "He begins where his last journey ended - on roads less traveled - finding more ghost towns,...


News Headline: Regina Brett to speak at Kent State Tuscarawas April 9 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Award-winning journalist Regina Brett will speak at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7 p.m. on April 9 in the Founders Hall auditorium, 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia.

Brett will speak about her newest book, "Be the Miracle: 50 Lessons for Making the Impossible Possible," a collection of inspirational essays in which she shares lessons that will help people make a difference in the world around them.

Brett is a New York Times best-selling author whose popular book "God Never Blinks: 50 Lessons for Life's Little Detours" has been published in 18 countries. Her presentations at seminars, colleges, churches, commencements, conferences and fundraisers inspire audiences to take the next right step, create the life of their dreams, make peace with the past, say yes to life and be the miracle they want to see in the world.

Sponsored by the Kent State Tuscarawas Artist/Lecture Series, the presentation is free and open to the public. Tickets are required and will be available beginning April 2 at the Founders Hall receptionist's office. Tickets are limited to two per person and must be picked up in person.

For more information, call 330-339-3391 or visit www.tusc.kent.edu .

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News Headline: Kent State tries to fill MAC Center for biggest 'Harlem Shake' | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Kent State students will show off their dance moves on Thursday as the university tries to create the biggest “Harlem Shake” video on the web.

The Kent State University Alumni Association is expecting to fill the floor of the MAC Center with students, staff and alumni for the dance party at 6 p.m.

“If you haven't seen a Harlem Shake video, you may be living under the rock on Front Campus,” the alumni association posted on the event's Facebook page.

Whether you come in costume, wear blue and gold, or bring a prop, the alumni association is asking participants to come with a lot of energy. Three cameras will capture all the action, including the dunk skills of Kent State forward Chris Evans.

But why shoot a dance video? First of to have fun, but the alumni association also said it's part of a push to make their presence known to students.

Other universities, like the University of Akron , University of Texas at Austin and Clemson University , have already jumped on board with the latest YouTube craze.

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News Headline: (VIDEO) Kent State Does the Harlem Shake | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — It's replaced Gangnam Style as the hottest thing on the Internet.

On Thursday night, Kent State tried its hand at the craze!

The KSU Alumni Association invited past and current students to head down to the MAC Center and dance the Harlem Shake!

There was plenty of school spirit to go around as the dancers dressed in all sorts of costumes.

The Harlem Shake is the now the number one song in the land thanks to more than 13 million YouTube views.

To view video, please click on link:
http://fox8.com/2013/02/21/kent-state-does-the-harlem-shake/

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News Headline: LOCAL: Kent State Trying to Create the Biggest "Harlem Shake" Video | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: newstalkcleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio – Kent State students will show off their dance moves on Thursday as the university tries to create the biggest “Harlem Shake” video on the web.

The Kent State University Alumni Association is expecting to fill the floor of the MAC Center with students, staff and alumni for the dance party at 6 p.m.

“If you haven't seen a Harlem Shake video, you may be living under the rock on Front Campus,” the alumni association posted on the event's Facebook page.

Whether you come in costume, wear blue and gold, or bring a prop, the alumni association is asking participants to come with a lot of energy. Three cameras will capture all the action, including the dunk skills of Kent State forward Chris Evans.

Here is what the Harlem Shake is all about:
Originally seen on http://wzakcleveland.com/

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News Headline: Kent State football player suspended following arrest for having stolen credit card, marijuana | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University freshman football player is in trouble with the law and has been suspended from the team following his arrest on charges of possessing a stolen credit card and marijuana.

Julian S. Durden, 18, of Pittsburgh, Pa., was charged with receiving stolen property, a fifth-degree felony, and one count each of possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana, both minor misdemeanors, on Feb. 9.

"Julian is in violation of team rules and is suspended indefinitely from all team and athletic activities," Kent State's Athletic Department replied when asked to comment on Durden's arrest.

