Report Overview:
Total Clips (12)
Academics; Office of the Provost; University Advising (1)
Aeronautics (1)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS) (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Human Resources (1)
Geology (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Foundation; WKSU (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Academics; Office of the Provost; University Advising (1)
Advisers help students chart a path to success (Snyder) 02/26/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Universities are placing an increased focus on advising, recognizing its role in promoting student, institutional goals College graduates often recall...


Aeronautics (1)
First Airport Master Plan Meeting is March 4 02/26/2013 Stow Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State officials seek input from community on airport The first public meeting for the Kent State University Airport Master Plan has...


College of Arts and Sciences (AS) (1)
Recruitment efforts are at root of STEM programs 02/26/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Colleges reaching out to younger students, promoting, preparing them in technical fields Northeast Ohio's colleges and universities are priming their...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Ohio Trains More Teachers Than It Needs (Mahony) 02/26/2013 StateImpact Ohio Text Attachment Email

Like many education majors, Melissa Beaune knew it would be tough to find a job after graduation, especially since she wanted to work with young children....


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Human Resources (1)
Kent State Smoking Ban Topic of Public Meetings 02/26/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

University holding first of many public meetings today on idea of banning smoking on campus Kent State University administrators will hold the first...


Geology (1)
AUDIO: From pollution to environmental problem solver (Ortiz) 02/26/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Forty years ago, Akron was one the first communities in the nation to ban phosphates from detergent. The idea was to keep phosphates out of our water....


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Succeed and Lose Your Job (Sasso, Sledzik, Smith) 02/26/2013 InsideHigherEd.com Text Attachment Email

The decision not to renew a popular lecturer's contract with Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication has faculty members criticizing...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Kent State University Tuscarawas to present 'A Chorus Line' 02/25/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia, will present "A Chorus Line" at 7:30 p.m. March 6. Tickets range from...


KSU Foundation; WKSU (1)
GAR awards $1 million to regional economic development fund 02/26/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Akron-headquartered GAR Foundation has awarded $1 million to a group that gives money to a host of programs focused on boosting the region's economy. ...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
'We can connect you': Libraries work to give readers new experiences (Wicks) 02/25/2013 Fremont News Messenger - Online Text Attachment Email

...have had to evolve, focusing on much more than just books, said Don Wicks, acting assistant director for the school of library and information science at Kent State University. “I think libraries want to be known as helping agencies more than just a place where information is stored,” Wicks said....


Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
KENT STATE PRESENTS SPANISH AND LATIN FILM SERIES, MARCH 1-16 02/25/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb.25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: During the month of March, Kent State University will present five Spanish and Latin...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Neil Druker: Memphis Principal's Efforts Unite Media and Literacy 02/25/2013 Digital Journal Text Attachment Email

...for an hour each day, allowing them to enjoy typical entertainment but to also be exposed to reading. In the article, Williamson cites the work of Kent State University literacy professor Tim Rasinski as the inspiration behind the experiment. Williamson explains, "Closed captioning is a way for...


News Headline: Advisers help students chart a path to success (Snyder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Universities are placing an increased focus on advising, recognizing its role in promoting student, institutional goals

College graduates often recall their adviser as a person who helped with class scheduling, one who confirmed that graduation requirements were met.

“Registration is something important that advisers do, but that's a small piece of what we do,” said Charity Snyder, director of University Advising at Kent State University. “We don't want the focus to be that narrow in the student's mind.”

Yes, academic advisers (also known as professional advisers and professional academic advisers) are nonfaculty personnel who counsel on academic matters, albeit a broad range. However, they also help students with navigating institutional processes and mapping a path toward graduation, as well as personal matters and long-term decisions.

“We are asking them, "What do you want to do with the rest of your life?' ” said Susanne Miller, senior academic adviser at Youngstown State University. “There are much bigger questions going on than, "What are you taking next semester?' ”

In recent decades, the position has evolved, becoming more visible as an entity, collaborating with on-campus colleagues, and recognized as a significant contributor toward student and administrative goals.

“The engagement a student has with an institution is the key to get them to graduate and graduate on time,” said Charlie Nutt. “Academic advising is critical to teach students how to get engaged, how to get involved.”

Dr. Nutt is executive director of the National Academic Advising Association, a Manhattan, Kan.-based organization with more than 11,000 members in the United States, Canada and 25 other countries. He also is an assistant professor of education in the department of counseling and special education at Kansas State University.

Additionally, he said, other factors have impacted the adviser's significance as a university player, including academic research on successful advising models, the industry's efforts to professionalize the position and economic factors.

“As we have seen significant changes in our economy and in our work force needs, colleges and institutions are being held to higher standards in regard to the graduation and completion rates of their students, in fact in many states, like Ohio, institutions are being funded partly on their graduation and completion rates, not just their enrollment numbers,” Dr. Nutt said.

