Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
Athletics (1)
College of Business (COB); Management and Information Systems (1)
College of Business (COB); Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Higher Education; Human Resources; Office of the Provost (1)
Insurance Studies; KSU at Salem (3)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Ashtabula; KSU at Geauga; Renovation at KSU (1)
May 4 (3)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (1)
Flashes headed to Arkansas 05/07/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

The Kent State men's golf team will play in its 26th NCAA Regional later this month in Fayetteville, Ark. The Golden Flashes, champions of the Mid-American...


College of Business (COB); Management and Information Systems (1)
Kent State Professor Develops Modern Voting Method (Datta) 05/06/2013 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio – A local college professor hopes to dramatically change the way everyone in the United States votes. Dr. Pratim Datta of Kent State University has developed a new program he calls VARS, for Voter Identification and Recommender System. Using the program, voters can...


College of Business (COB); Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
It's important to find the correct mix with other cultures (Mayo) 05/07/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Business tactics and casual conversation that work here might not internationally There's a cultural lesson to be found in peanut butter. Americans...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Healthcare job fair in Rootstown May 9 05/06/2013 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

Several area employers will be on hand at a healthcare job fair May 9 from 2 to 6 p.m. at the Northeast College of Medicine (NEOMED) Conference Center, 4209 State Route 44, in Rootstown. This free event will be open to the public. The healthcare industry continues to...


Higher Education; Human Resources; Office of the Provost (1)
Ohio public institutions consider creating adjunct referral system (Diacon) 05/07/2013 InsideHigherEd.com Text Attachment Email

...colleges and universities should count how many hours of actual work one credit hour constitutes, several institutions have grown tired of waiting. At the University of Akron, adjuncts will only be able to teach 8 credit hours beginning this fall, down from 12 before. The announcement sparked a demonstration...


Insurance Studies; KSU at Salem (3)
Nursing degrees tops for 2012 grads 05/07/2013 Fremont News Messenger - Online Text Attachment Email

...spokesman for the Ohio Board of Regents, which compiled data on college degrees and fields between fiscal 2003 and 2012. He pointed to new programs at Kent State University and Columbus State University that train students in the insurance industry, a growing Ohio market. Still, Ohio students’...

Nursing degrees dominated 2012 05/06/2013 Newark Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

...spokesman for the Ohio Board of Regents, which compiled data on college degrees and fields between fiscal years 2003 and 2012. He pointed to new programs at Kent State University and Columbus State University that train students in the insurance industry, a growing Ohio market. Still, Ohio students’...

Nursing degrees tops for 2012 grads 05/07/2013 Zanesville Times Recorder - Online Text Attachment Email

...spokesman for the Ohio Board of Regents, which compiled data on college degrees and fields between fiscal 2003 and 2012. He pointed to new programs at Kent State University and Columbus State University that train students in the insurance industry, a growing Ohio market. Still, Ohio students’...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Cuyahoga Community College names finalists for president (Smith) 05/07/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Alex Johnson, former president of Cuyahoga Community College's Metropolitan Campus, and Lars Hafner, a former embattled president of...


KSU at Ashtabula; KSU at Geauga; Renovation at KSU (1)
Ohio Controlling Board releases $1 million improvements at Kent State 05/06/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

COLUMBUS - The state Controlling Board released $1 million-plus Monday for improvement projects at Kent State University campuses in Portage County and beyond. More than $422,000 will go toward piping and ceiling replacements at the Kent building...


May 4 (3)
An education at Kent State 05/07/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Each commemoration of May 4, 1970, must begin with the four who died, Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder. Imagine all...

UN to Review Whether the FBI Killed the Kids at Kent State 05/07/2013 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email

Gwen Ifell and Oliver Stone were at Kent State this weekend to commemorate the May 4, 1970 shootings at the university that claimed four lives and wounded...

Kent State University remembers May 4, 1970, 43 years later 05/07/2013 Twinsburg Bulletin Text Attachment Email

About 200 people came together at Kent State University's Blanket Hill May 4 to reflect on the 43rd anniversary of the anti-war protests and riots that...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Twinsburg Schools Receive State Grant For Reading Program 05/07/2013 Twinsburg Patch Text Attachment Email

...nearly all of it. The reading program is partnership between the school district and Twinsburg Public Library, Ursuline College, Dr. Tim Rasinski from Kent State University and Dr. Lisa Riegel from Ohio State University. Under the Third Grade Reading Guarantee, third graders in 2013-14 who...


Town-Gown (1)
Roadwork set at Main, Lincoln streets in Kent 05/07/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

As part of the Kent State University Esplanade Project, work is to be performed at the manhole at the intersection of Lincoln and Main streets today....


News Headline: Flashes headed to Arkansas | Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State men's golf team will play in its 26th NCAA Regional later this month in Fayetteville, Ark. The Golden Flashes, champions of the Mid-American Conference, are seeded fifth in the 14-team region. The regional will be played from May 28 to June 2. Texas is the top seed, with host Arkansas No. 2.

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News Headline: Kent State Professor Develops Modern Voting Method (Datta) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Dave Nethers
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio – A local college professor hopes to dramatically change the way everyone in the United States votes.

Dr. Pratim Datta of Kent State University has developed a new program he calls VARS, for Voter Identification and Recommender System.

Using the program, voters can cast ballots in their local elections from anywhere in the world using personal computers or smart phones.

Datta believes VARS will not only eliminate concerns about voter fraud, but it will also address many of the concerns that voter rights activists have regarding disenfranchised voting.