According to court records, Kent State police allege that Durden possessed a debit card reported stolen by it's owner, a fellow resident of the fifth floor of Korb Hall. He also allegedly possessed a glass marijuana pipe and a grinder containing less than 100 grams of marijuana in the parking lot of Korb Hall.

Durden was arraigned in Portage County Municipal Court in Ravenna on Feb. 13, where a relative posted $2,000 bond on the felony charge. A preliminary hearing on the felony charge is scheduled for Friday Feb. 22 in the municipal court's Kent division.

Durden pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor charges and was referred to a drug diversion program, which will require him to get a substance abuse evaluation through Family & Community Services of Portage County and pay $222 in program fees and court costs, according to court records.

If Durden completes the diversion program and has no marijuana-related offenses within 90 days, his plea and conviction will be vacated and he will be eligible to have his record sealed, according to the rules of the diversion program.

Durden, a 5 foot, 7 inch tall freshman running back, was recruited out of Montour High School in the Pittsburgh suburbs. He rushed for 131 yards and a touchdown as a freshman running back in the 2012-13 football season. He scored his first touchdown during the Golden Flashes 23-7 defeat of Buffalo on Sept. 19, according to Kent State Athletics.

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News Headline: Portage County health departments receive grant to study shared services (Slenkovich, Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An ongoing discussion among the Kent State University College of Public Health and Portage County's three health departments about shared services and potential mergers has been reinvigorated by a $125,000 grant from the nonprofit Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

The two-year grant, announced Thursday, will be used by the College of Public Health to conduct an in-depth study of how the Kent, Ravenna and Portage County health departments can save money and improve care by sharing resources.

KSU officials have been moderating a discussion on shared services between the county's three health departments since February 2011, when the departments' boards all agreed to a university study on whether sharing services or merging could save money without diluting the quality of service to the public.

Ken Slenkovich, the assistant dean of the College of Public Health, said the grant will allow the college's faculty to take a closer look at the potential for shared services in the county's health departments, and share the university's research with the rest of the country.

"Now we have the resources to actually fund faculty and staff who can do more in-depth analysis," he said. "The other part is, this is a national effort. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is funding a number of these (grants) across the country and the idea is to pool those lessons learned from these different projects."

Kelly Engelhart, service director for Ravenna, noted that of 18 communities across the nation to get grants, Portage County was the only community in Ohio selected for a grant and KSU was the only university in the country to receive funding.

"It's a huge opportunity, we're really excited by it," Engelhart said.

She said the focus of the grant is to study ways the departments could share services and increase efficiencies.

"We want to look at what services are currently provided, what are required essential services for public health departments, and how can we improve those services if we do them collaboratively."

Engelhart said the study could result in important changes in public health in Portage County with significant opportunities to improve public health services.

"Robert Wood Johnson is the public health foundation in the United States," said DuWayne Porter, health commissioner for the county department. "They don't come very often to health departments the size of Portage County, Ravenna and Kent. It's a very prestigious grant."

Kent Health Commissioner Jeff Neistadt, said studying how the departments could share resources makes sense because they already share many of the same obstacles and challenges, from stretching their funding to combating obesity and smoking.

"We're all in the business of public health," he said. "High smoking rates don't stop at the Franklin Township border."

The three local health departments paid for the grant application, which was written by KSU.

Representatives of the three departments and KSU will attend a meeting March 13-14 in Kansas City to get started on the study. John Hoornbeek, associate professor of health policy and management at KSU, said local public health officials may travel to view shared service and consolidation efforts at work in other communities, or even host an event in Kent.

"We do anticipate and plan to engage with folks as close as Summit County," he said, noting the Summit County, Akron and Barberton health departments merged two years ago.

Porter said the College of Public Health "has been tremendous in helping with public health in Portage County."

Slenkovich said the study could lead to recommendations as simple as holding one immunization clinic in a central location, instead of multiple clinics throughout the county, to recommendations as complex as a merger between two or three of the departments.