Team efforts

Administration recognition of advising as a central player toward meeting institutional goals has impacted advising resource deployment and job duties at some institutions, especially as it relates to student outcomes, including timely graduation and reduced transfer and dropout rates.

At Kent State University, University Advising was created in 2011. That office, Ms. Snyder said, “will not centralize all advisory functions but is standardizing what does not need to be different, making the experience similar” for today's “fluid” student who changes majors, uses different campuses or learns through on-campus classes one semester, then online the next.

Last year, 17 full-time equivalent adviser positions were filled at Kent State University; the majority were newly created, Ms. Snyder said. Since the 2010-2011 academic year, the University of Akron has hired 18 new professional advisers, said W. Michael “Mike” Sherman, senior vice president, provost and chief operating officer.

Hiring more advising professionals supports advising initiatives, reduces the adviser-to-student ratio, improves student services, increases the timeliness and frequency of accessibility and ensures successful student completion.

“We're not just looking at attracting and enrolling students but graduating citizens,” said Nancy Roadruck, assistant vice president of student success at the University of Akron.

Advising can vary between institutions and among the units of each institution. Students may strictly work with a faculty adviser, full-time employees who teach. Elsewhere, students work exclusively with professional academic advisers, whose key function is student advising. With some programs, a faculty adviser is assigned to a student upon declaring a major. In some cases, a student has both faculty and professional academic advisers.

“In my ideal world, the advising model would be a relationship between the faculty adviser, the professional adviser and the student. Everyone would have a role to play,” Ms. Snyder said.

Prep work

Professional advisers are described as the detail people, the resource people. They help students make decisions toward a major and graduation, and are the campus conduits, for example, to career services, financial aid, tutoring and mental health counseling. They transition freshmen through first-year unknowns. They are technology experts, coaching students to manage online accountabilities.

Faculty adviser counterparts are considered mentors: experts connected to the field, helping students formalize major and career decisions.

At Baldwin Wallace University in Berea, the typical faculty adviser to undergraduate student caseload is a 20-1 ratio, said Margaret Stiner, director of academic advising and an adjunct English professor. At Notre Dame College in South Euclid, a faculty caseload is a 25-1 ratio, said Anna Zaks, director of student advising. Both institutions employ a faculty advising model.

According to academic and industry literature, advising impacts persistence, a student's ability to continuously enroll in subsequent semesters at the starting institution. Advising also impacts retention, graduating within a completion rate prescribed at four years, six years or some other timeframe.

“Now, we're seeing significant movement that is truly looking at how we prepare, from Day 1, to help students graduate in four years,” said Dr. Nutt of the National Academic Advising Association.

Clearly, advising is an important component of ensuring student retention and improving graduation rates. And advisers have become vital contributors toward maximizing those outcomes.

“If you can keep the caseload down and allow the adviser to be more proactive and advise the students, they will stay,” Ms. Roadruck said.

Spreading the wealth

But, undergraduate caseloads of professional academic advisers can be substantial.

The average student-to-adviser caseload at Kent State University is a 340-1 ratio, Ms. Snyder said; the University of Akron's is a ratio of 340-400-to-1, Dr. Sherman said; and at Youngstown State University it is approximately a ratio of 500-600-to-1, said Bill Buckler, coordinator of academic advising and associate professor of geography.

“Believe it or not, it's doable,” Ms. Roadruck said. “In that caseload, there are students who need to touch base, but don't need remedies.”

It's doable, in part, because students can be reached by large-scale means.

Freshmen orientations are the norm, held before the incoming semester's start. At Notre Dame College, during the school year, faculty and advising staff speak about the advisory process at first-year seminar classes.

Twitter and Facebook, marketing campaigns and targeted emails also make it doable.

So, too, do virtual capabilities. The University of Akron is testing web conferencing capabilities for use by the advising units. Final implementation and full availability is expected by the end of 2013.

“We can think outside of the normal one-to-one advisory appointment. It's that importance of touching base, of making connections by another means,” Ms. Snyder said.

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News Headline: First Airport Master Plan Meeting is March 4 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Patch
Contact Name: Courtesy Kent State Airport
News OCR Text: Kent State officials seek input from community on airport

The first public meeting for the Kent State University Airport Master Plan has been scheduled for Monday, March 4. In this meeting, the public will be introduced to the project and learn why university leaders are reassessing recommendations from the 2006 plan and taking a fresh look at the airport's assets and needs.

The meeting will be held at 6 p.m. at Council Chambers at Stow City Hall, located at 3760 Darrow Road in Stow. It will include a presentation of the master plan process, the project schedule and how the public can provide input on the airport's existing conditions and future use.

