Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
Alumni (2)
College of Education, Health and Human Services; University Facilities Management (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Communication Studies; Geology (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Human Resources (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
Pan-African Studies (1)
Safety (1)
University Facilities Management (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (2)
Cleveland Browns Josh Cribbs to act in movie shooting in Kent 02/27/2013 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Cribbs is taking his talents to the big screen with a new movie. The Pro Bowl kicker returner will...

Blog: Be in the same movie as Browns' Josh Cribbs 02/26/2013 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...appeared on ESPN, NFL Network, FX's The League, the Rachael Ray Show and Hot In Cleveland, but this will be his first movie, according to his publisher. A Kent State University graduate, Cribbs will be shooting his scenes in Kent on Saturday March 2. "The Murders at Brandywine Theatre" should be finished...


College of Education, Health and Human Services; University Facilities Management (1)
School Notes (White) 02/27/2013 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

...advantage of the new Aurora High School writing center open Tuesdays to Thursdays fourth to sixth periods from 10:20 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. AHS is partnering with Kent State University's Education Department to provide writing tutorial services at the new center. Math 24 students excel Feb. 12 was another...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
KSU College of Nursing sets Driving the Future 2013 event for March 4 02/27/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's College of Nursing presents "Driving the Future 2013," an event focused on inspiration and innovation and their roles in the education,...


Communication Studies; Geology (1)
Panel at Kent State discusses pros and cons of fracking 02/27/2013 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent -- A panel of journalists and geoscientists at Kent State University discussed the pros and cons of horizontal hydraulic fracturing, an oil and gas extraction process that is the source of debate...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Human Resources (2)
First Smoking Forum Draws Few at Kent State (Warzinski) 02/27/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Tobacco-free campus committee asking public for input; series of public meetings planned at all 8 campuses The Kent State University committee reviewing the idea of possibly banning smoking on all eight campuses Tuesday held the first of 21 public forums scheduled...

VIDEO: Smoking Controversy Lights Up on Kent State Campus (Decker) 02/26/2013 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio – There's no butts about it. Kent State may soon be a tobacco-free campus. After the Ohio Board of Regents encouraged all public universities to go tobacco-free last summer,...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Beacon's Lin-Fisher honored with journalism award 02/26/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...consumer writer on the business news desk at the Beacon Journal, has been named recipient of the 2013 Diversity in Media Distinguished Leadership Award by Kent State University. She will be honored at ceremonies at Kent State on April 2. The award is part of a journalism program honoring...

Successful Kent Professor Terminated Unexpectedly (Sledzik) 02/27/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Contract for Gene Sasso, lecturer and faculty member in School of Journalism and Mass Communications, not renewed The termination of a popular faculty...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Kent State Tuscarawas to offer leadership program March 15 02/26/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas will offer a leadership program from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on March 15 at Kent State's Science and Advanced Technology...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
'We can connect you': Libraries work to give readers new experiences (Wicks) 02/27/2013 News-Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...have had to evolve, focusing on much more than just books, said Don Wicks, acting assistant director for the school of library and information science at Kent State University. “I think libraries want to be known as helping agencies more than just a place where information is stored,” Wicks said....

'We can connect you': Libraries work to give readers new experiences (Wicks) 02/26/2013 Port Huron Times Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...have had to evolve, focusing on much more than just books, said Don Wicks, acting assistant director for the school of library and information science at Kent State University. “I think libraries want to be known as helping agencies more than just a place where information is stored,” Wicks said....


Pan-African Studies (1)
Dr. George Garrison, professor of Pan African Studies at Kent State University, told an audience Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a reformer in 1963. (Garrison) 02/26/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Prof says King's focus was evolving after ‘I Have a Dream' speech CHAMPION Dr. George Garrison, professor of Pan African Studies at Kent State University, told an audience at the university's Trumbull campus that the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. of 1968 was different from the...


Safety (1)
Desperate Times Call for Desperate Measures: How to Respond to an Active Shooter 02/26/2013 Weekly Villager - Online Text Attachment Email

...Virginia Tech and other deadly incidents–mass shootings are a disturbing reality of modern society. The A.L.I.C.E. Active Shooter program — presented by Kent State University — stands for Alert, Lockdown, Information, Counter, and Evacuation. It was developed by two law enforcement officers following...


University Facilities Management (1)
Local news briefs - Feb. 26 02/27/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT Tree award KENT: For the fifth consecutive year, Kent State University has won a Tree Campus USA award. The award, made by the national Arbor...


News Headline: Cleveland Browns Josh Cribbs to act in movie shooting in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Cribbs is taking his talents to the big screen with a new movie.

The Pro Bowl kicker returner will appear in “The Murders at Brandywine Theatre” about a town's laughingstock who uses a puppet to vent his frustrations. It starts shooting in Kent on March 2.