Using the program, a voter will first either swipe their identification card or sign in using their name. The program will first double check the name against the one on their personal I.D.

Next the voter will enter their social security number which can be electronically cross referenced with their name.

The program can then easily tell if the person trying to vote is a convicted felon or if they are using the identity of someone who is deceased.

Using the social security number, VARS can then access databases like credit reports, giving the person trying to vote a list of three to five questions only they can answer from their personal records.

“Generic questions such as did you receive, this particular year, did you receive a (tax) refund? Or where have you lived? Or where did you buy your car, not where did you buy but if you bought a car who did you finance it through? These are major decisions in life,” said Datta.

He explained that the questions will not be so complex as to rattle off a long chain of numbers or codes that might be easily forgotten.

If a specific number of the questions are not answered appropriately, the program can instantly file a voter fraud report and discontinue the process.

After passing through the security measures, VARS can then pull up a local ballot allowing the user to vote.

Datta says he has also woven an option into the program that helps people become more informed voters.

The option can take a voters preference regarding issues such as abortion, gay marriage, gun control, etc. and show how closely their priorities align with those of each candidate.

A voter can still select any candidate they choose, but they will be able to see how that candidate or issue compares with their own personal values.

Datta says the program is secure.

“There is always this issue of, ‘so I'm providing my social security number, I'm answering all of these things about my identity verification. Am I going to be prone to identity theft?' and my answer always has been no. It's going to be maintained in multiple different databases in different places,” said Datta.

The Kent professor says the most modern of voting methods used now simply dress up the same old system, leaving it open to questions about identity fraud and virtually eliminating the need for paper absentee ballots.

He calls VARS completely transparent.

Local boards of election would still be able to have voting precincts where people can come to cast their ballot if they do not have access to computers.

He hopes to convince local county boards of election in Ohio to use the program initially then take it across the country.

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News Headline: It's important to find the correct mix with other cultures (Mayo) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Business tactics and casual conversation that work here might not internationally

There's a cultural lesson to be found in peanut butter. Americans love it, but that sentiment is not universal outside our borders. So when Vitamix creates recipe books for its blenders sold in other countries, it often omits peanut butter in favor of local specialties, like the red bean paste prepared in many Asian countries.

“You can't walk into any exchange in another country and expect them to perceive things the way you perceive them,” said Jodi Berg, president and CEO of Vitamix, which has distribution centers in 80 countries. “Our presentations are different, our style is different, what we expect to get accomplished in a certain period of time is different.”

Being attuned more to learning than to selling is critical to navigating the cultural challenges of international business transactions, say Ms. Berg and other local pros.

“A lot of knowledge is not necessary,” said Jerry Torma, director of international HR and compensation for Westlake-based Nordson Corp. But, he stressed, openness is essential.

“Culture is an iceberg,” Mr. Torma said. “The more things you see — the food, the language, the dress — you'll start to see more of it.”

To encourage that kind of thinking, he tells every Nordson employee to remember three things.

“There are other time zones than your own; there are other languages than your own; there are other currencies than your own,” Mr. Torma said. “That keeps you open.”

Don't give them the finger

There's a minefield of faux pas that Americans can make when working overseas. In many parts of the world, the American thumbs-up is like offering a middle finger, Mr. Torma said. Turns of phrase like “let's get the ball rolling” or “you'll be our guinea pigs” can prompt confusion or even insult.

But many such missteps are forgivable and won't kill a deal, said Michael Mayo, a professor of marketing at Kent State University.

“People underestimate that if you are new to the market, they will give you a lot of latitude,” Dr. Mayo said. “If you can relax and be more of an explorer, more curious, that's something people outside the U.S. will appreciate.”

For example, Chinese business culture is built on the concept of guanxi, said Steven Feldman, a professor at Case Western Reserve University's Weatherhead School of Management and author of “Trouble in the Middle: American-Chinese Business Relations, Culture, Conflict and Ethics.”

It's a term that describes the network of trusted peers with whom Chinese like to do business, and earning that trust takes time.

“Many of the major mistakes I've seen, sometimes very costly financially, are aggressive, entrepreneur-type executives going in there and trying to do a deal quickly,” Dr. Feldman said. “It's a relationship-based culture, and it takes time to develop over months or even years.”

Large Fortune 500 businesses carry a certain amount of inherent guanxi, he said, but not so for small businesses.

“For a small business, it's open season,” Dr. Feldman said. “Culturally, they don't attribute importance to them. ... It's even more important to have a good middleman to help this process.”

It does fall to employers to prepare their people for such cultural challenges, but the employee must bring just as much to the learning process, said Jim Kuhn, a long-time expert in international HR who now runs recruitment firm Kuhn Global Talent in Hudson.

“They should be driven personally to quest for this information themselves,” Mr. Kuhn said. “You can't pick them based only on technical knowledge because they might not have the right interpersonal skills.”

The little things

Start with language. English may be widely spoken overseas, but “a little bit of language goes a long way (in cultural interactions),” Mr. Kuhn said. “Write five words on the back of your business card and remember them.”

He works with clients on the core competencies needed for success in international business, which include cross-cultural agility, resourcefulness, sensitivity and humility.

It helps to know a bit about how Americans are stereotyped overseas, Mr. Torma said.

“We are (considered) too results-oriented and not enough process-oriented,” he said. “We are generally honest and forthright, but we're a bit too informal, too quickly. (We say) "Just call me Jerry!' Some cultures aren't comfortable with that.”