Kent State has owned the public-use, general aviation airport since 1942 and uses the facility to support its Aeronautics Program, one of 32 accredited aviation education programs worldwide. The airport is a critical asset for the Aeronautics Program, which serves more than 560 students in five areas of concentration under the Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautics.

In 2004, the airport completed a master plan, which was then updated in 2006. At that time, the university was considering closing the airport and moving operations to another nearby airport. University leaders are now reassessing the recommendations of the previous plan, and a new plan is required to take a fresh look at the airport's assets and determine its needs.

The airport is a significant economic driver locally, supporting not only the university's Aeronautics Program, but also local businesses, community services and private pilots. The new master plan must take into account how the airport can best serve the needs of all members of the community.

For more information about the development of the master plan, visit www.KSUAirportPlan.com.

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News Headline: Recruitment efforts are at root of STEM programs | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Colleges reaching out to younger students, promoting, preparing them in technical fields

Northeast Ohio's colleges and universities are priming their admissions pumps with whiz kids who excel in science, technology, engineering and math — or the STEM fields — years before they set foot on a college campus.

Some have gone as far as helping launch middle and high schools dedicated to STEM education on or near their campuses, while others have focused on rounding out programs that target young learners in hopes of piquing their interest in disciplines related to science and math.

Most recently, Cleveland State, with the help of a $1.25 million grant from the KeyBank Foundation, in January announced plans to open a STEM school for 11th- and 12th-graders in conjunction with the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. Also, last fall, Northeast Ohio Medical University in conjunction with the Rootstown Local School District opened a STEM high school on the medical school's campus.

Additionally, the University of Akron in conjunction with the Akron Public Schools, the City of Akron, Greater Akron Chamber and Akron Tomorrow opened the STEM middle school at the National Inventors Hall of Fame in Akron. Last fall, the same partners opened a STEM high school at the site of the former Central-Hower High School, which the university acquired from the Akron Public Schools through a swap of hundreds of full-ride college scholarships valued at about $40,000 apiece.

“We're growing our own honors students for the University of Akron,” said Susan Ramlo, a professor and special projects coordinator for STEM education initiatives at the university.

If Gov. John Kasich has his way, the funding formula for higher education in the state of Ohio is expected to shift from being based largely on enrollment toward rewarding institutions with high degree completion rates. Given that students with STEM backgrounds are more likely to graduate, higher education officials expect a surge of new outreach efforts in the coming years.

“Everybody wants the better students,” Dr. Ramlo said. “Why not help K-12 schools provide better education? That gives us an opportunity then to hopefully recruit those students who will have great experiences at the University of Akron.”

Get 'em young

While many university officials such as Dr. Ramlo admit recruiting well-prepared students is a key driver for college and university investments in STEM, they also say there is an altruistic element to the moves. Educating students in the sciences, they say, breeds an informed citizenry and could create jobs in the long run.

“This isn't just about recruitment for us,” said Erik Porfeli, NEOMED's assistant dean for community engagement and admissions. “If it was just about that, we probably wouldn't invest as much as we are. When it comes to STEM, you have very bright and motivated students if given some opportunity and some direction can do great things before they enter the work force.”

Dr. Porfeli said in addition to the on-campus STEM school, the university operates a number of outreach initiatives aimed at fostering an interest in science at a young age.

About two years ago, the university and its partners launched its Health Professions Affinity Community — or HPAC — program, which is geared toward middle and high school students who have an interest in health care careers.

The HPAC program partners with Northeast Ohio schools and community organizations and helps students identify health problems, such as diabetes, in their communities and create action plans to help tackle that problem. Others involved with the program are Kent State University, Cleveland State University, the University of Akron and Youngstown State University.

“Our goal on a larger level is to do what we can as a state university to advance the health and the economic prosperity of our region,” Dr. Porfeli said. “We're in a uniquely strong position because there are so many jobs available in health care, and health care is directly responsible for the health of a community.”

Cleveland State, meanwhile, in 2005 launched Fenn Academy, a program that partners with area high schools to pique students' interest in engineering, according to Gregg Schoof, the university's manager of engineering student programs. The program helps design engineering programs at the high school level and so far has partnered with 42 high schools. Some of the businesses supporting the effort include Lubrizol Corp., Ford Motor Company, Parker Hannifin Corp. and Middough Companies.

Mr. Schoof attributes in part the surge in enrollment in the university's engineering program to the Fenn Academy. Last year's engineering freshman class, he said, increased 33% over the previous year, and projections for next fall call for a 50% hike in the number of students.

CWRU's big plans

With the help of a $2 million endowment, Case Western Reserve University last month launched the Gelfand STEM Center, a clearinghouse of sorts for the university's outreach efforts in the STEM arena. Programs under the center's umbrella include a series of camps to spur an interest in science and medicine. With the infusion of new funding, the center plans eventually to launch additional programs, according to James Bader, the center's director.