Cribbs's publisher said the Kent State alumnus is seriously looking to expand his acting career during the off-season. Cribbs has already appeared on shows like “The League” and “Hot in Cleveland”.

“The Murders at Brandywine Theatre” should be complete this summer, and will shown to various festival organizers and potential distributors.

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News Headline: Blog: Be in the same movie as Browns' Josh Cribbs | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Do you want to be in a movie that will also have the Cleveland Browns' Josh Cribbs in a role? Check it out.

OK, first things first.

Hundreds of movie extras are needed for the finale of "The Murders of Brandywine Theater." The scene will be filmed at the Ohio City Temple at 2831 Franklin Boulevard in Ohio City on Wednesday, March 6 with call times for extras at noon and 6 p.m.

Producers say all extras will be finished around 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. Although none of the extras will be paid due to the film's small budget, each person will be credited and thanked at the end of the movie.

Those interested can e-mail producer Jacob Ruby: Nwpfilms@gmail.com.

All extras are asked to dress as if they were attending a theater event with business casual attire. No red or blue colors.

"The Murders of Brandywine Theater" stars Dian Bachar ("BASEketball"), Danielle Lozeau ("Legion") and former wrestler Diamond Dallas Page ("The Devil's Rejects").

All extras under the age of 18 must have a parent/legal guardian present during filming. Drinks and snacks will be provided.

Eddy Spagehtti Productions says "The Murders at Brandywine Theater" is about a small town loser and puppeteer who finally finds the courage he's lacked all his life when his dummy, Moxxy, starts speaking up for him and, eventually, begins murdering those who always pushed him around.

Eddy Spaghetti Productions is a film and animation production company founded in 2011 in Akron by filmmaker Larry Longstreth.

Also in the cast is the Cleveland Browns' wide receiver Josh Cribbs. Cribbs is an aspiring actor and is looking to expand his acting career this off-season.

He has recently appeared on ESPN, NFL Network, FX's The League, the Rachael Ray Show and Hot In Cleveland, but this will be his first movie, according to his publisher.

A Kent State University graduate, Cribbs will be shooting his scenes in Kent on Saturday March 2.

"The Murders at Brandywine Theatre" should be finished this summer and will shown to various festival organizers and potential distributors.

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News Headline: School Notes (White) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 50 students are inducted into AHS's Honor Society

Aurora High School recently inducted 50 students into the National Honor Society. The list includes the following:

Grace Aldredge, Kyle Baldwin, Taylor Banc, Audrey Bezilla, Dalton Browsky, Lukas Calcei, Mario Cribrari, Jacob Delis, Kendall Deranek, Kaitlyn Desilva, Elizabeth Dombeck, Melissa Dureiko, Madeline Farr, Alyssa Fejko, Madelyn Gilley, Heather Gosnell, Parker Griff.

Adrien Helmuth, Alexander Hickey, Colleen Houlahan, Prayag Jina, Ashley Julian, Aliexandria Kokinchzk, Sarah Kronz, Michael Kuryshev, Mitchell Lackey, Kathryn McClure, Jenny McGregory, Jacob McVay, Michael Memeth, Miles Milner, Joseph Orlando, Isabella Pollack, Clare Rahill.

Nicholas Reminder, Brenna Rettberg, Thomas Riedy, Stephen Riley, Joseph Roberto, Anne Robinson, Megan Salzano, Mackenzie Schumaker, Zachary Stahl, Megan Stechler, Reid Stephan, Scott Sutton, Emily Tanski, Kendall Trudick, John Updyke and Brittany Zepernick.

AHS has writing center

Students are encouraged to take advantage of the new Aurora High School writing center open Tuesdays to Thursdays fourth to sixth periods from 10:20 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. AHS is partnering with Kent State University's Education Department to provide writing tutorial services at the new center.

Math 24 students excel

Feb. 12 was another exceptional performance for Aurora schools in the Portage County Math 24 competition.

In the annual challenge, fourth- to sixth-graders utilize math flexibility and skill to solve challenging problems resulting in the number 24. Preparation, hard work and swift calculations enabled students to perform with excellent results.

Results were as follows:

Fourth grade -- Michael Carpenter, finalist and top 4; Kevin Jin and Luke Weil, top 16; fifth grade -- Ashley Ruehr, top 16; sixth grade -- Zachary Goldstone and Colin Weil, top 4; seventh grade -- Andrew Sobodosh, Nikitha Murikinati and Hannah Baltes, top 4; eighth grade -- Olivia Grohe and James Kristell, top 4.

Kent State tree campus for the fifth straight year

The Arbor Day Foundation recently honored Kent State University with a "Tree Campus USA" designation for the fifth time in the program's five-year history.