“Think about cultural sameness instead of differences,” said Dr. Mayo. “Ask, "I see you have soccer trophies for your son. What's it like being a soccer dad?' ... Hit on something they love and they will spend the next 20 minutes talking to you about it.”

That's an easy one for Vitamix — everyone shares a need to eat, said Ms. Berg, and a connection to how what they eat makes them feel.

“People want to help you understand their culture and who they are,” she said. “That's part of human nature.”

Required reading

“Kiss, Bow or Shake Hands,” Terri Morrison and Wayne Conaway

“Essential Do's and Taboos: The Complete Guide to International Business and Leisure Travel,” Roger E. Axtell

“Trouble in the Middle: American-Chinese Business Relations, Culture, Conflict and Ethics,” Steven Feldman

CultureGrams online database of insider reports on 200-plus countries, www.culturegrams.com

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News Headline: Healthcare job fair in Rootstown May 9 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Several area employers will be on hand at a healthcare job fair May 9 from 2 to 6 p.m. at the Northeast College of Medicine (NEOMED) Conference Center, 4209 State Route 44, in Rootstown. This free event will be open to the public.

The healthcare industry continues to hire more workers for areas including patient care, home health services, therapy positions, medical billing and coding in hundreds of other areas of employment. Companies such as Robinson Memorial Hospital, Valley Care Health System of Ohio, Hattie Larlham, Community Caregivers and Altercare are seeking candidates for positions including physicians, emergency room medics, nurses (LPN and RN), State Tested Nursing Assistants (STNAs), medical billers and coders and many more areas of expertise.

Additionally, representatives of Kent State University College of Public Health and Fortis College will be on hand to provide information about continuing and advanced educational opportunities in the healthcare field.

Job seekers are encouraged to dress business casual and bring copies of their resume. They will have the opportunity to meet personally with employers to discuss their background and interests to help determine whether there's a potential fit.

This event is sponsored by Record Publishing Company, The Alliance Review, The Community Job Club, Inc., the Area Agency of Aging, The Alliance Training Center and The Alliance Career Center.

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News Headline: Ohio public institutions consider creating adjunct referral system (Diacon) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: InsideHigherEd.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Trading Adjuncts

Public institutions in northeastern Ohio, squeezed by upcoming guidelines that will limit how many credit hours their adjuncts can teach, are encouraging departments in the same disciplines to share the names and qualifications of their part-time instructors with one another. But adjunct advocates say they fear some instructors could be blackballed from teaching altogether, and that the inter-university cooperation could violate U.S. antitrust laws.

Many institutions are capping adjuncts' workloads to avoid having to provide them with health insurance once a provision of the Affordable Care Act goes into effect next year. Although the Internal Revenue Service has yet to finalize the guidelines governing how colleges and universities should count how many hours of actual work one credit hour constitutes, several institutions have grown tired of waiting.

At the University of Akron, adjuncts will only be able to teach 8 credit hours beginning this fall, down from 12 before. The announcement sparked a demonstration last week as adjuncts protested what they see as the university refusing to give equal pay for equal work. But the cap also hurts the institutions: Reduced workloads means Akron likely won't be able to satisfy student demand unless it hires more adjuncts. Today, more than 1,000 adjuncts teach at the university -- and slightly under half of them will be affected by the cap, the university estimates.

Akron Provost Mike Sherman said conversations with administrators at other institutions may have yielded a solution. By encouraging communication between departments across institution in the area, Sherman said, finding a suitable adjunct in the future could be as simple as a department head calling up a colleague at a different college. ​The theory is that the best adjuncts will work at several institutions, staying under each one's hour cap, and won't leave the area for full-time employment.

“The bottom line is part-time faculty play an important role in all our institutions, and our focus is to deliver high-quality academic programs, and that's what we're attempting to ensure within the evolving landscape of the implications of the Affordable Care Act,” Sherman said.

Among part-time faculty -- many of whom will have to teach at multiple institutions to make up for lost income once the workload caps are in place -- this sort of inter-institutional cooperation could in theory be a welcome development for those deemed worthy of being placed on the list of approved instructors. Instead, some advocates said the institutions are taking advantage of the instructors who do most of the teaching on their campuses.

“What's really happening here is that public universities in Ohio re] trying to have their cake and eat it too,” said Matt Williams, vice president of the adjunct group New Faculty Majority. “They're doing this to get around the implementations of the Affordable Care Act. They continue to drive down wages to balance their budgets on the backs of part-time faculty.”

Williams outlined another concern in a recent blog post: Akron could be violating federal law by sharing information about its employees with other institutions.

“[O]fficials at the University of Akron have stated that they are providing the names of their best part-time faculty to other local colleges and universities in hopes that those institutions will reciprocate and provide them with referrals to part-time faculty who may have been adversely affected by the institutions' caps on part-time faculty workloads,” Williams wrote. “I would argue that the sharing of such proprietary information with other institutions is anti-competitive under one or more theory of antitrust.”

The joint effort has yet to leave the planning stage, but Sherman said it is unlikely departments will be sharing information regarding the salaries and potential benefits of individual adjuncts with other institutions. He did not comment specifically on the antitrust issue.

“At each department they're looking at how they're going to be able to cover their courses,” Sherman said. “As far as I know, they'll be sharing the names and potential content expertise.”