“It gives us some liberties we haven't had previously,” Mr. Bader. “It is a phenomenal opportunity when you don't have to write a grant for everything you do.”

Mr. Bader said he would like the center to do more outreach to students' families to help them instill how rewarding a career in a STEM field can be. And if they choose not to pursue a career in a STEM discipline, there is still value in helping create a population literate in the sciences.

“We don't have to be fancy,” Mr. Bader said. “This work is just the type where you roll up your sleeves and get it done. It's just hard work to reach out to the kids and provide opportunities.”

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News Headline: Ohio Trains More Teachers Than It Needs (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: StateImpact Ohio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Like many education majors, Melissa Beaune knew it would be tough to find a job after graduation, especially since she wanted to work with young children. Beaune, a sophomore at Cleveland State University, thought—briefly—about going into a medical field where jobs might be more plentiful.

But science and math were never really her things.

She wanted to teach.

“I kind of based that decision on what I would wake up and love doing every day,” she said.

That's the same reasoning that continues to draw thousands of new students into Ohio colleges of education each year

Fewer new teachers are graduating from Ohio's colleges of education today than in years past. But Ohio still trains more new teachers than it actually needs. That forces some newly minted teachers to move out of state if they want to teach, or move to plan B.

Ohio schools are expected to need about 4,900 teachers a year through 2020 to fill new jobs and replace teachers who leave, according to state labor market projections. But more than 6,000 new teachers graduated from colleges of education in 2010, according to Ohio's most recent reports to the U.S. Department of Education on teacher training programs.

That means that Ohio colleges produce about 1,000 more new teachers a year than there are jobs openings.

“There's still that optimism that a lot of 18- and 19-year olds have that they're going to be the ones who are going to make it,” said Kent State University College of Education, Health and Human Services Dean Daniel Mahony.

And they can make it—they just have to be flexible, some educators say.

Some new teachers end up moving out of Ohio, to places where school enrollments are growing more rapidly. Out-of-state recruiters from states like Nevada, the Carolinas, Florida and Texas show up at Ohio job teacher job fairs every year.

Many new teachers take jobs at charter schools rather than traditional public schools, even though the pay may be lower and the jobs almost always lack union protection.

And some education majors start college with a plan B.

Stefanie Gaudion has wanted to work with children with disabilities since she volunteered in a special education classroom in her middle school. She's now a junior at Cleveland State and studying to be to be a special education teacher for students with moderate to severe disabilities.

In a way, Gaudion is lucky. Special education—along with secondary science and math—is among the areas of teaching where future teachers face better odds of landing a job. (Early elementary teachers face the worst odds.)

But Gaudion still has a backup plan in case she doesn't find a teaching job after graduation. She's minoring in speech and hearing science. If she needs to, she figures she can go back to school, take a few more classes and apply to graduate school to train to be a speech-language pathologist.

“They say I'm almost guaranteed a job there,” she said.

Failing to find jobs in schools, some teachers enter fields closer to their disciplines, said Jane Zaharias, an associate dean at Cleveland State University's College of Education.

Some who hoped to be chemistry teachers go into research labs; English majors go, well, lots of different places. Some education graduates opt for related fields like counseling or training adult workers or social services.

The transition can be harder for early childhood teachers. Some end up working at daycare centers, Zaharias said.

Others say the over-supply of teachers means colleges of education should be more selective. Some state legislators say Ohio should copy “educational powerhouses” like Singapore and Finland that only admit top students into teacher training programs.

At most Ohio colleges and universities, the ACT score required to enter the school's college of education is lower than the ACT scores of most students admitted to the school.

Still, the idea of telling some students that they're just not cut out to be teachers worries Daniel Mahony, the dean at Kent State's college of education.

“Particularly when someone's 17 or 18 years old, deciding if someone would be a great teacher isn't easy,” he said. “I'm always concerned that we're trying to predict way too early.”

The teacher glut soon may subside. Recent changes to teacher pensions give older teachers incentives to retire sooner: Teachers who retire after July 1, 2013 won't receive cost of living increases until 2018. And starting in 2015, age and length-of-service requirements will start to rise.

That is likely to create more job vacancies for new teachers.

“Those people who are out there in the wings right now, I think those people are going to find the door open for them to enter the teaching profession,” Cleveland State's Jane Zaharias said.

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News Headline: Kent State Smoking Ban Topic of Public Meetings | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University holding first of many public meetings today on idea of banning smoking on campus

Kent State University administrators will hold the first of several public meetings today to talk about the idea of banning smoking completely on all eight campuses.

There are actually three meetings today on the Kent campus in the governance chamber in the Kent State Student Center at 10 a.m., 3 and 5:30 p.m.