KSU grounds manager Heather White said her staff is dedicated to achieving the designation, which recognizes excellence in campus tree management. "At this point, we're like a heat-seeking missile," White said. "We're going after it every year."

According to the Arbor Day Foundation, schools must meet five standards to be named a "Tree Campus."

White said while the university meets the four standards easily every year, KSU officials must put serious work into creating a service project. This fall, geology students began an effort to create a database of all of the trees on campus for future use by the university's grounds staff.

She said students working on the project, which also served as a two-credit hour class, inventoried about 300 trees. The effort will likely continue for multiple years, both as a class and a resource for the university.

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News Headline: KSU College of Nursing sets Driving the Future 2013 event for March 4 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's College of Nursing presents "Driving the Future 2013," an event focused on inspiration and innovation and their roles in the education, science and health care of the future. The event will take place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 4 and will feature a series of TED TALK-style presentations. The event will take place at the Kent Student Center with morning sessions at the Kiva. Registration is required by today.

Driving the Future is a nationally attended conference series created in 2007 to facilitate brainstorming and dialogue addressing the gaps between education and practice for health care.

Scientist, inventor and educator Ron Mallett, Ph.D., will serve as keynote speaker at the event. Mallett teaches theoretical physics at the University of Connecticut. He was inspired as a child to challenge the test of time by his father's untimely passing and by the H.G. Wells classic novel, "The Time Machine." He vowed he would develop a theory to travel back in time to help his father, and this goal has been his life's work for the past 40 years. Today he has a convincing and respected argument for time travel based on Einstein's Theory of Relativity. Mallett will talk about how he developed his theory and how he persevered with what many feel is unbelievable or impossible.

Panel speakers at the event, from the fields of education, healthcare, science, medicine and the arts, also will share their inspirations, presenting their innovation expertise in a TED-TALK format. The speakers are:

Melody Tankersley, Ph.D., Kent State University provost fellow.

Vincent Hetherington, D.P.M., senior associate dean of the Kent State College of Podiatric Medicine.

John West, Ph.D., University Trustees Research Professor with the Kent State Liquid Crystal Institute.

Maria Jukic, J.D., executive director of the Cleveland Clinic Arts and Medicine Institute.

Following the morning presentations, the afternoon program is scheduled with breakout sessions for research poster and paper presenters focused on innovation.

The audience of Driving the Future has grown over the seven years of programming to now include not only students, faculty and practitioners in nursing, but also bench scientists, administrators, insurance and business executives and educators from a broad range of disciplines.

For more information about attending and to register for the morning session or the entire day of Driving the Future, visit www.kent.edu/nursing/events/driving-the-future.

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News Headline: Panel at Kent State discusses pros and cons of fracking | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name: KYLE MACDONALD
News OCR Text: Kent -- A panel of journalists and geoscientists at Kent State University discussed the pros and cons of horizontal hydraulic fracturing, an oil and gas extraction process that is the source of debate among environmentalists, politicians and economists.

The forum, "Fracking: Promise or Peril," was hosted Feb. 20 by KSU's School of Communication Studies for its first Global Communication Issues Forum.

Dimiter Kenarov, a Pulitzer-winning journalist for his reporting on natural gas extraction in Poland, opened the event by discussing the implications of fracking before joining a panel with Akron Beacon Journal environmental reporter Bob Downing, and KSU geology professors Donald Palmer and Yoram Eckstein.

"Shale gas is pretty much everywhere. There is no exploration, so to speak, it is just a matter of how economically viable it is to extract the gas or oil in certain shales," Kenarov said, noting that fracking's potential has captured the imagination of powers around the world and is a resource that could redistribute geopolitical power.

Once the panel discussion began, all conceded that the process is "mostly safe," but each raised concerns as well.

Downing said there are air pollution, waste handling and water availability issues that often are overlooked.

"Ohio has a lot of water that could provide for a lot of fracking, but are we willing to lose the water?" Downing asked.

He added that about 99 out of 100 wells are estimated to be safe and said Ohio is projected to have 30,000 wells drilled in the coming years.

"ARE WE prepared to deal with that amount of wells? I'm not sure we are," Downing said.

Eckstein said fracking is just as much an environmental threat as conventional oil and gas drilling, with the biggest problems being errors and omissions, noting the case of a home that exploded in Geauga County after a driller disregarded warnings that methane could seep through the home's foundation.

Though there are new technologies in the industry, horizontal drilling is nothing new, Palmer said, adding that it's very likely all the gasoline used in cars comes from fracking.

Though Palmer said he believes fracking can be done safely, he expressed concerns on the volume of water used and disposal of the waste water after the process is finished.

Downing said Ohio has taken into account the mistakes of industry and other states in the past that led to environmental issues while crafting Ohio's regulations.