While early conversations about an adjunct referral network involved four other institutions, some backed out because of their distance from Akron. Others, like Kent State University, decided they would rather hire more full-time faculty members to teach vacated courses.

“We think that we have fewer than 50 part-time instructors currently who are teaching sufficiently for us to qualify as full-time under the Affordable Care Act,” Provost Todd A. Diacon said. “We just don't have the need to participate.”

The remaining institution, Stark State College, confirmed in an e-mail that it “is in talks with the University of Akron as to how we can best share adjunct resources.”

Some adjuncts may find themselves teaching more courses in the next academic year, Sherman said. The university will create a number of temporary full-time positions to address student demand, and already the College of Arts and Sciences has announced the creation of about 20 such openings. And yes, they do come with benefits. Of course that means it is likely other adjuncts may be losing sections and, if not recommended to other institutions, they may have more difficulty finding work.

“What [the Affordable Care Act] does is that it creates a perspective around which the role of a part-time person is very clearly delineated, and I think that clarification has to some extent been to the benefit of the institutions,” Sherman said.

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News Headline: Nursing degrees tops for 2012 grads | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fremont News Messenger - Online
Contact Name: Jessie Balmert CentralOhio.com
News OCR Text: Schools working to turn degrees to careers

Degrees and Certificates Awarded

Discipline Area201210-year change5-year change1-year change

Arts & Humanities16,02440.8%22.0%6.8%

Engineering9,05344.8%25.5%6.4%

Natural Science & Mathematics8,9948.0%35.9%11.9%

Social & Behavioral Sciences12,04129.4%7.8%3.9%

Trades and Repair Technicians697-17.2%119.9%23.8%

Source: Degrees and Certificates Awarded by Ohio Public Institutions, Fiscal Years 2003 to 2012

As college students are handed their diplomas, thousands will head into the workforce with degrees tailored for growing industries in Ohio, while their peers hit the jobs wanted boards.

More students graduated with degrees and certificates in registered nursing than any other major in fiscal 2012, more than doubling the 2003 graduates. The field is one of Ohio’s top 50 high-wage occupations in demand with a median salary of $59,738 and expectation of 17.7 percent growth by 2018, according to the Buckeye Top 50, a state government created list.

“Workforce development is a big part of what we are working on with schools,” said Jeff Robinson, spokesman for the Ohio Board of Regents, which compiled data on college degrees and fields between fiscal 2003 and 2012. He pointed to new programs at Kent State University and Columbus State University that train students in the insurance industry, a growing Ohio market.

Still, Ohio students’ second most popular major in 2012 — liberal and general studies — shows graduates remain interested in a “well-rounded” degree that “might make it a little trickier to find something that is specifically suited to them,” Robinson said.

But Kathleen Powell, director of Career Exploration and Development at Denison University, a private liberal arts and sciences college in Granville, is quick to point out the benefits of such degrees.

“I think a liberal arts education is a great preparation for life in general,” Powell said. “You might be a chemistry major and go to work for a marketing company. ... I think it’s more about a student building their portfolio and putting all the right pieces together to get the end goal.”

The Board of Regents data compiled information from public institutions in 2012 and does not include numbers from Denison University or other private schools.

Ohio’s colleges and universities awarded 89,154 degrees and 9,365 certificates in fiscal 2012, a 38 percent increase over 10 years, according to the Board of Regents report. Half the degrees were bachelor’s degrees, 28 percent were associate degrees, 17 percent were master’s degrees and 5 percent were doctoral degrees.

The number of certificates awarded in the past decade skyrocketed 87 percent compared with a 49 percent increase in associate degrees, 31 percent increase in master’s degrees and 30 percent increase in bachelor’s degrees, according to the report. Certificates are ideal for nontraditional students who are older or working during the day, Robinson said.

“Students are getting through school for less money and less time. (Certificates) are preparing students for jobs that are out there,” Robinson said.

Health-related bachelor’s degrees, which ranged from veterinary science to athletic training and mental health therapy, more than tripled in the past decade from 1,994 awarded in fiscal 2003 to 6,057 in 2012, according to the report. The number conferred in 2012 was up 23 percent from fiscal 2011.

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics are growing fields with expanding job markets, so it makes sense that Ohio students are taking advantage of the openings, Robinson said.

Legal administrative degrees and certificates grew the most in the past decade from 11 conferred in fiscal 2003 to 477 in fiscal 2012. Paralegals and legal assistants were one of the Buckeye Top 50’s high-wage occupations in demand, with a median salary of $44,200 and projected field growth of 17.8 percent by 2018.

Other high-wage, high-demand jobs that showed impressive growth in degrees and certificates awarded in the past decade were computer engineering technology, which increased 519 percent, and public relations and advertising, which increased 446.6 percent, according to the Board of Regents data.

The largest declines in degrees and certificates were in the fields of Slavic, Baltic and Albanian languages (a 66.7 percent drop), communication technology (a 59.9 percent drop) and physical sciences (a 59.2 percent drop), according to the Board of Regents data.

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News Headline: Nursing degrees dominated 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Newark Advocate - Online
Contact Name: Jessie Balmert CentralOhio.com
News OCR Text: Schools working to target degrees to jobs

Degrees and Certificates Awarded

Discipline Area201210-year change5-year change1-year change

Arts & Humanities16,02440.8%22.0%6.8%

Engineering9,05344.8%25.5%6.4%

Natural Science & Mathematics8,9948.0%35.9%11.9%

Social & Behavioral Sciences12,04129.4%7.8%3.9%

Trades and Repair Technicians697-17.2%119.9%23.8%

Grand Total98,51738.3%21.9%8.3%

Source: Degrees and Certificates Awarded by Ohio Public Institutions, Fiscal Years 2003 to 2012

As college students are handed their diplomas, thousands will head into the work force with degrees tailored for growing industries in Ohio, while their peers hit the jobs wanted boards.