"Instead of having two accounting departments, maybe they can share some resources that way," he said. "It could potentially also lead to, maybe (the health departments) decide that, rather than just sharing resources, it makes more sense to consolidate into one health department."

Ravenna Mayor Joe Bica, who originally convened the task force two years ago, said "the vision has always been to reinvent public health in Portage County and to really increase the services we provide for our residents."

"Our research and all the things we've done to this point in collaboration, all lead us to we are much stronger together in regard to public health than we are as independent entities."

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News Headline: Black History: Film chronicles birth of diversity in fashion (Ellington) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some of the most famous supermodels in the world are black, including Naomi Campbell and Tyra Banks. However, not that long ago, there was a time when finding a woman of color on the runway was very rare.

In 1973, a group of established French designers were pitted against five up-and-coming American designers for a fashion show that was later dubbed the "Battle of Versailles." At the time, it was almost unheard of to have more than one black model walk in a show, said filmmaker Deborah Riley Draper.

"I've been obsessed with this story," she said. "It was high fashion drama and a milestone in the industry."

THE PROJECT

Draper delved into the story and came out with a documentary that chronicled the first instance of multiple black models and designers who were in the spotlight, and what that meant to the industry's future.

"Versailles '73: American Runway Revolution," is being screened at Kent State University's main campus on Saturday, along with a director's lecture from Draper and Q&A with Draper and supermodel Pat Cleveland, who walked in the show 40 years ago.

The Versailles show was originally a publicity stunt to raise money for the Versailles Restoration Fund. What no one expected was for the Americans to walk away triumphant, Draper said.

More than 800 people came to the showdown, including Princess Grace, Christina Onassis and Andy Warhol. The French designers included Yves Saint Laurent, Christian Dior, and Hubert de Givenchy, and the Americans were Bill Blass, Oscar de la Renta, Halston, Anne Klein, and Stephen Burrows. The Americans also brought a group of black models.

BIRTH OF THE WALK

These models refused to be just hangers for the clothes, Draper said.

"They were smart, talented women who auditioned and earned their spots," she said. "They created the fashion walk. These girls created supermodels because you paid attention when they were on the stage."

Less than four months after the show, there was a black model on the cover of Vogue, Draper said.

"The film is important to bring to Kent State because it was a groundbreaking event," said Kent State University assistant professor of fashion design and merchandising, Tameka Ellington. "It was the first event where African American designers and models were showcased, and it paved the way for African Americans in the fashion industry."

Draper said she loves sharing the film with students because young fashionistas need to know what went on in the industry before them in order to move it forward.

"The Versailles show was a germ of an idea," she said. "And it started a revolution."

See the film

The Fashion School at Kent State University will host a screening of the fashion documentary "Versailles '73: American Runway Revolution," with an accompanying lecture and Q&A with director Deborah Riley Draper and supermodel Pat Cleveland at 7 p.m. on Saturday in Rockwell Hall Auditorium, located at 515 Hilltop Drive on the Kent State University campus. The film is presented as part of campus programming for Black History Month. There will also be a pre-screening VIP reception at 6 p.m. Cost is $35 for admission to all events, $20 for admission to the lecture and screening only, and $10 for students for the lecture and screening. Tickets are available at the door, cash only. To RSVP for the VIP reception, please contact Tammy Cullen at tdavis2@kent.edu.

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News Headline: City of Kent reaches out to Kent State on fracking policy (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The city of Kent will reach out to Kent State University in an attempt to create a joint policy on unconventional oil and gas drilling on campus and city-owned land.

Council unanimously approved a motion by Councilwoman Heidi Shaffer Wednesday tasking the city's administration to reach out to officials at KSU and develop a joint policy on hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, on public land as the industry begins to take root in Portage County.

"We've been looking to see what we could find common ground on," Shaffer said. "I really want the public to know we're taking this seriously."