"There have been blowouts, spills, major fines imposed, cases of farm animals and people getting sick from exposures," he said. "We haven't seen any of that here in Ohio and part of that is the fine tuning of the rules to avoid those problems."

Kenarov said the hardest part about reporting on fracking in the U.S. is the lack of uniform regulation when going state to state.

He said lack of across-the-board regulation, transparency in industry and politics and lobbyism are the biggest problems associated with fracking.

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News Headline: First Smoking Forum Draws Few at Kent State (Warzinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Tobacco-free campus committee asking public for input; series of public meetings planned at all 8 campuses

The Kent State University committee reviewing the idea of possibly banning smoking on all eight campuses Tuesday held the first of 21 public forums scheduled to gather feedback on the issue.

The first meeting Tuesday morning, one of three held yesterday on the Kent campus, drew less than 20 members of the campus community, including members of the committee, press and university administration.

Evan Gildenblatt, executive director of Kent State's Undergraduate Student Government, said the committee is merely gathering information at this point in order to make a recommendation to Kent State President Lester Lefton's cabinet after all the public meetings are held.

"We are not making binding decisions, but we are gathering input on how this will effect our campus community here at Kent State University," he said.

The public forums are scheduled through March 14 across all eight campuses and include two more set for the Kent campus on Thursday. See the flier attached to this article for a complete list of times and dates.

Part of the feedback-gathering process included a survey distributed late last year about the idea of banning tobacco use. More than 8,300 people responded to the survey.

Greg Jarvie, vice president of enrollment management and student affairs and co-chair of the committee, said they're withholding the results of the survey until after all the meetings are held.

He said the committee is on track to make its recommendation to the president's cabinet this summer.

The first meeting Tuesday morning revolved more around the idea of adjusting the university's existing smoking policy to create designated smoking spaces and increasing the distance smokers must stay away from building entrances instead of focusing on banning smoking completely.

Marianne Warzinski, director of academic programming for the College of Communication and Information at Olson Hall, said the university should consider a policy that creates a more harmonious balance between smokers and non-smokers.

"If you ask me if I think it should be smoke-free, the answer is yes," she said. "I feel like the current policy isn't working quite well.”

Warzinski said her office is constantly flooded with secondhand smoke by people who light up on their way outside or who ignore the buffer of 20 feet required between smokers and building entrances.

“I'm getting secondhand smoke pretty much every day," she said. "Our campus, to be blunt, looks like an ash tray."

So to address litter and secondhand smoke issues she and several others at Tuesday's meeting suggested increasing the buffer distance or building an outdoor pavilion or other designated smoking area.

"We haven't ruled anything out," Gildenblatt said.

Thursday's public forums are at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. in the governance chambers on the second floor of the Kent State Student Center.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Smoking Controversy Lights Up on Kent State Campus (Decker) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Annette Lawless
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio – There's no butts about it. Kent State may soon be a tobacco-free campus.

After the Ohio Board of Regents encouraged all public universities to go tobacco-free last summer, the school is now surveying students for their opinion.

“As soon as I saw that, I was like, ‘Are you kidding me? Really?'” said student Megan Schimmoeller.

Schimmoeller enjoys smoking on campus, though she said it's already limited. The school allows people to smoke 20 feet away from buildings.

“We already have these specific things we have to follow. Why is there a need to take it away?” she asked. “I doubt I would do it, follow the ban. They don't enforce the rules as is.”

Fellow student Garrett Barrera said the new ban would pose its challenges and benefits.

”I think it's better for the environment and the people around. Keep healthier lifestyles,” he said. “Maybe it'll decrease the number of the population that do use tobacco.”

“People feel the right that they can do what they want,” Barrera continued.” It is their life. They can make their own decisions, so I think students would protest against it.”

The university is asking students – no matter their stance – to participate in public forums this week, so the university can move forward with a plan that represents the entire Kent State population, said college wellness coordinator Rachael Decker.

Kent already conducted a survey in the fall, and could have a new policy made by spring.

“We want to take our time to make sure we are analyzing the data appropriately, so we hope in the next couple months to have a recommendation to the office of the president, who will then take it on to the board,” Decker said.

Yet, Sarah Silbaugh said the school needs to factor what that new policy will mean for smokers like her. A ban will limit her legal right to smoke too much, she said.

”With as many students as we have here, to try to eradicate smoking is a little outrageous,” she said. “I understand problems with second-hand smoke, but we are courteous. I understand not smoking in the buildings, but saying we can't smoke on campus is just mean.”

According to the American Lung Association, more than 250 colleges across the country are completely smoke-free.

If Kent State does ban tobacco on campus, that ban would go into effect as early as 2014.

The Kent campus will host two more public meetings on the ban this week. The hour-long meetings will be at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Thursday in the Governance Chamber at the Kent State Student Center.