Kent State formed a steering committee to examine a recommendation from the Ohio Board of Regents, issued last summer, suggesting all public universities and colleges in Ohio ban the use of tobacco products on their campuses.

The committee is expected to make recommendations for action based on the results of a campus survey, the public meetings and other input.

A majority of Kent Patch readers think the university should ban tobacco products.

Any such action to ban tobacco use likely wouldn't happen until possibly January of 2014 at the earliest.

The Kent campus will host two more public meetings, on Thursday, at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. in the governance chamber to talk about the issue.

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News Headline: AUDIO: From pollution to environmental problem solver (Ortiz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Forty years ago, Akron was one the first communities in the nation to ban phosphates from detergent. The idea was to keep phosphates out of our water. Now, researchers in northern Ohio are out front again with an idea for keeping phosphates out of our lakes and streams -- by using smokestack scrubbers. WKSU's Tim Rudell explains.

The massive coal-burning Sammis Power Plant on the Ohio River north of Steubenville uses scrubbers to clear pollutants from the smoke it sends up its giant stacks. The phosphorus control idea starts with a by-product of those scrubbers.

Warren Dick is a professor of soil and environmental chemistry at the Ohio Agricultural Research & Development Center: “When you burn coal you produce sulfur dioxide gasses, and the Clean Air Act has required the removal of that because of acid rain, and they make this by product called gypsum, calcium sulfate.”

Gypsum is used for a number of things, including wall board. But, it turns out it also solves an environmental problem; it prevents phosphorous in farm fertilizers from getting into streams and lakes. That's a problem thought to have been brought under control in the 1980s. “A lot of phosphorus that was getting into our lakes was piggybacking on sediment…erosion. So they really pushed hard on conservation practices, tillage, and no tillage. It cut down the sediment phosphorous loading into Lake Erie. Then about 1990, they started to see this other thing going up, and that is soluble phosphorous loading.”

Phosphorus loading occurs when an unusual amount of the chemical accumulates in a body of water. Changes in how and when fertilizer is applied have made it easier for rain to dissolve phosphates and wash them out of the fields and into streams and lakes.

Kent State University oceanography professor Joseph Ortiz uses satellite images and other technologies to track the effects of that phosphate flow. He and his team monitor algae growth in Lake Erie, Grand Lake St. Mary's and other state parks — where huge algae blooms have posed threats to health. Ortiz explains phosphorous spurs algae growth once it gets to lakes because tiny plants eat it. “When you put that additional nutrient in the lake, the microscopic plants suddenly had access to tremendous amounts of food, and they went to town with it.”

But, Dick's Ohio State research team is getting positive results in tests spreading powdered gypsum from the smoke scrubbers on farm fields to head off phosphate migration. Gypsum forms bonds with the phosphorous in the fertilizer in a way that makes it less soluble in water, and therefore more likely to stay put on the crops it is intended to nourish.

The gypsum from smoke scrubbers that is at the root of all the research is entirely from First Energy's Sammis plant, where nearly half a million tons of it was produced last year. That will drop off in the future, however, because the company has scaled Sammis back to “as needed” operations as part of its strategy to reduce the use of coal in power generation.

To listen to audio, please click on link:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/34815

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News Headline: Succeed and Lose Your Job (Sasso, Sledzik, Smith) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: InsideHigherEd.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The decision not to renew a popular lecturer's contract with Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication has faculty members criticizing the administration for for relying on an adjunct to create a successful program -- and then casting him aside after he built it.

Gene Sasso, one of the creators of the school's online master's degree program in public affairs, said he was last month told -- without explanation -- that his three-year review would not go forward, and that he would not be returning to Kent State for the 2013-14 academic year.

“I keep on using the word flabbergasted,” Sasso said.

After all, why would Kent State get rid of the man who helped create a program that has, over the course of two years, enrolled over 260 students and generated over $6 million in revenue, and that continues to boast stellar student satisfaction and retention rates?

“That's the $64,000 question -- and no one is telling us,” said Bill Sledzik, an associate professor.

Sasso was hired summer 2010 to complete work on the master's degree program, leaving a decades-long career in public relations. In its first two years, the program's all-online, asynchronous structure has resonated among working professionals. After completing two prerequisites, students “jump on a carousel of nine rotating courses,” Sledzik said, before completing a capstone project. Each course lasts seven weeks, meaning the program can be completed in two years.

Several of the program's first graduates, who completed the course requirements last December, opposed the decision not to renew Sasso's contract in a letter to Kent State administrators.

"From our perspective -- verified by other faculty in the program -- Gene served as the program's architect and the guardian of the program's vision,” the letter reads. “This team's personal and deep commitment made the program work. And from our perspective, Gene was clearly the team leader.”