Fracking is the process of injecting highly pressurized fluid into rock formations to free oil and natural gas. While vertical fracking has been a common practice for since the 1950s, horizontal fracturing, which allows energy companies to extract larger amounts of oil and gas over a larger distance, has only become common in recent years.

Environmental activists have raised concerns about the amount of water used in the process, as well as the environmental effects of the chemicals in "fracking fluid," which is used to fracture the rock formations.

Oil and gas industry officials claim the process is relatively safe.

Council also approved Shaffer's motion to ask the city's Sustainability Commission to notify the public and council members "... if unconventional drilling activities are imminent in the vicinity of Kent."

Shaffer said her motions were an outgrowth of research and recommendations made by the city's Sustainability Commission and the local chapter of Concerned Citizens Ohio, a group of activists that support stronger local regulation on oil and gas drilling.

Although all regulation of oil and gas drilling is reserved by the state of Ohio, specifically the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Shaffer said she wanted the city to do anything it legally could to protect the city's air and water quality before fracking came to Kent.

Currently, the only horizontally-fractured wells producing oil and gas in Portage County are located in Suffield and Windham Township. Other wells not currently in production have been permitted and drilled within the county, but none of these wells are located in Kent or Franklin Township.

KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said Thursday the university did not have a policy specific to fracking, but instead looked to state law on the topic.

"As a state university, the land is owned by the state of Ohio, so we rely on their guidance," Vincent said.

While the state sets the rules for oil and gas drilling on public campuses, the university's board of trustees would have to approve any proposed drilling activity. Vincent said the board has not received any proposals for drilling on university land at this time and no discussions on the matter have been scheduled.

"The current administration has no plans to initiate drilling on our campus," she said.

She said city and university officials have only had "informal discussions" on the subject of fracking at this point.

Kent City Council discussed the possibility of banning fracking within city limits last spring, but Law Director Jim Silver advised council against it, noting the move could provoke a costly legal battle with the state, which the city would likely lose.

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News Headline: Looking back (Photo) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Descendants of many of Kent's founding families
were on hand when Kent State University hosted
an Early Residents Appreciation Dinner in 1968
to pay tribute to families who built the community and
had much to do with the location of the campus in Kent.
Among the 80 representatives of families from Kent predating
1900 were, from left, Marian A. Williams, whose
family owned the Williams Bros. Mill, who chatted with
KSU President and Mrs. Robert I. White, Margaret Getz,
whose family owned Getz Brothers Hardware and Mrs.
G.C. Sellman. This photo was published in the Record-
Courier on May 14, 1968.

To view photo, please click on link:
http://s3.amazonaws.com/newscloud-production/recordpub/e_edition/2013/02/512567367fd0dc2d4100012c/5126999d7fd0dc2d41000229/Rec-02222013-A-04_pdf/Rec-02222013-A-04_pdf_original.pdf?1361484189

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News Headline: KSU-Salem receives $700,000 gift (Lefton, Meek, Nameth) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM -The James and Coralie Centofanti Foundation received thanks Wednesday on behalf of grateful Kent State University students, staff and generations to come for a $700,000 gift to finish the Health and Sciences Wing at the Salem campus.

If the Kent State Board of Trustees approves, that generosity will be recognized with the renaming of the Health and Sciences Wing to James and Coralie Centofanti Hall, a fitting tribute to the Canfield couple with family ties in Salem.

"He would be very proud and very honored that the foundation he established has the capacity to donate these funds for the benefit of the students. My mother would be just as proud," their son, David, said.

David Centofanti, son of James and Coralie Centofanti and a member of the foundation named for them, addresses those gathered at a reception at the Salem campus of Kent State University.

He was one of several members of the Centofanti family present for a reception in the student lounge of the Health and Sciences Wing to celebrate the foundation's monetary commitment. David, of Canfield, and his uncle, Joseph Centofanti, of Salem, both offered remarks, along with KSU President Dr. Lester Lefton and KSU Salem Dean Dr. Steve Nameth.