More students graduated with degrees and certificates in registered nursing than any other major in fiscal year 2012, more than doubling the 2003 graduates. The field is one of Ohio’s top 50 high-wage occupations in demand with a median salary of $59,738 and expectation of 17.7 percent growth by 2018, according to the Buckeye Top 50, a state government created list.

“Work force development is a big part of what we are working on with schools,” said Jeff Robinson, spokesman for the Ohio Board of Regents, which compiled data on college degrees and fields between fiscal years 2003 and 2012. He pointed to new programs at Kent State University and Columbus State University that train students in the insurance industry, a growing Ohio market.

Still, Ohio students’ second most popular major in 2012 — liberal and general studies — shows graduates remain interested in a “well-rounded” degree that “might make it a little trickier to find something that is specifically suited to them,” Robinson said.

But Kathleen Powell, director of Career Exploration and Development at Denison University, a private liberal arts and sciences college in Granville, is quick to point out the benefits of such degrees.

“I think a liberal arts education is a great preparation for life in general,” Powell said. “You might be a chemistry major and go to work for a marketing company. ... I think it’s more about a student building their portfolio and putting all the right pieces together to get the end goal.”

The Board of Regents data compiled information from public institutions in 2012 and does not include numbers from Denison University or other private schools.

Ohio’s colleges and universities awarded 89,154 degrees and 9,365 certificates in fiscal year 2012, a 38-percent increase in 10 years, according to the Board of Regents report. Half of the degrees were bachelor’s degrees, 28 percent were associate degrees, 17 percent were master’s degrees and 5 percent were doctoral degrees.

The number of certificates awarded in the past decade skyrocketed 87 percent compared to a 49-percent increase in associate degrees, 31-percent increase in master’s degrees and 30-percent increase in bachelor’s degrees, according to the report. Certificates are ideal for nontraditional students who are older or working during the day, Robinson said.

“Students are getting through school for less money and less time. (Certificates) are preparing students for jobs that are out there,” Robinson said.

Health-related bachelor’s degrees, which ranged from veterinary science to athletic training and mental health therapy, more than tripled in the past decade from 1,994 awarded in fiscal year 2003 to 6,057 in 2012, according to the report. The number conferred in 2012 was up 23 percent from fiscal year 2011.

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics are growing fields with expanding job markets, so it makes sense that Ohio students are taking advantage of the openings, Robinson said.

Legal administrative degrees and certificates grew the most in the past decade, from 11 conferred in fiscal year 2003 to 477 in fiscal year 2012. Paralegals and legal assistants were one of the Buckeye Top 50’s high-wage occupations in demand with a median salary of $44,200 and projected field growth of 17.8 percent by 2018.

Other high-wage, high-demand jobs that showed impressive growth in degrees and certificates awarded in the past decade were computer engineering technology, which increased 519 percent, and public relations and advertising, which increased 446.6 percent, according to the Board of Regents data.

The largest declines in degrees and certificates were in the fields of Slavic, Baltic and Albanian languages (a 66.7 percent drop), communication technology (a 59.9 percent drop) and physical sciences (a 59.2 percent drop), according to the Board of Regents data.

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News Headline: Nursing degrees tops for 2012 grads | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Zanesville Times Recorder - Online
Contact Name: Jessie Balmert CentralOhio.com
News OCR Text: Schools working to turn degrees to careers

Degrees and Certificates Awarded

Discipline Area201210-year change5-year change1-year change

Arts & Humanities16,02440.8%22.0%6.8%

Engineering9,05344.8%25.5%6.4%

Natural Science & Mathematics8,9948.0%35.9%11.9%

Social & Behavioral Sciences12,04129.4%7.8%3.9%

Trades and Repair Technicians697-17.2%119.9%23.8%

Source: Degrees and Certificates Awarded by Ohio Public Institutions, Fiscal Years 2003 to 2012

As college students are handed their diplomas, thousands will head into the workforce with degrees tailored for growing industries in Ohio, while their peers hit the jobs wanted boards.

More students graduated with degrees and certificates in registered nursing than any other major in fiscal 2012, more than doubling the 2003 graduates. The field is one of Ohio’s top 50 high-wage occupations in demand with a median salary of $59,738 and expectation of 17.7 percent growth by 2018, according to the Buckeye Top 50, a state government created list.

“Workforce development is a big part of what we are working on with schools,” said Jeff Robinson, spokesman for the Ohio Board of Regents, which compiled data on college degrees and fields between fiscal 2003 and 2012. He pointed to new programs at Kent State University and Columbus State University that train students in the insurance industry, a growing Ohio market.

Still, Ohio students’ second most popular major in 2012 — liberal and general studies — shows graduates remain interested in a “well-rounded” degree that “might make it a little trickier to find something that is specifically suited to them,” Robinson said.

But Kathleen Powell, director of Career Exploration and Development at Denison University, a private liberal arts and sciences college in Granville, is quick to point out the benefits of such degrees.