Sledzik suggested Kent State chose not to renew Sasso's contract because of its collective bargaining agreement. While lecturers on the tenure track at the institution have to pass annual reviews, lecturers off the tenure track are reviewed every three years. Since passing the first review means collecting additional union employment protection, the administration could have made a strategic decision not to renew Sasso's contract.

“If they're going to get rid of a non-tenure-track faculty member, it makes sense to do it before they pass the third-year review,” said a faculty member who spoke on condition of anonymity. “That's the corporate mindset invading higher ed.”

Eric Mansfield, executive director of Kent State University media relations, said the university does not comment on personnel matters.

The faculty of the journalism school, led by Sledzik, passed a resolution to let Sasso's review proceed. The resolution was declined by the school's director, Thor Wasbotten. Should the review have proceeded, the administration would have been required to provide a formal reason for not renewing Sasso's contract. Choosing not renew Sasso's contract before the review means the administration is not legally obliged to do so.

“The administration wants people to think Gene was stepping on people's toes because it deflects the blame,” one faculty member said. “Gene advocated in a professional way for this program and its students, and instead of being championed for that, he was shown the door.”

Wasbotten erred by not consulting the faculty before choosing not to renew Sasso's contract, according to Deborah C. Smith, the grievance and arbitration chair for the American Association of University Professors' tenure-track unit at Kent State. “The university could have non-renewed [Sasso] after consulting with the faculty advisory body of the School even if the faculty recommended that he be renewed,” Smith said. “The problem from our standpoint is that they didn't consult.”

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News Headline: Kent State University Tuscarawas to present 'A Chorus Line' | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia, will present "A Chorus Line" at 7:30 p.m. March 6.

Tickets range from $37 to $58 and can be purchased at the Performing Arts Center box office, by calling 330-308-6400 or online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac . The box office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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News Headline: GAR awards $1 million to regional economic development fund | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Akron-headquartered GAR Foundation has awarded $1 million to a group that gives money to a host of programs focused on boosting the region's economy.

The Fund for Our Economic Future will receive the money over three years.

“We have a strong belief that philanthropy can play an important role in sustaining a globally competitive Northeast Ohio,” GAR President Christine Amer Mayer said in a news statement issued Monday.

The $1 million award was the largest among 15 grants, totaling almost $1.5 million, that GAR's distribution committee approved at its February meeting.

The foundation's second largest award was $135,000 to the Akron Art Museum for general operations. Akron Community Health Resources will receive $60,000 to provide medical and dental care to people who struggle financially.

GAR, the 11th largest grant-making foundation in Northeast Ohio, has made several sizeable gifts to the Fund for Our Economic Future, a collaboration of 53 public and private organizations across 16 counties.

The fund's grants include those to JumpStart Inc., which mentors and invests in early-stage companies in the region, and Team NEO, the regional job-attraction group that is a joint venture of chambers of commerce.

Other GAR awards were:

• Boys Hope Girls Hope of Northeastern Ohio, $25,000 for Summit County Hope Prep scholars.

• Christ Child Society of Akron Inc., $30,000 for its clothing center (over two years).

• College Now Greater Cleveland, $20,000 for a program involving students at Akron's Buchtel High School.

• Community Legal Aid Service Inc., $10,000 for legal support for Families with Children program.

• East Akron Neighborhood Development Corp., $20,000 for emergency home repair efforts.

• Hiram College, $20,000 for Summit County student scholarships.

• International Institute of Akron, $25,000 for a resource case manager.

• International Soap Box Derby, $20,000 for operations.

• Kent State University Foundation, $50,000 for the Last Opportunity Scholarship Fund.

• Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education, $25,000 for development of 50 internships in Summit county.

• United Way of Portage County Inc., $25,000 toward its 2013-2014 campaign.

• WKSU (89.7-FM), $20,000 toward its spring fund drive.

GAR is a private, independent foundation established in 1967 as a charitable trust by Galen J. Roush, co-founder and
chief executive officer of Roadway Express, and his wife, Ruth. For more information, go to www.garfoundation. org.

For more information about the Fund for Our Economic Future, go to www.futurefund neo.org.

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News Headline: 'We can connect you': Libraries work to give readers new experiences (Wicks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fremont News Messenger - Online
Contact Name: Anna Jeffries Advocate Reporter
News OCR Text: NEWARK — A scholar hunched over a huge, dusty book in a silent library room.

A librarian confronting a group of children, asking them to quiet down.

These are images many people have associated with public libraries in the past. But anyone still expecting that experience when they walk into their local library will be pleasantly surprised, said Doug Evans, executive director of the Ohio Library Council.

“Just like everything in our culture has evolved, so have libraries. We don’t want people to think it’s still quiet and they’ll get shushed by the librarian,” he said. “A lot of times you can walk into a public library, it can be loud and active. And it should be.”