To view video, please click on link:
http://fox8.com/2013/02/26/smoking-controversy-lights-up-on-kent-state-campus/

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News Headline: Beacon's Lin-Fisher honored with journalism award | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Betty Lin-Fisher, consumer writer on the business news desk at the Beacon Journal, has been named recipient of the 2013 Diversity in Media Distinguished Leadership Award by Kent State University.

She will be honored at ceremonies at Kent State on April 2.

The award is part of a journalism program honoring the late Robert McGruder.

The awards recognize the accomplishments of media professionals who encourage diversity in the field of journalism.

McGruder was a former executive editor of the Detroit Free Press, managing editor of the Plain Dealer in Cleveland and a graduate of Kent State University. McGruder died of cancer in 2002.

The 2013 McGruder Lecture and Award winner is Russ Mitchell, newscaster on WKYC (Channel 3) in Cleveland.

Lin-Fisher, 39, is an 18-year veteran of the Beacon Journal and has worked as a copy editor, metro reporter and assistant metro editor. For the last 12 years, she has been the consumer reporter and columnist and a general business reporter.

She covers consumer issues as well as several business beats, including retail, grocery stores, utilities and banks.

Her work has earned state awards for human interest writing, business writing, consumer reporting, breaking news and column writing. She was part of the team in the Beacon's American Dream/Reclaim the Dream Series in 2009, which looked at the challenges of the middle class and in which Lin-Fisher's columns offered practical ways readers could work on their finances. The series' national honors include the 2009 Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism, and placements in the National Headliner Awards for Journalistic Innovation and Scripps Howard National Journalism Awards Public Service Reporting.

Lin-Fisher also won the 2009 Society of Business Editors and Writers Best in Business Projects for her Reclaim the Dream series.

She lives in the Akron area with her husband and two children.

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News Headline: Successful Kent Professor Terminated Unexpectedly (Sledzik) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Contract for Gene Sasso, lecturer and faculty member in School of Journalism and Mass Communications, not renewed

The termination of a popular faculty member in Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication is raising some eyebrows in academia.

Students and staff are questioning the decision of university administrators to not renew the contract for lecturer Gene Sasso, who came to Kent in 2010 to help establish a new online public relations master's degree program — a program that's become quite successful since.

Sasso was told last month unexpectedly that his contract would not be renewed, Inside Higher Ed reported.

"There was no reason given or offered," Sasso told TV2, the communication school's student broadcasting arm.

Sasso was listed by Kent State's College of Communication and Information on its "points of pride" for the 2011-2012 academic year for being quoted by the Bulldog Reporter in "2012 Online Graduate Programs for Communicators." The outlet is considered a top-tier producer of professional development webinars for corporate communications firms.

Bill Sledzik, an associate professor in public relations at Kent State, wrote on his personal blog, ToughSledding, about the "brilliance" of Sasso's efforts coordinating Kent's public relations program.

"In his short time at Kent State, Gene has met every objective set for him," Sledzik wrote. "His bottom line: a program with 260-plus students, $6 million in revenue, and a student retention rate of 90 percent plus. It's a track record that, in the 'real world,' earns you a huge bonus."

University administrators have declined to comment publicly on Sasso's termination.

Kent State spokesperson Eric Mansfield told Inside Higher Ed that the university does not comment on personnel matters.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to offer leadership program March 15 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas will offer a leadership program from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on March 15 at Kent State's Science and Advanced Technology Center, 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia.

The program, titled "Leadership Through Developing, Empowering and Delegating," will address what organizations should do to develop, empower and delegate to its' employees and how to avoid damaging impacts of organizations that don't.

The program will also illustrate the benefits of delegating to avoid ineffective use of human resources, employee burnout, turnover and rising health care costs.

Andy Masters, an award-winning author and international speaker, will present the program. Designed for all levels of leadership, the presentation is based on Masters' book, "Things Leaders Say: A Daily Guide to Help Every Leader Empower & Inspire."

The cost is $50 per person; breakfast is included in the cost. Registration is required by March 14 and the first 100 paid guests will receive a free, signed copy of Masters' book. For more information or to register, call 330-308-7522 or email dmspence@kent.edu .

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News Headline: 'We can connect you': Libraries work to give readers new experiences (Wicks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald - Online
Contact Name: Anna Jeffries Advocate Reporter
News OCR Text: NEWARK — A scholar hunched over a huge, dusty book in a silent library room.

A librarian confronting a group of children, asking them to quiet down.

These are images many people have associated with public libraries in the past. But anyone still expecting that experience when they walk into their local library will be pleasantly surprised, said Doug Evans, executive director of the Ohio Library Council.