“I think a liberal arts education is a great preparation for life in general,” Powell said. “You might be a chemistry major and go to work for a marketing company. ... I think it’s more about a student building their portfolio and putting all the right pieces together to get the end goal.”

The Board of Regents data compiled information from public institutions in 2012 and does not include numbers from Denison University or other private schools.

Ohio’s colleges and universities awarded 89,154 degrees and 9,365 certificates in fiscal 2012, a 38 percent increase over 10 years, according to the Board of Regents report. Half the degrees were bachelor’s degrees, 28 percent were associate degrees, 17 percent were master’s degrees and 5 percent were doctoral degrees.

The number of certificates awarded in the past decade skyrocketed 87 percent compared with a 49 percent increase in associate degrees, 31 percent increase in master’s degrees and 30 percent increase in bachelor’s degrees, according to the report. Certificates are ideal for nontraditional students who are older or working during the day, Robinson said.

“Students are getting through school for less money and less time. (Certificates) are preparing students for jobs that are out there,” Robinson said.

Health-related bachelor’s degrees, which ranged from veterinary science to athletic training and mental health therapy, more than tripled in the past decade from 1,994 awarded in fiscal 2003 to 6,057 in 2012, according to the report. The number conferred in 2012 was up 23 percent from fiscal 2011.

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics are growing fields with expanding job markets, so it makes sense that Ohio students are taking advantage of the openings, Robinson said.

Legal administrative degrees and certificates grew the most in the past decade from 11 conferred in fiscal 2003 to 477 in fiscal 2012. Paralegals and legal assistants were one of the Buckeye Top 50’s high-wage occupations in demand, with a median salary of $44,200 and projected field growth of 17.8 percent by 2018.

Other high-wage, high-demand jobs that showed impressive growth in degrees and certificates awarded in the past decade were computer engineering technology, which increased 519 percent, and public relations and advertising, which increased 446.6 percent, according to the Board of Regents data.

The largest declines in degrees and certificates were in the fields of Slavic, Baltic and Albanian languages (a 66.7 percent drop), communication technology (a 59.9 percent drop) and physical sciences (a 59.2 percent drop), according to the Board of Regents data.

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News Headline: Cuyahoga Community College names finalists for president (Smith) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Alex Johnson, former president of Cuyahoga Community College's Metropolitan Campus, and Lars Hafner, a former embattled president of a Florida community college, are the two finalists for Tri-C president.

The college released the names this afternoon, about an hour after The Plain Dealer reported that the college's search committee had refused to identify the finalists despite Ohio Supreme Court rulings that similar information is subject to public inspection.

Both men are seeking to replace President Jerry Sue Thornton, who is retiring June 30.

Johnson served as president of Tri-C's Metro Campus from 1993 to 2003. He was chancellor of Delgado Community College in New Orleans until March, 2008, when he became president of the Community College of Allegheny County in Pittsburgh. The Pennsylvania school has more than 60,000 students on nine campuses and centers.

Hafner served about four years as president of State College of Florida, Manatee–Sarasota, formerly Manatee Junior College and Manatee Community College, before agreeing to step down last October following several disagreements with trustees, according to news reports. He signed an agreement that paid him $363,000 in exchange for his immediate resignation.

"Both Dr. Hafner and Dr. Johnson are outstanding and experienced community-college educators," said Jerry L. Kelsheimer, chairman of the Tri-C board of trustees in a news release. "We are fortunate that Dr. Hafner's candidacy was facilitated by a change in the political environment in his home state, while Dr. Johnson is already familiar with our College. We look forward to having in-depth conversations with each of them about their vision for Cuyahoga Community College and the opportunities they see for this great institution."

Kelsheimer said both finalists will be offered an opportunity to meet with students, faculty and administrators. The board expects to announce its selection by the end of May.

A 20-member search committee interviewed eight candidates recommended by a search firm, R.H. Perry & Associates in Washington, D.C.

In addition to Hafner and Johnson the other candidates were Terrence Burgess, president of San Diego City College, Stephen Curtis, president of Community College of Philadelphia, Craig Foltin, executive vice president and treasurer at Tri-C, Kathryn Jeffery, president of Sacramento City College, Belinda Miles, provost and executive vice president at Tri-C, and Daniel Phelan, president of Jackson Community College in Jackson, Mich. Phelan withdrew his candidacy.

The college's reluctance to release information on the finalists was in contrast with the transparent search by Youngstown State University, which has made public the names of three finalists in a search to replace President Cynthia Anderson, who is retiring July.

Tim Smith, an attorney and professor emeritus in the Media Law Center for Ethics and Access at Kent State University, criticized Tri-C for withholding the names, saying the secrecy is harmful to the school.

"It disadvantages the institution because all the faculty, staff and anyone else who might have some knowledge of the candidates are left out in the cold," Smith said. "The decision is made by a group of people who don't work there – the trustees."

Tri-C's search committee is chaired by trustee David Whitehead, a retired FirstEnergy Corp. executive.

Whitehead could not be immediately reached to explain why the school initially did not abide by the Ohio Supreme Court rulings about making public the names of finalists for government jobs.

The high court ruled in March 1996 in a case filed against Cleveland by The Plain Dealer that city officials broke the law in 1995 when they refused to make public applications they received for the police chief's position.

The justices, in a unanimous ruling, ordered the administration of then-Mayor Michael R. White to turn over the applications and resumes the city received in advance of White's selection in March 1995 of John J. Collins as chief, and, prior to that, his selection of chief Patrick Oliver.