Libraries always have been places where people can go to get the information they need. But as technology develops and people get information in different ways, libraries have had to evolve, focusing on much more than just books, said Don Wicks, acting assistant director for the school of library and information science at Kent State University.

“I think libraries want to be known as helping agencies more than just a place where information is stored,” Wicks said. “They’ve become a place where we can connect you.”

To serve the needs of their diverse clientele, libraries throughout Ohio are focused on providing experienced-based services, Evans said.

Some customers might want to learn a new skill or use the Internet. Groups might want to use the library as a meeting space, while parents might want a fun program for their children after school.

All of these experiences link people to the library while helping them get what they want, he said.

“Libraries have recognized that different things appeal to different people,” Evans said. “They probably have the widest and most diverse market to serve. They cover the breadth of the community and have to determine how to meet that wide array of needs.”

A variety of offerings

Libraries always have tried to provide the latest technology to patrons, whether it was access to typewriters, fax machines or audio tape players, Wicks said.

But when the Internet came along, some people thought libraries would begin to disappear, Evans said.

“But the Internet ended up being a boon for libraries. People could go and access the Internet, because not everyone has a home computer,” he said. “It became a situation where the library staff was called on to be interpreters of the information people are seeking on the Internet.”

Now people come to the library to enjoy social media, play games, apply for jobs or research government services, Evans said.

As technology continues to change, it is up to library employees to get familiar with the latest programs and devices so they can teach clients how to use them, he said.

To make sure staff members are keeping up on the latest trends, the Licking County Library system started an emerging technologies and digital content department in fall 2012, Director Babette Wofter said.

The department has scheduled Tech Times at all of its branches when patrons can come in and learn to use devices such as iPads or e-readers.

Some library employees have been given iPads, and many employees have gone through technology training so they can answer questions from the public, Wofter said.

“Libraries are so firmly branded in books, but we are so much more than that,” Wofter said. “One of the biggest things is the shift to more digital technology.”

Another change is the emphasis on the library as a meeting place where people can participate in programming, Wicks said.

“I see the library becoming more of a gathering place where people can be comfortable to go, relax, meet with friends and get the information they need,” he said. “I think there is movement that way.”

In the past few years, the Licking County Library significantly has increased its programming, Wofter said.

“We want to offer people exposure to something they’ve never (done) before,” she said. “We bring outside professionals more than we’ve ever done before.”

Programs range anywhere from knitting groups, book clubs and cooking demonstrations to classes on job hunting or saving money.

As more materials become available in digital formats, shelf space can be converted to meeting rooms and program areas. Computer labs can be converted to sitting areas where people can use tablets or laptops to use wireless Internet.

When the Licking County Library reopens its renovated Emerson R. Miller branch March 3, patrons will see a game room, a café, group study rooms and a place where people can watch the news or play chess, Wofter said.

As they plan for the future, Wofter and her staff will consider other ways to make comfortable spaces for patrons.

“(Libraries) still have to meet very basic needs, like providing books and children’s reading time,” Evans said. “But at the same time, they are thinking about the next step.”

Looking to the future

As libraries transition into the future, their focus is shifting toward online content and e-books, Evans said.

With e-readers such as Nooks and Kindles becoming more popular, more people are looking to libraries for materials.

“One of the key areas where libraries are focusing their attention is access and affordability to digital content,” he said.

The Licking County Library offers a variety of books, audiobooks, digital magazines and music that can be downloaded for free on its website, Wofter said.

To train the next generation of librarians for the future, professors are teaching classes about digital preservation, collection development and other new topics, Wicks said.

“Some of it happens through teaching people to understand how information is shared in our contemporary world,” he said. “How do people seek it, and how do those providing it disseminate it?”

As more digital content becomes available, libraries can use their websites to share documents, records and e-books with patrons, Wicks said.

Moving in that direction will open up the library even more to people who prefer to access content from their homes, he said.

“I think there will be more of a push for digital resources that people can access without going into a building,” he said.

Wofter said she is looking forward to providing more resources that Licking County residents can access on their e-readers or tablets. It’s one more way they can serve the diverse needs of their patrons.

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News Headline: KENT STATE PRESENTS SPANISH AND LATIN FILM SERIES, MARCH 1-16 | Email

News Date: 02/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb.25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

During the month of March, Kent State University will present five Spanish and Latin films.The films will be shown in the Schwartz Center auditorium (room 177).All films will be in Spanish with English subtitles.The event is free and open to the public, and a group discussion led by a Kent State faculty member will follow each film.

The films featured in this event include:

CHICO & RITA, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, AT 7:30 P.M.

Oscar-winning director Fernando Treuba (The Age of Beauty) and famous artist Javier Mariscal teamed up to create this animated love story starring the music, culture and people of Cuba.When Chico, a dashing piano player, and Rita, the beautiful Havana nightclub singer, meet, sparks fly, and they fall madly in love.