“Just like everything in our culture has evolved, so have libraries. We don’t want people to think it’s still quiet and they’ll get shushed by the librarian,” he said. “A lot of times you can walk into a public library, it can be loud and active. And it should be.”

Libraries always have been places where people can go to get the information they need. But as technology develops and people get information in different ways, libraries have had to evolve, focusing on much more than just books, said Don Wicks, acting assistant director for the school of library and information science at Kent State University.

“I think libraries want to be known as helping agencies more than just a place where information is stored,” Wicks said. “They’ve become a place where we can connect you.”

To serve the needs of their diverse clientele, libraries throughout Ohio are focused on providing experienced-based services, Evans said.

Some customers might want to learn a new skill or use the Internet. Groups might want to use the library as a meeting space, while parents might want a fun program for their children after school.

All of these experiences link people to the library while helping them get what they want, he said.

“Libraries have recognized that different things appeal to different people,” Evans said. “They probably have the widest and most diverse market to serve. They cover the breadth of the community and have to determine how to meet that wide array of needs.”

A variety of offerings

Libraries always have tried to provide the latest technology to patrons, whether it was access to typewriters, fax machines or audio tape players, Wicks said.

But when the Internet came along, some people thought libraries would begin to disappear, Evans said.

“But the Internet ended up being a boon for libraries. People could go and access the Internet, because not everyone has a home computer,” he said. “It became a situation where the library staff was called on to be interpreters of the information people are seeking on the Internet.”

Now people come to the library to enjoy social media, play games, apply for jobs or research government services, Evans said.

As technology continues to change, it is up to library employees to get familiar with the latest programs and devices so they can teach clients how to use them, he said.

To make sure staff members are keeping up on the latest trends, the Licking County Library system started an emerging technologies and digital content department in fall 2012, Director Babette Wofter said.

The department has scheduled Tech Times at all of its branches when patrons can come in and learn to use devices such as iPads or e-readers.

Some library employees have been given iPads, and many employees have gone through technology training so they can answer questions from the public, Wofter said.

“Libraries are so firmly branded in books, but we are so much more than that,” Wofter said. “One of the biggest things is the shift to more digital

technology.”

Another change is the emphasis on the library as a meeting place where people can participate in programming, Wicks said.

“I see the library becoming more of a gathering place where people can be comfortable to go, relax, meet with friends and get the information they need,” he said. “I think there is movement that way.”

In the past few years, the Licking County Library significantly has increased its programming, Wofter said.

“We want to offer people exposure to something they’ve never (done) before,” she said. “We bring outside professionals more than we’ve ever done before.”

Programs range anywhere from knitting groups, book clubs and cooking demonstrations to classes on job hunting or saving money.

As more materials become available in digital formats, shelf space can be converted to meeting rooms and program areas. Computer labs can be converted to sitting areas where people can use tablets or laptops to use wireless Internet.

When the Licking County Library reopens its renovated Emerson R. Miller branch March 3, patrons will see a game room, a café, group study rooms and a place where people can watch the news or play chess, Wofter said.

As they plan for the future, Wofter and her staff will consider other ways to make comfortable spaces for patrons.

“(Libraries) still have to meet very basic needs, like providing books and children’s reading time,” Evans said. “But at the same time, they are thinking about the next step.”

Looking to the future

As libraries transition into the future, their focus is shifting toward online content and e-books,

Evans said.

With e-readers such as Nooks and Kindles becoming more popular, more people are looking to libraries for materials.

“One of the key areas where libraries are focusing their attention is access and affordability to digital content,” he said.

The Licking County Library offers a variety of books, audiobooks, digital magazines and music that can be downloaded for free on its website, Wofter said.

To train the next generation of librarians for the future, professors are teaching classes about digital preservation, collection development and other new topics, Wicks said.

“Some of it happens through teaching people to understand how information is shared in our contemporary world,” he said. “How do people seek it, and how do those providing it disseminate it?”

As more digital content becomes available, libraries can use their websites to share documents, records and e-books with patrons, Wicks said.

Moving in that direction will open up the library even more to people who prefer to access content from their homes, he said.

“I think there will be more of a push for digital resources that people can access without going into a building,” he said.

Wofter said she is looking forward to providing more resources that Licking County residents can access on their e-readers or tablets. It’s one more way they can serve the diverse needs of their patrons.

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News Headline: 'We can connect you': Libraries work to give readers new experiences (Wicks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Port Huron Times Herald - Online
Contact Name: Anna Jeffries CentralOhio.com
News OCR Text: Clayton Black uses one of the library computers Friday at the main branch of the Fairfield County Public Library. / Jess Lanning/Eagle-Gazette

A scholar hunching over a huge, dusty book in a silent library room.

A librarian confronting a group of children, asking them to quiet down.

These are images many people have associated with public libraries in the past. But anyone still expecting that experience when they walk into their local library will be pleasantly surprised, said Doug Evans, executive director of the Ohio Library Council.