"What this foundation has done is change people's lives ... individual students' lives," Lefton said. "This kind of facility trains the people who are going to take care of us."

He offered his thanks to the foundation, its members and the members of the Centofanti family, saying their gift will make a big difference in the lives of generations of students.

The donation will be used to turn the now-empty 9,000-square foot shell on the second floor of the Health and Sciences Wing into state-of-the-art chemistry and biology laboratories, additional classrooms for biology, chemistry and other science-related studies and restrooms.

Dr. Ernie Freeman, associate professor of biology, said the gift allows the university to improve the lab facilities and improve the educational experience for students for generations to come.

"We can certainly use the extra space. We're bustin' at the seams with the labs right now," biology lecturer Leah Meek said.

Nursing Program Director Mary Lou Ferranto said they'll hopefully be able to do some research with the new labs.

The Health and Sciences Wing opened in September 2011 with state-of-the-art facilities on the first floor, including dedicated spaces for nursing and radiology instruction, centralized classrooms, a conference room, student lounge area and bookstore. The area had previously been a gymnasium. The multi-million dollar renovation added 16,000 square feet of space for education on the Salem campus.

As a member of the KSU Salem Advisory Board, Joseph Centofanti brought the programs and the Health and Sciences Wing to the attention of the foundation. He said they wanted to keep the money local and give to programs his brother would have been interested in helping.

He described how his brother was born in Italy and that their father, Camillo, came to America first and got a job in the steel mills, worked five years and then sent for the family to come over. Jim came over with their mother, Anna, and their sister, Mary, just before the Great Depression. Joe and their sister, Lillian, were both born in America.

He told those present that if they wanted to give credit to someone, give it their parents, who made a decision 90 years ago to relocate from Italy to the United States.

Nameth commented that he did some research on the Centofanti name and learned that it comes from cento, which means one hundred, and fanto, which means child. The meaning behind it was thought to be that the recipient would be blessed with a large family.

"You've extended your family today, all of you," he said.

David Centofanti said his father understood the meaning of education and this was his father's way of giving back. He said the foundation had already given a major gift to Youngstown State University and by giving this gift to KSU, they were able to help cover the educational needs in the two-county area.

Other members of the foundation committee besides Joseph and David Centofanti include Carol Potter, CEO of the Youngstown Better Business Bureau; Mark Graham, an executive vice president with Farmers National Bank; and Dante Zambrini, former superintendent of Canfield Schools.

James Centofanti was a member of the Board of Directors of Farmers National Bank, a business owner, philanthropist and horseman. He passed away in 2010 and Coralie passed away in 1999.

A timeline to begin construction on the second floor labs and classrooms will be developed in the next several months.

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News Headline: KSU benefits from generosity (Lefton, Meek, Nameth) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM -The James and Coralie Centofanti Foundation received thanks Wednesday on behalf of grateful Kent State University students, staff and generations to come for a $700,000 gift to finish the Health and Sciences Wing at the Salem campus.

If the Kent State Board of Trustees approves, that generosity will be recognized with the renaming of the Health and Sciences Wing to James and Coralie Centofanti Hall, a fitting tribute to the Canfield couple with family ties in Salem.

"He would be very proud and very honored that the foundation he established has the capacity to donate these funds for the benefit of the students. My mother would be just as proud," their son, David, said.

David Centofanti, son of James and Coralie Centofanti and a member of the foundation named for them, addresses those gathered at a reception at the Salem campus of Kent State University.

He was one of several members of the Centofanti family present for a reception in the student lounge of the Health and Sciences Wing to celebrate the foundation's monetary commitment. David, of Canfield, and his uncle, Joseph Centofanti, of Salem, both offered remarks, along with KSU President Dr. Lester Lefton and KSU Salem Dean Dr. Steve Nameth.

"What this foundation has done is change people's lives ... individual students' lives," Lefton said. "This kind of facility trains the people who are going to take care of us."