In September 1996, the court ruled that the city of Cincinnati must turn over to the Cincinnati Enquirer records related to its search for a new safety director.

When that newspaper asked to see all documents related to the search, the city refused, saying resumes, applications and questionnaires submitted were in a consultant's possession and that he had designated them trade secrets.

The court disagreed, saying that records held by a private entity on behalf of a public agency are subject to open records laws.

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News Headline: Ohio Controlling Board releases $1 million improvements at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS - The state Controlling Board released $1 million-plus Monday for improvement projects at Kent State University campuses in Portage County and beyond.

More than $422,000 will go toward piping and ceiling replacements at the Kent building that houses KSU's music and speech department. The project involves relocating water lines from a basement to a first-floor ceiling, with Standard Plumbing & Heating of Canton serving as the contractor.

Nearly $155,000 will be used to replaced the atrium skylight in Henderson Hall, replacing the original three-story skylight with solar-tinted, insulating glass, according to documents. DZI Construction Services of Clarkston, Mich., will serve as contractor.

The Controlling Board also released more than $233,000 for roof replacements at KSU Ashtabula campus and $461,277 for new air conditioning at the university's Geauga County campus.

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News Headline: An education at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Each commemoration of May 4, 1970, must begin with the four who died, Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder. Imagine all that each might have experienced the past 43 years, and the weight of that day on the Kent State University campus begins to take stronger hold, decisions with profound consequences, of life and death.

What all of us can do is attempt to better understand, including that independent analysis conducted by the Cleveland Plain Dealer of a tape recording, the Justice Department yet to say why it would not look further. The pursuit of enlightened context is what the May 4 Visitors Center at Kent State seeks to bring, its formal dedication coming over the weekend.

The center reflects the welcome evolution of the university in its handling of the tragedy. The moment wouldn't be forgotten, so many refusing to let that happen. So the school opted for a learning experience, one key milestone arriving with the creation of an annual symposium, a coming together to talk about democratic values, and no less the right to assemble in protest of the choices made by our elected government.

To be sure, there was violence those days. No lives were lost until National Guardsmen opened fire. In embracing the memory of May 4, Kent has taught much about reconciliation. Yet that isn't all it has taught. There is the education in loss, holding to the notion that the four who died will help the rest of us make better decisions.

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News Headline: UN to Review Whether the FBI Killed the Kids at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Gwen Ifell and Oliver Stone were at Kent State this weekend to commemorate the May 4, 1970 shootings at the university that claimed four lives and wounded nine people. The celebrities will share their thoughts on what happened 43 years ago as the university dedicates its new May 4 visitor center. Among the visitors who dropped by to hear them speak and scrutinize the new center was Laurel Krause, sister of Allison Krause, the 19-year-old freshman honor student, who was killed that day by members of the Ohio National Guard. The soldiers shot her where she stood -- 343 feet from away from them on the campus lawn.

What was the climate like the day Allison and the others were shot?

Well, aside from the fact that it was the first beautiful day after weeks of rain, the political climate was anything but clearing. Just four days earlier President Richard Nixon announced the U.S. invasion of Cambodia. He struggled to justify his decision to further escalate the conflict in south east Asia even as he worked to conceal the fact that he had authorized the illegal bombing of Cambodia for more than a year.

Domestically the clouds were gathering as well. Two years and one month earlier, Martin Luther King, Jr., had been assassinated after turning his attention on the evils he perceived were associated with the Vietnam War. His voice had added to the growing number of young voices speaking out across the nation calling for an end to the war and an elimination of military conscription, better known as the draft.

FBI director J. Edgar Hoover had compiled surveillance tapes and documents on everyone from the Kennedy family to MLK, Jr. and while his top secret files were destroyed upon his death, there is no reason to believe he did not run a series of intelligence programs based at monitoring and curtailing the efforts of young people on campuses all across the nation who he felt "seek to destroy our society."

For these and other reasons, Laurel Krause and her organization, The Kent State Truth Tribunal (KSTT), filed a petition on February 9, 2013, with the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC), asking them to review their claim that Vietnam War protesters were intentionally targeted by Hoover's FBI and the Department of Defense. On April 5, the UNHRC agreed to hear the case.

Laurel and the other members of the KSTT have a lot to say on what they believe has been a 43 year coverup and spin job. From the time headlines broke that called the shooting victims "bums" and portrayed them as an unwashed violent rabble of questionable morality, until this year when the UN became the first governing body willing to dig a little deeper into the official story, Laurel has keenly remembered the details of the day her sister died.

Time will tell what will come of Laurel's struggle to get justice for her sister and the other victims. And justice for Laurel means that the government will one day acknowledge the truth. Until that day comes and on this anniversary of Allison's death, it's illuminating to know exactly how the day unfolded for the rest of the Krause family.

At 12:24 p.m. 28 Ohio National Guard soldiers -- after hearing what they later called sniper fire -- opened fire on unarmed protesters at Kent State University. Most of the protesters were more than the length of a football field from the soldiers. The soldiers had live rounds in their guns and must have been cautioned that they may need to shoot to kill the college kids.

At about 3:00 p.m. 15-year-old Laurel Krause got off the school bus and started walking to her home. A neighbor ran up to Laurel and told her that the radio had announced that Allison had been hurt in a shooting at Kent State.

Laurel called her mom and dad who were at work.

Laurel's mom came home and called the Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna, Ohio, and was told over the phone that "she was DOA." Doris Krause collapsed on the floor.