“Just like everything in our culture has evolved, so have libraries. We don’t want people to think it’s still quiet and they’ll get shushed by the librarian,” he said. “A lot of times you can walk into a public library, it can be loud and active. And it should be.”

Libraries always have been places where people can go to get the information they need. But as technology develops and people get information in different ways, libraries have had to evolve, focusing on much more than just books, said Don Wicks, acting assistant director for the school of library and information science at Kent State University.

“I think libraries want to be known as helping agencies more than just a place where information is stored,” Wicks said. “They’ve become a place where we can connect you.”

To serve the needs of their diverse clientele, libraries throughout the state of Ohio are focused on providing experienced-based services, Evans said.

Some customers might want to learn a new skill or use the Internet. Groups might want to use the library as a meeting space, while parents might want a fun program for their children after school.

All of these experiences link people to the library while helping them get what they want, he said.

“Libraries have recognized that different things appeal to different people,” Evans said. “They probably have the widest and most diverse market to serve. They cover the breadth of the community and have to determine how to meet that wide array of needs.”

A variety of offerings

Libraries always have tried to provide the latest technology to patrons, whether it was access to typewriters, fax machines or audio tape players, Wicks said.

But when the Internet came along, some people thought libraries would begin to disappear, Evans said.

“But the Internet ended up being a boon for libraries. People could go and access the Internet because not everyone has a home computer,” he said. “It became a situation where the library staff was called on to be interpreters of the information people are seeking on the Internet.”

Now people come to the library to enjoy social media, play games, apply for jobs or research government services, Evans said.

As technology continues to change, it is up to library employees to get familiar with the latest programs and devices so they can teach clients how to use them, he said.

Becky Shaade, youth services coordinator at the Fairfield County District Library, said the library offers downloadable e-books and e-audiobooks, digital magazines and music for free to anyone who has a library card.

“In the last few years, with e-readers taking off, the use of that service has exploded,” Shaade said of the downloadable books. “About

5 percent of overall book circulation is e-books. That might not sound like a lot, but it’s about 30,000 e-books checked out and that number is growing every year.”

Another change libraries are moving toward is an emphasis on the library as a meeting space, Wicks said.

“I see the library becoming more of a gathering place where people can be comfortable to go, relax, meet with friends and get the information they need,” he said. “I think there is movement that way.”

All those changes are impacting the way libraries use space, Evans said.

As more materials become available in digital formats, shelf space can be converted to meeting rooms and program areas. Computer labs can be converted to sitting areas where people can use tablets or laptops to use wireless Internet.

“(Libraries) still have to meet very basic needs, like providing books and children’s reading time,” Evans said. “But at the same time, they are thinking about the next step.”

Looking to the future

As libraries transition into the future, their focus is shifting toward online content and e-books, Evans said.

With e-readers, such as Nooks and Kindles, becoming more popular, more people are looking to libraries for materials.

“One of the key areas where libraries are focusing their attention is access and affordability to digital content,” he said. “I don’t think that is going to stop.”

Shaade said it was about two weeks ago when the Fairfield County District Library started offering downloadable music via Freegal.

“It’s a subscription service we pay for, so that’s what makes it free and legal,” she said. “People can download music, keep it on their computer or device and listen to those songs wherever, whenever. And they’re good songs.”

Shaade said she thinks the library has done a good job of keeping up with its technology-saavy patrons.

“We want to stay current while still offering customers the same things they’ve always gotten from us,” she said.

To train the next generation of librarians for the future, professors are teaching classes about digital preservation, collection development and other new topics, Wicks said.

“Some of it happens through teaching people to understand how information is shared in our contemporary world,” he said. “How do people seek it and how do those providing it disseminate it.”

As more digital content becomes available, libraries can use their websites to share documents, records and e-books with patrons, Wicks said.

Moving in that direction will open up the library even more to people who prefer to access content from their homes, he said.

“I think there will be more of a push for digital resources that people can access without going into a building,” he said. “Libraries are an experience place, and sometimes those experiences are happening online.”

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News Headline: Dr. George Garrison, professor of Pan African Studies at Kent State University, told an audience Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a reformer in 1963. (Garrison) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Prof says King's focus was evolving after ‘I Have a Dream' speech

CHAMPION

Dr. George Garrison, professor of Pan African Studies at Kent State University, told an audience at the university's Trumbull campus that the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. of 1968 was different from the man who delivered one of the nation's great speeches nearly 50 years ago.

“Most of us know the Dr. King of the ‘I Have a Dream speech,'” he said Monday at the campus's Black History Month program. “But Dr. King lived another five years after that. While his ideas and what he said are consistent throughout his lifetime, they did not remain static. They evolved and changed as the history of that period changed.