The Man Next Door (El Hombre de Al Lado), Saturday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m.

In this dark comedy, Leonardo (Rafael Spregelburd) is a prestigious designer who lives with his family in a famous house designed by Le Corbusier.Life is seemingly ideal for Leonardo until one day his neighbor Victor (Daniel Araoz), a boorish used car salesman, breaks through a common wall to make a window in order to "catch a few rays of sun." The film explores the complex relationships between class differences, social barriers and right and wrong.

Even the Rain (Tambien la LLuvia), Friday, March 8, at 7:30 p.m.

Filmmaker Sebastian (Gael Garcia Bernal) and his cynical producer Costa (Luis Tosar) arrive in Cochabamba, Bolivia, to make a film about Columbus's voyage to the New World and the subjugation of the indigenous population.Just as filming begins, the natives face a crisis when the government privatizes the water utility and prices skyrocket.

La Yuma, Friday, March 15, at 7:30 p.m.

Nicaragua's first full-length feature in 20 years, La Yuma tells the story of a young woman who dreams of transcending her bleak life in the slums of Managua by becoming a boxer.Looking beyond the meager possibilities that seem available to her (and ignoring the advice of her gang-member friends), she finds solace and hope in her training and falls in love with a middle-class journalism student.

From the Land to Your Table (Que Culpa Tiene el Tomate), Saturday, March 16, at 7:30 p.m.

What do you get when you take seven directors from seven different countries with seven different cultures and points of view? From the Land to Your Table is the first documentary of its kind in that it shows the perspectives of seven majorly talented filmmakers and directors from all over Latin America as they capture the conditions and cultural diversity of popular produce markets in their individual countries.

The Spanish and Latin film series is made possible with support from film distribution company, Pragda, the secretary of state for culture of Spain, and Spain's Program for Cultural Cooperation with U.S.universities.

For more information about the Spanish Film Series, contact Francoise Massardier-Kenney, director of Kent State's Institute for Applied Linguistics, at fkenney@kent.edu or 330-672-2150.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Neil Druker: Memphis Principal's Efforts Unite Media and Literacy | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Digital Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This past school year, one Memphis, Tennessee elementary school principal has enacted a new approach to teaching kids how to reach--through the television. Literacy advocate Neil Druker weighs in on this new method.

PHILADELPHIA, PA, February 25, 2013 /24-7PressRelease/ -- According to literacy advocate Neil Druker, the public has always been quick to eliminate the value of television and digital media in relation to encouraging the practice of reading among youth. However, a recent article from an ABC News affiliate reveals how Raychellet Williamson--Memphis, Tennessee elementary school principal--is using media to promote literacy among her students. Over the recent holiday break, Williamson required students to watch television with closed captioning for an hour each day, allowing them to enjoy typical entertainment but to also be exposed to reading.

In the article, Williamson cites the work of Kent State University literacy professor Tim Rasinski as the inspiration behind the experiment. Williamson explains, "Closed captioning is a way for children to see more words in print. Every time they see a word, it gets imprinted in their memories. Eventually it becomes a word they recognize immediately." Familiar with several approaches to reading comprehension, Neil Druker comments, "It is long known that students today are very responsive to learning through varied models--especially through lessons that have a visual element. Although there really is no 'teacher' providing a lesson through the closed-caption approach, it does allow the student to experience a direct opportunity to learn through observation."

The article explains how this version of homework was reinforced, "Children at Williamson's Shannon Elementary [watched] 60 minutes of closed caption TV a day over the holiday break. Every child [was] expected to bring documentation, signed by a parent, of their closed caption use." Although an innovative approach, Neil Druker--a professional involved in promoting literacy--explains that the amount of success will depend on how active students are in the process.

Although the articles notes that Williamson has experienced a notable success in overall literacy at Shannon Elementary since she implemented the practice in November, Druker believes that television offers no solid replacement for lessons gained from books or the classroom. "On a passive level, closed captioning can definitely help students expand vocabulary and become familiar with words and their usage. However, it is important to remember that captions can are sometimes truncated or contain grammatical, which could make it more confusing for the student. Although students can look to television as an educational opportunity, they should still engage in independent reading and remain encouraged to ask teachers questions they may have about written language," Neil Druker concludes.

ABOUT:

Neil Druker is a professional and entrepreneur who lives in Boston, Massachusetts. He is actively involved with community issues and is an advocate for animal rights and encouraging the arts. In addition to these causes, Neil Druker is one of the strongest advocates for literacy in his community. Over the years, Druker has devoted a great deal of his time and energy to helping others learn to read and write, to getting kids involved in reading and to promoting literacy on every level possible.

Website: http://neildrukernow.net/

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