Laurel's dad, Arthur Krause, worked as a middle manager for Westinghouse and his co-worker brought him home. Arthur had received a call from his brother saying that the local radio station had announced that Allison was dead. When he arrived home, Doris confirmed it, and the family friend drove them from their home in Pittsburgh, Penn., to the hospital in Ohio.

Laurel recounts that no one from the university or the U.S. government was there to assist them. When the door swung open to the room where Allison lay dead, Laurel could see her sister's body. When her parents went into the room to identify Alliston, Laurel waited in the hall where two armed men wearing no uniforms were standing. One of the men muttered behind her, "They should have shot more."

These are the memories Laurel Krause has carried 43 years. These are the memories that motivate her to make regular calls to the Department of Justice and ask when her sister's murder will be investigated and solved. And every time Laurel calls, she is referred to the civil rights department. Laurel says, "She was nothing more than garbage to them. They don't want to investigate her murder. The DOJ has no department for the killing of students by the government."

The day after his daughter's death, Arthur filed a lawsuit he refused to drop regardless of how much money he was offered. Arthur died never receiving the justice he was after. Laurel has continued his fight. She says the battle can get unpleasant but that won't stop her. She's not surprised that she hasn't gotten answers, and she's not daunted by the obstacles in her way. Laurel says, "Any time the FBI kills a member of your family, they are gonna to be up your ass for the rest of your life."

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News Headline: Kent State University remembers May 4, 1970, 43 years later | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: About 200 people came together at Kent State University's Blanket Hill May 4 to reflect on the 43rd anniversary of the anti-war protests and riots that escalated into a military takeover of KSU and shooting by the Ohio National Guard, leaving four students dead and nine others wounded.

Helping set the stage was a timeline of events that led to the tragedy -- an unbridgeable generation gap, the Vietnam War and U.S. surge in Cambodia that was unsupported by the nation's youth, the rioting and vandalizing in downtown Kent, arson of KSU's ROTC building and Gov. James Rhodes sending armed Ohio National Guardsmen who fired the shots that killed Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder.

Speeches at the 43rd commemoration centered around remembering the personalities and virtues of the victims, and issued calls for social justice, the fight for truth and the celebration of freedom.

"The greatest tribute we can pay to Sandy, and to Allison, Bill and Jeff today, is to celebrate freedom and remember especially the tragic effect whenever excessive force is used anywhere to respond to the voices and youthful actions of college students," said Chic Canfora, a KSU sophomore and eyewitness to the shootings.

Russ Miller, the brother of Jeffrey Miller, said students on May 4, 1970 were standing up for what they believed in, rather than staying passive and silent.

"It would have been very easy to silently oppose the war that day," Miller said. "It took courage and conviction for those kids to assert themselves, to take the tougher road."

The aftermath of the shootings at KSU contributed to raising awareness against the Vietnam War, as well as holding elected officials accountable, Miller said, explaining a civil case against Rhodes, which went to the U.S. Supreme Court, led to a 1973 ruling that elected officials are not immune from accountability for their actions.

May 4 Task Force member Kendra Pacifico recalled an account of Allison Krause calling out to her fellow students to 'Do something' while students were being backed up against the pagoda near Taylor Hall.

"Allison is no longer here to do something. It is up to us to do something," Pacifico said. "We need to make up for the lost 43 years of peace and justice advocacy that Allison would have achieved."

Keynote speaker Tom Hayden, known best for his role as an anti-war, civil rights and radical activist, commended KSU and the audience for continuing to remember the tragic events and continue to push for the full truth behind the shootings for the sake of history. Hayden was critical of the U.S. Justice Department's recent decision to not reopen the investigation, despite new audio evidence that analysts believe contains an order for the Guardsmen to fire on students.

"Judgments are shaped by politics. To say that the question of whether there was an order to kill at Kent State is of no matter, that it was long ago, is a judgment that is not based on a pure study of the evidence, it is based on a political calculation on whether or not it's important to reopen," Hayden said. "You have every right to continue waiting and expecting that full disclosure will come, the whole story will come out and none of us will rest until that day is achieved."

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News Headline: Twinsburg Schools Receive State Grant For Reading Program | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Patch
Contact Name: Chris Mazzolini
News OCR Text: Twinsburg School received a $174,000 grant to pay for most of a summer reading program to help with the third-grade reading guarantee.

Twinsburg Schools has received a state grant worth $174,000 to pay for most a reading program that will help the district meet the new Third Grade Reading Guarantee standard.

Twinsburg Superintendent Kathi Powers said the program will help provide liberacy experiences starting this summer of the district's elementary students along with support workshops for parents.

"We have a lot of work to do and pieces to put together," Powers said.

Twinsburg requested $181,000 and received nearly all of it.

The reading program is partnership between the school district and Twinsburg Public Library, Ursuline College, Dr. Tim Rasinski from Kent State University and Dr. Lisa Riegel from Ohio State University.

Under the Third Grade Reading Guarantee, third graders in 2013-14 who don't score high enough on a state reading test will not be able to be promoted to fourth grade.

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News Headline: Roadwork set at Main, Lincoln streets in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of the Kent State University
Esplanade Project, work is
to be performed at the manhole
at the intersection of Lincoln and
Main streets today.

Work will begin at 8 a.m. and is
expected to be completed by 1 p.m.

There will be a police officer on
site to direct traffic.

Please use caution when traveling
through this area.

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