“While initially his concerns were more domestically focused on issues of African-Americans in the United States of America and the conditions they dealt with here, in his later years his concern expanded beyond the United States of America as he began to analyze the foreign policy of this nation and the condition of other peoples throughout the world.”

In the early years, he was a reformer, and the “I Have a Dream” speech was an example of this, Garrison said.

But between August 1963 and his death in 1968, the country changed considerably with the rise of Malcolm X and the Black Panther Party and other revolutionary organizations.

King began to focus more on U.S. poverty and violence in our nation and abroad.

“King is going to transition from his position as a reformer in 1963 to a revolutionary in 1967 and 1968. This is the Martin Luther King Jr. that has slipped through the cracks,” he said.

Garrison said the roots of King's philosophy are in the experiences of the first African-Americans, whose struggle for abolition of slavery was strengthened by the Bible, which contains stories of others facing similar challenges.

“Dr. King felt the weight of this tradition and understood the dual role of the black minister as both secular and spiritual leader,” he said.

“Dr. King thought it was a moral, social and spiritual obligation to be concerned about others and to live together in peace and harmony,” he said.

King influenced President Lyndon B. Johnson to “attempt to establish the ‘Great Society,' a nation free of poverty with all citizens enjoying the benefits of wealth with equal opportunity to all,” Garrison said.

When King, Bobby Kennedy and others died, “the dream these individuals had died with them, unfortunately. The great society of President Johnson was vilified by the next administration of President Richard Nixon. He began the process of dismantling Johnson's great society,” which included on-the-job and vocational training, Garrison said.

When King was killed, he was organizing the “poor people's campaign,” answering an invitation by sanitation workers in Memphis, Tenn., who were striking for better wages.

“He thought it was contradictory for people to call themselves Christians and hoard the wealth,” Garrison said. In King's view, “It would be inconceivable that people would oppose President Obama's health-care initiative to extend health care to 30 million to 40 million people without health care,” he added.

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News Headline: Desperate Times Call for Desperate Measures: How to Respond to an Active Shooter | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Weekly Villager - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Portage County – What if a violent intruder showed up at your workplace or school, intent on shooting to kill? What would you do?

In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing.

With Teddy Roosevelt's empowering quote in mind, a hands-on tutorial on how best to respond to an active shooter was sponsored by the Portage County Safety Council at the Ravenna Elks Lodge on Valentine's Day. Captain M. Renee Romine, retired Army Reserve Captain, Certified A.L.I.C.E. Instructor, presented the program to a standing-room-only crowd of area administrators, safety directors, policy makers, and human resources managers.

With the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre on our collective conscience– along with Chardon High, Aurora, CO. movie theater, Virginia Tech and other deadly incidents–mass shootings are a disturbing reality of modern society.

The A.L.I.C.E. Active Shooter program — presented by Kent State University — stands for Alert, Lockdown, Information, Counter, and Evacuation. It was developed by two law enforcement officers following the mass shooting at Columbine High School in 1999. KSU has provided A.L.I.C.E training to more than 5,000 faculty, staff and students over the past 13 years.

At the core of the program is the directive to increase your probability of survival by doing everything in your power to make yourself a difficult target. Typically, a shooter will take down as many victims as possible within just a 10-minute time frame. The natural response for victims during this critical time is to Fight, take Flight or Freeze.

“Do something,” Romine encouraged. “You are not helpless. Do whatever you can. Keep moving to create a more difficult target.” For instance, those at Virginia Tech who took a professor's advice to break out a window and jump out onto the grassy lawn below, survived. Similarly, students who laid on the floor and braced their legs against the door of a classroom, successfully barricaded themselves from the Virginia Tech shooter.

Thinking ahead, having a plan in place, and conducting practice drills help individuals and groups to be ready if and when that dreaded moment occurs. Focusing on the Counter element of A.L.I.C.E., Romine suggested throwing things in the assailant's face to confuse and distract him. This creates an opportunity to swarm and disarm him; or to run and escape when his vision is impaired.

Romine also suggested that workplaces and classrooms be equipped with crisis buckets filled with barricading and first aid supplies, including rope, duct tape, medical materials, etc.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a helpful video available on YouTube, titled, “RUN. HIDE. FIGHT. Surviving an Active Shooter Event.” The 6-minute video provides clear and concise examples of how best to react in the event you're caught in the crosshairs of an active shooter.

The bottom line: Don't freeze! As Teddy Roosevelt also said, Do what you can, with what you have, where you are. It could save your life.

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News Headline: Local news briefs - Feb. 26 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

Tree award

KENT: For the fifth consecutive year, Kent State University has won a Tree Campus USA award.

The award, made by the national Arbor Day foundation, was created in 2008 to honor college campuses for their tree management.

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