He offered his thanks to the foundation, its members and the members of the Centofanti family, saying their gift will make a big difference in the lives of generations of students.

The donation will be used to turn the now-empty 9,000-square foot shell on the second floor of the Health and Sciences Wing into state-of-the-art chemistry and biology laboratories, additional classrooms for biology, chemistry and other science-related studies and restrooms.

Dr. Ernie Freeman, associate professor of biology, said the gift allows the university to improve the lab facilities and improve the educational experience for students for generations to come.

"We can certainly use the extra space. We're bustin' at the seams with the labs right now," biology lecturer Leah Meek said.

Nursing Program Director Mary Lou Ferranto said they'll hopefully be able to do some research with the new labs.

The Health and Sciences Wing opened in September 2011 with state-of-the-art facilities on the first floor, including dedicated spaces for nursing and radiology instruction, centralized classrooms, a conference room, student lounge area and bookstore. The area had previously been a gymnasium. The multi-million dollar renovation added 16,000 square feet of space for education on the Salem campus.

As a member of the KSU Salem Advisory Board, Joseph Centofanti brought the programs and the Health and Sciences Wing to the attention of the foundation. He said they wanted to keep the money local and give to programs his brother would have been interested in helping.

He described how his brother was born in Italy and that their father, Camillo, came to America first and got a job in the steel mills, worked five years and then sent for the family to come over. Jim came over with their mother, Anna, and their sister, Mary, just before the Great Depression. Joe and their sister, Lillian, were both born in America.

He told those present that if they wanted to give credit to someone, give it their parents, who made a decision 90 years ago to relocate from Italy to the United States.

Nameth commented that he did some research on the Centofanti name and learned that it comes from cento, which means one hundred, and fanto, which means child. The meaning behind it was thought to be that the recipient would be blessed with a large family.

"You've extended your family today, all of you," he said.

David Centofanti said his father understood the meaning of education and this was his father's way of giving back. He said the foundation had already given a major gift to Youngstown State University and by giving this gift to KSU, they were able to help cover the educational needs in the two-county area.

Other members of the foundation committee besides Joseph and David Centofanti include Carol Potter, CEO of the Youngstown Better Business Bureau; Mark Graham, an executive vice president with Farmers National Bank; and Dante Zambrini, former superintendent of Canfield Schools.

James Centofanti was a member of the Board of Directors of Farmers National Bank, a business owner, philanthropist and horseman. He passed away in 2010 and Coralie passed away in 1999.

A timeline to begin construction on the second floor labs and classrooms will be developed in the next several months.

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News Headline: About Books: Writer still looking for Buckeye oddities | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Writer Randy McNutt continually sets off on quests to keep Ohio's oddities from being forgotten. And "Finding Utopia" (paperback, $21.95) is the result of his latest series of journeys.

"In �Finding Utopia,' Randy McNutt sets off again to explore Ohio's forgotten nooks and byways," says the publisher, Kent State University Press, in publicity information. "He begins where his last journey ended - on roads less traveled - finding more ghost towns, battlefields-turned-cornfields, and old memories that beckon him like spectral hitchhikers. On the way he meets another cast of quirky and determined people who struggle to keep their towns on the map."

Among McNutt's discoveries - reached in his "aging Jeep," - are a haunted pioneer inn, a Victorian town that appears to be a movie set, and a town that manufactured gunpowder before it was blown to bits in the 1800s.

"Often encountering a past that is livelier than the present, he walks through another town where magnetic water once �cured' many ailments, stays the night in a stagecoach inn known for a ghostly cat and its owner who still roam the halls, finds a town built on cranberry bogs, and uncovers what's left of a World War I training camp sitting atop ancient Indian mounds," said the publisher. "In tiny Utopia, for which this book is named, he descends into an underground stone chamber to hear tales of the spirits that haunt it."

The book is part travel guide, a little bit history book and sort of a memoir. Its value, said the publisher, is in McNutt's talent at "merging the past and present."

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